The Most Expensive Zip Codes for Renters

When it comes to saving money on rent, ZIP code is everything.

Using data from rental market research firm Yardi Matrix, rental listing service RentCafe analyzed how the cost of renting differs by ZIP code in 125 major U.S. metro areas.

The top 10 most expensive ZIP codes are located in just two cities — New York and San Francisco. In fact, Manhattan and San Francisco took all but one of the top 20 spots in the RentCafe ranking. New York City alone is home to 27 of the top 100 most expensive ZIP codes.

The priciest pads are located in Manhattan’s Battery Park Ball Fields (10282), where renters pay an average $5,924 per month, making it the most expensive ZIP code in the country.

Right behind Battery Park were the Lenox Hill area (average rent: $4,898) and apartments on the Upper West Side near Lincoln Square (average rent: $4,892), which took the No. 2 and No. 3 slots on the most expensive list.

San Francisco had two in the top 10: ritzy neighborhoods Presidio and Main Post (94129), where average rental prices stand at $4,762, and the city’s South Beach area (94105) pulled in ninth at $4,380.

According to the ranking, Boston was the third most expensive city for renters. There, renters can expect to pay $4,227 to live in the city’s most expensive ZIP code, the Black Bay neighborhood (02199).

MagnifyMoney looked at RentCafe’s findings to figure out which cities had the most expensive ZIP codes. Here’s how they stacked up:

Ranking

City State Most Expensive ZIP Code

Average Rent

1 Manhattan NY 10282 $5,924
2 San Francisco CA 94129 $4,762
3 Boston MA 02199 $4,227
4 Palo Alto CA 94301 $3,718
5 Menlo Park CA 94025 $3,657
6 Brooklyn NY 11201 $3,622
7 Los Angeles CA 90401 $3,477
8 Santa Monica CA 90405 $3,423
9 Durham NC 03824 $3,381
10 Playa Vista CA 90094 $3,367

How to save on rent

Always comparison shop.

Comparison shopping is one of the most important things you can do to save money on your next move. Comparing prices in and around the area you want to live is one way to make sure you pay a fair price for your new space.

Back in the day, comparing prices on apartment would have involved calling several different management companies to compare quotes. Even then, you might have missed a good deal. With today’s technology you can (and should) easily search for and compare rent prices all over the world with interactive maps on sites like RentCafe, Apartment Finder, or Cozy.

Fly South for lower rent

Renters looking to pay as little as possible should look toward southern states like Kansas or Alabama. Two Wichita, Kan., ZIP codes (67213 and 67211) priced around $400 per month, while apartments in Decatur, Ala. (35601) will run renters on average $458 per month. So, for what you’d pay for one month of rent in Manhattan, you could rent a place in Kansas for a whole year.

Below are the top ten cities with the least expensive rental listings based on Yardi Matrix data.

Ranking City State Least Expensive

ZIP Code

Average Rent
1 Wichita KS 67213 $407
2 Decatur AL 35601 $458
3 Memphis TN 38106 $464
4 Columbus GA 31903 $482
5 Fort Wayne IN 46809 $495
6 Huntsville AL 35810 $503
7 Louisville TN 37777 $507
8 Gravel Ridge AR 72076 $508
9 West Memphis AR 72301 $508
10 Athens AL 35611 $510

 

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The Hidden Costs of Selling A Home

With home values picking back up, many homeowners may be already dreaming of the money they’d make selling their home. Although the aim is to make money on a home sale, or at least break even, it’s easy to forget one important thing: selling a house costs money, too.

A joint analysis by online real estate and rental marketplace Zillow and freelance site Thumbtack found American homeowners spend upward of $15,000 on extra or hidden costs associated with a home sale.

Most of those expenses come before homeowners see any returns on their home sale. Most of the money is spent in three categories: closing costs, home preparation, and location.

Here are a few hidden costs to prepare for when you sell your home.

Pre-sale repairs and renovations

Zillow’s analysis shows sellers should plan to spend a median $2,658 on things like staging, repairs, and carpet cleaning to get the property ready.

Buyers are generally expected to pay their own inspection costs; however, if you’ve lived in the home for a number of years and want to avoid any surprises, you might also consider spending about $200 to $400 on a home inspection before listing the property for sale. That way, you can get ahead of surprise repairs that may decrease your home’s value.

Staging is another unavoidable cost for any sellers. Staging, which involves giving your home’s interior design a facelift and removing clutter and personal items from the home, is often encouraged because it can help make properties more appealing to interested buyers. Not only will you need to stage the home for viewing, but sellers often need to have great photos and construct strong descriptions of the property online to help maximize exposure of the property to potential buyers. If your agent is handling the staging and online listing, keep an eye on the “wow” factors they add on. Yes, a 3-D video walk-through of your house looks really cool, but it might place extra pressure on you budget.

You could save a large chunk on home preparation costs if you decide to DIY, but if you outsource, expect a bill.

ZIP code

Location drove home-selling costs up for many respondents in ZIllow’s analysis, as many extra costs were influenced by regional differences — like whether or not sellers are required to pay state or transfer taxes.

With a median cost of $55,000 for closing and maintenance expenses, San Francisco ranked highest among the most-expensive places to sell a home. At the other extreme, sellers in Cleveland, Ohio, pay little more than a median $10,100 to cover their selling costs.

Generally, selling costs correlate with the cost of the property, so expect to pay a little more if you live in an area with higher-than-average living costs or have a lot of land to groom for sale. Take a look at Zillow’s rankings below.

Closing costs

Closing costs are the single largest added expense of the home-selling process, coming in at a median cost of $12,532, according to Zillow. Closing costs include real estate agent commissions and state sales and/or transfer taxes. There may be other closing costs such as title insurance or escrow fees to pay, too.

Real Trends, a research and advisory company that monitors realty brokerage firms and compiles data on sales and commission rates of sales agents across the country, reported the national average was 5.26% in 2015.

Real Trends says rates are being weighed down by:

  • an increasing number of agents working for companies like Re/Max that give them flexibility to set commission rates without a minimum requirement
  • more competition from discount brokers like Redfin, an online brokerage service that charges sellers as low as 1%
  • an overall shortage of homes for sale pressuring agents to negotiate commission rates

The firm’s president, Steve Murray, told The Washington Post he predicts agent commissions will fall below 5% in the coming years.

Luckily, some closing costs are negotiable.

To save on real estate agent commissions, you can either negotiate their fee down or find a flat-fee brokerage firm like Denver-based Trelora, which advertises a flat $2,500 fee to list a house regardless of its selling price. Larger companies like Re/Max give their agents full control over their commission rates, so you may have better luck negotiating with them.

If you have the time on your hands, you could also list the home for-sale-by-owner to save on closing costs. Selling your home on your own is a more complicated and time-intensive approach to home selling and can be more difficult for those with little or no experience.

Other costs to consider:

Utilities on the empty home

If you’re moving out prior to the sale, you should budget to keep utilities on at your old place until the property is sold.

It will help you sell your home since potential buyers won’t fumble through your cold, dark home looking around. It may also prevent your home from facing other issues like mold in the humid summertime. Be sure to have all of your utilities running on the buyer’s final walk through the home, then turn everything off on closing day and handle your bills.

Make room in your household’s budget to pay for double utilities until the home is sold.

Insurance during vacancy

Again, prepare to pay double for insurance if you are moving out before your home sells. You’ll still need homeowner’s insurance to ensure coverage of your old property until the sale is finalized. Check the terms first, as your homeowner’s insurance policy might not apply to a vacant home. If that’s the case, you can ask to pay for a rider — an add-on to your basic insurance policy — for the vacancy period.

