The 5/1 ARM Mortgage: What Is It and Is It for Me?

5/1 ARM mortgage
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Finding the right mortgage can be a confusing process, especially for first-time homebuyers. There are so many options that it can be hard for a consumer to know how to get the optimal rate and terms.

One way to get a better initial interest rate is by taking out a 5/1 ARM mortgage. Small wonder that many potential borrowers want to know what makes a 5/1 ARM mortgage so unique and whether it might be the right loan for them.

Below is a guide to how 5/1 ARM mortgages work, how they are different from traditional 15- and 30-year mortgages, and what pros and cons consumers need to understand.

How a 5/1 ARM works

A 5/1 ARM mortgage, as explained by MagnifyMoney’s parent company, LendingTree, is a type of adjustable-rate mortgage (hence, the ARM part) that begins with a fixed interest rate for the first five years. Then, once that time has elapsed, the interest rate becomes variable. A variable rate means your interest rate can change. Consequently, so can your payment.

The number “5” in “5/1 ARM” means that your interest rate is fixed for five years. The number “1” in “5/1 ARM” means your interest rate could change each year after the first five years have passed.

Interest rates are based on an index, which is a benchmark rate used by lenders to set their rates. An index is based on broad market conditions and investment returns in the U.S.. Thus, your bank can adjust its interest rates at any point that the benchmark rate changes or if there are major fluctuations in the U.S. stock market.

What’s fixed? What’s adjustable?

Fixed-rate mortgages have the same interest rate for the duration of the mortgage loan. The most common loan periods for these are 15- and 30-year.

Because a 15-year fixed rate mortgage is, obviously, for a shorter term than a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, you will likely pay much less interest over time. However, as a result, you will have a higher monthly mortgage payment since the loan payoff period is condensed to 15 years.

Adjustable-rate mortgages like the 5/1 ARM loan mentioned above have a fixed interest rate for the beginning of the loan and then a variable rate after the initial fixed-rate period.

The chart below shows an example of the same house with three different types of mortgages.

As you can see below, the 15-year fixed rate mortgage has a lower interest rate, but a much higher payment. The 5/1 ARM has the lowest interest rate of all, but once that interest rate becomes variable, the lower rate is not guaranteed. This is one of the cons of a 5/1 ARM mortgage, which will be outlined in the next section.

Mortgage snapshot

Here is an example of three different types of mortgage payments for someone taking out a $200,000 mortgage. The chart below makes the assumption that the fictional person this is for has a high credit score and qualifies for good interest rates.

 

Interest Rate

Monthly payment

Principal Paid
After 5 Years

Total Interest Cost
After 5 Years

30-year fixed

3.625%

$912.10

$20,592.12

$35,046.14

15-year fixed

3.0%

$1,403

$57,987.88

$26,263.08

5/1 ARM

2.875%

$829.78

$22,595.20

$27,191.90

The pros and cons of 5/1 ARM mortgages

The pros

The biggest advantage of a 5/1 ARM mortgage is that interest rates are typically lower for the first five years of the loan than they would be with a typical 15- or 30-year fixed-rate deal. This allows the homeowner to put more of the monthly payment toward the principal balance on the home, which is a good way to gain equity in the property.

The 5/1 ARM mortgage commonly has a lifetime adjustment cap, which means that even though the rate is variable, it can never go higher than that cap. That way, your lender can tell you what your highest monthly payment will be in the future should your interest rate ever reach that point.

The cons

As mentioned above, the con of a 5/1 ARM mortgage is the whole “adjustable” component. Once you get past the five-year term, there will be uncertainty. Every year after the fifth year of your mortgage, the rate can adjust and keep adjusting.

There is a way around this. You can refinance your mortgage after the five years and secure a new mortgage with a fixed rate. But be warned: Refinancing comes with fees. You will have to calculate on your own whether or not the savings you derive from a lower payment for five years is worthwhile as you measure it against the cost of refinancing to a fixed-rate loan.

That’s why it’s important to know how long you want to live in your home and whether or not you’ll want to sell your home when you move (as opposed to, say, renting it out).

A 5/1 mortgage is right for …

“For certain people, like first-time homebuyers, 5/1 ARM mortgages are very useful,” Doug Crouse, a senior loan officer with nearly 20 years of experience in the mortgage industry, tells MagnifyMoney.

Here are the types of people who could benefit from a 5/1 ARM mortgage:

  • First-time homebuyers who are planning to move within five years.
  • Borrowers who will pay off their mortgages very quickly.
  • Borrowers who take out a jumbo mortgage.

Crouse explains that with some first-time homebuyers, the plan is to move after a few years. This group can benefit from lower interest rates and lower monthly payments during those early years, before the fixed rate changes to a variable rate.

