6 Vital Things Parents Need to Know About Student Loans

Before helping your child take out loans — or taking out loans in your own name — make sure you understand the benefits and drawbacks.

About 3.5 million high school students are expected to graduate from high school this spring, and most will go to college. While this a proud moment for students and parents, many families are stressed about how to pay for school in the fall.

Before helping your child take out loans — or taking out loans in your own name — make sure you understand the benefits and drawbacks. Here are six things every parent should know about student loans.

1. There’s Still Time to Complete the FAFSA

For your children to get federal student aid such as loans, grants and work-study programs, they must complete the Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) every year.

If your child hasn’t completed their FAFSA yet, there’s still time — but not much. Though the federal deadline is June 30, 2018, states and individual schools often have much earlier due dates.

Moreover, schools have limited funds when it comes to some loans and grants, so the earlier your child applies, the better. To make sure you get the necessary funds, submit the FAFSA as soon as possible. You can complete the application online in less than 30 minutes.

2. Take Advantage of Federal Loans First

You’ll find out what types of federal aid your child is eligible for after completing the FAFSA. If your children need to take out loans to pay for school, encourage them to start with federal student loans rather than private ones.

Federal loans typically have lower interest rates, more generous repayment terms and do not require a lengthy credit history or a co-signer. Plus, they come with benefits such as access to income-driven repayment plans and deferment or forbearance options if your child struggles to make payments after graduation.

Private student loans can have higher interest rates and typically require a co-signer. They also have fewer repayment options, which can make keeping up with payments more difficult on an entry-level salary. Private loans should be a last resort used to fill the gap if federal loans don’t cover the total cost of college attendance.

3. Learn How Parent PLUS Loans Work

If you want to help your child pay for school but don’t have enough money saved to pay outright, you may be eligible for a parent Direct PLUS Loan. This is a federal loan designed specifically for parents of dependent students.

To be eligible, you must be the biological or adoptive parent and your child must be enrolled at least half-time at a qualifying school. Both you and your child need to be U.S. citizens or eligible noncitizens. Unlike other forms of federal loans, parent PLUS Loans require a credit check.

To get a parent PLUS Loan, your child should complete the FAFSA. You will sign a PLUS Loan master promissory note. You can borrow as much as the cost of your child’s education, minus any other financial assistance you receive. The current interest rate for Parent PLUS Loans is 6.31%.

4. Think Twice Before Co-Signing

If your child needs a private loan to pay for school, the lender may require a co-signer before approving them. Before you agree to cosign, make sure you understand what it entails.

Becoming a co-signer means you’re the guarantor of the loan. If your child falls behind on the payments, you’re responsible for making them. If your child misses a payment and doesn’t tell you, your credit will be damaged. That consequence can make it more difficult for you to get approved for other forms of credit, such as a mortgage or car loan. (You can see how student and other loans impact your credit with a free credit snapshot on Credit.com.)

Co-signing is a huge responsibility, so make sure you’re comfortable with the potential fallout before putting your signature on a loan application.

5. Know Discharge Rules

While no one wants to think about themselves or their child dying or suffering a serious accident, it’s important to understand a loan’s rules about these events before taking on student debt.

If your child has federal loans and later dies, the government will discharge the debt. If you have a parent PLUS Loan and either you or your child passes away, the loans are also eliminated. If your child becomes permanently disabled and can no longer work, they can get their loans forgiven through Total and Permanent Disability Discharge.

Private loans are different. Some lenders discharge loans in the case of death or disability, but not every lender offers this. There have been horror stories about parents who have lost a child, yet are still responsible for the student loans. Make sure you understand the lender’s rules before taking out or co-signing a private loan.

6. Prioritize Yourself

Though supporting your children through school is a wonderful gift to offer, take a hard look at your finances first. If you have other forms of debt or your retirement savings are too small, prioritize your own finances.

Your children can get grants, scholarships and work part-time in school to pay for college. If they struggle to repay their federal student loans, there are a wealth of plans and programs to help them get back on track.

The same is not true when it comes to credit card debt, personal loans or retirement. If you fall behind on payments or don’t save enough before you stop working, there are few places you can turn for help. Ensure you are in a secure financial position before taking on more debt for your child.