Capital gains tax

If you could make more than $250,000 on the home’s sale (or $500,000 if you’re married and filing jointly), you’ll want to take a look at the rules on capital gains tax. If your proceeds come up to less than $250,000 after subtracting selling costs, you’ll avoid the tax. However, if you don’t qualify for any of the exceptions, the gains above those thresholds could be subject to a 25% to 28% capital gains tax.

The Key Takeaway

Selling a home will cost you some money up front, but there are many ways you can plan for and reduce the largest costs. If you’re planning to sell your home this year, do your research and keep in mind falling commission costs when you negotiate.

List all of the costs you’re expecting and calculate how they might affect the profit you’d make on the sale and your household’s overall financial picture. If you’re unsure of your costs, you can use a sale proceeds calculator from sites like Redfin or Zillow to get a ballpark estimate of your potential selling costs, or consult a real estate agent.

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Why the ‘Save 10% for Retirement’ Rule Doesn’t Always Work

To keep saving simple, many retirement experts and financial planners tout a general 10% rule for most savers: If you start saving at least 10% of your income in your 20s, you should have plenty saved up by the time you’re ready to retire.

Why save for retirement?

Social Security might not be around to help you make ends meet in retirement; that’s even more likely for millennials and the cohorts that follow. With the nation’s current birth and death rates, it’s estimated that Social Security funds will be exhausted by 2034.

Whether or not the future retirees of America will have Social Security to rely on, their benefit check alone likely won’t be enough to meet all of their needs in retirement.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, retired households need to bring an average $42,478 to meet their annual expenses.

And yet, as of March 2017, the average monthly Social Security benefit for retirees was $1,365.35, or about $16,384 annually. That’s only slightly more than the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016 poverty threshold for two-person households 65 and older ($16,480). Even in households where two spouses are receiving Social Security income, that’s still less than $32,000 per year.

That’s why it’s so important for workers to set additional income aside during their working years. When Social Security falls short, those extra savings will be essential.

Who does the 10% retirement rule work best for?

It’s likely that 10% became the rule of thumb simply because it’s easy to remember and makes the mental math a lot easier. But it’s important to understand who the rule is targeting: younger workers.

Since younger workers have more time to let their money grow, they can afford to save a bit less in their early days. But the advice changes as workers’ savings windows narrow with age. A 40-something worker, for example, who never saved for retirement may be encouraged to save twice as much for retirement since they have a shorter timetable.

“Ten percent may be enough, it may not be enough, and it may even be too much,” depending on your age and financial picture, says Amy Jo Lauber, a certified financial planner in Buffalo, N.Y. Someone paying off student loans or high-interest credit cards simply may not be able to put away 10% of their income.

It gets increasingly complicated when you consider your personal income and ability to save as well as your retirement goals.

“Typically, younger clients do not have complex situations and can get by with simple strategies. Once there are competing priorities, such as saving for a home, kids, and kids’ college, then things get complicated and more sophisticated strategies are required,” says Howard Pressman, a certified financial planner and partner at Egan, Berger & Weiner.

As Pressman suggests, you might need to tweak the rule if you’re starting to stash away retirement funds at an earlier or later age or want to put more money away now for a more lavish retirement.

Timing is everything

This chart from JP Morgan’s 2017 Guide to Retirement demonstrates the power of saving early for retirement.

At a modest 6% annual growth rate, Consistent Chloe, a 25-year-old who puts away $5,000 a year until she reaches age 65 should have a retirement account balance of more than $820,000, according to the bank. And when all’s said and done, only $200,000 would have come out of her own pocket — the rest would have resulted from the power of compounding interest.

In comparison, Nervous Noah, a more timid 25-year-old saver, could put away the same $5,000 a year in a savings account earning far less annual interest on his cash. After the same 40-year period, he would only have a balance of $308,050.

Investing earlier can bring even greater success. If a person starts putting away $5,000 a year at 20, growing at 6%, their balance at 65 would be about $1,132,549, which we calculated using the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s compound interest calculator. That’s more than $300,000 added to Consistent Chloe’s retirement balance for beginning just two years earlier.

The final balance at 65 drops below $1 million for anyone starting after 25. As you can see above, those who begin saving will have less and less to live on in retirement.

7 retirement savings tips

  1. Start early

The emphasis of this rule is starting early. The earlier you save, the more you can take advantage of compound interest.

“Compounding is earning interest on interest earned in prior periods and is the most powerful force in all of finance,” says Pressman. To make the most of this rule, start saving 10% of your income for retirement by the time you turn 25.
Start by maxing out your 401(k) or IRA contribution limits for the year. If you still have additional funds, it might be time to meet with a financial planner to find out how to best invest your surplus.

  1. Know your options

The best place to stash retirement savings is either an IRA or a 401(k). Your money simply won’t grow enough to beat inflation if you leave it in a low-interest-bearing account like a checking or savings account.

  1. Make debt and emergency savings a priority

“Before anyone starts focusing on retirement saving, the first thing they should do is to establish an emergency cash reserve. This is to protect them from a job loss, a health emergency, or even an expensive car repair,” says Pressman. He recommends saving three to six month’s worth of expenses in a savings account.

If placing 10% of your income in a retirement account is too much of an ask because you have more pressing financial obligations like higher-interest debts, or don’t earn enough to cover your expenses, you should address those before increasing your retirement contribution.

Generally speaking, if the interest rate on any debts you owe is higher than what you’d earn on your retirement savings, you’ll make more progress toward your financial goals by addressing the higher-interest debt first.

  1. Plan differently if you have irregular income

Lauber says those who are freelancing and cobbling together a living may need to put several financial policies in place to help them navigate with irregular income.

“The 10% rule works for them but only if other measures are in place for the immediate day-to-day needs,” says Lauber. You can still create a budget with irregular income, but you might need to approach retirement saving more aggressively when income is higher, and strategize your saving to compensate for months when income is nonexistent or low. Find more tips on how to manage irregular income here.

  1. Make the most of your match

Don’t leave free money on the table. If your employer offers to match your contribution, Kristi Sullivan, a certified financial planner with Sullivan Financial Planning in Denver, Colo., advises individuals to save as much as your employer matches immediately or 6% if there is not a match. That way, you won’t miss out on free additions to your retirement nest egg.

  1. Automate your contribution

Out of sight, out of mind. Automate your retirement contribution to ensure you pay yourself first.

“Typically, once it’s done through payroll deduction, the person seldom misses it,” says Lauber.

  1. Check in regularly

Don’t just “set it and forget it.” Mark R. Morley, certified financial planner and president of Warburton Capital Management, stresses “clients must be ‘invested’ in their own plan.”

He says to check periodically on your retirement account and make adjustments where necessary. If you have a financial adviser, you may want to schedule regular progress meetings.

“When a client is engaged in their own plan and can see real results, we can work on the two variables that affect the retirement accounts: time and money,” says Morley.

The post Why the ‘Save 10% for Retirement’ Rule Doesn’t Always Work appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

9 Things Every 20-Something Should Know About Money

If you’re a “younger” millennial and find yourself struggling with your finances in your 20s, pay attention.

There’s no better time to learn about money than when you’re young and broke. The 10 years between 20 and 30 go by fast, and will be full of many important life changes that can shape your overall financial future. Whether it’s financial planning, saving, or investing, the sooner you start, the better off you’ll be.

