Is it Possible to Refinance a Personal Loan?

refinance a personal loan
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Trapped in a personal loan with a high interest rate or a massive monthly payment? It is possible to refinance to a loan that better suits your financial needs. We’ll explain how to refinance a personal loan and pitfalls to avoid when refinancing unsecured debt.

Is it possible to refinance a personal loan?

Refinancing a personal loan involves taking out a new loan to pay off an existing personal loan. Some people will refinance by negotiating new loan terms with their existing lender. However, many people refinance by taking out a new loan from a different lender. They use the proceeds of the loan to payoff their current loan.

It’s important to note that many lenders don’t advertise personal loan refinancing. However, you shouldn’t necessarily exclude them from your loan refinance search.

For example, a company spokesperson from SoFi (one of our top-rated personal loan issuers) explains that it treats all personal loans like incremental debt. If the company believes you can handle the payments on both your existing loan and your new loan, you may qualify for the new personal loan. On the other hand, Lightstream, a division of SunTrust Bank, specifically offers personal loan refinancing. Lightstream prices loans differently based on their intended use. Either company could be a great option to refinance your personal loan.

Depending on your income, your credit score, and your credit usage you may find a great rate at any number of personal loan companies.

When does it make sense to refinance a personal loan?

Refinancing your personal loan generally makes sense when the new loan comes with better terms or you need to refinance in order to remove a cosigner.

For example, your credit may have improved or your income increased significantly enough that you may qualify for a loan with a better APR. On the other hand, you may be struggling to meet your monthly payments and want to take out a new personal loan with lower monthly payments and a longer loan term.

“It could make sense to refinance almost any time if you can get better terms,” says Todd Nelson, business development officer for Lightstream, a division of SunTrust Bank. “Less interest is always a good thing.”

How to refinance a personal loan

No matter your goal, you’ll want to take a few steps to make sure that you get the best possible deal on your new loan.

Understand your existing loan

Before you pay off an old loan, check whether your loan has prepayment penalties, so you can factor any penalties into your loan analysis. Most banks do not charge prepayment penalties for personal loans, but those that do will typically charge a set fee for paying off a loan early. The terms and conditions of your loan will outline whether or not you have to pay a prepayment penalty. If you don’t understand the terms, you can talk to your lender to clarify the rules.

In addition to understanding your prepayment penalties, you’ll want to know your interest rate, the time remaining on your loan, and the required monthly payment. Refinancing your loan may affect all three of these numbers.

Get your credit in order

Once you understand your existing loan, you’ll want to check your credit score. You may need to make some efforts to clean up your credit before applying for a loan refinance. In particular, removing errors from your credit report and paying down credit card debt may help to improve your odds of approval. If possible, avoid applying for additional loans for three to six months before you refinance your personal loan. Applying for multiple lines of credit in a short time period makes you look like a worse credit risk according to the Fair Isaac Corporation, which creates the FICO® scores that are widely used in lending decisions.

Although your credit score matters, it’s not the only factor lenders will consider when setting your loan rate. “A great credit score doesn’t mean you’ll get the best rate,” Nelson cautions. Lenders will also consider your existing debt load, your income and how you’ve used debt in the past.

Prepare a budget

Refinancing a debt means your monthly payment will change. You’ll want to be sure that you can handle the change by preparing a budget. You need to know how much you can realistically pay each month, so you can continue to make timely payments every month.

Start shopping around for a new loan

Once you have your finances in order, you’ll want to start shopping for new loans. A great place to start is with LendingTree, where you can fill out a short online form and potentially get quotes from several lenders at once. LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

LEARN MORE

If you don’t see banks offering better terms, you may want to stick with your current loan until you pay it off.

Apply for multiple loans

When you see the potential for savings, start applying for new personal loans. When you apply for a new personal loan, you will see a hard credit inquiry on your credit report. The more places you apply, the more credit inquiries you’ll see.

However, multiple credit inquiries won’t destroy your credit if you apply within a few weeks.
According to the credit reporting bureau Experian, “Generally, credit scoring models will count multiple hard inquiries for the same type of credit product as a single event as long as they occur in a short window of a few weeks.”

When you apply for a personal loan refinance, you’ll need all your personal identification documents, and you may need proof of income (such as a pay stub, W-2 form or a tax return).

Check out our list of the best personal loans for 2017.

Choose the best offer

Once you have a few offers in hand, you’ll want to compare them to see which is the best deal for you.

You can use this calculator to compare the interest you expect to pay on your existing loan (use your current balance, current interest rate, and current monthly payment at the top) with the interest and fees you’ll pay on a new personal loan.

When you find the best offer, you can accept the loan terms with your new lender.

Pay off your old loan

The process for paying off your old loan will vary by lender. According to Nelson from Lightstream, lenders who work with high-credit-score applicants will generally deposit the funds into your checking or savings account. Then it’s up to you to pay off your existing debt.

In general, you can close your old debt by making a payment through the Bill Pay portal on your lender’s website. After you make the payment, you should see a balance of $0. You can call your lender to be sure that the final payment is processed and the loan is closed.

Lenders that work with subprime borrowers may pay off the old debt directly. In those cases, you should still call the lender to confirm that your old debt is closed.

Shopping for lower interest rates

If you’re looking for a lower interest rate, you’ll probably find a better personal loan in one of two circumstances. First, you may find a better interest rate if your credit score improved since taking out the loan. The more your credit score improved, the more likely you are to see great refinancing options.

You may also find a better interest rate if you didn’t originally shop around. In this situation, it may pay off to compare personal offers from a few different lenders. You may be surprised by how low your rate can go.

Of course, a lower interest rate doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily save money when you refinance your personal loan. You will want to do the math the following to see if you will actually save money with a refinance. If the origination fees and the total cost of interest are lower than the remaining interest on your loan, it makes sense to refinance the loan.

Finding lower monthly payments

Anyone looking to lower their monthly payments will usually want to refinance to a longer loan. While credit score improvements may lower your monthly payment a little, spreading the payments over a longer period lowers the payments even more.

If you’re facing a pinched cash flow, refinancing to a longer loan may make sense (especially if you can combine it with a better interest rate). The problem with refinancing to a longer loan is that you’ll generally pay more interest in the long run. Use this personal loan calculator to see how much more you’ll pay over time.

Taking out a larger loan

Some people consider refinancing a personal loan when they want to take on a bigger loan for an upcoming expense, or to consolidate additional debt. Refinancing makes sense if the new loan has a lower interest rate. In general, you want to keep your loan at the lowest interest rate possible, even if that means having two payments. If you want to take on more debt, be sure your budget can handle the added expense. Create a debt payoff plan before you take on any new debts.

When to avoid refinancing a personal loan

Even with lenders offering tantalizingly low interest rates, refinancing a personal loan doesn’t always make sense.

Refinancing isn’t cost-effective

For example, you don’t want to choose a new loan if it won’t save you money. This calculator can help you compare your current costs to the interest and fees you’ll pay if you choose to refinance. High origination fees may keep an otherwise attractive offer from being cost-effective.

Aggressive debt payoff

Refinancing a personal loan may backfire if you’re on an aggressive debt payoff plan. A loan with an origination fee may require several months of standard payments to reach a break-even point. This refinance calculator can help you determine how long it takes to reach the break-even point. (Use a tax rate of 0 percent.)

When you don’t have a debt payoff plan

Some people feel tempted to refinance a personal loan when their budget gets tight, and the monthly payments feel high. A personal loan refinance could be a smart financial move, but the refinance needs to be part of your comprehensive money management strategy. Before refinancing, create a realistic debt payoff plan.

Things to watch out for

In general, personal loans are straightforward, but you should beware of these personal loan traps (especially if you’re trying to refinance a subprime personal loan).

Prepayment penalties: Most major banks don’t charge prepayment penalties, but before you refinance, you’ll want to check your existing loan, too, to make sure one isn’t lurking in the fine print. A prepayment penalty may negate some of the savings you get from lowering your interest rate.

Credit insurance: Some lenders will try to get you to buy life insurance to cover the cost of the loan if you die. In general, this is not a good value. In fact, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has adopted measures that restrict the sale of credit insurance. However, you may still hear a pitch for the product.

It makes a lot of sense to have some level of insurance in place to cover your debts if you’re married, lose a job, etc. However, an inexpensive term life policy is a far better value than a loan specific policy. Job loss credit insurance may be a more compelling product, but it can be very expensive. Be sure to weigh the cost of the insurance before purchasing it.

Origination fees: Many personal loans come with origination fees, which can be as high as 8 percent of the loan’s value. That makes taking out a new loan an expensive proposition. Compare the remaining interest on your loan to the cost of the origination fee plus the interest cost of the new loan before deciding to refinance.

Late payment fees: Some lenders will charge you a late fee if you miss your payment date. Late fees can drive up your loan costs in a hurry. Anyone who has struggled with payments in the past will want to check this fee before refinancing.

Alternatives to refinancing a personal loan

Refinancing a personal loan to another personal loan isn’t always the cheapest option. If you’ve got great credit, or you own a home you might find cheap options to eliminate your debt.

Balance transfer credit cards

Some credit card companies will allow you to transfer a personal loan balance to a promotional 0 percent intro APR balance transfer credit card. This can be a quick way to drop your interest rate in a hurry.

Before you apply for a balance transfer credit card, you’ll want to check on a few things. First, you won’t want to apply for a credit card from a bank that holds your debt. For example, you won’t want to opt for the Citi Simplicity® credit card if a Citi Affiliate owns your debt.

It’s also important to clarify that the credit card company will allow you to transfer a personal loan balance to your credit card. For example, the Chase Slate® card does not allow you to transfer personal loan balances to your credit card.

You can generally learn more about a lender’s balance transfer policy by reading their terms and conditions page in a section entitled Balance Transfers. However, if the terms aren’t clear, you should take the time to call a bank representative before applying.

A balance transfer credit card is an appropriate solution for people who can pay down their personal loan debt before the introductory rate expires.

HELOCs

Homeowners who have equity in their house may also find that a HELOC, or home equity line of credit, offers better terms than their existing personal loan. A HELOC has tax-deductible interest, and it operates like a line of credit. You can use a HELOC to pay off higher interest debts, or to pay for other important expenses. However, you need to be careful not to treat a HELOC as free money. You still need to pay off your HELOC in time.

The post Is it Possible to Refinance a Personal Loan? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

The Ultimate Guide to Obamacare (Updated for 2018)

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Since Obamacare (or, as it’s officially known, ACA, the Affordable Care Act) created the first federal health insurance marketplace in 2013, some 20 million Americans have become newly insured.

Consumers who don’t qualify for Medicaid or Medicare or who don’t have private insurance through their employer can shop for health coverage either through the federal marketplace — HealthCare.gov — or by way of their state’s exchange.

This year, ACA applicants will have to wade through an average of 30 plans from two or three different insurers to make their insurance choice. The open enrollment period for Obamacare coverage begins Nov. 1 and ends Dec. 15, with coverage due to begin Jan. 1, 2018.

That’s where this guide will come in handy. We will explain exactly what it’s like to enroll, what documents you should have on hand, and, of course, how to sort through all the health insurance options you may find.

Have any burning Obamacare questions? Send us a note at info@magnifymoney.com.

Part I: What is Obamacare?

Most people use the blanket term “Obamacare” when they talk about President Barack Obama’s signature health care legislation, 2010’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA touched almost every aspect of the health insurance industry. It had implications for employer-run health insurance plans. For government health plans, too.

One of the most visible features of the ACA was the creation of federal and state health care exchanges that sell health insurance to people who don’t have affordable coverage through other means. Many people who buy health insurance through the exchanges say they purchased Obamacare plans.

Some of the important features of these plans include:

  • Accessibility: All Americans may purchase health insurance through a federal or state-run health exchange even if they have a pre-existing condition.
  • Standardization: All health insurance plans must cover preventive care at 100 percent, and they must cover the costs associated with most medical procedures.
  • Affordability: The ACA offers tax credits and cost-reduction subsidies to limit the monthly premium costs for people earning less than 400 percent of the federal poverty line. Insurers may use age and smoking status to set monthly premium costs, but no other factors may be considered.

It’s also important to note that the ACA has a requirement called the individual mandate. You must get health insurance coverage, or you will most likely pay a penalty at tax time. You can get qualified health insurance through your employer or a government program. However, if you don’t get it there or through some other source, you will need to purchase an Obamacare plan or pay that penalty.

Who can buy insurance through a health care exchange?

Most Americans can purchase health insurance through a health care exchange. If you do not receive insurance through your employer and you don’t qualify for Medicaid or Medicare, then you are likely eligible.

Most long-term, legal immigrants to the United States may purchase insurance. HealthCare.gov maintains a comprehensive list of qualified immigration statuses for purchasing insurance through the marketplace.

Most large employers and some midsize or small companies offer health insurance benefits to their employees. If your employer offers affordable health insurance to you (costing less than 9.56 percent of your total income), you will not qualify for health insurance subsidies through the exchanges.

Incarcerated people and those living outside the United States cannot purchase insurance through the marketplace.

Part II: Obamacare costs and tax subsidies

One major factor to consider when weighing the options is your expected tax subsidy. Most people buying insurance through the health care exchanges will qualify for a health insurance subsidy. This subsidy is applied in the form a credit that immediately reduces the cost of your Obamacare plan coverage.

According to a study from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services, 84 percent of people who purchased insurance through a health care exchange qualified for a health insurance subsidy in 2017. The average subsidy was about $371 in 2017.

With the subsidy applied, nearly eight out of 10 (77 percent) health insurance purchasers paid less than $100 a month for their health insurance premiums in 2016.

To qualify for a subsidy, you must meet three standards:

  1. You must not have access to affordable insurance through an employer (including a spouse’s boss).
    1. Affordable insurance for 2018 is defined as individual coverage through an employer that costs less than 9.56 percent of your household’s income.
    2. You can check that your insurance offers minimum-value coverage by having your human resources representative fill out this form.
  2. You must have a household modified adjusted gross income between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty line.
    1. You can calculate modified adjusted gross income using this formula:
      1. Adjusted gross income (Form 1040 Line 37) +
        Nontaxable Social Security benefits (Form 1040 Line 20a minus 20b) +
        Tax-exempt interest (Form 1040 Line 8b) +
        Foreign earned income and housing expenses for Americans living abroad (Form 2555)
  3. You’re not eligible for coverage through Medicaid, Medicare, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) or other types of public assistance. Some states have expanded Medicaid to anyone who earns up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line.

How can I calculate my subsidy?

The easiest way to calculate the subsidy you will receive is to use a subsidy estimator from HealthCare.gov or the Kaiser Family Foundation. Both calculators estimate your subsidy based on the information you provide. They also help you understand what factors affect your subsidy estimations.

Your income, household size and the cost of premiums in your state factor into your subsidy. Premium tax credits can help reduce the amount that you will spend on monthly premiums to a set percentage of your income. You will receive the same subsidy, no matter which plan you ultimately choose.

Below you can see the maximum amount you will spend on insurance premiums (for a silver plan) based on your income.

Income (based on 2017 federal poverty line)

Max monthly Silver Plan premium cost after subsidies

Special notes


Lower 48 states:
$12,060-$16,702



Alaska:
$15,060-$20,857



Hawaii:
$13,860-$19,195


Lower 48 states:
$20.20-$46.21



Alaska:
$25.23-$57.70



Hawaii:
$23.22-$53.11

Check if you qualify for expanded Medicaid.