Know Your Funding Options

Before signing loan paperwork, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting into. Student loans can be complicated, and if you’re not careful, you could be on the hook for thousands in debt. Work with your children to ensure you understand all your options and obligations as you prepare to send them off to college.

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Moving to One of These 9 States Could Save You Thousands

Should you move to one of the nine states with no income tax? Here's how to decide.

Each year, taxpayers pay trillions in income taxes. In fact, the government collected approximately $3 trillion last year. If you’re like most taxpayers, you owe both federal and state taxes, which means an even bigger chunk of your paycheck goes to the government.

When you’re carrying debt — whether it’s student loans or a credit card balance — it can be frustrating to see so much of your hard-earned money leave your hands. That’s why many people consider moving somewhere with no state income tax.

According to a new study by Student Loan Hero, taxpayers could save an average of $1,977 a year by moving to a state with no income tax. But before you pack your bags, find out what factors you should keep in mind.

States Without Income Taxes

States that collect income taxes use them to fund essential programs and services for residents. More than 50% of state tax revenues go toward education and healthcare initiatives, such as Medicaid. State agencies also use collected income taxes to pay for services, including transportation and law enforcement.

Residents in most of the country must pay federal and state income taxes. However, nine states don’t levy any state income tax: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. Because you don’t have to pay state taxes, you can get a significant yearly savings.

How Much Could You Save?

How much you could save by moving to a state with no income tax depends on your income bracket and where you live now. For example, Oregon workers have a state income tax of 7.75%, the highest rate of any state in the country. Someone earning the median salary in the state — $49,710 — would pay $3,851 in addition to their federal taxes.

Moving to another state to save that kind of cash can be tempting. So tempting, in fact, that 30% of survey respondents would move to a state with no income tax to save money. Moreover, 38% of respondents said they’d use their tax savings to accelerate their student loan debt repayment. (To see how student loans are impacting your credit, check out your free credit report snapshot on Credit.com..)

Using Your Savings for Debt Repayment

The savings you get from not paying state taxes can save you even more money in the long run. Using that money to repay your loan helps you pay off the loans faster, cutting down on interest charges. It can also save you thousands over the life of your loan.

For example, say you had $35,000 in student loans with an interest rate of 6.31% (the current rate for Grad PLUS loans) and a minimum monthly payment of $400 a month. Now, take the average $1,977 you would save by moving to a state without income tax and divide it up over 12 months. That would give you an extra $165 in your pocket each month. If you put that additional amount toward your student loans, you could pay off your debt about three and a half years early and save more than $4,500 in interest.

Other Costs

Before packing up and moving to a new state, consider other costs that may eat into your savings. Between putting down a deposit on a new apartment, moving your belongings and registering your vehicle in a new state, you can spend thousands.

In addition, some states with no income tax make up their revenue through other means, such as sales tax. Florida has a 6% sales tax on goods and services, including essentials such as clothing or food. If you’re not used to paying taxes on groceries, the added sales tax can put a dent in your budget. That’s why it’s important to compare the cost of living when deciding if it’s worth it to move to a new state.

Moving to Save Money

Depending on your circumstances, moving to a state with no income tax can give you a substantial savings. You can use that money to pay off your student loans faster, boost your emergency fund or catch up on retirement savings. But before you make the leap, be sure you understand the added expenses of moving so your decision is financially sound.

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5 College Degrees That Are Worth the Money

There's no doubt that college is expensive. Here are the degrees that can really pay off.

There’s no doubt that college is expensive. In fact, the average cost per credit hour is $594, according to a new Student Loan Hero study on the cost of a college credit.

For a typical four-year program, students will spend $71,335 on average. If you have to take out loans to pay for your own educational pursuits, you could end up paying even more thanks to interest charges.

With so much money on the line, it’s important to be practical. So when deciding on your college major, it can be helpful to consider the degree’s return on investment (ROI) before making a decision.

How to Determine a Degree’s Potential ROI

When considering a degree’s ROI, think about what the earning potential is in your chosen field.

Some fields — such as teaching — can be immensely rewarding, but are notoriously low-paying. If you can get a degree for a relatively low cost, it may be worth it. Otherwise, you may be overwhelmed with debt as you start your career. Try researching salary potential on PayScale or a similar site.

