Senate Tax Reform vs. House Tax Reform

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Update: The Senate’s version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is moving on to its next stage. The Senate Committee on Finance approved the Senate’s version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act late November 16 with a 14-12 vote along party lines.

The Senate’s bill will go to the full Senate for a vote the week following the Thanksgiving holiday. At least 52 senators must vote in favor of the bill’s passing to move it forward. If no Democrats vote for the bill, Republicans can only stand to lose two votes.

The vote was made only hours after the House version of the tax bill passed by a 227-205 chamber vote, just before the chamber’s Thanksgiving holiday. No Democrats backed the bill.

From the looks of it, the Senate isn’t exactly on the same page with their colleagues in the House of Representatives. The plan bears the same name as the House’s bill, but the Senate’s version of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act diverges from the House’s plan on a number of individual and business tax reforms.

Most notably, the proposed Senate Republican plan would delay cutting the corporate tax rate by one year, include more tax brackets than the House plan and retain the mortgage interest deduction, among a few other popular tax breaks.

The bills do share some things in common. For example, neither version calls for any changes in workers’ 401(k) tax contribution limits. And both tax plans would repeal the alternative minimum tax and maintain the charitable contribution deduction. Both plans also repeal personal exemptions, but double the standard income tax deduction for individuals, married couples and single parents.

Complying with a Senate rule known as the Byrd rule is an issue. Under that rule, during the legislative reconciliation process, senators can move to block legislation if, among other reasons, it would possibly mean a significant increase in the federal deficit beyond a 10-year term.

If the Senate is able to pass its tax bill, the differences between the two plans may lead to clashes over tax policy as a pressured Congress tries to get a single tax reform bill to President Donald Trump’s desk by Christmas.

Here is a quick breakdown of the major differences between the two plans. Read beyond the table for further detail.

Income tax brackets

The Senate’s plan maintains the tax system’s seven tax brackets—10%, 12%, 22.5%, 25%, 32.5%, 35% and 38.5% — as opposed to the House’s four. The senate plan notably maintains the lowest tax rate at 10 percent and modifies all but one other. The proposal also adjusts qualifying income levels.

The Senate plan would reduce the income tax on the nation’s highest earners to 38.5% from the current 39.6%. Individuals and heads of households earning more than $500,000, and married couples earning more than $1 million would pay the highest rate. The proposed income thresholds for the Senate’s plan are pictured below.

Alternatively, the House bill proposes four income brackets of 12%, 25%, 35%, and 39.6%.

The state and local tax deduction

The Senate plan fully eliminates the State and Local Tax, or SALT, deduction. Nearly one third of Americans took the deduction in 2015, according to the Tax Policy Center, so the repeal is likely to ruffle some feathers. While the House tax plan reduced deductions for state and local taxes, it still allowed Americans to deduct up to $10,000 in property taxes. The senate plan would completely get rid of the SALT deduction, including the deduction for property taxes.

Some critics fear eliminating the SALT deduction would disproportionately affect earners in states with high taxes, like New York and California. Across the nation, just six states— California, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Texas, and Pennsylvania— comprised more than half of the value of all state and local tax deduction claims in 2014.

The mortgage interest deduction

Nothing would change under the Senate’s plan. Americans would still be able to deduct the amount of interest paid on up to the first $1 million of mortgage debt under the Senate tax plan. The House tax plan, on the other hand, had proposed to lower the threshold for the mortgage interest deduction to $500,000.

Only about six percent of new homes are valued at more than $500,000, according to an August 2017 report by the United for Homes campaign. The group argues lowering the cap would have “virtually no effect on homeownership rates.”

Corporate tax rate

The Senate plan still reduces the corporate tax rate from 35% to 20%, but corporations won’t get a break until 2019, when the Senate plan phases in the reduction. On the other hand, the House Plan would have initiated the reduced rate in 2018.

The decision to phase in the cut was likely made because a delayed corporate tax cut would make it easier for the Senate to reach its goal of passing a tax bill that does not increase the deficit by more than $1.5 trillion over the next decade.

The estate tax

The estate tax exemption is doubled from $5.49 million in assets ($10.98 million for married couples) onto heirs under both the Senate and House bills.

The House plan doesn’t get rid of the estate tax immediately. The House’s proposal also doubles the exclusion amount to $10 million, but eliminates the estate tax after 2023. The estate tax affects only the estates of the wealthiest 0.2 percent of Americans, according to the Center of Budget and Policy Priorities.

Adoption and child tax credits

Unlike the initial House tax plan, the Senate plan proposes keep some popular tax breaks. The plan proposes to retain the Adoption Tax Credit, which allows families to receive a tax credit for all qualifying adoption expenses up to $13,570. The Senate plan also slightly bumps up a proposed child tax credit compared to the House plan. While the House plan increased the credit from $1000 to $1600, the Senate plan proposes raising the credit slightly more, to $1650.

Student loan interest and medical expenses deduction

Under Senate plan, students will still be able to deduct interest paid on student loans up to $2500. Furthermore, taxpayers would still be able to claim medical expenses as a deduction if they account for over 7.5 or 10% of their income. This is a departure from the House plan, which would have eliminated both.

Pass through business

The Senate tax plan establishes a 17.4 percent deduction for pass through businesses like sole proprietorships, S corporations, and partnerships.The HIll reports the deduction would lower the effective tax rate on the highest earning small businesses to just over 30 percent, according to a Senate Finance aide. The deduction would only apply to service businesses based in the U.S

The House plan establishes a 25 percent tax rate for pass-through companies. But only 30 percent of the business’s revenue is subject to that rate. The remaining 70 percent would be taxed at the individual tax rate. The House amended the bill Thursday to create a new 9 percent tax rate for the first $75,000 of income of a married active owner with less than $150,000 of pass-through income.

What’s next for GOP tax reform?

The future is unclear for either proposed tax plan. The two chambers will likely need to compromise over differences in the coming weeks to get a bill passed and to the President’s desk by year’s end.

Thursday’s news came just as the House Ways and Means Committee finalized its own bill after announcing two amendments, with a vote expected next week.

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