Lower 48 states:
$16,703-$30,209



Alaska:
$20,858-$37,724



Hawaii:
$19,196-$34,718


Lower 48 states:
$47.05-$203.91



Alaska:
$58.75-$254.64



Hawaii:
$54.07-$234.35

You will qualify for cost-reduction subsidies if you purchase a silver plan.


Lower 48 states:
$30,210-$48240



Alaska:
$37,725-$60,240



Hawaii:
$34,719-$55,440


Lower 48 states:
$203.92-$384.31



Alaska
$254.65-$479.91



Hawaii:
$234.36-$441.67

If you earn more than 400% of the poverty line, you will not qualify for subsidies.

Income (Based on 2017 federal poverty line)

Max monthly Silver Plan premium cost after subsidies

Special notes


Lower 48 states:
$24,600-$34,069



Alaska:
$30,750-$42,587



Hawaii:
$28,290-$39,179


Lower 48 states:
$41.21-$94.26



Alaska:
$51.51-$117.82



Hawaii:
$47.39-$108.39

Children will qualify for CHIP. Check if you qualify for expanded Medicaid.


Lower 48 states:
$34,070-$49,200



Alaska:
$42,588-$61,500



Hawaii:
$39,180-$56,580


Lower 48 states:
$95.97-$259.94



Alaska:
$119.96-$324.93



Hawaii:
$110.36-$298.93

Children in 46 states will qualify for CHIP. You may qualify for extra savings if you purchase a silver plan.


Lower 48 states:
$49,201-$61,621



Alaska:
$61,501-$77,027



Hawaii:
$56,581-$70,864


Lower 48 states:
$259.95-$415.94



Alaska:
$324.93-$519.92



Hawaii:
$298.94-$478.33

In some states, children will qualify for CHIP. You may qualify for extra savings if you purchase a silver plan.


Lower 48 states:
$61,622-$98,400



Alaska:
$77,028-$123,000



Hawaii:
$70,865-$113,160


Lower 48 states:
$415.96-$783.92



Alaska:
$519.94-$979.90



Hawaii:
$478.35-$901.51

In a limited number of states, children qualify for CHIP up to 375% of the poverty line. If you earn more than 400% of the poverty line, you will not qualify for subsidies.

What circumstances might affect my eligibility for a subsidy?

Your subsidy can change if your circumstances change. It’s important to plan for such circumstances.

(Read ahead: “What happens if I don’t qualify for a subsidy?”)

Families with children:

Instead, they will receive free or low-cost insurance through CHIP. You can enroll your children in CHIP through the health insurance marketplace, or by calling 1-800-318-2596. You may need to speak with a Medicaid agent in your state to see if you qualify. You can also learn more about CHIP through InsureKidsNow.gov.

Your children may qualify for CHIP even if you and your spouse qualify for an employer-sponsored health insurance plan, though this rule varies by state. In some states, families that have children and employer-based coverage may receive financial assistance to purchase the coverage.

CHIP does not have enrollment deadlines, so you can apply at any time.

Families where one spouse has work coverage:

Some employers only offer health insurance to their employees. Spouses and children cannot get covered. In that case, you can buy insurance with a subsidy through the marketplace.

Families with expensive employer coverage:

If you can purchase family coverage through your or your spouse’s employer, then you will not qualify for subsidies. If an employee can gain individual coverage for himself or herself for less than 9.56 percent of total household income, the insurance is considered affordable. Coverage for the family isn’t factored into the affordability calculation.

This so-called “family glitch” affects two million to four million people and requires them to pay high prices for premiums. If you are caught in this situation, your children may qualify for CHIP. However, uncovered spouses and children must purchase insurance or pay the individual mandate penalty unless coverage for the family costs more than 8.05 percent of your household income. Even in those cases, you will still not qualify for premium assistance.

Senator Al Franken, D-Minn., has proposed a Family Coverage Act that may rectify the tax code, but it has not been passed.

Individuals getting married in 2018:

If you’re getting married next year, your subsidy depends on your combined income. In the months preceding your marriage, your income is one-half of your and your spouse’s combined income. Once you get married, your subsidy is based on your joint income and your qualifying family.

You need to report a marriage to be eligible for a special enrollment period on HealthCare.gov or through your state’s insurance exchange.

Individuals getting divorced in 2018:

If you get divorced or legally separated in 2018, you must sign up for a new health insurance plan after you separate. Your subsidy will be based on your income and household size at the end of the year. However, you will need to count subsidies received during your marriage differently than subsidies received when you’re legally separated.

For the months you are married, each spouse divides advanced subsidies received to each new household. If spouses cannot agree on a percentage, the default is 50 percent. If the plan only covered one taxpayer and his or her dependents, then the advanced tax credits apply 100 percent to that spouse.

Divorce reduces your income, but it also reduces your household size. These factors change your estimated subsidy. How much will depend on the magnitude of each change.

Reporting a divorce makes you eligible for a special enrollment period. When you enroll in a new plan, the exchange website will help you estimate your new subsidy for the remainder of the year.

Giving birth or adopting a child:

You have 60 days from the birth or adoption of your child to enroll him/her in a health care plan. If you miss this window, your child will not have health coverage, and you will pay a penalty. However, if you enroll your child in a timely manner, you can expect your subsidy to increase.

Report the birth or adoption of a child to be eligible for a special enrollment period on HealthCare.gov or via your state’s insurance exchange.

A newborn or adopted child may be eligible for CHIP rather than subsidized health insurance.

Turning 26:

If you’re on your parents’ insurance, generally you can stay until you have turned 26, but you should check your plan to be sure. You will have a 60-day special enrollment period to get your own plan from the health care exchange when you turn 26.

You may also be eligible for a special enrollment period from an employer-sponsored health plan. If you fail to have health insurance for more than three months, you will pay a penalty.

Losing employer coverage:

If you lose employer-based health coverage, you can either enroll in COBRA or purchase a plan through the health care exchange. Once you enroll in COBRA, you become ineligible to purchase subsidized coverage through the exchange.

You need to report job status changes to be eligible for a special enrollment period on HealthCare.gov or your state’s insurance exchange.

Changes in income:

Premium tax credits are based on your annual income. If you increase your income, you will be expected to pay back some or all of the advance premium you received. If you earn more than 401 percent of the federal poverty line, all premiums need to be repaid. If you earn less than 400 percent of the federal poverty line, you may have to pay back $2,500 of advanced premiums per family or $1,250 for individuals.

You need to report income changes to avoid under- or overpaying on your premiums throughout the year.

Moving states or counties:

Most insurance plans that you purchase through the marketplace are state- and county-specific. If you move, you need to report the relocation through the insurance exchange. You may have to change insurance plans after moving. Moving to Alaska or Hawaii will allow you to claim a greater subsidy amount than you can claim in the lower 48 states. If you move from Alaska or Hawaii, you can continue to claim the higher subsidy amount for the whole year.

Part III: Bronze, silver, gold, platinum: Choosing the right Obamacare plan for your needs

The health care exchanges — both federal- and state-run — classify health insurance plans into four categories: bronze, silver, gold, and platinum. Metal categories are based on how you and your plan split the costs of your health care.

According to a 2016 study by the Department of Health and Human Services, 76 percent of consumers who bought a silver plan in 2016 stood to save an average of $58 a month by switching to the lowest-premium plan in 2017.

But that doesn’t meant the cheapest plans are necessarily best for you. They often come with higher out-of-pocket expenses, like deductibles, which can make them very expensive if you end up needing lots of medical care through the year.

Think of this way — the higher the premium, the more comprehensive the coverage will be and the lower your out-of-pocket costs. If you expect that you’ll need fairly frequent medical care or treatment, you might be better off choosing a more comprehensive plan despite the higher monthly premium.

Obamacare ‘Metal’ Plans: Explained

Bronze Plan

Cheapest premium, 60% coverage

Bronze health plans offer the least amount of estimated coverage. Insurers expect to cover 60 percent of the health care costs of the typical population. These plans feature the lowest monthly premiums, the highest deductibles and high out-of-pocket maximum expenses. Just under one-quarter (23 percent) of health insurance enrollees opted for a Bronze plan in 2017.

Silver Plan

Moderate premium, 70% coverage

Silver health plans offer moderate estimated coverage. Insurers expect to cover 70 percent of health care costs, and plan members cover the remaining 30 percent. If you qualify for cost-reduction subsidies (also called “extra savings”), you must purchase a silver plan. In 2017, 71 percent of all participants in the health care exchanges opted for a silver plan.

Gold Plan

High premium, 80% coverage

Gold health plans offer high levels of estimated coverage. Insurers expect to cover 80 percent of health care costs, while plan members cover the remaining 20 percent. These plans feature high monthly premiums, but lower deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums. Only 4 percent of all health insurance consumers on the health care exchanged opted for a gold plan in 2017.

Platinum Plan

Highest premium, 90% coverage

Platinum health plans offer the highest level of protection against unexpected medical costs. Insurers expect to cover 90 percent of medical costs, and plan members cover the remaining 10 percent. These plans have the highest monthly premiums and the lowest deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums. Just 1 percent of all health insurance exchange participants purchased a platinum plan in 2017.

Catastrophic Plans

Cheapest premium, lowest coverage

Catastrophic health plans: People under age 30 or with hardship exemptions may purchase individual catastrophic health insurance plans. These plans are not available for families. Catastrophic plans do not have a cost-sharing component. Your out-of-pocket maximum will be $7,350. Once you reach $7,350 in medical expenses, your insurance company will pay the remaining costs.

Catastrophic plans cover most preventive services. Catastrophic plans generally offer the lowest monthly premiums, but you can’t use a premium tax credit to reduce your monthly cost.

Now that you know all the types of plans offered, it’s time to choose the one that fits your needs.

What to consider before choosing a plan

Choosing a health plan can seem like a daunting task, but you can get all the help and information you need to make an informed decision. Your health and your pocketbook matter, and we want to help you protect both.

Your tax subsidy: Before you choose a plan, you’ll decide whether to receive advanced or deferred subsidies.

If you take your subsidy upfront, it will reduce your premiums right away. If you defer it, then it will be given to you as a tax credit when you file your taxes. If you over- or underpay your premiums throughout the year, the will have to reconcile the amount owed at tax time.

Most people with predictable income and household size should take most or all of the subsidy upfront. However, if you expect to undergo a major life change (such as an increase in income, a marriage or a divorce), consider taking less of your subsidy in advance.

Time to shop. For people shopping for 2018 coverage, the average number of plans available is 30. Rather than comparing every plan, we recommend creating criteria around the following variables:

  1. Monthly cost: Consider how the monthly premium will affect your budget. This does not mean you should choose the plan with the lowest premiums, but you should consider the price. People without chronic conditions who have adequate emergency savings may want to at least consider opting for an option with low monthly premiums.
  2. Deductible and co-insurance: Do you have the emergency fund or income you need to cover a small medical emergency? A broken arm, stitches or an unexpected infection can result in hundreds of dollars in medical costs. If you have a high-deductible plan, you’ll need to cover these costs without help from the insurance company. If possible, choose a plan with a deductible that you could comfortably cover out of your savings or income.
  3. Maximum yearly cost: Add the annual cost of your premiums and your out-of-pocket maximum to determine your maximum yearly cost. In a worst-case scenario, this is the amount you will pay out of pocket. People with chronic conditions that require heavy out-of-pocket fees should try to limit their maximum yearly cost. A plan with a higher maximum yearly cost may represent a higher risk.
  4. Services and amenities: All insurance plans from the marketplace cover the same essential health benefits, but some offer more unique services such as medical management programs, vision and dental coverage.
  5. Health savings accounts: If you choose a high-deductible plan, you may want to opt for one lets you contribute to a tax-advantaged health savings account. Any money you contribute to this account (up to annual established limits) reduces your taxable income, and will not be taxed upon withdrawal when it used for medical expenses.
  6. Network of providers. It’s important to be sure that your preferred medical providers contract with the plan you choose. Not every doctor is “in network” with every insurance plan. You can check each plan’s provider directory before making a selection.

Once you have a firm grasp of your particular criteria, look for plans that fit your needs and ignore the rest.

Using the exchange website, you can filter and sort plans based on these factors. Most people need to balance cost and coverage to find a plan that works for them.

If you are part of the minority that need to buy their own health insurance plans, you should know that not every state uses HealthCare.gov to host their state’s health insurance exchange. Residents in the following states should use their specific state exchange to look for health insurance:

California; Colorado; Connecticut; Washington, D.C.; Idaho; Maryland; Massachusetts; Minnesota; New York; Rhode Island; Vermont; Washington.

Part IV: How to enroll in Obamacare

Applying for insurance takes 30-60 minutes if you have all the necessary information in hand.

Your Obamacare enrollment checklist:

  • Names, birthdates and Social Security numbers for all members of the household
  • Document numbers for anyone with legal immigration status
  • Income information for all coverage-holders
  • Information about employer-sponsored health plans
  • Tax return from previous year (to help predict income)
  • Student loan documents
  • Alimony documents
  • Retirement plan documents
  • Health Savings Account documents

State or federal marketplace?

If your state does not offer its own health care exchange, you should use HealthCare.gov. As mentioned in the previous section, each state has the right to choose whether to run its own or use the federally run exchange and some do use their own.

The state-run exchanges perform the same functions as the federally run exchange. They allow you to estimate your tax credit and purchase insurance. As a consumer, you must provide the same information to your state as you would on the federal exchange.

While the online user experience will vary when states adopt their own online marketplace, the Affordable Care Act is a federal law and program. This means that the requirements and benefits do not change from state to state, even if the exchange platform changes.

The website interface for the federal exchange is simple, but answering the questions may be confusing. It’s important to fill out the application as accurately as possible so you can enroll in the best health insurance plan for you.

We’ve done our best to clarify the confusing portions in our step-by-step process below.

Filling out your Obamacare application

Family and household info

Start the application by filling out contact information and basic information about members of your household. Even if a member of your family will not need coverage, include that relative in your application.

The website will help you determine if a member of your household has insurance options outside the health care exchange. It will also help you determine if a person is a dependent. For the purpose of the health care exchange, your family includes all the people included on your income tax filing.

You need to know Social Security numbers, birthdates, immigration and disability status, and whether each household member can purchase health insurance through an employer plan.

Income and deductions

Next you’ll estimate your income for the coming year. Include all the following forms of income:

  • Jobs
  • Self-employment income (net)
  • Social Security benefits
  • Unemployment income
  • Retirement income
  • Pensions
  • Capital gains
  • Investment income
  • Rental/royalty income
  • Farming and fishing income
  • Alimony received

Afterward you’ll enter deductions. The application calls out student loan interest and alimony paid, but you should estimate all “above-the-line deductions” that should be included. These include:

  • Retirement plan contributions: 401(k), 403(b), 457, TSP, SEP-IRA, simple IRA, traditional IRA
  • Contributions to a Health Savings Account
  • Self-employed health insurance premiums
  • Tuition and fees paid
  • Educator expenses (up to $250 per teacher)
  • Half self-employment tax
  • Moving expenses
  • Early-withdrawal penalties from a 1099-INT

Do not double-count income or deductions since you’ll fill out these forms for each person. If you make a mistake, you can edit it when you review your household summary.

Additional information

Finally, you’ll fill out a few other miscellaneous details that will allow the application to confirm that you are eligible for subsidies or marketplace insurance.