Another factor to consider is field growth. While some career fields have high average salaries (law, for instance), new graduates have saturated the market and competition is fierce. Getting your foot in the door can be difficult and many workers are forced to take lower-paying jobs to make ends meet.

One great resource is an interactive report released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. It outlines unemployment data by industry, starting salaries, and the income you should expect by mid-career. It’s a tool that can help you see what fields are most in demand to help you ensure job security later on.

Five Majors With High Earning Potential

With those factors in mind, here are five degrees that are generally worth the money spent earning them.

1. Engineering

Engineering is one of the top-paying careers available today. The top-paying engineering specialties are petroleum, chemical and electrical engineering.

The industry is expected to grow about 3% by 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This signals continued demand for new workers. In most cases, you only need a bachelor’s degree, and not a master’s or professional credential, to begin your career.

And as an engineer, you can command the highest entry-level salary of all of your peers. Starting salaries average $64,891.

2. Computer Science

Computer science is another lucrative degree with the potential to work in several different areas. Organizations of every size and scope need skilled technology professionals, from small nonprofits to huge Fortune 500 companies.

Computer science is growing rapidly. The field is estimated to grow about 12% over the next seven years, outpacing many other industries.

If you enjoy this type of work, job security is high. Entry-level salaries average $61,321.

3. Math & Sciences

If you enjoy math, a degree in math and sciences can open doors for you throughout your career. You can work as a market analyst, operations researcher or project manager in a range of fields.

As companies increasingly adopt technology and research to grow their business, math professionals will be highly sought after. Experts project that the field will grow by 28% over the next few years.

The average starting salary is $55,087.

4. Economics

Similarly, the field of economics is in high demand, and salaries are increasing to meet the need. Economics is expected to grow 6% by 2024.

However, before pursuing a career in economics, it’s important to note that most jobs require a master’s degree. The added cost of graduate school can drastically increase your education costs. So it’s essential to evaluate the total expense compared to the salary.

The starting median salary is $52,100.

5. Communications

This major often gets a bad reputation for fierce competition and low salaries. However, communications salaries have recently increased and demand for new workers has gone up, as well. Within this broad field, you can pursue a career in public relations, marketing, or broadcast media.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the addition of 27,000 jobs in communications by 2024.

The average starting salary for someone in this major is $47,047.

Selecting a major is a huge decision with long-lasting implications for your future. Before making a choice, sit down and evaluate your financial, personal and professional goals. Then you can decide what makes the most sense for you.

Remember: Passion is important, but so is your future. Earning a degree that promises better salary and employment opportunities means you can pay off student loans faster and actually enjoy the fruits of your labor.

Editor’s note: Your student loan repayments can have an impact on your credit scores. To see how your repayment history is affecting your credit scores, you can check out a snapshot of your credit absolutely free using Credit.com’s Credit Report Summary.

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5 Items You Should Pay Taxes On (But Aren’t)

The IRS expects you to pay taxes on all sorts of earnings, including these five things you might be overlooking.

When it comes to taxes, everyone knows you have to report your income from a full-time job or side gig. (Of course, not doing so is a common tax mistake.) But the IRS doesn’t stop there — they expect you to pay taxes on all sorts of earnings, including these five things you might be overlooking.

1. eBay Profits

If you sell the occasional item, such as a dress you no longer like or a collectible from your childhood, you likely don’t need to report your eBay income on your taxes. Because the items you auction off are probably selling for less than you originally bought them for, you’re taking a loss and the IRS views the transaction like a garage sale.

But if you sell items regularly — auctioning off 200 items and earning more than $20,000 in sales each year — your income is taxable. PayPal will issue you a 1099-K form with your earnings for the year in addition to reporting your income info to the IRS.

But even if you don’t meet those numbers, you may still have to pay taxes on eBay sales. If you deliberately buy items to resell on eBay or manage an inventory, the IRS considers your eBay store to be a business and will tax your profits as income.

2. GoFundMe Campaign

Crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe are increasingly popular, raising money to help people with everything from medical bills to paying off student loans. But when it comes to taxes, crowdfunding can be extremely complicated.

According to GoFundMe, donations made through the site are considered personal gifts and are usually not taxable as income.