Mindy Jensen, who is the community manager for BiggerPockets, an 800,000-person online community of real estate investors, agrees. “You can actually use a 5/1 ARM to your advantage in certain situations,” Jensen tells MagnifyMoney.

For example, Jensen mentions a 5/1 ARM could work well for someone who wants to pay down a mortgage very, very quickly. After all, if you know you’re going to pay off your loan early, why pay more interest to your lender than you have to?

“Homeowners who are looking to make very aggressive payments in order to be mortgage-free can use the 5/1 ARM” to their advantage, she explains. “The lower initial interest rate frees up more money to make higher principal payments.”

Another group that can benefit from 5/1 ARM mortgages, Crouse says, is those who take out or refinance jumbo mortgages.

For these loans, a 5/1 ARM makes the first few years of mortgage payments lower because of the lower interest rate. This, in turn, means that the initial payments will be much more affordable for these higher-end properties.

Plus, if buyers purchased these more expensive homes in desirable areas where home prices are projected to rise quickly, it’s possible the value of their home could soar in the first few years while they make lower payments. Then, they can sell after five years and hopefully make a profit. Keep in mind that real estate is a risky investment and nothing is guaranteed.

The 5/1 isn’t right for …

Long-term home buyers who plan to stay put for the long haul probably won’t benefit from a 5/1 ARM loan, experts say. “An adjustable-rate mortgage loan is a bad idea for anyone who sees their home as a long-term choice,” Jensen says.

Crouse echoes the sentiment: “If someone plans to stay in their home for longer than five years, this might not be the best option for them.”

Jensen adds that homeowners should consider whether or not they want to be landlords in the future. If you decide to move out of your home but keep the mortgage and rent a property, it won’t be so beneficial to sign up for a 5/1 ARM loan.

Questions to ask yourself

If, after reading this guide, you think a 5/1 ARM mortgage might be right to you, go through this list of questions to be sure. Remember, you can also consult with your lender.

  • How long do I want to live in this home?
  • Will this home suit my family if my family grows?
  • Is there a chance I could get transferred with my job?
  • How often does the rate adjust after five years?
  • When is the adjusted rate applied to the mortgage?
  • If I want to refinance after five years, what is the typical cost of a refinance?
  • How comfortable am I with the uncertainty of a variable rate?
  • Do I want to rent my house if I decide to move?

Hopefully these questions and this guide can aid you in reaching a sensible decision.

The post The 5/1 ARM Mortgage: What Is It and Is It for Me? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

What is PITI? 

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If you’re getting ready to buy a home, you might hear the term “PITI” from your real estate professional. You might also come across it in emails with your lender or read it in your mortgage paperwork.

So what is PITI? Simply put, it’s an acronym that describes the four key components of your monthly housing costs as a homeowner. 

Specifically, PITI stands for: principal, interest, taxes and insurance.

Many people make the mistake of comparing the cost of their monthly rent and utilities with a monthly mortgage and interest payment. In this kind of flawed comparison, owning a home can often seem like the better deal. 

However, as evidenced by PITI, there is more to owning a home than paying a mortgage plus interest. Not even addressing utilities, you also have to factor in property taxes and insurance, which can definitely increase your monthly payments.  

That’s why it’s important to use a PITI loan calculator, like this one from our parent company LendingTree, and speak to your lender to find out what your actual PITI payments will be. Only then will you have a comprehensive idea of the true cost of homeownership. 

To help you get there, we’ll go into more detail below about each of these four components of a mortgage and what to consider before you buy a home. 

Principal 

Your home’s principal is the base amount of money you borrowed to buy it. So, if you financed $200,000 for a home, you have $200,000 of principal left to pay off. 

It’s very important to note that your entire mortgage payment will not be applied to your principal balance. Only a portion of it will. The rest of your mortgage payment will go toward interest, taxes and insurance. If you want to pay down your mortgage faster, you’ll have to send in extra payments and instruct your mortgage company to apply that cash to the principal, not toward future interest. 

Interest 

Interest is the cost you pay for taking out a loan. The bank charges you for lending you money in the form of interest. After all, if it lends you X dollars, that’s X dollars it can’t use itself. So there is a cost associated with lending. You’ll normally see interest in percentage form. (The interest rate on this loan is 4 percent.)  

Still, it can be difficult to understand how to calculate your interest rate and how that affects your mortgage payment. Here are some of the ways to determine your interest costs: 

There is also a difference between your mortgage interest rate and your APR. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, your APR (annual percentage rate) includes your mortgage interest and other charges like fees. So be sure to ask your lender to see your APR so you can get a sense of the total cost of your mortgage. Knowing APR is also a good tool to use to properly compare lenders, because some lenders charge higher fees than others even if they’re offering the same loan amount. 