It’s especially important that you have accurate information about job-related coverage for you and your family. This information will determine your eligibility for subsidies and other government programs.

Completing Obamacare enrollment

After you complete the application, you can review and submit it. At this point, the system will suggest which members of your household should complete CHIP or Medicaid applications. The remaining family members can enroll in a health insurance plan.

Part V: Where to get help enrolling In Obamacare coverage

Because of the complex nature of the marketplace exchange, there are marketplace navigators. These professionals provide free, unbiased help to consumers who want a hand filling out eligibility forms and choosing plans.

Marketplace navigators. You can find local marketplace navigators through the health care exchange website.

Be advised: The Trump administration has slashed budgets for health care navigators, leading some states to close down the programs altogether. As a result, it may make it difficult to find help locally from a navigator in some states.

Nonprofit organizations. Outside the exchange, nonprofit organizations are working to help people gain coverage by teaching them about their insurance options. Enroll America offers free expert assistance to anyone who makes an appointment. You can use the connector below to make an appointment with one of their experts.

Insurance brokers. Brokers can offer another form of help. Brokers aim to make it easier for consumers to compare insurance plans and apply for coverage. Insurance brokers have relationships with some or all of the insurance companies on the marketplace. Using a broker will not increase the price you pay for a plan, and it will not affect your subsidies. However, here’s another important note: Online brokers may not have 100 percent accuracy regarding a plan’s details. It’s important to visit a plan’s website before you enroll in a plan.

If you want to work with a broker, consider some of these top online brokers. PolicyGenius compares all the plans that meet criteria that you establish, and they serve up the top two plans that meet those criteria. HealthInsurance.com makes applications quick and easy, and the site specializes in special enrollment help.

Medicare plan finder. If you’re over age 65, use Medicare Plan Finder to find a Medicare plan that works for you.

CHIP: Likewise, if you think your children qualify for CHIP, use Insure Kids Now to enroll them in your state’s plan.

PART VI: Frequently asked questions

What happens if I don’t apply for insurance?

In most cases, you must enroll in health insurance or you’ll have to pay a penalty.

The penalty for 2018 hasn’t yet been released, but the 2017 penalty was calculated as the greater of 2.5 percent of your income (up to the national average cost of a bronze plan) or $695 per adult and $347.50 per child (up to $2,085).

This steep penalty means that most people are better off purchasing some health insurance.

However, under certain circumstances you can avoid buying insurance and avoid paying the penalty. These are a few of the most common exemptions:

  • Health care cost-sharing ministry members: Must show evidence of membership
  • Low income, no filing requirement: If you do not earn enough income to file taxes, then you are automatically exempt from paying a noncoverage penalty.
  • Coverage is unaffordable: For 2017, if you, your spouse, or your dependents cannot obtain employer coverage or a bronze plan for less than 8.05 percent of your income (after applicable subsidies), you may opt out of coverage. (However, if your individual coverage from an employer costs less than 9.56 percent of your income, and your employer offers family coverage, nobody in the family will qualify for subsidies).
  • Short coverage gap: You went without insurance for less than three months.
  • Living abroad: No coverage is required if you live abroad for at least 330 days.
  • General hardships:These include homelessness, eviction, foreclosure, unpaid medical bills, domestic violence and more.  (You must get a marketplace exemption.)
  • Unable to obtain Medicaid: If you earn less than 138 percent of the federal poverty line, and your state didn’t expand Medicaid, you don’t have to purchase health insurance.
  • AmeriCorps coverage
  • Members of qualified religious sects: Must be granted exemption through HealthCare.gov.

Although you will not pay a penalty, you may still want to seek out catastrophe insurance or some other coverage to help with high potential health costs.

What happens if my plan was canceled?

For 2018, some insurers dropped their insurance plans from the health care exchange. In some states, major insurers Aetna and Humana are exiting the exchange. As a consumer, you cannot assume that the plan you chose in the past will be around next year.

If you used HealthCare.gov in the past, and your insurance plan remains in place, you’ll automatically be enrolled in the same plan again this year. This is true even if important variables like the deductible and premiums changed from last year.

If your plan was canceled, HealthCare.gov will automatically enroll you into a new health insurance plan with a price and coverage quality comparable to your previous plan’s.

Although the federal exchange will help you opt into a new plan (ensuring that you have some health insurance coverage), it’s far better to select a new plan on your own. You can enroll in a new plan Nov. 1 through Dec. 15. If you do not enroll in a new plan during this time, you will be stuck with the automatic enrollment option.

Whether you’re shopping for a new plan or reviewing an old plan, take these steps before open enrollment ends.

  • Update personal information on your application. Your income, household size, where you live and more will affect plan and subsidy eligibility. It’s important to keep your application up to date. The plan that fit you last year may no longer be appropriate, but you won’t know unless you keep the information current.
  • Review your plan before you re-enroll. You should receive a notification in the mail if your plan has been changed or canceled. Take the time to understand if the changes affect you.
  • Compare plans that fit your needs. Consider enlisting free help from a health care navigator, a nonprofit or a broker to help you decide.
  • Choose the plan that best fits your needs and your budget.

What options do students (and their dependents) have for health insurance?

University students who are enrolled full time have multiple options for health insurance.

Under age 26: All student under age 26 may continue to receive coverage from their parents’ insurance plan even if living in another state. Of course, it may make more sense to gain coverage in the state where you’re living, so review the coverage network with your parents. Many coverage networks only include doctors in a few ZIP codes.

If you visit an out-of-network doctor, you will face higher deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums. As an alternative to staying on your parents’ plan, you can purchase your own health insurance plan through the health care exchanges even if you are a dependent.

Students who are dependents and over age 26 may be required to purchase their own health insurance plans.

University coverage: Many students will opt for a student health plan from their university. In general, student health plans meet minimum qualifying coverage criteria, and are affordable options. However, student health plans are not treated as employer coverage. Because of that, students may still qualify for Medicaid or insurance premiums. Students (especially independent students) should look into these alternatives when reviewing their insurance options.

The spouses and dependents of students must take time to understand their options. These are a few common scenarios:

If a student or spouse has an affordable employer-sponsored plan that covers family members: Student and spouse do not qualify for insurance subsidies or Medicaid. Children may qualify for CHIP. Student and spouse should seek coverage through either the student health plan or the employer-sponsored plan in most cases. All members of the family must have qualified health coverage, or they will pay the individual mandate penalty.

Student health plan doesn’t offer coverage for spouse or dependents, and neither spouse has an employer-sponsored health plan: Spouse and dependents can apply for Medicaid, CHIP or subsidized insurance through the health care exchanges (provided they meet income criteria). Student may choose any coverage option (including Medicaid or subsidized insurance) without paying a penalty.

Student health plan offers coverage of spouse or dependents, and neither spouse has an employer-sponsored health plan: Student, spouse and dependents may purchase the student health plan. They can also apply for Medicaid, CHIP or subsidized insurance through the exchanges (provided they meet income criteria). All family members may choose any coverage option without paying a penalty.

Where if I don’t qualify for a subsidy?

If you don’t qualify for a health insurance subsidy, you can still apply for health insurance through HealthCare.gov or your state’s health insurance exchange. However, some insurers offer more or different options outside the exchange. Anyone who doesn’t qualify for a health insurance subsidy should consider using an online broker instead to look for plans.

People who don’t qualify for a health insurance subsidy should reconsider their health insurance options in 2018. An analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation said that a number of insurers have requested double-digit premium increases for 2018. Based on initial filings, the change in benchmark silver premiums will likely range from -5 to 49 percent across 21 major cities. (These rates are still being reviewed by regulators and may change, the analysis said.)

With rapidly rising costs, enrollees without subsidies may want to consider the lower-cost bronze plans to see if they meet their health insurance needs.

Part VII: The ultimate Obamacare glossary

Understanding basic health insurance terminology can help you make a more informed decision about your options. Here are common terms you should know.

This credit can be taken in advance to offset your monthly premium costs. The subsidy is based on your estimated income and can be taken directly from your insurer when you apply for coverage. You must repay credits if you qualify for a smaller subsidy once taxes have been filed. You can learn more about repayment limitations here.
This program was designed to provide coverage to uninsured children who are low-income but above the cutoff for Medicaid eligibility. The federal government has established basic guidelines, but eligibility and the scope of care and services are determined at the state level. Your children may qualify for CHIP even if you purchase an insurance policy through the health care exchange. You can learn about CHIP eligibility through the marketplace or by viewing this table at Medicaid.gov.
Your share of the costs of a covered health care service. This is the percentage you must pay out of pocket after you have met your annual deductible. You pay a specific coinsurance amount until you meet your out-of-pocket maximum.

If you earn between 100-250 percent of the federal poverty level, you may qualify for additional savings. This extra savings reduces your out-of-pocket maximum, and it offers assistance with copays and coinsurance.

Disclaimer: There is ambiguity surrounding whether or not Congress and the White House will appropriate funds for the cost sharing subsidies. In October, President Trump used an executive order to cut off funding for the subsidies. However, the Affordable Care Act still requires that health insurers must issue them to all people earning 100-250 percent of the federal poverty line. As a result of this Trump executive order, many insurers raised premiums for silver plans. The premium increases will not affect the prices that people with subsidies will pay, but they will affect the prices you pay if you do not qualify for a subsidy.

Until the Affordable Care Act or the cost sharing subsidies are repealed, insurers will continue to pay cost reduction subsidies in 2018.

A fixed amount you pay for a covered medical service, typically when you receive the service or prescription. Also commonly referred to as a “copay.”
The amount you pay for covered health services before your insurer begins to cover part of your costs. According to the IRS, a high-deductible health insurance plan is any plan with a deductible over $1,300 for an individual or $2,700 for a family.
Medical services are only covered if you go to doctors, specialists or hospitals in the plan’s network (except in an emergency).
These plans focus on integrated care and focus on prevention. Usually, coverage is limited to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. Generally, out-of-network care isn’t covered unless there is an emergency.

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) allow you to save and invest money for current or future medical expenses. You do not have to pay any taxes on money you contribute to an HSA, and you can withdraw the money tax- and penalty-free if you use the funds for a qualified medical expense.

You can only contribute to an HSA if your insurance meets the standards for a high-deductible insurance plan. Individuals can contribute up to $3,450 to a health savings account, and families can contribute up to $6,900 in 2018.

If you shop for insurance through Healthcare.gov, plans will indicate whether they are HSA approved. To be an HSA compatible plan, your deductible must be at least $1,350 for an individual or $2,700 for a family. The out of pocket maximums on these plans must be less than $6,650 for an individual or $13,300 for a family.

The out-of-pocket maximums required by the IRS do not line up with Affordable Care Act maximums, so many plans with high deductibles will not allow you to contribute to an HSA. If contributing to an HSA is an important part of your financial plan, be sure to filter for HSA compatibility on HealthCare.gov. And be advised: Not everybody will have an opportunity to purchase a subsidized HSA-compatible health insurance plan.

If you can afford to purchase health insurance and choose not to, you will be charged an individual shared responsibility payment, in the form of a tax penalty. There are a few qualified exemptions, outlined in the guide above, that allow you to avoid the fine. For example, if your employer-sponsored health plan costs more than 8.05 percent for individual coverage, you will not have to pay the fine (though you will not qualify for tax credits).

The fine for 2018 has not yet been released, and Congress has considered removing the individual mandate requirement for 2018. If it is removed, we will update this piece with the required information.

For the 2017 tax year, the individual mandate was calculated two ways:

  1. 2.5 percent of household income (up to the total annual premium for the national average price of the marketplace bronze plan)
    OR
  2. $695 per adult and $347.50 per child (up to $2,085)

You had to pay the greater of the two penalties.

Medicaid: A joint federal and state program that provides health coverage to low-income households, some pregnant women, some elderly Americans and people with disabilities. Medicaid provides a broad level of coverage including preventive care and hospital visits. Some states provide additional benefits as well.

If you were a foster child who “aged out” of foster care, you can continue to receive Medicaid coverage until age 26 with no income limitations.

Medicaid Expansion: Obamacare gives each state the choice to expand Medicaid coverage to people earning less than 138 percent of the federal poverty line. The primary goal of the ACA is reducing the number of uninsured people through both Medicaid and the health insurance marketplace. The Kaiser Family Foundation keeps track of expanded Medicaid coverage by state.

Medicare: Most people who are over age 65 and disabled people who have received Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) payment for 25 months in the United States will qualify for a Medicare Health Insurance Plan. Open enrollment for Medicare, which started Oct. 15, runs through Dec. 7. You can learn more about Medicare plans from the Medicare Plan Finder.

The amount you pay each month for your health insurance.
The highest amount you will pay for covered services in a year. In 2018, all health insurance plans sold through the Federal Health Exchange will have a out-of-pocket limits of $7,350 for an individual or $14,700 for a family plan.
You pay less for medical services if you use providers in the health plan’s network. You need a referral from your primary care doctor to see a specialist.
You pay less for medical services if you use the providers in your plan’s network. You may use out-of-network doctors, specialists or hospitals without a referral. However, there is an additional cost.
All health insurance plans purchased through the health care exchange cover some preventive care benefits without additional costs to you. These benefits include wellness visits, vaccines, contraception and more.
Most insurance plans have preferred pricing with a group of health care providers with whom they have contracted to provide services to members.
The federal subsidy for health insurance that helps eligible individuals or families with low or moderate income afford health insurance purchased through a health insurance marketplace.

The post The Ultimate Guide to Obamacare (Updated for 2018) appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

America’s Super Saving Cities: The regional forces shaping America’s saving landscape

Where do America’s biggest savers live? Using IRS and U.S. Census data, MagnifyMoney created a City Saving Score for over 2,000 U.S. cities to explore which cities have the most savers and which cities have the biggest savings accounts.

On average, 29 percent of Americans who filed tax returns in 2016 earned interest income on their savings. Average interest income was $530 per return, representing 0.8 percent of total reported income. But regional, demographic and economic forces drive some cities to become super savers while others languish behind. Residents of Greenwich, Conn., earned an average of more than $25,000 in interest income per resident, while in Camden, N.J., just 4 percent of the residents had enough savings to require reporting to the IRS.

Why is there so much variation?

In this report, MagnifyMoney reveals America’s super saving cities, and the forces driving their success as savers.

Key Findings

  • Scarsdale and Garden City, N.Y., are tied for #1 as the cities with the biggest savers overall, with a City Saving Score of 99.6 out of 100.
  • Los Altos, Calif., has the highest concentration of savers — 71 percent of residents reported interest income on their tax returns.
  • Greenwich, Conn., residents earned the most from interest on savings — over $25,000 per filer.
  • Among cities with incomes under $150,000 a year, The Villages, Fla., had the biggest savers with a City Saving Score of 98.5.
  • Camden, N.J., had the lowest activity among savers — only 4 percent of residents reported interest income and an average $8 a year in interest.
  • Communities in the New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago metros represented over 75 percent of the top 5 percent of city saving rankings.

Behind the rankings: The ‘City Saving Score’

There is no comprehensive data that shows the average amount Americans are saving at a metro or city level, so we had to get a bit creative to determine where the biggest savers live.

To rank cities, MagnifyMoney created a “City Saving Score.” Using data for over 2,000 cities, MagnifyMoney ranked cities based on three factors:

  • Breadth of community savings (measured by the percentage of all tax returns that declared interest income, ranked by percentile).
  • Dedication to savings relative to income levels (measured by the percentage of total income that came from interest, ranked by percentile).
  • Magnitude of savings in the community (measured by the average interest income per tax return, ranked by percentile).