But the key word is usually. There are exceptions. In 2015, a cancer survivor who received $50,000 in donations got a tax bill for more than $19,000. It gets even more complicated if you collect donations on behalf of someone else. Even if you transfer the money to them, you could be on the hook for paying taxes on the entire amount.

Before creating or cashing out a GoFundMe campaign, talk to a tax professional about what you can do to ensure the IRS views the donations as gifts rather than income. Otherwise, you could end up having to pay taxes.

3. Free Items

Items you receive free from companies can be a tricky area. If they’re true gifts, free things are not taxable. But when there is an exchange of goods and services — such as a company giving you a product in exchange for a review on the item — the IRS considers it bartering and the value of the sample is taxable as income.

This is an important distinction, especially for bloggers and social media influencers who often receive gifted items from companies. While the monetary income from your activity may be small, the value of samples can add up quickly. You may have to pay taxes for the full amount.

4. Forgiven Debt

If you have debt your lender forgave, the amount could be taxable as income. If you repay your federal student loans with an income-driven repayment plan, for instance, part of your balance may be forgiven if you meet the program’s requirements. That’s great news, but the discharged balance is taxable as income.

For example, say you were eligible to have $10,000 forgiven because you met the requirements of your income-based repayment plan. While you no longer have to make payments on your loan after it’s been forgiven, the IRS will tax you on the discharged amount of $10,000, and you will be sent a 1099-C Cancellation of Debt form. (Here’s what to know if you get one.)

Exceptions to this rule are loans discharged through Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Teacher Loan Forgiveness and debt eliminated through bankruptcy. In those scenarios, you do not have to pay taxes on the forgiven amount.

5. Fantasy Football

Fantasy football is a $3.6 billion industry, one in which the average player spends nine hours a week strategizing. It’s a fun activity that can consume players and take over office spaces. But whether you’re a serious participant or a casual player, fantasy football can have surprising tax implications.

The IRS requires individuals to report winnings from gambling, prizes and hobbies. If you win the office pool or an online league, your prize money is taxable as income.

If your winnings are more than $600, the league or host should send you and the IRS a 1099-MISC form. But even if your winnings are below that threshold and you don’t get a 1099, you still need to report that income on your taxes.

Keep in mind: You may be able to deduct some of the associated costs, too. If you won $1,000 but it cost $500 to enter, you can report only the net profit.

Find Out If You Need to Pay Taxes

When it comes to getting their share of your income, the IRS doesn’t play around. Besides the money you earn from your job, you may owe money for other overlooked activities. If you’re unsure about what to include in your tax return, talk to a tax professional to avoid any penalties or fees.

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The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide for Filing Your Taxes

Find out how to do your own taxes — the right way.

When I was living on my own and working my first job, I decided to do my taxes myself.

I had no real idea how to file taxes, so I made a lot of mistakes. And because I was utterly clueless, it cost me. I missed important deductions and credits. Even worse, I messed up the math.

I ended up owing money to the IRS because of my errors, but I learned a lesson. Afterward, I did my homework and made sure I did my taxes correctly.

Don’t make the same mistakes I did. Find out how to do your own taxes — the right way.

Do I Need to File My Taxes?

The government doesn’t require everyone to file a tax return, so the first step is to figure out if you actually need to file. Three main factors determine if you need to file your taxes:

If you’re single and under the age of 65, you have to file taxes if you make more than $10,350 a year. If you’re married, filing jointly and your household income is more than $20,700, you also have to file a return.

If you make less than those annual amounts and are a dependent on your parents’ taxes, you do not need to file an individual return.

If you’re still not sure if you have to file a return, the IRS recently launched the “Do I Need to File a Return?” tool. It’s a questionnaire that takes about 10 minutes to complete. Once you’re done, the IRS will give you a recommendation on filing a return.

Important Tax Deadlines for 2017

You were probably always taught that the tax filing deadline is April 15. Though that’s normally true, this year is an exception. In 2017, you have three extra days to complete your taxes because tax deadline is April 18.

This year, April 15 is a Saturday, and the IRS doesn’t allow the tax deadline to fall on a weekend. The following Monday is Emancipation Day, a legal holiday in the District of Columbia. The IRS closes their offices that day, so the whole nation gets an extra day.

How to Request a Tax Extension

When learning how to do taxes, remember that if you’re going through a hardship or will be unable to file your return by April 18, you can get an extension. By filing a tax extension request, you can get up to six extra months to complete your return.