If you can educate yourself on how to manage the little money you have now, you’ll be better prepared to manage your finances effectively when you earn more and life inevitably gets more complicated.

Lucky for you, today’s technology provides you with a wealth of (free) financial information at your fingertips, including this handy list of expert-approved money lessons to learn on your journey to dirty 30.

9 Things You Should Learn about Money in your 20s

#1: The magic of spending less than you earn

The first financial lesson you should learn is simple enough: spend less than you earn. Most people mess this one up.

At least, Pew Research shows 68% of Americans say they use credit cards and loans to make purchases that they otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford with their income and savings. This leads to more stress in your life, a dependency on debt, and an endless cycle of working to pay off or evade lenders.

Learn to follow a budget well and you’ll easily learn to live within your means. You may even take it a step further in your 20s — save more by living below your means, not just within your paycheck.

“Gain peace of mind that you’re being responsible by setting up guidelines for your spending and savings early in your 20s,” says Dan Andrews, certified financial planner and founder of Well-Rounded Success. The website provides financial guidance geared toward a millennial audience.

If you get those guidelines set early in your life, you’ll likely have an easier time addressing more complicated money topics like homeownership and having kids. If not, a large unexpected bill or the birth of a child could destroy your finances.

#2: Eventually something will go wrong

In the savings hierarchy, your emergency fund should be your first priority.You are bound to run into an emergency eventually.

“I know when you’re a 20-something, you feel invincible, but the fact is, emergencies are still going to arise, it’s not a matter of if, but when,” says Gen Y financial expert and author of The Broke and Beautiful Life Stefanie O’Connell.

The rule of thumb says to set aside 6 to 12 months’ worth of fixed expenses in case of an emergency. You can stash this money in a checking account, savings account, or any of these other options.

If you don’t plan for a financial emergency, you’ll find yourself in a tight spot when an emergency undoubtedly happens. If, for example, you lose your income, a liquid savings buffer might save you from turning to your parents for money or taking on high-interest debt to survive. That’s not an improbable crisis to imagine, as almost half of American households experience volatile income.

“By setting aside money, you can live off this savings while you look for new work, or better yet, have the flexibility to pursue the work you want,” says Andrews.

After the dust settles, you can high-five yourself for handling your crisis on your own.

#3: “YOLO” is a pretty terrible financial strategy

One of the hardest parts of your 20s is learning to think past “today” when making money decisions — especially when everyone seems to want to live in the moment.

Really ask yourself what goals you have for the future: Starting your own business? A family? Now is the time to stop thinking and start planning for how you’ll afford those life milestones when the time arrives.

Make it a habit to plan and save early for these stages before you reach them. When you’re planning, think about what’s most important to you and nearest in your life’s timeline. Don’t forget to consider the time it would take to save for larger expenses.

O’Connell gives the following example: If you decide to start saving for a $50,000 home down payment just two years before you plan to buy a home, you’ll have to save $25,000 a year. That’s tough. But if you think about that milestone money goal from 10 years out, you only have to save $5,000 a year, which is much more manageable.

Not every account has to be for a huge savings goal like a mortgage payment. You can practice the habit of planning ahead with any large purchase you plan to make.

“Create fun savings accounts, like a travel fund or to save up for that Dr. Seuss painting that you really want. These savings accounts motivate you to stash away more money for the financial milestones in your future,” says Andrews.

#4: The key to getting a killer credit score

Don’t get bogged down trying to understand everything about your credit score and why it’s so important right now. Just remember a few key facts so that you don’t mess up your score early and spend the next decade trying to undo the damage.

  • Use your credit card, but pay it off in full each month.
  • Don’t max it out. In fact, never use more than 30% of your total available limit.
  • The best strategy: Put one small bill or recurring purchase (like coffee) on your credit card, and pay it off each month. Use cash for everything else.

If you focus on those things, you should easily avoid derogatory marks on your credit report and quickly build a healthy credit score. Learn more tips to build your credit score here.

#5: One day you will get old and want to retire

Remember how we said it’s hard to think far into the future in your 20s? Well, this is going to be challenging. But it’s crucial to start saving for retirement as early as possible. Your biggest advantage to saving for retirement is your age. The younger you are, the more time you have to take advantage of compound interest on your retirement savings and other investment accounts.

So figure out what retirement savings options your employer offers (typically a 401(k)) and open an account. If your employer offers a match, then that is amazing and don’t miss out — it’s free money.

Contact your employer’s human resources department for help working through your options. That is what they are there for. A great, hands-off option for young savers is a Target Date Fund. Then set up an automatic payroll deposit at least high enough to capture any match your job offers.

Don’t worry about the swings of the stock market. Don’t worry about picking the perfect portfolio. Just put money in your retirement fund as early as possible and get to the complicated stuff later. The point is that you start saving for retirement — not that you become the next Warren Buffett right away.

“Too many young people don’t take advantage of all the benefits they can get at their workplaces. Simply ask your HR department if there’s a match on 401(k) contributions,” says Andrews.

Once you get a good grasp on retirement savings, you can upgrade to more sophisticated investing strategies.

#6: How to be your own “tax guy”

Do your own taxes at least once. The experience will give you a better idea of how the tax system works and can save you an average $273 you’d otherwise spend on tax preparation fees. Many free and low-cost options exist to e-file your taxes, including free filing options found on the IRS website.

“When you do your own taxes it also helps to demystify the process. If you decide to pay for help in the future, you’ll be able to vet your future accountant and hold your own in conversations,” says O’Connell.

She advises young people to take the opportunity to learn about how the tax system works and any tax strategies you can use to save money in the future, like making Roth IRA contributions, tuition payments, or charitable donations.

Another reason to learn now: Your taxes may never be simpler to understand. There may be special circumstances that require you to hire a tax professional when you’re older, like getting married, investing in the stock market, or owning your own business. If you feel like you need professional help, look for a tax preparer since their rates are typically cheaper than hiring a Certified Public Accountant.

#7: When to ignore social media


Don’t get caught up in spending your money to catch up with whatever your other friends are doing. You don’t know what anyone’s financial picture looks like behind all those Instagrammed vacations or a wedding album fit for a princess.

“Your day will come when you make your friends jealous, but that’s not the point. The point is to focus on your financial life to give you the foundation to live your great life,” says Andrews.

He advises 20-somethings to gain resilience while young, because you’ll likely compare your lifestyle to others at every age.

#8: Your debt won’t go away if you ignore it

If you do decide to ignore your debts, you could suffer consequences even worse than a dinged credit score.

Debt collectors can sue you for payment. If you ignore a debt lawsuit, the resulting judgment could result in garnished wages or lost assets.

“You’ve got to become proactive about your debt. It has to go from being something you procrastinate to something you prioritize. And a priority is something you build your life around,” says O’Connell.

O’Connell suggests you change your mindset to think of debt as an emergency that needs to be addressed immediately.

“In moments of crisis we don’t make excuses, we get ruthless because we have to. Excuses like, ‘but it’s a special occasion’ or ‘I can’t give up my vacation’ don’t even cross our minds,” says O’Connell. She adds getting ruthless might mean making some sacrifices and hustling to earn more income, but it’ll be worth it when you’re debt-free.

Struggling to make your student loan payments? You’ve still got options.

#9: How and when to negotiate your salary

Remember, the salary you earn at your first real-world job “will serve as the anchor from which you negotiate future raises, making your starting salary, arguably, the most important of your career,” says O’Connell.

That in mind, it’s worth negotiating a bit to get the best deal you can when you’re presented with your first employment offer. Hiring managers and recruiters expect candidates to negotiate; to them, it demonstrates initiative. The experience will also give you an opportunity to educate yourself about negotiation skills and get valuable, real-world practice.