Top cities for big savers: Scarsdale and Garden City, New York

Scarsdale, N.Y., and Garden City, N.Y., scored the highest marks on our City Saving Score, with scores of 99.6 out of a possible 100.

They have an obvious advantage on the savings front — Scarsdale residents report an average income of more than $450,000 per tax return, putting them in the top 1 percent of earners in the U.S. today.

On average, savers in Scarsdale declared $9,258 in interest income — 17.5 times as much as the average American saver, who declared $530 in 2016.

Scarsdale savers are also enjoying a higher savings rate than many others. According to the IRS data, 2 percent of their income came from interest earned from savings accounts, which is 2.5 times the national rate of 0.8 percent.

It’s not just the savings volume driving Scarsdale’s place at the top. Two-thirds of Scarsdale residents reported interest income on their tax returns in 2016. That’s more than twice the national rate of 29 percent.

In Garden City, N.Y., residents earned just over $247,000 on average, putting the average household in the top 5 percent of American earners. Just under two-thirds (64 percent) of Garden City residents report income from interest.

However, with the average Garden City resident declaring $5,520 in interest, that represents 2.2 percent of overall income (10 percent more than their peers in Scarsdale, and almost three times the national rate).

The city where (almost) everyone saves: Los Altos, California

In addition to focusing on the amount people earn from their savings, we wanted to look at the share of savers in each city, which gives us an idea of a community’s total commitment to saving. The IRS requires anyone who earns more than $10 in interest income to declare interest income on their tax return. Even in the current low-interest environment, many middle-income savers could have qualified to declare interest income in 2016.

Among the top 10 cities with the most savers, two (The Villages, Fla., and Sun City West, Ariz.) had average incomes below $100,000 in 2016. Both cities feature large retirement communities, and these residents may have a higher propensity to keep their investments liquid compared with younger residents.

However the city with the most savers was Los Altos, Calif., where the average reported income is $476,000 annually. In Los Altos, nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of residents were savers. This is more than double the national average of 29 percent. The average interest income in Los Altos, Calif., was $5,299 — 10 times the national average.

Sky-high interest income in Greenwich, Connecticut

Greenwich, Conn., may not have the highest share of savers in the country (just over half (52 percent) of the city’s residents declared interest income on their tax returns in 2016). But their savers are making a bundle on earned interest.

Average interest income per return for the 2016 tax year was $25,451 — more than 48 times the national average of $530. If savers in Greenwich earned an average of 2% interest on their savings, the average saver would have held nearly $1.3 million in savings. The more than $25,000 in interest income constitutes 3.8 percent of the average reported Greenwich income, which is $664,000 annually thanks to a large number of hedge fund managers and other finance executives living in the area.

In terms of absolute interest income, Greenwich savers lead the pack by a wide margin. Second place Beverly Hills earns $16,638 in interest, just two-thirds of the Greenwich rate. In third place, Scarsdale earns $9,258.

Where do the biggest savers live?

Over three-quarters (77 percent) of the cities with scores of 95 or above came from just five major metro areas. These include the New York Tri-State area, the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, San Francisco Bay Area, Southern California, and Chicago. Retirement communities in Arizona and Florida also feature prominently in the top saving communities, while just 15 percent of all major savings hubs are outside one of the areas mentioned above.

High saving doesn’t require high income

All cities with average incomes in excess of $250,000 earned a savings score of 90. However, some cities with lower incomes made surprise appearances near the top of the savings ranking.

In fact, 14 cities with incomes under $150,000 a year had scores of 95 or above in our study. Many of these “thrifty cities” have large retiree populations like The Villages, Fla., and Sun City West, Ariz. However, other thrifty cities included family-oriented suburbs where average households earned an upper-middle-class income.

  • Agoura Hills, Calif. (96.6 score), a Los Angeles suburb where a quarter of all residents are under the age of 19. Average income among tax filers in the city is $137,000, 60 percent of the average income of other top saving cities. Despite having more children and lower incomes than most other big saving cities, half of Agoura Hills households reported interest income. The average saver in Agoura Hills earned $1,913 per year in interest, 3.6 times the national average of $530.
  • Arcadia, Calif. (95.7 score) is another Los Angeles suburb with an average reported income of $101,000. In addition to modest average incomes (by Southern California standards), nearly 1 in 4 residents in Arcadia is under the age of 19. This means that plenty of households have to pay the high costs of raising kids. In spite of this, 48 percent of taxpayers report interest income, with the average return boasting $1,420 in interest income.
  • Towson, Md. (95.1 score), home of Towson University. In the Baltimore suburb, half (49 percent) of filers report interest income from savings. Despite an average reported income of $125,558, savers earned an average of $1,464 in interest income in 2014.

Where saving isn’t happening

Although rising interest rates are a boon for savers, plenty of communities will struggle as consumer debt rates rise, and income prospects remain middling. The cities with the lowest savings scores are spread throughout the country, but they have a few things in common. The average reported income in the bottom 5 percent was $35,000. That’s 41 percent less than the median income household in the United States today.

Most of the worst saving cities lost job-heavy industries over the course of the last 20 to 50 years. Rust Belt cities like Detroit, Mich., and East St. Louis, Ill., over-represent the bottom 5 percent in savings ranks. Likewise, former industrial towns in the Northeast like Camden, N.J., and Chester, Pa., also fell into the bottom 5 percent of saving cities. Many of the worst saving cities suffer from declining populations as younger generations seek economic opportunities elsewhere.

METHODOLOGY: How we ranked cities with the biggest savers

To rank cities, MagnifyMoney created a “City Saving Score” on a scale of 0 to 100 that included three equally weighted components:

  • How broadly members of the community saved (measured by the percentage of all tax returns that declared interest income, ranked by percentile).
  • The community’s dedication to saving regardless of their income (measured by the percentage of total income that came from interest, ranked by percentile).
  • The absolute magnitude of savings in the community (measured by the average interest income per tax return, ranked by percentile).

MagnifyMoney measured these factors using anonymized data from tax returns filed with the IRS from January 1 to December 31, 2016. ZIP code level data was translated to a city level using the primary city assigned to each ZIP code. The study was limited to cities with a combined primary ZIP code population of 25,000 or more.

To be counted as a saving household, the taxpayer must declare interest income using a form 1099 on their 2016 tax returns. Any filers who earned over $10 on investments, including a high-yield checking or savings account, a CD, a money market account or certain types of taxable bonds, would have reported this income to the IRS.

Interest income is an imperfect way to measure a particular community’s dedication to saving. Many people keep their cash in low-yield checking accounts, and some savers will not use financial instruments declared on Form 1099. In many parts of the country, savers and investors may prefer to build wealth using stocks, real estate or other forms of investments while keeping lower cash reserves.

Despite these drawbacks, interest income from the 1099 form represents a useful proxy for overall savings. The financial instruments that require 1099 reporting include many types of liquid savings that are easily accessible with negligible risk. Most people use interest-bearing accounts to hold funds for use in the case of job loss or a related emergency, or to mitigate consumer debt by paying for larger purchases in cash.

 

The post America’s Super Saving Cities: The regional forces shaping America’s saving landscape appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Save Big on Your Back-to-School Shopping

It's easy to overspend at World Market but with these ways to save, you can breathe a sigh of relief when checking your receipt.

Back-to-school season generally starts around two months before the beginning of school—so if you haven’t started yet, you’re already behind. What once required a few Dixon Ticonderoga pencils and a notebook now requires carts full of supplies. In 2016, the National Retail Federation estimated that families with children in grades K–12 would spend an average of $673 on clothes, accessories, school supplies, electronics, and shoes during the back-to-school season. Based on robust wage growth, I expect that number to increase for 2017.

While most parents will take advantage of some sales during the back-to-school season, you can save more by identifying the right time to buy. As an industry insider, I can give you the tips you need to save on back-to-school shopping.

Back-to-School Clothes

A lot of people are shocked to learn that clearance sales aren’t necessarily the best time to buy clothes. When the items go on clearance, the first markdown will generally be in the neighborhood of 20ؘ%–30%. On the other hand, retailers will regularly mark down items 40% during a one- to two-week sale.

The only clothes you want to buy on clearance are those that will go beyond a store’s first markdown. Unfortunately, markdown rates are set on a store-by-store basis according to inventory levels and can be difficult to predict. As a result, I don’t risk waiting for deep clearance discounts.

Instead, take advantage of seasonal sales for the best results. The deals vary by category, so I give some specific guidance of finding the best clothing deals.

Uniforms

Major clothing retailers will often advertise an annual “uniform sale.” This sale takes place a few weeks before private schools reopen in your area. Start watching weekly ads the week following the Fourth of July to be sure you catch the deals.

During their uniform sales, major retailers (especially Kohl’s, Macy’s, Target, and Walmart) offer huge discounts on khakis, polos, and black pants. You’ll want to buy enough during the sale to last the whole year.

When I worked in retail, savvy parents with kids in private school would often buy two to three different sizes during uniform sales. That way, they didn’t have to pay full price when their kid inevitably grew during the school year.

By the way, public school parents should pay attention to these sales, too. They are the people who get caught paying full price for Dockers when their kid has to wear black pants for a holiday band performance.

Summer Styles

Summer styles typically go on sale in May and June, and they tend to go to clearance by early July. After the first day of school, your kids will probably spend weeks or even months going to school in shorts and T-shirts (depending on where you live), so you may want to supplement your school wardrobe with summer fashion choices that go on sale during those earlier months.

You won’t find sales on summer styles during back-to-school shopping, but you might find some decent clearance items. Remember, the first markdown on clearance is usually in the 20%–30% off bracket.

That’s not a great deal, and you’ll probably find fall fashion sales with lower-priced options. However, if you see an item for 50%–60% off the original price, it’s a good deal and worth buying if it fits your clothing needs. An item for 70%–75% off retail will generally be out of the store in a week or two, so snap that deal up immediately.

Steep discounts on clearance items don’t mean the product has quality issues. It just indicates that the product didn’t sell well at that particular store. Most stores have limited return policies on clearance items, however, so be sure you know the policy before you buy the item.

Fall Styles

Fall styles typically start to go on sale in mid-July. Kids and teens who like shopping at name-brand stores should watch out for “annual denim sales,” which typically happen in early August. Certain denim styles stay on the market year round, making this the best time of the year to buy jeans.

In general, it’s best to skip most other “fall style” pieces until winter. The most popular fall styles will stick around until November, when you can scoop them up at significant discounts during the holiday discount season. The exception to this rule would be any BOGO (buy one, get one) deals that make sense for your kids’ fashion needs.

Backpacks and Lunchboxes

The new school year means a new backpack and lunchbox, right?

If your kid is still young enough to want cartoon characters or superheroes on their backpack and lunchbox, then a back-to-school sale will yield the best prices. These backpacks usually won’t stick around after September.

Likewise, you can find deals on insulated lunchboxes (which are also appropriate for adults who brown-bag). Buy during the back-to-school sale, and you’ll thank yourself later. While most retailers will stock a few extra lunchbox styles during the peak season, you shouldn’t expect to find these on clearance. Most stores stock just enough lunchboxes to get through the back-to-school rush.

However, teen and adult backpacks are a totally different story. Sporting goods stores will put these on a steep discount during the November and December holiday season. You also may see deals on camping backpacks in April and May. This is one purchase that is worth putting off if you can.

Electronics

One thing I can’t stand is when I see parents buying new electronics for the upcoming school year. Yes, retailers will discount computers, calculators, and the like for the “back to college” rush, but waiting just a few months can save huge coin. So when should you buy?

Calculators

If you’ve got a middle or high school student, they will probably need a TI-83+ for their math class. This is something that you should buy used, preferably in May or June when college graduates are unloading theirs for rock-bottom prices.

If you must buy new, June is the time to do it. Some online retailers will try to compete with the used market by dropping their prices. Set up a notification on CamelCamelCamel.com, and you’ll find deals around $75.

Laptops

College students who want to buy Apple products should shop online or at the Apple Store for the best deals. Usually, Apple will provide student warranties, extra software, or other bonuses during late July and August. Apple doesn’t usually drop its prices, but the bonuses can be worthwhile. Netbooks and other lower-capacity laptops tend to see rock-bottom prices during Black Friday sales in late November.

Generic School Supplies

Ten-cent folders and crayons for a quarter? Deals like these will start rolling in about four to five weeks before schools start. Watch weekly ads to find the local loss leaders (a pricing strategy where a product is sold at a price below its market cost to stimulate other sales of more profitable goods or services), and buy them right away. If you’re feeling extra generous, stock up on generic school supplies and donate them to your local school. The teachers will thank you for saving their pocketbooks.

Back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to deplete your bank account. In fact, some credit cards will even offer rewards for back-to-school shopping. But before you apply for a card—which could ding your credit when the card provider checks your score—make sure you’ve got the requisite credit by checking your credit report for free at Credit.com.

Hannah L. Rounds is a contributor at CentSai, a financial wellness community for millennials and Gen Xers. She loves talking and writing about the counterintuitive intersections between marriage, family, money, and careers. In addition to “geeking” out over personal finance, she loves cooking, reading to her son, snowboarding, and watching superhero shows on Netflix.

Image: Eva-Katalin

The post How to Save Big on Your Back-to-School Shopping appeared first on Credit.com.

Seniors Are Getting Crushed by Debt, New MagnifyMoney Analysis Shows

More American seniors are shouldering debt as they enter their retirement years, according to a new MagnifyMoney analysis of data from the latest University of Michigan Retirement Research Center Health and Retirement Study release. MagnifyMoney analyzed survey data to see whether debt causes financial frailty during retirement. We also spoke with financial experts who explained how seniors can rescue their retirements.

1 in 3 Americans 50 and older carry non-mortgage debt

The Health and Retirement Study from the University of Michigan Retirement Research Center surveys more than 20,000 participants age 50+ who answer questions about well-being. The survey covers financial topics including debt, income, and assets. Since 1990, the center has conducted the survey every other year. They released the 2014 panel of data in November 2016. MagnifyMoney analyzed the most recent release of the data to learn more about financial fitness among older Americans.

In an ideal retirement, retirees would have the financial resources necessary to maintain the lifestyle they enjoyed during their working years. Debt acts as an anchor on retiree balance sheets. Since interest rates on debts tend to rise faster than earnings from assets, debt has the power to destroy the balance sheets of seniors living on fixed incomes.

We found that nearly one-third (32%) of all Americans over age 50 carry non-mortgage debt from month to month. On average, those with debt carry $4,786 in credit card debt and $12,490 in total non-mortgage debt.

High-interest consumer debt erodes seniors’ ability to live a quality lifestyle, says John Ross, a Texarkana, Texas-based attorney specializing in elder law.

“From an elder law attorney perspective, we see a direct correlation between debt and institutional care,” Ross says. “Essentially, the more debt load, the less likely the person will have sufficient cash assets to cover medical care that is not provided by Medicare.”

Even worse, debt leads some retirees to skip paying for necessary expenses like quality food and medical care.

“The social aspect of being a responsible bill payer often leads the older debtor to forgo needed expenses to pay debts they cannot afford instead of considering viable options like bankruptcy,” says Devin Carroll, a Texarkana, Texas-based financial adviser specializing in Social Security and retirement.