An extension can give you a reprieve in filing your return, but if you owe any money to the IRS it’s still due by April 18. If you miss that deadline, you could owe late fees and penalties. (Unpaid taxes can also damage your credit report.)

Documents You Need to File Your Taxes

When you’re preparing to do your taxes, collect the necessary documents ahead of time. It’s common for forms to trickle in slowly, so keeping a folder specifically for tax documents can help you track everything you need.

Here are some common documents that you may need to file your taxes:

W-2: A W-2 is a form your part-time or full-time employer sends you. It shows how much money you made in the past year and how much you paid toward taxes, Social Security and Medicare.

1099: If you earned more than $600 by freelancing or working a side-gig such as driving for Uber, your client will send you a 1099 form. The form shows how much you made last year, but unlike W-2s, no money was taken out for taxes.

Other income records: If you worked a side hustle but made less than $600 for a client, you won’t get a 1099 but you still have to report that income. Keeping a spreadsheet of your earnings or having a separate business bank account can help simplify tax time.

1098: If you made interest payments on your student loans, your lender will send you a 1098 form saying how much interest you paid last year.

1095-A: If you got health insurance through Healthcare.gov, the government will send you a 1095-A form. This says you had qualifying coverage for the year.

Interest earned: If you earned interest from any savings accounts over the year, your bank will send you a form. This will show how much interest you gained.

Bank account routing number: To get your tax refund as quickly as possible, it’s a good idea to sign up for direct deposit when you file your return. To do so, you’ll need your bank account number and your routing number.

Expenses and receipts: If you landed a new job, moved to advance your career or attended business conferences, you can deduct associated costs. Make sure you keep receipts to use when you do your taxes.

How to File Taxes: Which Method?

While you can certainly do your taxes the old-fashioned way, using the paper forms can lead to errors. There are many options that can help you file your taxes more accurately:

Tax software: You can file your taxes electronically using available programs such as TurboTax or Credit Karma’s free filing tool. Some options are free but others have a fee, so choose a program based on your preference. If you make less than $64,000, you can use the IRS’ free filing tool.

VITA sites: If you need more hands-on aid and make under $54,000, you can get free in-person help. Try using an IRS-trained volunteer at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site.

Hire a tax professional: When doing your own taxes is too confusing or complicated, hire a tax professional. They can handle your taxes for you and ensure you get the maximum refund available.

When choosing which option is best for you, consider how complex your taxes are. If you’re employed and have a side-hustle, but don’t have a business partnership or many investments, using software may be more than enough.

But if you run your own business, own a rental property or have investments, your taxes may be complex enough to warrant professional assistance.

Know Your Deductions and Credits

In the early stages of your career, you are unlikely to have enough deductions to make it worthwhile to itemize. Instead, you can claim the standard deduction of $6,300 and reduce how much of your income is taxable.

But you may be eligible for certain credits or deductions, even if you don’t itemize. Credits reduce what you owe in taxes, while tax deductions lower your taxable income. Both are valuable items to consider when doing your taxes and can help you get your maximum refund.

Here are some of the most common credits and deductions:

American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC): The AOTC is worth up to $2,500 per year and includes money paid for tuition and other related expenses.

Charitable Donation Deduction: If you donated money or items to a nonprofit organization, you may be able to deduct the value on your taxes.

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC): The EITC is a valuable credit that 20% of eligible people miss out on because they don’t claim it on their taxes. The average EITC recipient gets an average of $2,482 by claiming the credit — you could be eligible if are a low-income earner.

Home Office Deduction: If you work from home or run a business from where you live, you may be able to deduct up to $1,500 on your taxes.

Lifetime Learning Credit: With the Lifetime Learning Credit, you can deduct up to $2,000 in qualifying education expenses.

Student Loan Interest Deduction: If you made payments on your student loans, you can deduct up to $2,500 that you paid towards interest on your taxes.

Tuition Fee Deduction: With the tuition fee deduction, you can deduct up to $4,000 in college tuition and other fees.

There are also ways to cut down your property taxes.

File Your Return

When it comes to filing your taxes, you must file both a federal and state return. If you lived in multiple states last year, you need to file a return for each state you resided in.