Again, the internet is your friend here. You can learn salary negotiation tactics from numerous online resources, then practice with friends or mentors so you’re ready when a real offer is on the table. One word of warning: Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Remember, you can ask for much more than more money (think: commuter benefits, education credit, etc.).

If you’re asking for a raise with a current employer, consider the average pay raise for salaried employees in 2017 is 3%, according to the Economic Research Institute, a think tank that provides salary survey data to Fortune 500 companies. So asking for a salary hike from $50,000 to $60,000 is pushing it at a 20% pay raise without much experience to justify your ask.

To sum it all up…

Just do your best. Focus on learning these concepts, but don’t beat yourself up. If you stray from your path to financial freedom every now and then, it’s all right. You can’t expect to be a perfect money manager — even accountants have accountants — but if you correct yourself when you make mistakes early on, you’ll be glad you made the effort later on in life.

The post 9 Things Every 20-Something Should Know About Money appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

13 College Costs You Don’t Think About

When families think of financing a college education, they usually think about covering tuition costs. It’s easy to home in on tuition — after all, it’s an obvious, in-your-face expense. But tuition and fees don’t make up the largest portion of the average cost of college attendance.

In the College Board’s most recent Trends in College Pricing, researchers found non-tuition-related expenses at public four-year schools account for 61% of a total $24,610 average cost of attendance.

Here are a few hidden college costs for families to consider before the school year starts.

 

Housing

Room and board make up about 42% of the total cost of attendance at four-year public institutions, according to the College Board. After tuition, housing is the second-largest expense students will encounter.

For students who choose (or for whom it is required) to live in on-campus housing, room and board might be a non-negotiable expense. The cost to live in a dorm can vary from as low as $5,326 for the school year to more than $18,000 according to U.S. News Short List rankings. Generally speaking, it’s cheaper to live on campus in areas with higher rent, while off-campus housing is cheaper in areas with lower rental costs.

Other on-campus living requirements such as enrollment in the school’s meal plan, a security deposit, and dorm fees can also add up.

Don’t assume the university’s housing cost estimate is correct, as schools use different factors to calculate costs. A 2015 Trulia analysis found “schools often underestimate the cost of off-campus housing, sometimes by thousands of dollars for the school term.” For example, the University of California, Berkeley, estimates a student would spend $7,184 to live off campus, while Trulia’s data showed it would cost $12,375 for two students to share a two-bedroom apartment for nine months.

Tips to save on off-campus housing:

Compare costs to on-campus housing. Depending on where you attend school, a 9- or 12-month off-campus lease plus utilities and internet might actually be more expensive than room and board in a university dorm.

Look for roommates to help ease the burden of utilities and other bills.

Use search engines like Uloop and College Student Apartments to filter through housing options near your school and find even more savings.

 

Furniture and decor

Plan to budget a few hundred bucks for furniture and decor. If you’re lucky, your dorm or apartment might include a few pieces of furniture. Even then, you’ll need bedding, curtains, linens, and other staples. Plan to spend funds on furniture and decorations to make the new space feel like home.

The good news is that any college town where students are constantly moving in and leaving each year are great for the resellers market. Check out Craigslist in your area to save on furniture, or resale sites like AptDeco, Furnishare, or Furnishly. Facebook’s new marketplace feature is a good idea, too.

Pro tip: Consider starting a college registry. Target’s College Registry offers a 15% discount on any items that aren’t purchased. Also, don’t forget your student ID card. Some retailers may offer student discounts.

 

Parking fees

If you plan to commute or keep a vehicle on campus, set aside money for parking ahead of time. Schools typically offer a range of parking packages for students. For example, student parking permits at Boston University go for as low as $266.40 per school year for evening commuters, to $1,905.50 for those who live on campus and need to park overnight.

You may be required to pay a lump sum for parking at the beginning of each semester. Check if your school prices parking passes by location. If they do, research on-campus transit. You may be able to pay for cheaper parking farther from your classes, then hop on campus transit to class. Consider cheaper parking options like city parking lots or curbside options if there are any nearby.

 

Study abroad and other travel

College years are prime time for travel. Whether you’re hitting the beach with friends on spring break or considering an extended study abroad program, you could easily spend thousands of dollars on travel over the course of four years.

Study abroad programs, complete with room, board, instruction, and sometimes internships, can get pricey. For example, Northwestern University estimates a year studying abroad in Brazil to costs about $21,000 for students, while a summer abroad in the University of Georgia’s UGA en Buenos Aires program costs $4,294, plus about $3,000 in tuition and fees.

Often, students finance study abroad trips with financial aid. Just think it through before you take on more debt, especially if you’ve taken on a lot of student debt already. Many school study abroad offices offer scholarships for students. Another good source is Cappex.com, which tracks college scholarships.

 

Food

The average college and university charges about $4,500, or $18.75 per day, for a three-meal-a-day dining contract for a typical 8- or 9-month academic year, according to the Hechinger Report, an independent, nonprofit education news site.

If you want to use the meal plan but the standard campus meal plan is too expensive or wasteful for your budget, you could find savings in a lower-cost plan. Many post-secondary institutions offer lower-cost meal plan packages. Schools may also require first-year students or those living on campus to sign up for a meal plan, but allow upperclassmen and commuters to decide to what extent — if at all — they want to participate.

For example, at New York University, a student can pay $2,800 per semester for an all-access meal plan (28 meals per week) or as little as $1,210 per semester for a so-called “flex” plan (5 meals per week).

 

Books, fees, and supplies

Textbooks and class fees don’t come cheap. The average full-time student at a four-year public institution will spend $1,298 per year on books and supplies, according to the College Board.

Sometimes, fees come as a surprise. In an ongoing study, Wisconsin HOPE Lab researchers tracked the cost experiences of students at four public universities in Wisconsin. At one school, students on the waiting list for a required English course that was full were told to sign up for the online version. Without a heads up, the students were charged an unexpected $250 online course fee.

A student might also need to purchase special equipment or software essential to a course or course of study. Science and technology courses may tack on lab fees, while art students may shell out cash for studio time or class materials.

If you can get hold of a course syllabus early, you should. Don’t only look for what’s required to pass. Check carefully for any fees or payments needed to take the course before you show up. If you can’t get a copy of the syllabus and are unsure, you can usually reach the professor to ask via email.

 

Your family’s changing financial picture

stressed worker job work

You could be surprised by a rise in your cost of attendance if you or your family’s financial picture changes.

The effects of this scenario are demonstrated in the Wisconsin Scholars Longitudinal Study, a six-year-long investigation of how Pell Grant recipients attending public institutions in Wisconsin experienced the price of higher education conducted by the HOPE Lab.

Researchers found the financial burden on students grows over time as tuition rises and families experience financial changes. Twenty percent of students in the study experienced a median $1,215 hike in the Expected Family Contribution — how much of the cost of attendance their household was expected to pay after their first year. When your EFC grows, it means you’re likely to be awarded less financial aid.

Many students, they found, also lost eligibility for the Pell Grant and other aid dependent on Pell eligibility.

 

Dried-up scholarships and grants

Additionally, students usually receive the most financial aid for their first year of college, but scholarships and grants may not stick around for all four years. They could be allotted for the first year only, or a student may lose academic or financial eligibility. Many universities use “front loading” to attract freshman to the school. They recruit incoming freshman with grants and scholarships and may not continue to fund grants for continuing students. On average this increases the net price from the first to second year of college by about $1,400.