Some older Americans may even be carrying debt that they don’t have the capacity to pay.

According to our analysis, 40% of all older Americans have credit card debt in excess of $5,000. More than one in five (22%) Americans age 50+ have more than $10,000 in credit card debt. On average, those with more than $10,000 in credit card debt couldn’t pay off their debt even by emptying their checking accounts.

Over a third of American seniors don’t have $1,000 in cash

It’s not just credit card debtors who struggle with financial frailty approaching retirement. Many older Americans have very little spending power. More than one-third (37%) of all Americans over age 50 have a checking account balance less than $1,000.

Low cash reserves don’t just mean limited spending power. They indicate that American seniors don’t have the liquidity to deal with financial hardships as they approach retirement. This is especially concerning because seniors are more likely than average to face high medical expenses. Over one in three (36%) Americans who experienced financial hardship classified it as an unexpected health expense, according to the Federal Reserve Board report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2015. The median out-of-pocket health-related expense was $1,200.

Debt pushes seniors further from retirement goals

Seniors carrying credit card debt exhibit other signs of financial frailty. For example, seniors without credit card debt have an average net worth of $120,000. Those with credit card debt have a net worth of just $68,000, 43% less than those without credit card debt.

The concern isn’t just small portfolio values. For retirees with debt, credit card interest rates outpace expected performance on investment portfolios. Today the average credit card interest rate is 14%. That means American seniors who carry credit card debt (on average, $4,786) pay an average of $670 per year in interest charges. Meanwhile, the average investment portfolio earns no more than 8% per year. This means that older debtors will earn just $4,508 from their entire portfolio. Credit card interest eats up more than 15% of the nest egg income.

For some older Americans the problem runs even deeper. One in 10 American seniors has a checking account balance with less than $1,000 and carries credit card debt. This precarious position could leave some seniors unable to recover from larger financial setbacks.

Increased debt loads over time

High levels of consumer debt among older Americans are part of a sobering trend. According to research from the University of Michigan Retirement Research Center, in 1998, 36.94% of Americans age 56-61 carried debt. The mean value of their debt (in 2012 dollars) was $3,634.

Over time debt loads among pre-retiree age Americans are becoming even more unsustainable. Today 42% of Americans age 50-59 have debt, and their average debt burden is $17,623.

Credit card debt carries the most onerous interest rates, but it’s not the only type of debt people carry into retirement. According to research from the Urban Institute, in 2014, 32.2% of adults aged 68-72 carried debt in addition to a mortgage or a credit card, and 18% of Americans age 73-77 still have an auto loan.

Even student loan debt, a debt typically associated with millennials, is causing angst among seniors. According to the debt styles study from the Urban Institute, as of 2014, 2%-4% of adults aged 58 and older carried student loan debt. It’s a small proportion overall, but the burden is growing over time.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in 2004, 600,000 seniors over age 60 carried student loan debt. Today that number is 2.8 million. Back in 2004 Americans over age 60 had $6 billion in outstanding student loan debts. Today they owe $66.7 billion in student loans, more than 10 times what they owed in 2004. Not all that student debt came from seniors dragging their repayments out for 30-40 years. Almost three in four (73%) older student loan debtors carry some debt that benefits a child or grandchild.

Even co-signing student loans puts a retirement at risk. If the borrower cannot repay the loan on their own, then a retiree is on the hook for repayment. A co-signer’s assets that aren’t protected by federal law can be seized to repay a student loan in default. Because of that, Ross says, “We never advise a person to co-sign on a student loan. Never!”

How older Americans can manage debt

High debt loads and an impending retirement can make a reasonable retirement seem like a fairy tale. However, an effective debt strategy and some extra work make it possible to age on your own terms.

Focus on debt first.

Carroll suggests older workers should prioritize eliminating debt before saving for retirement. “Several studies have shown a direct correlation between debt and risk of institutionalization,” he says. Debt inhibits retirees from remodeling or paying for in-home care that could allow them to age in place.

Downsize your lifestyle

As a first step in eliminating debt, seniors should check all their expenses. Some may consider drastic measures like downsizing their home.

Cut off adult children

Even more important, seniors with debt may need to stop supporting adult children.

According to a 2015 Pew Center Research Poll, 61% of all American parents supported an adult child financially in the last 12 months. Nearly one in four (23%) helped their adult children with a recurring financial need.

Wanting to help children is natural, but it can leave seniors financially frail. It may even leave a parent unable to provide for themselves during retirement.

Work longer

Older workers can also eliminate debt by focusing on the income side of the equation. For many this will mean working a few years longer than average, but the extra work pays off twofold. First, eliminating debt reduces the need for cash during retirement. Second, working longer also allows seniors to delay taking Social Security benefits.

Working until age 67 compared to age 62 makes a meaningful difference in quality of life decades down the road. According to the Social Security Administration, workers who withdraw starting at age 62 received an average of $1,077 per month. Those who waited until age 67 received 27% more, $1,372 per month.

Retirees already receiving Social Security benefits have options, too. Able-bodied retirees can re-enter the workforce. Homeowners can consider renting out a room to a family member to increase income.

Consider every option

If earning more money isn’t realistic, a debt elimination strategy becomes even more important. Ross recommends that retirees should consider every option when facing debt, including bankruptcy. He explains, “A 65-year-old, healthy retiree would be well advised to pay down the high-interest debt now. Alternatively, an 85-year-old retiree facing significant health issues is better off filing bankruptcy or just defaulting on the debt. For the older person, their existing assets are a lifeline, and a good credit score is irrelevant.”

Don’t take on new debt

It’s also important to avoid taking on new debt during retirement. “The only exception,” Ross explains, “[is taking on] debt in the form of home equity for long-term medical care needs, but then only when all other reserves are depleted and the person has explored all forms of government assistance such as Medicaid and veterans benefits.”

Every senior’s financial situation differs, but if you’re facing financial stress before or during retirement, it pays to know your options. Conduct your research and consult with a financial adviser, an elder law attorney, or a credit counselor from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling to choose what is right for your situation.

The post Seniors Are Getting Crushed by Debt, New MagnifyMoney Analysis Shows appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 700

In late 2016, American consumers hit an important milestone. For the first time in a decade, over half of American consumers (51%) recorded prime credit scores. On the other side of the scale, less than a third of consumers (32%) suffered from subprime scores.1 As a nation, our average FICO® Score rose to its highest point ever, 700.2

Despite the rosy national picture, we see regional and age-based disparities. A minority of Southerners still rank below prime credit. In contrast, credit scores in the upper Midwest rank well above the national average. Younger consumers struggle with their credit, but boomers and the Silent Generation secured scores well above the national average.

In a new report on credit scores in America, MagnifyMoney analyzed trends in credit scores. The trends offer insight into how Americans fare with their credit health.

Key insights

  1. National average FICO® Scores are up 14 points since October 2009.3
  2. 51% of consumers have prime credit scores, up from 48.1% in 2007.4
  3. One-third of customers have at least one severely delinquent (90+ days past due) account on their credit report.5
  4. Average VantageScores® in the Deep South are 21 points lower than the national average (652 vs. 673).6
  5. Millennials’ average VantageScore® (634) underperformed the national average by 39 points. Only Gen Z has a lower average score (631).7

Credit scores in America

Average FICO® Score: 70088

Average VantageScore®: 6739

Percent with prime credit score (Equifax Risk Score >720): 51%10

Percent with subprime credit score (Equifax Risk Score <660): 32%11

Credit score factors

Percent with at least one delinquency: 32%12

Average number of late payments per month: .3513

Average credit utilization ratio: 30%14

Debt delinquency

Percent severely delinquent debt: 3.37%15

Percent severely delinquent debt excluding mortgages: 6.9%16

States with the best and worst credit scores

What is a credit score?

Credit scoring companies analyze consumer credit reports. They glean data from the reports and create algorithms that determine consumer borrowing risk. A credit score is a number that represents the risk profile of a borrower. Credit scores influence a bank’s decisions to lend money to consumers. People with high credit scores will find the most attractive borrowing rates because that signals to lenders that they are less risky. Those with low credit scores will struggle to find credit at all.

The Big 3 credit scores

Banks have hundreds of proprietary credit scoring algorithms. In this article, we analyzed trends on three of the most famous credit scoring algorithms:

  • FICO® Score 8 (used for underwriting mortgages)
  • VantageScore® 3.0 (widely available to consumers)
  • Equifax Consumer Risk Credit Score (used by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Each of these credit scores ranks risk on a scale of 300-850. In all three models, prime credit is any score above 720. Subprime credit is any score below 660. All three models consider similar data when they create credit risk profiles. The most common factors include:

  • Payment history
  • Revolving debt levels (or revolving debt utilization ratios)
  • Length of credit history
  • Number of recent credit inquires
  • Variety of credit (installment and revolving)

However, each model weights the information differently. This means that a FICO® Score cannot be compared directly to a VantageScore® or an Equifax Risk Score. For example, a VantageScore® does not count paid items in collections against you. However, a FICO® Score counts all collections items against you, even if you’ve paid them. Additionally, the VantageScore® counts outstanding debt against you, but the FICO® Score only considers how much credit card debt you have relative to your available credit.

American credit scores over time

Average FICO® Scores in America are on the rise for the eighth straight year. The average credit score in America is now 700.

On top of that, consumers with “super prime” credit (FICO® Scores above 800) outnumber consumers with deep subprime credit (FICO® Scores below 600).

We’re also seeing healthy increases in prime credit scores, defined as Equifax Risk Scores above 720. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 51% of all Americans have prime credit scores as measured by the Equifax Risk Score. Following the housing market crash in 2010, just 48.4% of Americans had prime credit scores.20

A major driver of increased scores is the decreased proportion of consumers with collection items on their credit report. A credit item that falls into collections will stay on a person’s credit report for seven years. People caught in the latter end of the real estate foreclosure crisis of 2006-2011 may still have a collections item on their report today.

In the first quarter of 2013, 14.64% of all consumers had at least one item in collections. Today, just 12.61% of consumers have collections items on their credit report. Overall collections rates are approaching 2005-2006 average rates.40

Credit scores and loan originations

Following the 2007-2008 implosion of the housing market, banks saw mortgage borrowers defaulting at higher rates than ever before. In addition to higher mortgage default rates, the market downturn led to higher default rates across all types of consumer loans. To maintain profitability banks began tightening lending practices. More stringent lending standards made it tough for anyone with poor credit to get a loan at a reasonable rate. Although banks have loosened lending somewhat in the last two years, people with subprime credit will continue to struggle to get loans. In June 2017, banks rejected 81.4% of all credit applications from people with Equifax Risk Scores below 680. By contrast, banks rejected 9.11% of credit applications from those with credit scores above 760.22

Credit scores and mortgage origination

Before 2008, the median homebuyer had an Equifax Risk Score of 720. In 2017, the median score was 764, a full 44 points higher than the pre-bubble scores. The bottom 10th of buyers had a score of 657, a massive 65 point growth over the pre-recession average.23

Some below prime borrowers still get mortgages. But banks no longer underwrite mortgages for deep subprime borrowers. More stringent lending standards have resulted in near all-time lows in mortgage foreclosures.

Credit scores and auto loan origination

The subprime lending bubble didn’t directly influence the auto loan market, but banks increased their lending standards for auto loans, too. Before 2008, the median credit score for people originating auto loans was 682. By the first quarter of 2017, the median score for auto borrowers was 706.26

In the case of auto loans, the lower median risk profile hasn’t paid off for banks. In the first quarter of 2017, $8.27 billion dollars of auto loans fell into severely delinquent status. New auto delinquencies are now as bad as they were in 2008.28

Consumers looking for new auto loans should expect more stringent lending standards in coming months. This means it’s more important than ever for Americans to grow their credit score.

Credit scores for credit cards

Unlike other types of credit, even people with deep subprime credit scores usually qualify to open a secured credit card. However, credit card use among people with poor credit scores is still near an all-time low. In the last decade, credit card use among deep subprime borrowers fell 16.7%. Today, just over 50% of deep subprime borrowers have credit card accounts.30

The dramatic decline came between 2009 and 2011. During this period, half or more of all credit card account closures came from borrowers with below prime credit scores. More than one-third of all closures came from deep subprime consumers.

However, banks are showing an increased willingness to allow customers with poor credit to open credit card accounts. In 2015, more than 60% of all new credit card accounts went to borrowers with subprime credit, and 25% of all the accounts went to borrowers with deep subprime credit.

State level credit scores

Consumers across the nation are seeing higher credit scores, but regional variations persist. People living in the Deep South and Southwest have lower credit scores than the rest of the nation. States in the Deep South have an average VantageScore® of 652 compared to a nationwide average of 673. Southwestern states have an average score of 658.

States in the upper Midwest outperform the nation as a whole. These states had average VantageScores® of 689.

Unsurprisingly, consumers across the southern United States are far more likely to have subprime credit scores than consumers across the north. Minnesota had the fewest subprime consumers. In December 2016, just 21.9% of residents fell below an Equifax Risk Score of 660. Mississippi had the worst subprime rate in the nation: 48.3% of Mississippi residents had credit scores below 660 in December 2016.35

These are the distributions of Equifax Risk Scores by state:37

Credit score by age

In general, older consumers have higher credit scores than younger generations. Credit scoring models consider consumers with longer credit histories less risky than those with short credit histories. The Silent Generation and boomers enjoy higher credit scores due to long credit histories. However, these generations show better credit behavior, too. Their revolving credit utilization rates are lower than younger generations. They are less likely to have a severely delinquent credit item on their credit report.

Gen X and millennials have almost identical revolving utilization ratios and delinquency rates. Compared to millennials, Gen X has higher credit card balances and more debt. Still, Gen X’s longer credit history gives them a 21 point advantage over millennials on average.

To improve their credit scores, millennials and Gen X need to focus on timely payments. On-time payments and lower credit card utilization will drive their scores up.

A report by FICO® showed that younger consumers can earn high credit scores with excellent credit behavior. 93% of consumers with credit scores between 750 and 799 who were under age 29 never had a late payment on their credit report. In contrast, 57% of the total population had at least one delinquency. This good credit group also used less of their available credit. They had an average revolving credit utilization ratio of 6%. The nation as a whole had a utilization ratio of 15%.39

Sources

  1. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  2. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Average FICO Score Hits 700: A Milestone for Consumers,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  3. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Average FICO Score Hits 700: A Milestone for Consumers,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  4. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  5. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017
  6. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  7. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  8. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Average FICO Score Hits 700: A Milestone for Consumers,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  9. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  10. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  11. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  12. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  13. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Late Payments, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  14. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Revolving Credit Utilization Ratio, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  15. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type, All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  16. Calculated metric using data from “Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type and Total Debt Balance and Its Composition. All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017. Multiply all debt balances by percent of balance 90 days delinquent for Q1 2017, and summarize all delinquent balances. Total delinquent balance for non-mortgage debt = $284 billion. Total non-mortgage debt balance = $4.1 trillion$284 billion /$4.1 trillion = 6.9%.
  17. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  18. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Average FICO Score Hits 700: A Milestone for Consumers,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  19. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Average FICO Score Hits 700: A Milestone for Consumers,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  20. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  21. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  22. Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2017 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). The SCE data are available without charge at http://www.newyorkfed.org/microeconomics/sce and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.
  23. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  24. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  25. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Number of Consumers with New Foreclosures and Bankruptcies, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  26. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  27. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  28. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  29. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  30. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  31. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  32. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  33. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  34. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  35. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  36. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  37. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  38. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 VantageScore®, Experian. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  39. Andrew Jennings, “FICO® Score High Achievers: Is Age the Only Factor?” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  40. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Third-Party Collections (Percent of Consumers with Collections), from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  41. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Third-Party Collections (Percent of Consumers with Collections), from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017.