The only time you do not need to file a state return is if you live in a state that does not charge income tax. There are seven states that fit in this category:

  • Alaska
  • Florida
  • Nevada
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Washington
  • Wyoming

You can submit your federal and state returns using tax software or you can mail in the tax forms. Depending on where you live, where you need to send the forms may change, so check the IRS website before putting them in the mail.

How to Track Your Tax Refund

If you’re eligible for a tax refund, you can track your return’s status and find out when to expect your money by using the IRS’ “Where’s My Refund?” tool. If you opt for direct deposit, you can expect your refund in as little as 10 days after filing.

How Can I Pay My Taxes If I Owe the IRS Money?

If instead of a refund, you owe money to the IRS, you have different payment options. If you use software to prepare your taxes, you can usually pay the money owed electronically through the program.

If you did your taxes on your own or didn’t pay electronically, you can use the IRS payment tool. Just make a payment through your checking account on the IRS website.

If you owe more than you can pay upfront, you can contact the IRS to set up a payment agreement and make monthly installments.

Learning How to Do Your Own Taxes

Figuring out how to file taxes for the first time can be confusing, overwhelming and stressful. Managing the process on your own can be difficult.

Using this guide — and the help of tax software or a professional — can help streamline the process and ensure you handle your taxes correctly.

For more information on how to file taxes and why it’s so important to be accurate, here are four reasons you should never lie on your taxes. You can read up on how to file your taxes for free here.

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4 Serious Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Lie on Your Taxes

Thinking of lying on your tax return? Here's why that's a very bad idea.

The average tax refund is more than $3,000. When you hear that number and do your taxes, only to find out that your refund is much less — or worse, that you owe money — it can be tempting to fudge the numbers and increase your refund.

But misrepresenting your income on your return counts as tax fraud, and has serious consequences. Below, find out what happens if you lie on your taxes and what IRS penalties you could face.

1. You Can Get Audited

Because the IRS gets all of the 1099s and W-2s you receive, they know if you do not report all of your income. Even if you accept unreported payments in cash or check, your financial activity can reveal red flags about what income you do not report, potentially triggering an audit.

An IRS audit is an extensive review of your taxes and financial records to ensure you reported everything accurately. Though most people have a less than 1% chance of being audited, it’s not worth the risk.

Undergoing an audit is a time-intensive and costly process that involves providing years of documentation and even in-person interviews. If the IRS audits you, you can (and probably should) hire a professional to represent you and your interests. While that’s a smart idea, it can be a pricey, unexpected cost.

While the IRS may have only flagged one return for audit, they can review any return from the past six years. If they find more issues, they can add penalties and fines for every year they find problems. If you made tax mistakes for the past several years, you could end up owing thousands for taxes you misrepresented.

2. Tax Fraud Carries Heavy Penalties and Fees

If the IRS does select you for audit and they find errors, the penalties and fines can be steep.

According to Joshua Zimmelman, president of Westwood Tax and Consulting, fudging your taxes to reduce your tax bill or boost your refund can cost you more in the long run.

“If you don’t pay your tax liability by the due date, the IRS will charge you a late payment penalty. Even if you file on time, you may still be charged a late payment penalty if you under report your income and the IRS finds out,” Zimmelman said.

And the penalty is just the start. The IRS can also charge you interest on the underpayment as well. “If you’re found guilty of tax evasion or tax fraud, you might end up having to pay serious fines,” said Zimmelman.

While tax evasion or tax fraud is normally imagined as something that affects high earners and big executives, even those with lower incomes need to be careful. When describing the penalties for tax fraud, the IRS does not differentiate between income amounts or how much you underpaid your taxes. If you falsify any information on a return, they can fine you up to $250,000.

3. Criminal Charges Are Possible

Besides potentially owing thousands in IRS penalties, fees, and interest, you could also face criminal charges.

“Tax fraud is a felony and punishable by up to five years in prison,” said Zimmelman. “Failing to report foreign bank and financial accounts might result in up to 10 years in prison.”

Criminal investigations and charges start when an IRS auditor detects possible fraud during their audit of your returns. Courts convict approximately 3,000 people every year of tax fraud, signaling how serious the IRS takes lying on your taxes.