Contact your school’s financial aid office early on if you expect a change in income to affect your EFC, as you may be able to explain your situation in an appeal. If you receive a scholarship or grant, carefully scrutinize the terms to make sure you know how long the money will last and what you’ll need to do to keep the award.

 

A new laptop

For many courses, having a laptop or access to a personal computer is crucial to success. Be prepared to pay $700 to $1,500 for that success, depending on the specs you need to excel in your major.

Some of the pricing is dependent on the laptop’s operating system. Students can get a Google computer for a couple of hundred dollars or a PC for less than $700, while an Apple Macbook Air starts at about $1,000. Always ask about a student discount. Some retailers like Apple offer discounted education pricing models for students and educators. Others, like Best Buy, periodically send out a newsletter with college student deals. You could save hundreds just by leveraging your student status.

Try using the school’s computers to complete work outside of class if they come with the software you need already loaded. You may also be able to rent laptops, tablets, cameras, and other technology from your school or local retailers. If you need to purchase software, and it can be downloaded on multiple computers, you could share a login with a classmate to share and split the cost.

 

Club and organization fees

Socializing comes at a price in college. Campus organizations often charge membership dues ($10-$25 at the low end), but it can get much more expensive for students looking to enter a sorority or fraternity. UCLA estimates the average annual cost of room, board, and dues to be about $7,650 for sororities and $8,328 for fraternities. That’s before adding in all of the other membership costs like clothing and fees to attend social functions.

While in an organization, there will likely be multiple occasions when you would need to buy merchandise, gifts, or clothing for events. If you’re into sports, for example, you may want to participate in an intramural sports league. You might need to pay a league fee, then purchase equipment and a team uniform.

Overall, keep your budget top of mind when faced with these opportunities. You might think twice about handing over thousands to your new “brothers” if it means skipping meals later on in the semester.

 

Internships

Internships — especially unpaid ones — can get expensive. Internships present a great opportunity for students to connect with others in their selected field and learn on-the-job skills, but they don’t pay much. For a student financing their education alone, an unpaid or low-paying internship could mean a missed opportunity. You could get offered the internship of your dreams with a large company, then have to turn it down if the pay is too little to cover your living costs.

Let’s say you accept an unpaid part-time summer internship offer (in exchange for course credit) from a firm in an expensive city like Los Angeles. It may be nearly impossible to make ends meet without financial assistance from your family or loans. Yes, you could probably cover some costs with another part-time position, or save money by staying in co-living community like Purehouse, but you’ll be scraping by to eat decent food or do anything outside of work.

The most competitive and best-paying internships are quickly filled. Apply to paid internships early on if an unpaid internship is out of the question. Periodically check for paid spring and summer internships with fall semester deadlines. Look for internships close to campus or your family to offset costs. If the internship is in another city, check to see if you have family or friends you can stay with for the time.

 

“Fun”

Social events present great opportunities to connect outside of class with others in your major or cohort. However, being a social butterfly is a quick way to deplete any bank account.

For example, student season tickets for the 2016 Ohio State football season ran students $180 to attend all five Big Ten conference games. To attend an additional two conference games, students would need to purchase a $252 package. That’s before you spend money on food, drinks, and an outfit for the pre-game tailgate.

You only have four to six years to make long-lasting relationships in college that could affect the rest of your life, so it’s understandable to feel pressure to attend parties, hang out at bars, go to dinners, and other activities. However, you could go broke or get into debt if you’re not careful.

Look for free or low-cost events to attend, then be selective about which events and activities are worth it for your budget. Keep an eye on your spending and always ask if you can save money on meals, clothes, or events with a student ID discount. You might get teased for seeming “cheap,” but you could avoid putting these expenses on a credit card.

 

Health insurance and medical costs

If you do not get health coverage through your parents, some schools may require you to sign up for a health plan. For example, New York University automatically enrolls students in its school-sponsored health care plan, but students can waive the plan if they can provide evidence they maintain alternate health insurance coverage that meets the university’s minimum health insurance criteria.

The cost of a basic plan for the spring 2017 semester: $1,654. If you’re an out-of-state student and don’t find alternative insurance coverage in time for classes, you could be stuck paying the bill as “NYU requires that all students registered in degree-granting programs maintain health insurance.”

Shop around to be sure you’re getting the best coverage at the best price possible. That may mean going outside of your school’s designated plan. You might want to consider signing up for coverage in the federal government’s Health Insurance Marketplace or your state’s equivalent insurance marketplace.

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Confessions of a Side Hustler: How Full-Time Workers Keep Their Side Gigs a Secret

Many Americans are juggling extra gigs on top of their regular nine-to-five. According the Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 7.5 million Americans held more than one job in 2016. The figure rose by more than 300,0000 workers from the previous year, due in part to years of stagnant wages, a competitive labor market and the growth of the gig-economy. Of the multiple job holders, more than half, or 4.1 million, split their time between a full-time and part-time gig.

Having a side gig waiting tables after work is one thing. It’s when workers decide to turn their side hustle into a full-time business that things can get complicated.

For budding entrepreneurs, it can make sense to continue working full time until their new venture business is up and running. A full-time job provides a certain level of stability — like a consistent salary, health care, and other benefits.

Knowing when and if to disclose your new business with your employer is the hard part. For that reason, some entrepreneurs choose to keep their secret side hustle just that — a secret.

Some experts say an employer should know if you have any business interests outside of your daily work responsibilities. Others argue what you do on your free time is none of your employer’s business so long as you aren’t using company time or resources.

“Some employers really encourage their employees to work on side businesses because it stimulates creativity,” says Jill Jacinto, a millennial career expert at Manhattan-based career consultancy firm WORKS. On the other hand, she adds, some employers “might feel you are neglecting your current job or getting ready to make a move elsewhere.”

Beyond feeling ostracized by fellow workers or their employers, there are also potential legal conflicts or consequences to worry about, says Bruce Eckfeldt, founder of Eckfeldt & Associates, a business coaching and management training firm based in New York City and a master coach for career-assistance company, The Muse.

“Before you invest a bunch of time in your startup, make sure that your current employment agreement isn’t going to be a problem,” he says. If you happen to be launching a business in the same field as your current employer, there may be restrictions outlined in your contract that could come back to bite you.

In addition, you should do your very best to separate your new business from your day job as best you can. Separating your time and focus is a little more obvious — don’t work on your startup at your job — but you may also need to create some physical boundaries too.

“Build a solid wall between the work you do for you employer and for your startup. Separate email address, file repositories, maybe even computers and profiles if you’re really careful,” says Eckfeldt. He says this adds a physical level of separation between your day job and your startup. It also protects you against any claims you have used work time or resources on your startup. Doing so is common for many starting out, but generally considered unprofessional, and could breach the terms of your employment contract.

We interviewed several full-time workers who are secretly juggling side businesses along with their 9-to-5. We asked about their motivations, how they keep their other job under wraps, and the toll it has taken on their professional lives. To protect their identities (and their livelihoods), we have changed several of their names.

Here’s what it’s really like to live a double work life.

“I sell live crickets on the side.”

By day, Jason*, 32, is a project manager for a paint and flooring company in York, Pa.

After work, he puts on a much different hat as a pet food distributor. But he doesn’t sell Kibble ‘n Bits. His website, The Critter Depot, sells live crickets, which pet owners purchase in bulk to feed pets like snakes and large reptiles. Jason also operates a couponing blog under a pseudonym “Jason” and picks up Craigslist gigs in his free time.