The post Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 700 appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Average Household Credit Card Debt in America: 2017 Statistics

Even as household income and employment rates are ticking up in the U.S., credit card balances are approaching all-time highs. What’s behind the growth of credit card spending among consumers? In a new report on credit card debt in America, MagnifyMoney analyzed credit debt trends in the U.S. to find out exactly how much credit debt consumers are really taking on and, crucially, how they are managing their growing reliance on plastic.

Key Insights:

  • While credit balances are increasing, the amount of debt that households are carrying from month to month is actually much lower than it was leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. As of December 2016, households with credit card debt owed an average of $8,158, down 22.9 percent compared to October 2008, when household credit card debt peaked at $10,588.
  • Credit card balances and credit card debt are not the same thing. The 73 million Americans who pay their bill in full each month have credit card balances reported to the major credit reporting bureaus.
  • Assessing financial health means focusing on credit card debt trends rather than credit card use trends.

Credit Card Debt in the U.S. by the Numbers

Credit Card Use

Number of Americans who use credit cards: 201 million1

Average number of credit cards per consumer: 2.32

Number of Americans who carry credit card debt: 125 million3

Credit Card Debt

The following figures only include the credit card balances of those who carry credit card debt from month to month.

Total credit card debt in the U.S.: $527 billion4

Average credit card debt per person: $4,2055

Average credit card debt per household: $8,1586

Credit Card Balances

The following figures include the credit card statement balances of all credit card users, including those who pay their bill in full each month.

Total credit card balances: $784 billion as of January 2017, an increase of 7.4 percent from the previous year.7

Average balance per person: $3,9058

Who Pays Off Their Credit Card Bills?

42 percent of households pay off their credit card bills in full each month

31 percent of households carry a balance all year

27 percent of households sometimes carry a balance10

Understanding Household Credit Card Balances vs. Household Debt

At first glance, it may seem that Americans are taking on near record levels of credit debt. Forty-two percent of American households11 carry credit card debt from month to month, and, if you look at the total credit card balances among U.S. households, the figure appears astronomical — $784 billion. But that figure includes households that are paying their credit debt in full each month as well as those that are carrying a balance from month to month.

While credit balances are increasing, the amount of debt that households are carrying from month to month is actually much lower than it was leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. The total of credit card balances for households that actually carry debt from month to month is $527 billion.

As of the second quarter of 2017, households with credit card debt owed an average of $8,158.3 That is a decrease of 22.9 percent compared to October 2008, when household credit card debt peaked at $10,588.12b

And as household incomes have risen in recent years, this has helped to lower the ratio of credit card debt to income. Today, indebted households with average debt and median household incomes have a credit card debt to income ratio of 14.4 percent.13 Back in 2008, the ratio was 19.1 percent.

Per Person Credit Card Debt

Once we adjust for these effects, we see that an estimated 125 million Americans carry $527 billion of credit card debt from month to month. Back in 2008, 5 million fewer Americans carried debt, but total credit card debt in late 2008 hovered around $631 billion.16 That means people with credit card debt in 2008 had more debt than people with credit card debt today.

Average credit card debt among those who carry a balance today is $4,205 per person2 or $8,158 per household.3 Back in 2008, credit card debtors owed an average of 23.7 percent more than they do today. In late 2008, the 115 million17 Americans with credit card debt owed an average of $5,567 per person12a or $10,689 per household.12b

Delinquency Rates

Credit card debt becomes delinquent when a bank reports a missed payment to the major credit reporting bureaus. Banks typically don’t report a missed payment until a person is at least 30 days late in paying. When a consumer doesn’t pay for at least 90 days, the credit card balance becomes seriously delinquent. Banks are very likely to take a total loss on seriously delinquent balances.

In the second quarter of 2010, serious delinquency rates on credit cards were 13.74 percent of all balances owed, nearly twice as what they are today. Today, credit card delinquency rates are down to 7.38 percent.14

Our Method of Calculating Household Credit Card Debt

Credit card debt doesn’t appear on the precipice of disaster, but the recent growth in balances is cause for some concern. Still, our estimates for household credit card debt remain modest.

In fact, MagnifyMoney’s estimates of household credit card debt is two-thirds that of other leading financial journals. Why are our estimates comparatively low?

A common estimate of household credit card debt is:

This method overstates credit card debt. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York/Equifax Consumer Credit Panel (CCP) does not release a figure called credit card indebtedness. Instead, they release a figure on national credit card balances. Representatives of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank both confirmed that the CCP includes the statement balances of people who go on to pay their bill in full each month.

To find a better estimate of credit card debt, we found methods to exclude the statement balances of full paying households from our credit card debt estimates. Statement balances are the balances owed to a credit card company at the end of a billing cycle. Even though full payers pay off their statement balance each month, their balances are included in the CCP’s figures on credit card balances.

To exclude full payer balances, we turned to academic research outside of the Federal Reserve Banks. The paper, Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards, by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, found full payers had mean statement balances of $3,412. We used this figure, multiplied by the estimated number of full payers to find the statement balances of full payers.

Our credit card debt estimate is:3

Credit Card Debt: Do We Know What We Owe?

Academic papers, consumer finance surveys, and the CCP each use different methods to measure average credit card debt among credit card revolvers. Since methodologies vary, credit card debt statistics vary based on the source consulted.

MagnifyMoney surveyed these sources to present a range of credit card debt statistics.

Are We Paying Down Credit Card Debt?

A Pew Research Center study25 showed that Americans have an uneasy relationship with credit card debt. More than two-thirds (68 percent) of Americans believe that loans and credit card debt expanded their opportunities. And 85 percent believe that Americans use debt to live beyond their means.

Academic research shows the conflicting attitude is justified. Some credit card users aggressively pay off debt. Others pay off their bill in full each month.

However, a substantial minority (44 percent)26 of revolvers pay within $50 of their minimum payment. Minimum payers are at a high risk of carrying unsustainable credit card balances with high interest.

In fact, 14 percent of consumers have credit card balances above $10,000.27 At current rates, consumers with balances of $10,000 will spend more than $1,400 per year on interest charges alone.28

Even an average revolver will spend between $58130 and $59731 on credit card interest each year.

Credit Debt Burden by Income

Those with the highest credit card debts aren’t necessarily the most financially insecure. According to the Survey of Consumer Finances, the top 10 percent of income earners who carried credit card debt had nearly twice as much debt as average.

However, people with lower incomes have more burdensome credit card debt loads. Consumers in the lowest earning quintile had an average credit card debt of $3,000. However, their debt-to-income ratio was 21.7 percent. On the high end, earners in the top decile had an average of $11,200 in credit card debt. But debt-to-income ratio was just 4.9 percent.

Although high-income earners have more manageable credit card debt loads on average, they aren’t taking steps to pay off the debt faster than lower income debt carriers. In fact, high-income earners are as likely to pay the minimum as those with below average incomes.32 If an economic recession leads to job losses at all wage levels, we could see high levels of credit card debt in default.

Generational Differences in Credit Card Use

  • Boomer consumers carry an average credit card balance of $6,889.
  • That is 24.1 percent higher than the national average consumer credit card balance.34
  • Millennial consumers carry an average credit card balance of $3,542.
  • That is 36.1 percent lower than the median consumer credit card balance.35

With average credit card balances of $6,889, baby boomers have the highest average credit card balance of any generation. Generation X follows close behind with average balances of $6,866.

At the other end of the spectrum, millennials, who are often characterized as frivolous spenders who are too quick to take on debt, have the lowest credit card balances. Their median balance clocks in at $3,542, 36.1 percent less than the national median.

Better Consumer Behavior Driving Bank Profitability

You may think that lower balances spell bad news for banks, but that isn’t the case. Credit card lending is more profitable than ever thanks to steadily declining credit card delinquency. Credit card delinquency is near an all-time low 2.34 percent.14

Despite better borrowing behavior, banks have held interest on credit cards steady between 13% and 14%37 since 2010. Today, interest rates on credit accounts (assessed interest) is 14%. This means bank profits on credit cards are at all-time highs. In 2015, banks earned over $102 billion dollars from credit card interest and fees.38 This is 15 percent more than banks earned in 2010.

How Does Your State Compare?

Using data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Consumer Credit Panel and Equifax, you can compare median credit card balances and credit card delinquency. You can even see how each generation in your state compares to the national median.

Median Credit Card Balance by Age (All Consumers) by State

Footnotes:

  1. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”

    The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations shows 75.02 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit showed 268 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users.

  2. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit , Page 4, Q1 2017, 453 million credit card accounts. 459 million credit card accounts / 201 million credit card users1 = 2.3 credit cards per person.
  3. The 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households reports 58 percent of credit card users carried a balance in 2015. 201 million1 * 58% = 116 million people with credit card debt.

    Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows that 67 percent of credit card users were not “full payers.” This results in a high estimate of 135 million people with credit card debt.

    Average estimate is 125 million with credit card debt.

  4. Using data from the 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households, 201 million credit card users * (58 percent not full payers) * $4,262 per individual5 = $496 billion in credit card debt.

    Using data from Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate 201 million credit card users * (67 percent not full payers) * $4,148 per individual5 = $558 billion in credit card debt.

    Average estimated total credit card debt is $527 billion.

  5. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $784 billion in outstanding credit card debt. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:

    [$784 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 201 million credit card users1)] / (201 million credit card users * (100% – 33% not full payers)) = $4,148

    Using their estimate of 42 percent full payers, from the 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households and the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    [$784 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 42% full payer * 201 million credit card users1)] / (201 million credit card users * (100% – 42% not full payers)) = $4,262

    Average estimated credit card debt per person is $4,205.

  6. Average per person credit card is $4,2055 and the average household contains 1.94 adults over the age of 18. $4,205 * 1.94 = $8,158.
  7. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Compare Q2 2016 to Q2 2017, outstanding credit card debt (Page 3).
  8. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Page 3, Q2 2017, credit card debt $784 billion / 201 million1 = $3,905.
  9. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. National Balance on Bankcards — average of $5,551.
  10. Page 30, 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households.
  11. 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports 37.1 percent of U.S. households carry credit card debt. There are 125.82 million U.S. households.

    Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw reported that 46.1 percent of U.S. households carried a balance the month prior to the Survey of Consumer Finances.

    Between 48 million14 and 58 million15 households carry credit card debt. Using the average of the two estimates, we believe 53 million households out of 125.82 million households carry credit card debt.

  12. a. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit showed 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.

    The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $866 billion in outstanding credit card debt in Q3 2008. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:

    [$866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 183 million credit card users)] / (183 million credit card users * (100% – 33% not full payers)) = $5,365

    U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, 2008 Panel, Wave 4shows 44.5 percent of all households with a credit report have credit card debt. Using this along with the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    [$866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * (100% – 44.5%) full payer * 240 million people with credit reports)] / (240 million people with credit reports * (44.5% not full payers)) = $5,769

    Average estimated credit card debt per person is $5,567.

    b. Average per person credit card is $5,56712a and in 2008, the average household contained 1.92 adults over the age of 18. $5,567 * 1.92 = $10,689.

  13. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Real Median Household Income in the United States [MEHOINUSA672N], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/MEHOINUSA672N, September 6, 2017.
  14. August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit , Page 12, % of Total Balance 90+ Days Delinquent, Credit Cards
  15. Statement balances are the balances owed to a credit card company at the end of a billing cycle. Full payers will pay off the entirety of their statement balance each month. Finding an estimate of full payers” statement balances was not an easy task. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York does not provide estimates of full payers compared to people who carry a balance.

    In order to get our estimates, we turned to academic research outside of the Federal Reserve Banks. In the paper, Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we found robust estimates of the statement balances of “full payers.” According to their analysis (see Table 1-A), full payers had mean statement balances of $3,412 (when summarized across all credit cards) before they went on to pay off the debt.

    We multiplied $3,412 by the estimated number of full payers to get the estimated balances of full payers.

  16. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.

    The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows $866 billion in outstanding credit card debt in Q3 2008. Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows an average balance of $3,412 for “full payers.” Using their estimate of 33 percent full payers, we calculate:

    $866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * 33% full payer * 183 million credit card users) = $659 billion

    U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, 2008 Panel, Wave 4shows 44.5 percent of all households with a credit report have credit card debt. Using this along with the $3,412 full payer balance from Table A-1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang, we calculate:

    $866 billion – ($3,412 (full payer balance) * (100% – 44.5%) full payer * 240 million people with credit reports) = $587 billion

    Estimated credit card debt is $623 billion.

  17. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”

    The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations Shows 75.02 percent of the adult population uses credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 267 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users. Page 30, 2015 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households shows that 58 percent of households with credit cards sometimes or always carry a balance.

    201 million * 58% = 116 million people with credit card debt

  18. Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2015 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). “The SCE data are available without charge at www.newyorkfed.org and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.”

    The October 2016 Survey of Consumer Expectations Shows 75.02 percent of the adult population uses credit cards. The August 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 267 million adults with credit reports. For a total of 201 million credit card users. Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards by Benjamin J. Keys and Jialan Wang shows that 67 percent of credit card users were not “full payers.”

    201 million * 67% = 135 million people with credit card debt

  19. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports 37.1 percent of U.S. households carry credit card debt. There are 125.82 million U.S. households.
  20. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw reported that 46.1 percent of U.S. households carried a balance the month prior to the Survey of Consumer Finances.
  21. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports a median credit card debt of $2,300 per household with credit card debt.
  22. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw used CCP data and determined a more realistic median credit card debt of $3,500 per household. Two-person households systematically underreported their debt.
  23. The 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances reports a median credit card debt of $5,700 per household with credit card debt.
  24. Meta Brown, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, and Wilbert van der Klaauw used CCP data and determined a more realistic average credit card debt of $9,600 per household.
  25. The Complex Story of American Debt, Page 9.
  26. Table 1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  27. Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing.
  28. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Commercial Bank Interest Rate on Credit Card Plans, Accounts Assessed Interest [TERMCBCCINTNS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TERMCBCCINTNS, September 7, 2017.

    May 2017 interest rate on accounts assessed interest 14%: $10,000 * 14% = $1,400.

  29. Table 1 in Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  30. $4,1482 * 14%28 = $581
  31. $4,2622 * 14%28 = $597
  32. Minimum Payments and Debt Paydown in Consumer Credit Cards.
  33. 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances.
  34. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. Average credit card balance for baby boomers is $6,889 compared to a national average of $5,551.
  35. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Balances on Credit Cards, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017. Average credit card balance for millennials is $3,542 compared to a national average of $5,551.
  36. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US), Commercial Bank Interest Rate on Credit Card Plans, Accounts Assessed Interest [TERMCBCCINTNS], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TERMCBCCINTNS, September 7, 2017.
  37. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Sources of Revenue: Credit Card Income from Consumers for Credit Intermediation and Related Activities, All Establishments, Employer Firms [REVCICEF522ALLEST], retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/REVCICEF522ALLEST, September 7, 2017.
  38. CCP data shows 76.6 percent of people with credit reports had balances on credit cards in September 2008. The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit shows 240 million adults with credit reports in Q3 2008. For a total of 183 million credit card users.