The odds of the IRS charging you for fraud is relatively small — if you’re investigated, the chances are less than 20 percent that you’ll face a criminal charge — but the potential consequences are severe. It’s not worth the risk to get a little extra money in your refund.

4. You May Miss Out on a Mortgage or Loan

Finally, not reporting all of your income can have serious ramifications when it comes to buying a car or a home.

“If you under-report your income, it might hurt you when you try to buy a house or apply for a personal loan,” said Zimmelman. “You might not get it if it looks like you cannot afford to pay it back, so lying on your taxes may hurt in that respect.”

When mortgage companies and banks review your application, they request copies of your tax returns to check your total income. If you lied about your income to lower your tax liability, your full income won’t be on the return. That means you may be denied for the loan you need, hurting your financial future.

Accurately Report Your Taxes

No one likes owing money at tax time or missing out on a big refund. But tax fraud is a serious criminal action, and glossing over your income or boosting your deductions counts as lying to the IRS.

Saving yourself a little money at filing time can end up costing you thousands of dollars with auditing, penalties, and fines. Save yourself the trouble and report your information accurately.

For more information on filing your taxes, avoid these six common mistakes millennials make on their taxes.

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Want to Pause Your Student Loan Payments? Here’s What You Need to Know

You might be able to postpone your student loan payments, but make sure you've considered the financial consequences before you do.

If you’re struggling with a medical emergency, unemployment or other financial crisis, making your student loan payments can be impossible. Rather than fall behind, you can opt to put your payments on hold through student loan deferment or forbearance.

Deferment is an option that lets you postpone both your principal and interest payments. If you qualify, you can pause payments for up to three years. Forbearance is more temporary — you can postpone or reduce your monthly payments for up to 12 months.

However, delaying your payments through deferment or forbearance can have serious financial repercussions. Depending on the type of loans you have, your loan balance can continue to grow due to interest and other fees.

Choosing Deferment or Forbearance

Below, find out how your loan type affects deferment and forbearance, and what alternatives you may have.

Deferring Federal Loans

With certain federal loans, you don’t have to worry about interest payments if you enter deferment.

If you have federal Perkins loans, Direct subsidized loans or subsidized Stafford loans, the government will cover the interest that accrues on your loans while your loans are in deferment. With your interest taken care of while you get back on your feet, you will have less to pay back in interest.

If you have unsubsidized federal loans or PLUS loans, the government will not pay for the interest that accrues during deferment. If you defer your loans, they will continue to gain interest, possibly causing your balance to balloon and costing you thousands. Not to mention your debt-to-income ratio will get worse, making it more difficult to qualify for new credit such as a mortgage or car loan. (Not sure where your credit stands? You can view two of your scores, with updates every 14 days, for free on Credit.com.)

Before entering deferment, use a student loan deferment calculator to find out how much interest will accrue on your student loans if you postpone your payments.

Federal Loans and Forbearance

Unlike deferment, your federal loans will continue to accrue interest in forbearance, regardless of the loan type. Because interest continues to build, entering forbearance can be costly, but it’s still better than missing payments and defaulting on your loans.

Is Deferment/Forbearance Available on Private Loans?

Technically, deferment and forbearance are federal loan benefits. Not all private loan servicers offer similar options — but some do. For example, SoFi offers deferment for students who are going back to school. And if you’re facing a financial difficulty, you may be able to enter forbearance for up to a year.

If you’re experiencing financial hardship, it’s worth asking your servicer if deferment or forbearance is an option. Just keep in mind that entering deferment or forbearance with private loans can be more expensive than federal loans. There are often fees you have to pay, and interest will accrue while you postpone your payments.

Alternatives to Deferment or Forbearance

If you want to avoid pausing your student loan payments completely, there are other ways to manage payments when they’re too high:

Income-Driven Repayment Plans

If you have federal student loans, you may be eligible for an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan. There are four IDR plans available today: income-based repayment (IBR), income-contingent repayment (ICR), Pay As You Earn (PAYE), and Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE).

Under each plan, the basics are about the same: The federal government extends your repayment term 20 to 25 years and caps your monthly payment at a percentage of your discretionary income. At the end of the term, your remaining balance (if any) is discharged. You still have to pay income taxes on the forgiven amount, however.