“I like to get income from many sources, so I side-hustle,” Jason tells MagnifyMoney.

The husband and soon-to-be father of three says his ultimate goal is to retire as soon as possible. He plans to keep taking on extra work as long as he can manage it. He calls his full-time job “the bedrock” of his retirement plan.

“The full-time job, that’s the bedrock. That’s the foundation. If I had to sacrifice the other three [businesses], I would make sure I kept my full-time job,” says Jason. “Even if my side hustles got to the point where they were pulling in six figures alone, I wouldn’t get rid of my full-time job.”

On why he doesn’t tell his employer about his other income streams, Jason says he doesn’t want to blur the lines between his different businesses.

He’s careful to focus only on office work during office hours, and on his businesses when he’s at home. He doesn’t want to risk losing any trust at work.

“I don’t want [my boss] to think maybe I’m too zoned in on my side projects and not zoned in enough on my at-office projects,” he says.

For him, keeping his job in addition to the side income streams is all about keeping his family afloat.

“If I were a bachelor, I’d say you’ve got to put every ounce of your time into it. But the father in me says you’ve got to be level-headed because it’s not just you that’s relying on [your income], your whole family is relying on it.”

“I’m a travel agent when I’m not working on Wall Street.”

While Fred*, 45, was working at an investment firm in New York City, he developed an idea for a travel business. In 2009, he launched YLime, a concierge service that helps organize group trips for Americans looking to book travel to various countries for annual Carnival celebrations. Recently, he expanded his offerings to include travel packages to some African countries and wine tours on Long Island, N.Y.

His reasons for keeping his side business under wraps are simple: his workplace frowns upon employees having outside income.

“I’ve been on Wall Street for about 20 years now, and there is a certain culture in here. If they see you doing something else, it limits your growth,” he says. “They are not going to consider you for those positions because they assume you’ve already checked out to a certain extent.”

Although he says his company isn’t a conflict of interest for his position, he would be concerned if his higher-ups knew about YLime.

“Depending on your relationship with some people in the firm, some people may try to use that information against you,” Fred says.

“My bosses found out about my secret trucking business from a local news reporter.”

After a management shake-up at the Las Vegas gaming company where she had worked for a decade, 41-year-old project manager Marcella Williams thought her days were numbered.

Fearing she might lose her job, she decided to use her project management skills to open her own business on the side as a backup.

She launched CDL Focus, a truck rental and shipping company, in mid-2015. She rents two semi-trucks, primarily to people looking to obtain a commercial driver’s license. They can use her trucks to practice driving or to take the licensing test without going through an employer to gain access to a truck. Williams employs a driver for the other part of her business, which focuses on shipping.

She spent nearly $130,000 of her own savings and salary to bootstrap the business. In its early days, she admits it was hard to focus 100% on her day job while trying to get CDL Focus off the ground.

“The truth is, I probably spent a lot more time especially in the beginning working on the business than on my job,” says Williams. She gave her full-time job assignments priority and would shift her focus once her regular duties were completed, she says.

Williams recalls a time a potential truck client called her in the middle of a meeting with her supervisor.

“I’ve been in a meeting with my boss and my phone is ringing off the hook and he’s like, ‘do you need to get that?’” she says. In those cases, Williams says she tries to take the call after hours or send an prewritten reply so that she can respond later.

“You want to run your business and stay on top of it, but when you have a one- to two-hour conference call or meeting, you have to decide: are you going to screw over the person who is paying you?” she says.

After almost two years in operation, Williams caught the attention of a local reporter who wrote about her new venture. It wasn’t long before her employers found out.

The same day, her supervisor asked her into his office to be sure she wasn’t going to quit.

Now, she says, “[my co-workers] ask me ‘how is your trucking company going?’ in the middle of cubicle land.”

“I flip houses and sell bounce castles, and my employers have no idea.”

Austin, Texas-based Dennis* says he hasn’t quite mastered the ability to focus on his full-time job and ignore his side business until after work hours. The 31-year-old works as a logistics manager for a large technology company. About a year and a half ago, he and his wife took their savings and launched a real estate investing business.

Dennis and his wife buy, renovate, and resell homes. They learned the basics of house-flipping from a well-known investor in Austin. “Our first year we did 13 transactions,” says Dennis.

Excluding education and other startup costs, Dennis and his wife got into the market with $1,000 in direct mail advertising and about $15,000 spent fixing up their first property. They now earn between $20,000 and $50,000 on each home they flip. The couple says they brought in about $65,000 in 2016.

In 2016, Dennis also launched a pair of e-commerce stores, which sell bounce houses for children and clothing and accessories.

“I work on all three [projects] while I’m at my day job so it is hard, especially trying to keep everything a secret and not having co-workers see what I am truly working on,” Dennis says. “I know that I am not fulfilling my primary duties at my full-time job to the fullest extent of my abilities.”

To make things easier, the couple has hired a call center to take and record all calls from the real estate business, which are then addressed after Dennis comes home from work. He says he will do the same for the e-commerce stores as business grows.

His ultimate goal is to build up enough passive income to replace his corporate income. For now, he keeps his job for financial security, while he grows his e-commerce portfolio and his and his wife’s real estate business.

“The salary and stock incentives that we have right now are kind of hard to walk away from unless I had sufficient passive income that would replace what I have now,” he reasons. He has given himself two years to grow his businesses into self-sustaining operations. At that point, his stock in the company will be fully vested, and he can consider leaving for good.

“I’ve been blessed. I have a good education, and I’ve always had a good job, but ultimately my main goal in life is to be independent and not have to do the corporate grind,” he says.

The post Confessions of a Side Hustler: How Full-Time Workers Keep Their Side Gigs a Secret appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

11 Sephora Savings Hacks Everyone Needs to Know

If you can name your top 5 favorite beauty vloggers on YouTube, you’ve probably heard of a little makeup wonderland called Sephora. Bonus points if you’ve ever walked into the makeup emporium to touch up your brows with a free sample and left half an hour later and $100 poorer.

The LVMH-owned beauty store has been fairly successful since it first opened in 1969. It currently boasts 2,000 retail stores worldwide and around 15,000 of your favorite products. All of that revenue doesn’t have to come at the expense of your wallet.

We’ve done some digging to find 12 ways you can save money the next time the smell of perfume whisks you into your local Sephora retailer’s checkout counter with your credit card in hand.

  1. Loyalty Pays

Sephora is good to those who are loyal to the brand. Save on products and services when you sign up for the retailer’s loyalty program, Sephora Beauty Insider.

When you sign up, you’ll get points for each dollar spent in-store and online. The program has three tiers: Beauty Insider, VIB, and VIB Rouge, depending on how much money you spend with the leading makeup retailer.

Beauty Insiders — aka Sephora shoppers who spend less than $350 a year — get a free birthday gift and free classes, plus the option to pay $10 a year for unlimited free shipping privileges. VIBs, or Very Important Beauty Insiders, get all of the above plus additional exclusive savings and one free custom makeover for an annual $350 spent on merchandise.

Spend $1,000 a year in merchandise purchases, and you’re rewarded with the VIB Rouge level. Rouge offers all of the aforementioned perks, but you won’t need to pay the additional $10 a year for unlimited free shipping. You’ll also get other exclusive perks like unlimited custom makeovers.

  1. Get freebies by scanning the Beauty Deals page

Sephora has an entire page of its website dedicated to savvy shoppers like yourself. It’s appropriately titled Beauty Deals. It’s a little tricky to find the deals page as there isn’t a direct link to the page on Sephora’s home page, so make sure to bookmark www.sephora.com/beauty-deals.