    The May 2017 Report on Household Debt and Credit, Page 3, Q3 2008, credit card debt $886 billion / 183 million = $4,720

  39. State Level Household Debt Statistics 1999-2016, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, May, 2017. All average credit card debt balances are calculated using the following formula:

    (Total Credit Card Balancea – Balance of Population Not Carrying Debtb) / Population Carrying Credit Card Debtc

    1. Total Credit Card Balance = (Average Credit Card Debt Per Capita * Population)
    2. Balance of Population Not Carrying Debt = Average Credit Card Debt Per Capita * Population * % of Population Using a Credit Card
    3. Population * % of Population Using a Credit Card * (1 – .375)
  40. State Level Household Debt Statistics 1999-2016, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, May, 2017.
  41. Data from Consumer Credit Explorer.

The post Average Household Credit Card Debt in America: 2017 Statistics appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

The Ultimate FAFSA Guide: Maximize Federal Student Aid for College

college student loans bills graduate

Over the past decade, college tuition rates rose an average of 5% per year. The average bachelor’s graduate in 2015 had over $35,000 in student loan debt. To graduate without burdensome debts, students must maximize their aid options. This means understanding the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and using their knowledge to maximize student aid.

Starting with the 2017-2018 FAFSA, maximizing federal aid is easier than ever. The U.S. Department of Education now allows access to the FAFSA three months earlier (October rather than January). Applicants will also use an earlier year for income and tax information. This means it’s easy to incorporate FAFSA into the college application timeline.

What is the FAFSA?

The FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. It’s a dense form that students must complete to receive federal student aid.

The form ensures that federal student aid goes to students with the greatest need. However, this does not mean that only low-income families should fill out the form. Filling out the FAFSA is the only way to receive access to low-cost federal student loans. The FAFSA also gives families access to some scholarships, grants, and work-study programs. Some schools require a completed FAFSA for a student to apply for merit-based aid.

What do I need to fill out the FAFSA?

Filling out the FAFSA may seem daunting, but proper preparation will help families complete the application with minimal stress. One of the most important ways to ease the stress is to gather documents from the appropriate time. Use the chart below as a reference guide to understand the appropriate documents.

School attendance window FAFSA form FAFSA availability Income and tax year Assets and liabilities Born before this date for independent student status Homeless or self-supporting and at risk of homelessness after this date for independent status
July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 2016-2017 January 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 2015 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1993 July 1, 2015
July 1, 2017-June 30, 2018 2017-2018 October 1, 2016-June 30, 2018 2015 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1994 July 1, 2016
July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019 2018-2019 October 1, 2017-June 30, 2019 2016 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1995 July 1, 2017
July 1, 2019-June 30, 2020 2019-2020 October 1, 2018-June 30, 2020 2017 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1996 July 1, 2018

Here’s a checklist of items you’ll need before filling out the FAFSA.

All Students

  • Social Security number
  • Alien registration number (if you are not a U.S. citizen)
  • Student’s federal income tax returns from the appropriate year
  • Student’s prior year W-2 or other earning statements from the appropriate year
  • Student’s records of untaxed income from the appropriate year
  • Student’s bank statements (checking, savings)
  • Student’s non-retirement investment account statements (after tax brokerage, 529 accounts, Coverdell ESA accounts, CDs, money market accounts)
  • Student’s record of non-taxed income (including income gifts that come from 529 plans owned by grandparents, income gifts to pay tuition, etc.)
  • Student’s records for investment real estate
  • An FSA ID to sign electronically

Dependent Students Only

  • Parent’s federal income tax returns from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s W-2 or other earning statements from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s records of untaxed income from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s banking and checking account statements
  • Parent’s non-retirement investment account statements (after tax brokerage, 529 accounts, Coverdell ESA accounts, CDs, money market accounts)
  • Parent’s records for investment real estate (not personal home)

Most students will be considered dependents. This is true even if a student is self-supporting for a period of time prior to starting college.

To be classified as independent, a student must meet one of these qualifications:

  • Student turns 24 prior to January 1 of FAFSA start year (see chart above)
  • Student is starting postgraduate studies
  • Student is on active military duty (not for training purposes or for state service only)
  • Student is a military veteran
  • Student supports dependent children
  • Student is a legally emancipated minor
  • Parents died after age 13, foster child after age 13, or dependent or ward of the state after age 13
  • Student is homeless or self-supporting and at risk of homelessness after July 1 in the year prior to start year (see chart above)

When are the FAFSA deadlines?

College students need to fill out the FAFSA every year that they want to receive federal financial aid. A traditional student who spends four years in school can expect to fill out the FAFSA four times through their college career.

Starting with the 2017-2018 FAFSA, the U.S. Department of Education extended the FAFSA deadlines. Previously, the U.S. Department of Education released the FAFSA on the January 1 prior to the attendance window. Applicants could complete the form from January 1 through the end of the attendance window.

when-are-the-fafsa-deadlines

Now, the U.S. Department of Education releases the FAFSA on October 1 prior to the attendance window. You may complete the FAFSA from the date it is released until the end of the attendance window. You can retroactively receive grants and loans for the school year provided that you complete the FAFSA by the end of the attendance window.

Deadlines for state and institutional aid

State and institutional aid organizations are not as lenient as the U.S. Department of Education. Most states require aid applicants to complete their FAFSA as soon after October 1 as possible. You can check your state-specific deadline on the FAFSA website.

Most states have just one FAFSA deadline, even if you plan to attend school on a delayed schedule. Often states give out aid on a first come, first served basis. Do not delay completing the FAFSA. You can work out changes based on your attendance after you’ve completed the FAFSA.

In general, you want to file the FAFSA as soon as you can to maximize institutional aid. Many universities grant institution-specific aid shortly after accepting students. Submit your FAFSA to all potential schools soon after you apply. Even if a school hasn’t accepted you yet, you should allow them to see your FAFSA responses.

Filling out the FAFSA alone may not be enough to get aid from your state or school. Many states require that you fill out additional forms to receive state-based aid. The most common form is the College Scholarship Service (CSS) profile. The CSS profile considers more data, and it offers students and their families the opportunity to flesh out their financial situation.

The CSS profile and other financial aid applications DO NOT replace the FAFSA. To get any federal student aid, you must fill out the FAFSA. You may also need to fill out additional forms. The Edvisors Network maintains a comprehensive list of state-based scholarships and grants. Students can research the forms that their state requires.

Students who are seeking college-based aid may have to complete institutional applications. These applications may be in addition to the FAFSA or in lieu of it. If aid details aren’t clear from the school’s website, contact the financial aid department to learn more. Many students find that their best chance at institutional aid comes right after applying to the school.

What happens after I fill out the FAFSA?

Three to five days after you complete the FAFSA, you will receive a Student Aid Report via email. This report is what schools will use to determine your eligibility for federal (and sometimes other) student aid.

Decoding your Student Aid Report

The most important number on the FAFSA is your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Your family’s EFC is the amount parents and students are expected to allocate toward educational expenses. This amount can vary from zero dollars to more than the expected cost of college. This number is in the upper right-hand corner of the Student Aid Report.

In general, the lower your EFC, the more federal aid you will receive. Your specific eligibility for federal aid depends on your school’s cost of attendance.

The Student Aid Report also includes a Data Release Number (DRN). You will need this four-digit code to allow your school to change certain information on your FAFSA.

In addition to these two numbers, you will see your responses to questions on the FAFSA. If you find a mistake, you will need to correct it on FAFSA.gov. You can use your FSA ID to log in and submit changes. If your situation changes (such as the number of people in your parents’ household or your dependency status), you will need to update your FAFSA because it will change your EFC.

Schools submit awards packages to you

The U.S. Department of Education will send your Student Aid Report to any schools you have listed on your FAFSA. If you apply for another school after completing the FAFSA, you should log in to FAFSA.gov to submit your Student Aid Report to that school.

Once you’ve been accepted to the school, the school will use the EFC and their cost of attendance to determine your eligibility for federal aid. The school will send you a report that includes your eligibility for federal grants, subsidized and unsubsidized loans, and work-study programs. They may also send you details about other financial awards that you’ve received from the state or the institution.

You may need to contact the financial aid office at a school to see if you’re eligible for any scholarships or grants that they didn’t list. Be proactive in meeting other financial aid deadlines defined by your school’s financial aid office. Completing the CSS profile or institutional applications may allow you to earn more scholarships or grants or better loan rates. Check with schools where you’ve been accepted and your state’s website to learn more.

You can receive awards packages from multiple schools, even if you haven’t enrolled. Compare the awards packages to find the most cost-effective education. The federal aid will remain the same in every package, but the state and institutional aid can have a huge effect on your out-of-pocket costs.

Accept or decline aid

Once you choose a school, you will need to decide whether or not to accept the various forms of aid. Most people will accept grants and scholarships since those do not need to be paid off.

You will need to decide if accepting federal work-study or loans is best in your circumstances. You can work closely with a financial aid officer from your school to understand the pros and cons behind these options.

Once you make a decision, you’ll have the option to accept aid (including loans) through an online platform offered by your school.

what-happens-after-i-fill-out-the-fafsa

How is my federal aid package determined?

Federal aid is awarded based on expected family contribution (and to a lesser extent the cost of attendance at your chosen university). A lower expected family contribution means you’ll get more aid, including subsidized loans and possibly a Pell Grant for low-income students.

The expected family contribution accounts for four variables:

  • Student’s income (and spousal income for independent students)
  • Student’s non-retirement assets (and spousal income for independent students)
  • Parent’s income (for dependent students)
  • Parent’s non-retirement assets (for dependent students)

Parents and students can shelter a limited amount of their income and assets from the EFC. The sheltering limits change each year, and they are published within the FAFSA application.

Students are expected to contribute 50% of their income after sheltering. They are expected to contribute 20% of nonsheltered assets to their educational expenses. Students cannot shelter as much income or net worth as parents.

Parents are expected to contribute 22% to 47% of income after sheltering. They are expected to contribute 12% of nonsheltered assets.

Using the EFC and an expected cost of attendance, the U.S. Department of Education appropriates funds. The FAFSA4caster will help you determine your current EFC and an expected aid package based on current costs of attendance. This is a useful tool for students who are more than one year out from starting college.

Full-time students with an EFC less than $5,200 can expect to receive a Pell Grant worth between $600 and $5,185.

Students who demonstrate financial need (those with a cost of attendance greater than their expected family contribution) will be eligible for either direct subsidized or direct unsubsidized loans. Both loans for undergraduate students have an interest rate of 3.76%. Graduate students will pay 5.31% on their direct unsubsidized loans.
The federal government places limits on direct borrowing. The limits are in the table below. If you need to borrow more money, you will have to look to federal PLUS Loans (higher interest rates), private loans, or covering educational expenses through other means.

Year Dependent Student Limit Independent Student Limit
First Year Undergraduate $5,500 (up to $3,500 subsidized) $9,500 (up to $3,500 subsidized)
Second Year Undergraduate $6,500 (up to $4,500 subsidized) $10,500 (up to $4,500 subsidized)
Third Year + Undergraduate $7,500 (up to $5,500 subsidized) $12,500 (up to $5,500 subsidized)
Undergraduate Student Total Limits $31,000 (up to $23,000 subsidized) $57,500 (up to $23,000 Subsidized)
Graduate Students N/A $20,500 (unsubsidized only)
Graduate Student Total Limits N/A $138,500 (up to $65,500 in subsidized loans). Aggregate amount includes totals from undergraduate studies.

How can I maximize my federal aid?

You must use accurate information when you complete the FAFSA. However, careful planning and understanding the FAFSA can help you maximize your aid. Keep these steps in mind as you apply for aid.

Avoid common FAFSA errors

It’s easy to make errors when you’re filling out a 100+ question application, and the wording on the FAFSA can be unclear. These are mistakes to avoid.

  • Factor deductions out of your adjusted gross income (AGI): Questions 36 and 85 on the FAFSA ask for adjusted gross income.
    • A lot of people forget to take out their deductions when they report AGI. Your AGI should not include contributions to certain retirement accounts, contributions to a health savings account, or college tuition, fees, or student loan interest (with limitations). Use these directions to be sure you’re using the right numbers.
  • Some income from work is sheltered: Questions 39, 40, 88, and 89 ask about income earned from work.
    • This is not the same as your adjusted gross income. The FAFSA uses this number to determine how much of your income can be sheltered. The more income you earn from work, the more you can shelter. Use these formulas to list the correct number.
  • Understand the value of your investment assets: Questions 42 and 91 request the value of your investment assets.
    • Don’t include retirement accounts or educational accounts. The value of real estate should factor in debt (and your personal home should be excluded). Cash value in life insurance policies are not considered investment assets.
  • Your business and farm values are likely zero: Questions 43 and 92 ask for the value of investment farms or small businesses.
    • Most families will have a value of zero. Unless you employ more than 100 employees or your family has less than 50% of the voting rights, you don’t need to declare this. Likewise, farms can be excluded if you live and work on the farm.

If you’re not sure, what a question means, use the guide Completing the FAFSA to understand the definition. The wording of questions leads a lot of people to overestimate their EFC.

In addition to avoiding errors, careful planning can help you reduce your EFC and maximize your aid.

Reduce your assets

One of the best ways to reduce your EFC is to reduce the assets that you declare on the FAFSA. You can do this without destroying your wealth. These are a few options to consider.

  • Pay down consumer debt (reduces available cash).
  • Don’t cash out a life insurance policy.
  • Carry debt on rental properties rather than a personal house (your personal house isn’t an asset that the FAFSA considers, but rental properties are).
  • Accelerate needs-based purchases (reduces cash for spending you would have done otherwise).
  • Contribute money to retirement accounts.

Reduce your income

Smart income planning will help keep your EFC low. These are a few ideas that can help reduce the amount of income counted on the FAFSA.

  • Ask grandparents to delay financial help until the last year of school. Gifts from relatives are untaxed income that need to be declared on the FAFSA. The last year of school won’t appear on the FAFSA, so a gift in the last year goes a long way.
  • Avoid realizing capital gains (selling a rental property or a brokerage account) until the last year of college. Capital gains cannot be sheltered, and they are counted toward income. Most families should not realize capital gains during the college years to avoid FAFSA penalties.
  • Contribute to a pre-tax retirement plan like a 401(k) or a Traditional IRA.
  • Contribute to a health savings account.

Increase your ability to shelter income and assets

The FAFSA allows families to shelter some portion of their income and assets. Taking full advantage of these shelters may lead to more aid. These are a few things to consider.

  • Parents with small businesses should hire their students for up to $6,400 worth of work. This reduces parents’ income by $6,400 and increases the student’s income up to the sheltered amount for dependent students.
  • Parents of dependent students should keep assets in their name. Dependent students have to contribute 50% of available assets as opposed to 12% of parents’ available assets.
  • Delay college until independence. Students who get married or wait until age 24 to start college will not have to consider their parents’ income or assets.
  • Invest more in the family farm or business. A family farm or family business can help you build wealth, and you don’t have to declare these on the FAFSA.

Avoid high-cost strategies

Some families get tricked into high-cost strategies that don’t pay off. These are a few that you should avoid.

  • Don’t take out a whole life insurance policy. A whole life insurance policy reduces your available cash, but it comes at a high commission cost. Don’t bother purchasing one unless you actually want whole life insurance coverage.