Enrolling in an IDR plan can drastically reduce your payments and give your budget more breathing room. Depending on your income and family situation, you may qualify for a payment as low as $0 per month.

Refinancing

Unfortunately, if you have private loans, your options are more limited. But one effective way to reduce your monthly payments is to refinance your debt. By refinancing, you take out a new loan that pays off your old private loans. Your new loan will have completely new terms, including — ideally — a lower interest rate.

Refinancing private loans can help lower your payments and help you pay less in interest over time. It’s a smart way to save money while giving yourself more room in your budget. Be sure to keep in mind that if you refinance federal student loans with a private lender, however, you forfeit federal protections such as IDR and deferment/forbearance eligibility.

Deciding What to Do in a Hardship

Student loan forbearance and deferment are useful options when you experience a financial hardship. If you’re facing an emergency and can’t keep up with your payments, deferment or forbearance can give you a much-needed break while you get back on your feet.

While entering deferment or forbearance is a much wiser option than defaulting on your debt, there are still consequences. Make sure you understand the financial impact of postponing your payments, as putting them off can add thousands to your student loan balance. And in the case of private loans, postponing may not be an option at all.

If you’re struggling to keep up with your loans, the most important thing is to be proactive and talk directly with your servicer to find out what options are available to you.

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4 Life Goals You Can Still Achieve With Student Loan Debt

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There are currently more than 44 million people with student loan debt totaling over $1.3 trillion.

With so much debt, many college graduates have delayed major life milestones such as getting married, buying a house, traveling, and starting a business.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Although student loans can be a financial burden, you can still follow your dreams. Here’s how to get one step closer to living the life you want by reaching these four goals.

1. Getting Married

A 2013 survey by the American Institute of CPAs found 15% of respondents had delayed getting married because of their student loan debt. But getting hitched when you have student loan debt isn’t totally impossible.

One of the biggest reasons people delay marriage is the high cost of weddings. In fact, the average wedding costs over $32,000, according to The Knot. If you have student loan debt, that expense can hurt your finances deeply, reducing your chances of getting rid of your debt sooner rather than later.

But there’s no law that says you need the elaborate ceremony, giant guest list, and pricey dress. Getting married can actually be a simple and inexpensive celebration. An afternoon ceremony and a simple dinner can make getting married a financial reality, rather than waiting until you pay off your student loans.

2. Buying a Home

For many, breaking the renting cycle and becoming a homeowner is a significant life goal. But some may feel that student loan payments make it impossible to get approved for a mortgage, let alone afford one. (Keep in mind that while your student loan balances won’t necessarily keep you from qualifying for a mortgage, your credit can. You can see how your student loan payments and other credit accounts are affecting your credit by getting your two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, right here on Credit.com.)

Don’t let student loans ruin your dream of buying a house. If you know you can afford the payments, but are struggling to get approved for a mortgage because of your outstanding debt, consider refinancing.

Refinancing student loans at a lower interest rate will reduce your monthly payments, freeing up more cash to put towards student loan debt, as well as lower your debt-to-income ratio. Keep in mind, there are some potential drawbacks to consider when refinancing federal student loans. Even so, this tactic can make you look like a better borrower in the eyes of mortgage lenders.

3. Taking a Vacation

If one of your passions is exploring the world, don’t let student loans hold you back. The best way to travel abroad while keeping up with your student loans is to find ways of earning extra income.

If you can, pick up a side hustle or second job to help bolster your emergency fund. Once you have built up a good nest egg, you can set up automatic payments on your student loans. Then you can travel without worrying about paying down your debt on time.

4. Starting a Business

Launching a business when you have student loans can be challenging, but it is doable. There are ways to become an entrepreneur and still keep up with your loan payments.

Try moonlighting while working full-time to get your side business started. This approach is a smart way to minimize the risk of starting your own company. You’ll still bring in a regular salary, ultimately building your business without risking your income.

Once your business is off the ground, you can minimize your expenses and free up cash by refinancing your loans or signing up for an income-driven repayment plan that will reduce your federal student loan payments. You’ll likely get a lower interest rate and lower monthly payment after the process is done which will make your loans more affordable as your business continues to grow.

Managing your student loan debt can be a real challenge, but it’s no reason to put your life on hold. With some research and preparation, you can accomplish any of these life goals while still managing your loans successfully.

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