It’s where you’re sure to find all of Sephora’s promotional codes for additional discounts and samples. You’re allowed a maximum of three free samples at checkout.

  1. Buy gift sets to save on individual products

If you’re going to purchase one or two items from a product line, you might be better off just buying a gift set. For example, the Yves Saint Laurent Black Opium Beauty Gift Set will run you $100 and comes with the Black Opium Eau de Parfum ($91), Rouge Pur Couture lipstick ($37), and Mascara Volume Effet Faux Cils ($32).

$91 + $37 + $32 = $160 value.

By getting the set, you’d save $60.

  1. Size up and save

If you buy something regularly, purchase the value size rather than smaller sizes. You’ll almost always spend less per ounce that way. For example, the regular 4.2-oz. bottle of Clinique’s Dramatically Different Gel will run you about $6.24 per ounce, whereas the smaller, half-ounce travel size option costs about $10 per ounce.

  1. Stock up on free samples in store

If you want to try out a product that’s way, way, out of your normal price range, get a free sample in-store to try before you buy. That way you won’t waste the full-size perfume you bought because of the brand more than the scent.

You are allowed up to three free samples per department in-store, and can get even more freebies online with beauty deals. Make sure to take home a sample of that expensive foundation to see if you can apply it as smoothly in your bathroom as the artist did in the store’s lighting.

Samples can also come handy when you’re traveling. So stop by Sephora and stock up on samples instead of travel-size bottles for short vacations.

  1. You can and should return products you don’t like

If you didn’t follow amazing aforementioned advice to try before you buy, it’s OK, I don’t listen to my mom either. What’s great is that at Sephora, you CAN make returns, even on makeup. Learn the return policy: you can return opened goods within 60 days in gently used condition.

  1. Shop out to in, bottom to top

Like at grocery stores, products are arranged at Sephora so that you see what costs the most, first. Check out items on the outer edges and on the bottom shelves first. They are typically cheaper than the ones you’ll see displayed at eye level according to Real Simple.

  1. Shop semi-annual sales

Sephora holds major semi-annual sales twice a year. This is another instance where your loyalty pays. Only Beauty Insiders get access to the major sale, when products are up to 20% off. The semi-annual sales typically happen in the spring and fall, usually mid-April or mid-November, and the sales normally last a few days.

  1. Use discounted gift cards

Purchase a gift card someone else is getting rid of at a discount before you shop. You can buy discounted gift cards for Sephora or department stores like Macy’s or JC Penney’s with in-store Sephora counters.

To find discounted gift cards, use sites like Gift Card Granny, which aggregates discounted gift card offers from around the web for you. Other great resources are Raise, WalletWhiz, and Cardpool.

Right now, we found Sephora gift cards available for up to 9% off through Gift Card Granny.

  1. Download a rebates app

You can get even more of the money you spent at Sephora when you shop using rebate smartphone apps like Ibotta or Checkout 51. For example, when you take a picture of your receipt after spending at least $50 at Sephora, you get $5 back on Ibotta.

With Checkout 51, you’ll browse local offers at stores, then take a picture of your receipt, and your savings will be credited to your account. When your account hits $20, you can cash out.

  1. Learn to DIY

You can save a lot of time and money on makeovers at Sephora by learning a few of the artist’s tricks yourself. Learn how to sculpt the perfect brow or apply flawless foundation at one of the retailer’s free 2-hour beauty classes.

Check online or ask the manager at your local Sephora for find out when and how to sign up for classes. If you have about 15 minutes and want a more personal experience, you can have a professional explain their process to you during a mini-makeover any day.

  1. Like, follow, subscribe

Following Sephora on its social media channels is the most obvious and easiest way to save on goods and snag freebies. Look out for posts on Sephora’s Facebook and Pinterest accounts to hear first about current sales and free samples.

 

 

The post 11 Sephora Savings Hacks Everyone Needs to Know appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How the 72-Hour Rule Can Help You Save Money

Clock time deadline

How often do you make an impulse purchase, only to regret it the next day?

Journalist and money expert Carl Richards  came up with the “72-hour rule” to kick his habit of buying every book he wanted on Amazon, ending up with a pile of unread books.

Now, he says he lets a book sit in his shopping cart for at least 72 hours before hitting “buy,” and he’s saving money only buying books he will actually read. You can apply a similar practice to your spending habits.

Why wait 72 hours?

Our brains respond positively to instant gratification. It’s why so many of us find it difficult to save money or lose weight. We want the item or food now, and when there’s nothing stopping us, why wait?

You need the space between receiving the money and spending it to think. The shorter that space is, the less time you have to think and the more likely you are to spend the funds impulsively.

Tax refunds are a prime example of a time when it can be tricky to control your urge to spend. Tax refunds averaged $2,860 in 2016, according to the IRS. This year, a SunTrust survey found about 1 in 4 Americans already planned to spend their refund money on a large purchase before they even received the funds. That proportion rises to 36% among millennials and 40% among Gen-Xers, according to SunTrust.

“People often look at their tax refund as found money like lottery winnings or inheritance. The temptation to spend surprise money on something fun or frivolous is strong,” says Denver, Colo.-based Certified Financial Planner Kristi Sullivan.

You want to avoid doing that. Your tax refund isn’t lottery winnings or an inheritance. It’s your hard-earned money being returned to you with no interest gained.

That’s not great, considering the average citizen admits they can’t pull together $400 in case of an emergency.

Kinney says “hitting the pause button on spending impulses gives the rational brain time to think” of more practical ways to use the money like getting out of debt, contributing to a college savings fund, or adding to your savings.

Although he acknowledges when you’re living paycheck to paycheck, it’s a little harder to resist a sudden — albeit predictable — boost to this month’s budget.

“People feel constrained by their paycheck all through the year, then suddenly this windfall of money gives them the ability to splurge. The temptation can be hard to resist,” says Kinney.

Here are a few ways you can manage the temptation, and the time.

Make your priorities clear

Once you know what your financial goals are — whether they are saving up for a new car or paying down student debt — the key is to look at every financial choice and determine whether or not it will help or hurt your progress toward that goal.

“A need that you haven’t already bought is rare. Wants are everywhere. Time to reflect might have you making a more mature decision with your money,” says Sullivan.

Do some soul searching to see where your financial priorities lie. You might find your need to pay off your credit card this month to avoid paying more in interest outweighs how badly you want that new gadget. Think about it.

Emergency fund and debt comes first

“Sit down and think about other pressing financial issues, and how you plan on paying for them,” says David Frisch, a Melville, N.Y.-based financial planner. He suggests you review bank statements, brokerage accounts, long-term goals, and other financial considerations, then give some thought to whether or not you’re on track to achieve them.

For example, if you realize you don’t have enough in your emergency fund to cover three to six months of expenses, you might decide to put the money there instead of spending it. Or, if your refund could completely pay off a high-interest debt like a credit card, you might decide to free yourself from the debt burden.

Treat yourself

Holding back on purchasing something you really want can be painful, but it doesn’t have to be complete torture. Sullivan suggests taking the edge off with a small reward for each day you wait. It’s a lot like crash dieting, which experts agree never works. If you deprive yourself of too many small pleasures for too long, you might see a donut one day (or maybe that new iPhone) and not just buy one but the whole dozen. But if you have a treat once in awhile, you might not be as likely to binge later.

Just make sure the reward you choose isn’t too expensive, and you should avoid getting into more debt. Your “reward” could serve as a break while you comb through your finances.