Lastly, your interest payment will not be the same every month. This is called amortization, the gradual reduction of a debt by regular scheduled payments of interest and principal. Many first-time homeowners are surprised at how much of their mortgage payment goes toward interest and not principal. In order to plan ahead, ask your lender for a sample amortization schedule so you can get an idea of how much of your monthly payments will go toward interest and how much will apply to principal over time. As you pay down your interest costs, you’ll start to see the principal balance reduce more and more. 

Taxes

As a homeowner, you pay property taxes on your home. These funds are used to fund your local communities, including your local public schools, fire departments, police forces, libraries and more. 

Here is some information on property taxes and how your city determines them: 

  • Property taxes vary from one state to the next. 
  • A local tax assessor will determine your local property tax, but has no control over your state tax rate. You can also look up how to calculate property taxes to find out more information about your own home. 
  • You can check your property tax assessment every year to make sure there are no errors on it. In some areas, you’ll have an updated assessment every year, but in others, it could be every few years. 
  • There are many factors that impact your property tax rate. Some of these factors include improvements to your property, the price of similar homes in your area, and even things not related to your home, like state and local budget cuts 

Luckily, the property taxes you pay are often an income tax deduction, so that is one benefit to homeownership. 

Insurance 

The amount of insurance you pay as a homeowner really depends on where you live, how  much of a down payment you gave your lender, and what type of coverage you want or need. Below are three examples of common types of insurance that homeowners carry:  

  • Homeowners insurance: Homeowners insurance typically protects your home against damage caused by things like a house fire. Most homebuyers put their insurance payments in an escrow account ahead of time. Then, your bank uses the funds you put in the account to pay the insurance on your behalf. 
  • Flood insurance: Not all homeowners buy flood insurance. This will really depend on where your home is, and whether there’s a risk of flooding from hurricanes or being in a low-lying area. It’s important to do your research and get a flood certificate to find out if the property is located on a floodplain.  
  • Private mortgage insurance: If you can’t put 20 percent down on your house, some banks (but not all) will require you to pay for private mortgage insurance, also known as PMI. Some types of mortgages, like FHA loans, require such insurance.

    What is not included in PITI payments? 

Although PITI is comprehensive when considering how much it will cost you to own and operate your home, there are some other costs that aren’t factored in.

Below are some examples.

  • Utilities: Your utilities might include electricity, natural gas, water, trash collection and the like. 
  • Recurring subscriptions: Have you factored in things like cable, phone, internet, Netflix, etc. 
  • Homeowners association fees: If you live in a condo or in a neighborhood that shares the costs associated with common spaces or services, you might have to pay an HOA fee on top of your PITI costs. 
  • Home improvements: If you want to upgrade some part of your home, this will be an added cost. 
  • Home maintenance costs: You can predict basic home maintenance costs, like cutting the grass or fixing a leaky faucet. You can’t predict some of the larger expenses, like those arising from termite damage or a broken hot water heater.This is why it’s important to have an emergency fund before buying a home.

    Ryan Inman, a Las Vegas based financial adviser, often works with young families and potential homeowners. He says it’s important to pay attention to the non-PITI costs mentioned above. “My best advice to first-time homebuyers is to compare the amount of rent and utilities you are paying now with how much PITI, HOA fees and utilities will be on a home,” he tells MagnifyMoney. 

“Save the difference for three to six months, and see how your lifestyle is affected. 

The key to Inman’s strategy is figuring out if you can maintain a comfortable lifestyle (no dramatic changes or sacrifices) on your mock homeowner’s budget. If it’s no problem, then you might be ready for homeownership.  

“Also, factor in that you will now be responsible for maintaining the home,” he adds. “There is no rule for how much this can be,” since it really depends on the age and quality of the home, “but it could be costly.” 

Next steps: 

Now that you understand more about what PITI stands for and represents, it’s time to do your research. Remember, you can calculate your total mortgage PITI payment by using a PITI payment calculator 

When you get your results using the PITI payment calculator, don’t forget to add in the uncounted items mentioned above, like home maintenance costs and utilities. 

It’s also important to have a cash buffer for unexpected emergencies so you don’t go into debt fixing a flooded basement or addressing significant damage from a storm. 

If you do all of this, you’ll have an excellent idea of what your cost of homeownership will be. If you feel comfortable with this cost and are convinced you’re set to handle anything unexpected that might pop up, then you’re well on your way to becoming an owner. 

The post What is PITI?  appeared first on MagnifyMoney.