Don’t try to shelter assets in a trust. A trust where you or your child is a named beneficiary needs to be declared on the FAFSA. It’s difficult to get around this. Unless you have a specific need for a trust, don’t create one.

How can I use FAFSA to plan for college costs?

The FAFSA is not a college-cost planning tool, but you can use other tools to plan for upcoming college costs. College Navigator offers free information on current college costs. Using it with estimated aid from the FAFSA4caster will give high school students a good idea of their aid options. You could also consider using a paid tool like EFC Plus for an easier college-planning tool.

Parents and students looking to keep student loan debt low will benefit from using the Family Budget Analyzer, which can help you find places to cut expenses. A college cost projector will help you know the costs that your family needs to cover. Sallie Mae also offers a long-range planning calculator that can help you estimate your total indebtedness upon college graduation.

Understanding the FAFSA is one small part of planning for college costs. It will pay for you to understand it, but federal aid is just one component of the college-planning picture. Most students will need to devote time to finding a cost-effective education and applying for grants and scholarships to supplement federal aid.

The post The Ultimate FAFSA Guide: Maximize Federal Student Aid for College appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Here’s Everything You Should Know About Term Life Insurance

Shot of a group of people warming up outdoors

The majority of healthy Americans can use term life insurance policies to get sufficient coverage in place for anywhere from $15 to $100 a month. Most (85%) American consumers believe that most people need life insurance, but just over 60% carry a policy. Even among those who carry a life insurance policy, the amount covered is frequently not enough.

Term life insurance is a low-cost way for individuals with financial dependents to meet those people’s needs even after death. But it can be confusing to understand what it is and what it covers.

When to Consider Life Insurance

Anyone who has a financial dependent should consider buying life insurance if they don’t have the assets available to cover their dependent’s financial needs in the event of their death.

There are five major events that create financial dependence and may justify the purchase of life insurance. These events include:

  1. Taking on unsecured debt with a co-signer
  2. Taking on secured debt with a co-signer
  3. Marriage
  4. Having a child
  5. Moving to a single income

How Much Life Insurance Do I Need?

Term life insurance is the cheapest form of life insurance, but carrying too much life insurance is a waste of money. The exact amount you decide to carry will depend on your risk tolerance and the size of your financial obligations. In this article we offer rules of thumb that can help you calculate the financial loss associated with your death.

Most life insurance companies and brokers also offer life insurance calculators, but these calculators rely on averages. Since each person’s situation is different, it can be valuable to create an estimate on your own.

Unsecured debt with a co-signer

If you’ve taken on unsecured debt (like student loans) with a co-signer and you don’t have sufficient cash or investments to cover the debt, then consider purchasing life insurance in the amount that is co-signed. The beneficiary of this policy should be the person who co-signed the loan with you.

For example, if your parents have taken out $50,000 in loans via a Parent PLUS Loan or private loans, then you should take out a $50,000 policy with your parents as the beneficiaries. In most cases involving unsecured debt with a co-signer, a short term (such as 10-15 years) will be the most cost-effective option for covering this debt.

Secured debt with a co-signer

Secured debts (like a mortgage or a car loan) have some form of capital that could be sold to pay off most or all of the loans, but you still might want to consider taking out life insurance for these types of debts.

While your co-signer can sell the asset, pay off the debt, and become financially whole, that may not be the right choice for your situation (especially if the co-signer is your spouse).

For example, a couple that takes out $200,000 for a 30-year mortgage may decide to each take out a $200,000, 30-year term life insurance policy. This policy will allow either spouse to continue to live in the house in the event of the other’s death.

Marriage

Marriage isn’t a financial transaction, but it brings about financial interdependence. In the event of your death, the last thing you want your spouse to be concerned about is their finances.

Couples without children who both work aren’t financially dependent on each other, but many people would still like to provide their spouse 1-3 years’ worth of income in life insurance to cover time off from work, final expenses, and expenses associated with transitioning houses or apartments.

A couple who each earn $40,000 per year, and who have $20,000 outside of their retirement accounts, can consider purchasing life insurance policies between $20,000-$100,000 in life insurance to provide for the other’s financial needs in the event of their death.

Having a child

Because children are financially dependent on their parents, parents should carry life insurance to cover the costs of raising their children in the event of a parent’s death.

The estimated cost of raising a child from birth to 18 is $245,000, so it is reasonable for each parent to carry a policy of $100,000-$250,000 per child. It is especially important to note that stay-at-home parents should not neglect life insurance since their death may represent a big financial loss to their family (manifested in increased child care costs).

The beneficiary of this life insurance policy should be the person who would care for your child in the event of your death. Sometimes this will be your spouse, but sometimes it will be your child’s other parent, or a trust set up in your child’s name.

If a couple has two children under age 5, and $50,000 in accounts outside of retirement, then each parent should have between $150,000 and $450,000 in life insurance. Parents of older children may choose to take out smaller policies or forego the policy altogether.

Income dependence

If your spouse is dependent upon your income to meet their financial needs, then it is important to purchase enough life insurance to care for their immediate and ongoing financial needs in the event of your death. If you are the exclusive income earner in your house or if you co-own a business with your spouse that requires each of you to play a role that the other cannot play, then your death would yield a tremendous financial loss for several years or more.

In order to estimate the size of policy needed in this situation, there are a few guidelines to consider. According to the well-respected Trinity Study, if you invest 25 times your family’s annual expenditures in a well-diversified portfolio, then your portfolio has a high likelihood of providing for their needs (accounting for inflation) for at least 30 years. A policy worth 25 times your annual income, less the assets you have invested outside of retirement accounts, is the maximum policy size you should consider.

Many people choose to take out even less than this because their spouse will eventually choose to return to work. A second rule of thumb is that the total amount of life insurance for which your spouse is the beneficiary should be worth 10-12 times your annual income. A policy of this size would reasonably provide money to pay for living and education expenses (if your spouse needs to re-train to enter the workforce) for many years without damaging your spouse’s prospects of retirement.

Based on these rules of thumb, if you earn $100,000 and your family’s expenses are $70,000 per year, and your spouse is a stay-at-home parent, then you should have enough life insurance to pay out between $1 million and $1.75 million (remember to subtract the values of any other policies or non-retirement assets above when calculating this amount).

How to Shop for Life Insurance

After deciding on the amount of insurance you need, and the terms you need, you can start shopping for the best policy for you. Although it’s possible to shop around for the best insurance, MagnifyMoney recommends that most people connect with a life insurance broker. For this report, every quote received from a broker was within a few cents of the quote received directly from the insurance company.

If you tell a broker exactly what you want, they can pull up quotes from a dozen or more reputable companies to get you the most cost-effective insurance given your health history. This is especially important if you have some health restrictions.

People with standard health (usually driven by high blood pressure or obesity, or many family health problems) may find some difficulty finding low rates, but brokers can help connect them with the right companies.

People with “substandard health” because of obesity, high blood pressure, or elevated cholesterol, those suffering from current health issues, or people recently in remission from major illnesses will not qualify for term life insurance.

Top Three Life Insurance Brokers

  1. PolicyGenius – PolicyGenius is an online-only broker with an easy-to-use process and helpful policy information. Users give no contact information until they are ready to purchase a policy. PolicyGenius’s system saves data, so users don’t have to re-enter time and again. It is very easy to compare prices and policies before applying.
  2. Quotacy – Quotacy is an online-only life insurance broker with connections to more term life insurance companies than most other life insurance companies. Quotacy offers quick and easy forms to fill out, and they do not require that you give contact information until you are ready to purchase a policy. Unfortunately, they do not fully vet out the policies, so you may need to ask an agent questions before completing a purchase.
  3. AccuQuote – AccuQuote is an online-based brokerage company that specializes in life insurance products. Unlike the online-only brokerage systems, their quotes are completed through a brokerage agent via a phone call. People who prefer some human interaction will find that AccuQuote emphasizes customer service and offers the same price points as online-only competitors.

Top Life Insurance Companies

For those who prefer to shop for life insurance without the aid of a broker, these are the top five companies to consider before purchasing a policy. Each of these companies allow you to begin an application online though you may need to connect with an agent for more details (including a rate quote).

To be a top life insurance issuer, companies had to offer the lowest rates on 30-year term insurance for preferred plus or preferred health levels, and be A+ rated through the Better Business Bureau.

  1. Allianz – Allianz offers the lowest rates for both Preferred and Preferred Plus customers, but they do require you to contact an agent or a broker for a quote.
  2. Thrivent Financial – Thrivent Financial offers the lowest rates for Preferred Plus customers, but they require you to contact an agent before they will confirm your rate.
  3. American National – American National offers among the lowest rates with Preferred and Preferred Plus customers, and they work closely with all major online brokers. You must contact an agent to get a quote directly from them.
  4. Banner Life Insurance (a subsidiary of Legal & General America) – Banner Life Insurance offers an online quote portal and very low rates for Preferred Plus customers. They also seem to be a bit more lenient on the line than other customers for considering Preferred Plus (not considering family history).
  5. Prudential – Prudential offers an online quote portal and the lowest rates for Preferred customers.

What to Expect Next

After you’ve decided to purchase an insurance policy, the policy will need to undergo an underwriting process. This will include a quick medical examination (height, weight, blood pressure, urine sample, and drawing blood) that usually takes place in your home. After that, the insurance companies will need to collect and review your medical records before issuing a policy for you.

Underwriting typically takes 3-8 weeks depending on how complete your medical records are. The company will then issue you a policy, and as long as you continue to pay, your policy will remain in effect (until the expiration of the term). Once your policy is in effect, you can rest easy knowing that your financial dependents will be taken care of in the event of your death.

 

The post Here’s Everything You Should Know About Term Life Insurance appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

6 Health Benefits You Should Never Have to Pay For

 

child and doctor talking in clinic

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, most insurers must now provide preventive benefits without any form of cost sharing. And yet, millions of Americans are still missing out on free (and potentially life-saving) preventative health care services, like flu shots and cancer screenings.

If pocketbook concerns are keeping you from taking care of your health, take a second look. You may find that the preventive services you want are covered without cost to you.

Free benefits — Really?

Of course, it’s misleading to call preventive benefits completely free. You pay for them in the cost of your health insurance premiums. But you may as well use these benefits because, after all, you’re already paying for them. Recent studies show that preventive benefits may save 2 million lives and $4 billion dollars annually.

Furthermore, the ACA doesn’t guarantee free preventative treatments for 100% of insured people. Some insurance plans were given a pass on providing preventative services if they were implemented before March 2010. In 2016, 23% of workers who receive benefits through their employer are enrolled in a grandfathered plan and may not receive full free preventive benefits.

There is also the risk that medical providers may bill patients for services that should be free. Those types of errors are caused when medical billing offices unwittingly bundle covered and uncovered services, when your bill contains an error, or when your insurer errantly denies a claim.

Office visits and preventive services are often billed separately. This means you may receive a legitimate bill even when you thought you were going to receive free care. The only way to avoid this conundrum is to ask for costs in advance. You may also be billed if you use an out-of-network provider.

Below, we cover the preventive benefits you can expect to receive for free, and the times that they may lead to unexpected medical bills.

Benefits for adults

Preventive benefits for all adults fall into six categories. Some benefits are limited to at-risk groups or women only. Before you use a preventive benefit, ask your doctor if you qualify for free screenings. If you don’t, you will have to pay a bill.

Some preventive services will be built into an annual physical, but you can request the services as you need them.

Remember, the preventive service is free, but you may need to pay for ongoing treatment if you uncover a health problem.

Cancer Screenings:

  • Breast cancer screening (mammogram)
  • Cervical cancer screening (pap smear)
  • HPV screening (pap smear)
  • Skin cancer counseling
  • Colorectal screenings (fecal occult blood testing, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy)
  • Lung cancer screening (tomography)

Insurers (except grandfathered insurers) cannot impose an extra charge for polyps removed during a colonoscopy. They also cannot charge for medically necessary anesthesia.

Treatment for Chronic Conditions:

  • Screening for the following diseases: abdominal aortic aneurysm, diabetes (blood glucose), hypertension (blood pressure), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, latent TB infection, liquid disorders, osteoporosis
  • Depression screening
  • Low-dose aspirin (adults with cardiovascular or colorectal disease risk factors)

Except obesity management and prescribed aspirin, you must pay for chronic condition treatments through your insurer. This means treating chronic conditions will include cost sharing.

Many chronic condition tests require a blood or urine sample. If your doctor is worried about your health, they may test for multiple uncovered diseases. In that case, you can expect to pay a fee for lab work.

You may also see a charge if a medical biller uses the wrong medical billing codes. If you end up with an unexpected bill, request an itemized bill and an explanation of benefits. You will see on the bill if any you have fees associated with the covered screening. When you see fees for covered screenings, call your doctor to have them adjust the bill. You can also ask your insurer to adjust the claim for you.

Free Health Promotion Treatment

  • Alcohol misuse
  • Obesity screening and management
  • Diet and activity counseling for cardiovascular disease prevention
  • Falls prevention (adults 65+)
  • Tobacco cessation
  • Well-woman visits
  • Intimate partner violence screening and counseling

Initial counseling and tobacco cessation pharmaceuticals are covered at 100%, but your doctor may recommend therapies and counseling not covered by insurance. Be sure to ask if counseling will be billed as a preventive benefit.

Free Immunizations

All immunizations recommend by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) must be covered as preventative benefits. This includes over 20 types of immunizations including the annual flu shot.

If you aren’t sure whether an immunization will be covered by your insurance, ask your doctor before you agree to the immunization.

Sexual Health Treatment

  • Screening tests for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV infection
  • STI counseling
  • HIV counseling
  • Contraceptive services

Insurers must cover the lowest cost version of 18 unique forms of birth control. Treatment for sexually transmitted diseases or infections is not covered as a preventive benefit.

Lab work for sexually transmitted diseases that are not listed will cost extra. Request cost estimates for all tests and screenings even if they are part of your standard wellness visit.

Pregnancy Treatments

  • Anemia, bacteriuria, gestational diabetes, HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis screening
  • Depression screening
  • Folic acid supplements
  • Preeclampsia preventive medicine
  • Tobacco cessation behavioral cessation support
  • Breastfeeding counseling, supplies, and support

Obstetricians commonly ask for tests outside of those listed above. You should expect to pay lab fees for those tests. Most obstetricians can provide clients with a list of routine pregnancy tests and associated costs. In addition to lab fees, you should expect to pay for ultrasounds, labor and delivery fees, and facility fees during your pregnancy and birth experience.

Benefits for Children

Preventive benefits for children are more robust than preventive services for adults. Nearly all procedures provided during scheduled well-child visits will be covered as preventive services. This includes regular checkups, screenings for childhood diseases and disorders, and immunizations.

If your child provides a blood or urine sample you may want to ask about lab fees, but all other services will be free.

Children at risk and sexually active adolescents can receive all the preventive benefits that adults receive in addition to those specific to children.

Regular well-child visits will make it easy for you and your child to take advantage of any preventive benefits available to you.

Final word: Don’t neglect preventive benefits

Preventive coverage can help you catch and cure otherwise deadly diseases. Curing early-stage diseases often costs less than later-stage treatments, and early treatments may save your life. Recent studies show that preventive benefits may save 2 million lives and $4 billion dollars annually.

These services come with no additional cost sharing to you. Take advantage of preventive coverage; you can’t afford to neglect your health.

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