The takeaway

Take some time to think before spending whenever you receive unexpected income, and you might make better spending decisions. Maybe you need only 24 hours, instead of 72, or maybe you need a little longer to decide what to do with money, but the same lesson applies. If you’re considering a purchase that’s a “want” and not a “need,” think before you buy.

The post How the 72-Hour Rule Can Help You Save Money appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

What is a Required Minimum Distribution?

For workers or retirees who have not begun to withdraw funds from their retirement accounts by age 70½, the IRS requires that they start withdrawing funds. The RMD requirement applies to all tax advantaged retirement accounts, from traditional IRAs and 401(k)s to 403(b)s and SEP IRAs. The RMD does not apply to Roth IRAs or Roth 401(k)s.

Here’s a full list of retirement accounts subject to the RMD rule:

  • Traditional IRAs
  • SEP IRAs
  • SIMPLE IRAs
  • 401(k)s
  • 403(b)s
  • 457(b)s
  • profit-sharing plans
  • other defined contribution plans

How do I figure out how much to withdraw?

Just like filing your taxes, it falls on your shoulders to remember to take the RMD once you reach 70½. You can do the math yourself (we’ll explain below) to figure out what your required minimum distribution will be, or you can ask for help from a tax professional or financial adviser.

To calculate your RMD, you need to know exactly how much you’ve got saved up in each account as of Dec. 31 of the previous year. Next, use this table from the IRS to find your “distribution period” score, which is based on your life expectancy.

Most people can calculate their RMD by dividing their total retirement account balances by the distribution period that corresponds with their age.

Let’s say you turned 70½ in Dec. 2016 and had a balance of $1 million in your eligible retirement accounts on Dec. 31. You would then find the distribution period that corresponds to your age in Table III.

According to the table, your distribution period number is 27.4. When you divide $1 million by 27.4, you get an RMD of $36,496.35. That is the minimum withdrawal you must make from that account by April 1, 2017.

When do I have to start taking an RMD?

If you are already retired, you are required to take distributions by April 1 of the year after you turn 70½.

If you are still working at age 70½ and you carry a traditional 401(k) or 403(b) account with your employer, you do not have to take an RMD unless you own 5% or more of the company. However, if you are still working at age 70½ and you have individual retirement accounts outside of your employer retirement account, you will need to make an RMD from those IRAs.

You do not have to take your RMD as one lump-sum payment. The IRS will allow you to take out the funds in chunks throughout the year, which allows your money to keep growing tax free. As long as the total meets the RMD for the year, you’re in the clear.

What happens if I don’t take my RMD?

If you don’t take your RMD during the year after you turn 70½, you’ll be slapped with a 50% excise tax on the amount that was not distributed when you file taxes.

For example, if your RMD was $10,000, but you only took out $5,000, you will be assessed the 50% tax on the $5,000 that you did not withdraw.

You can delay your first RMD. If you choose to do so, you’ll be required to take two in the next year, which will affect your gross income.

 

What if I don’t need to live off of the distribution?

You are required to take your RMD beginning at 70½ , but you that doesn’t mean you have to spend it.

“A lot of clients believe that they must take an RMD and spend it. In reality, all the IRS cares about is that you remove it from the account, declare it as income, and pay taxes on it,” says Riverside, Calif.- based financial planner Breanna Reish.

You are actually free to use the money however you’d like.

One way to meet your RMD requirement is by making a qualified charitable distribution paid directly from the IRA to a qualified charity. The charitable distribution can satisfy all or part of the amount you are required to take from you IRA.

What if I have multiple retirement accounts?

If you have more than one retirement account, things can get a little more complicated. You still need to take an RMD, but you don’t have to take one out of each account. You’ll need to add up the amount you have in all of your qualifying retirement accounts, then use that figure to determine your RMD using Table III.

Again, it’s probably a good idea to seek advice from a tax or financial adviser professional who can help make the wisest decision for your finances.

The post What is a Required Minimum Distribution? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Watch Out for This 16% Student Loan Fee

The Trump administration has made it possible for debt collectors to once again charge hefty fees to some student loan borrowers who miss several payments in a row — even if those borrowers make an effort to get back on track right away.

These fees, which can be as high as 16%, are typically levied against the borrower’s entire outstanding loan balance and accrued interest charges. The so-called “collection charges” are meant to help recoup losses incurred by pursuing unpaid debts.

In a recent letter, the U.S. Department of Education rescinded an Obama-era rule that forbade guaranty agencies — debt collectors charged with recouping unpaid federal student loan debt — from charging defaulted borrowers collection fees if the borrowers began a repayment plan within 60 days of defaulting on their loans. In the new letter, the agency said the previous guidance should have included time for public comment and review before it was issued.

The reversal comes days after the Consumer Federation of America released an analysis of Department of Education data that shows the rate of student loans in default has grown 14% from 2015 to 2016.This certainly isn’t the first Obama-era rule or legislation the new administration has sought to undo, with an Obamacare replacement plan on its way to a vote in the House and plans to unravel regulations meant to crack down on for-profit colleges and universities.

A Department of Education spokesperson declined to comment.

Bad news for 4.2 million borrowers

The changes will impact borrowers who took out federal student loans under the old Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program. The FFEL Program was phased out in 2010 and replaced with the current Direct Loan Program, but millions of borrowers are still paying back FFEL loans issued prior to that change. Those who have loans under the Direct Loan Program will not be impacted by the changes.

As it stands, some 4.2 million FFEL borrowers are currently in default on loans that total $65.6 billion, according to Department of Education data. Loans are considered to be in default after 270 days of nonpayment.

The changes will raise the stakes for borrowers struggling to make payments on their federal student loans, and make it even more important for those borrowers to avoid missed payments.

Fortunately, federal student loan borrowers are eligible for several flexible repayment methods, as well as forbearance and deferment.

An Ongoing Debate

The debate over a servicer’s right to charge borrowers a default fee has gone on for several years.

In 2012, student loan borrower Bryana Bible sued United Student Aid Funds after she was charged more than $4,500 in fees after defaulting on her loans. She started a repayment agreement to resolve the debt within 18 days, but was still charged fees.

The Department of Education sided with Bible and said companies had to give borrowers 60 days after a loan default to start paying up before they are charged fees. The Obama administration backed the Department of Education and issued the letter when the court asked for guidance on the issue.

There is one clear winner with this rule change: debt collectors.

“Rescinding the [previous guidance on collection fees] benefits guarantee agencies at the expense of defaulted borrowers,” says financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz. He adds the change may increase the cost of collecting defaulted federal student loans, since borrowers will have less incentive to quickly rehabilitate their defaulted student loans.

What Happens If I Default on My Federal Student Loans?

Federal student loans are considered to be in default after a borrower misses payments for 270 days or more.

About 1.1 million federal student loans were in default status in 2016, according to Department of Education data.

The consequences of going to default are severe.

  • The entire balance of your loan + interest is immediately due
  • You lose eligibility for deferment, forbearance, and flexible repayment plans
  • Debt collectors will start calling
  • Your credit will suffer
  • And … your wages and/or tax refunds could be garnished

Are you missing federal student loan payments?

You’ve got options.

  • Contact your loan servicer ASAP
  • Find out if you’re eligible for a flexible repayment plan
  • Or ask about forbearance

Already in default?

  • Ask your loan service about loan rehabilitation
  • If you make 9 on-time payments over the course of 10 months, your default status will be lifted

You’ve only got one shot to rehabilitate your federal student loans after going into default. Don’t miss it.

 

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