Amex Blue Cash Everyday Review: Good For Grocery Shoppers

The Blue Cash Everyday Card is an American Express cash back rewards credit card with no annual fee. It gives 3% cash back for supermarket spending, 2% cash back for spending at gas stations and department stores, and 1% cash back on everything else.

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
Cashback Rate
up to 3%
APR
13.99%-24.99%

Variable

Credit required
good-credit

Good

  • $100 statement credit after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card within the first 3 months.
  • No annual fee.
  • 3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%).
  • 2% cash back at U.S. gas stations and at select U.S. department stores, 1% back on other purchases.
  • Low intro APR: 0% for 12 months on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable rate, currently 13.99% to 24.99%.
  • Expanding merchant acceptance: Over 1 million more places in the U.S. started accepting American Express® Cards in the last year.
  • Cash back is received in the form of Reward Dollars that can be easily redeemed for statement credits, gift cards, and merchandise.
  • Terms Apply.
  • See Rates & Fees
  •  

How to Earn Cash Back Rewards

For an introductory deal, the Blue Cash Everyday Card offers up to $150 in statement credits. During your first 6 calendar months of card membership, you can earn one $25 statement credit after you spend $250 in purchases on the Card in that month. The rewards program includes a decent amount of fine print for each cash back category.

Here’s what you need to know:

3% cash back at U.S. supermarkets up to $6,000 per year

Fine print: Superstores, warehouses, and specialty stores are not included. So keep in mind, if you visit your local fishmonger or butcher a few times a month, the cash you spend there probably won’t count as grocery shopping. Also, spending money at Amazon, Target, and Walmart specifically won’t earn you 3% cash back.

Here are samples of grocery stores that will earn you 3% cash back:

  • Foodtown
  • Gristedes
  • Meijer
  • Pathmark
  • Shoprite
  • Stop and Shop
  • Vons
  • Whole Foods
  • Winn-Dixie
  • Online supermarkets such as FreshDirect

2% cash back at gas stations and select department stores

Fine print: Superstores, supermarkets, and warehouse clubs that happen to sell gas are not included in the 2% cash back category. American Express gives examples of gas stations and a list of department stores that qualify for 2% cash back.

Here are some examples of gas stations:

  • Exxon
  • Gulf
  • Hess
  • Mobil
  • Murphy Express
  • Murphy USA
  • Shell

Here are the department stores:

  • Bealls
  • Belk
  • Bloomingdale’s
  • Bon Ton Stores
  • Boscov’s
  • Century 21 Department Stores
  • Dillard’s
  • J.C. Penney (JCP)
  • Kohl’s
  • Lord & Taylor
  • Macy’s
  • Neiman Marcus
  • Nordstrom
  • Saks Fifth Avenue
  • Sears
  • Stein Mart

1% cash back on all other purchases

Fine print: The 1% cash back applies to all purchases that don’t qualify for 2% or 3% and grocery shopping you do beyond the $6,000 annual cap.

How does American Express determine cash back for each purchase?

American Express uses merchant codes to determine how much cash you earn for each purchase. Merchant codes (or MCCs) are four-digit codes assigned to merchants that classify their business. You need to buy gas and groceries from stores that have an eligible merchant code to get 2% or 3% cash back. For full cash back category terms, head here.

The cash back you earn can also be impacted by the way you choose to process your payments. According to the American Express terms and conditions:

“Purchases made through a third-party payment account or on an online marketplace (with multiple retailers) will not receive a higher percentage reward. A purchase may not receive a higher percentage reward if the merchant submits the purchase using a mobile or wireless card reader or if you use a mobile or digital wallet.”

By “higher percentage reward,” American Express means more than the basic 1% back. The best bet at making sure you get the highest reward possible from your spending is keeping things super simple.

Focus on shopping at the supermarkets, gas stations, and department stores American Express has on the example lists above. At checkout, swipe your Blue Cash Everyday Card the old-fashioned way to pay for your shopping haul.

The Amex Blue Cash Everyday Card vs. The Amex Blue Cash Preferred Card

At first look, the 3% cash back on groceries seems legit because you’re earning cash back with no fee. However, shoppers who spend any more than $3,000 per year on groceries should take a look at the upgraded Amex Blue Cash Preferred Card instead to see if it offers a higher reward.

The Blue Cash Preferred Card gives 6% cash back on groceries and has a $95 annual fee, but you shouldn’t let that cost deter you.

If you spend just $3,200 on groceries per year with the Blue Cash Preferred Card, the 6% cash back minus the $95 fee offers a greater amount of cash back than what you would earn spending the same amount on the free Blue Cash Everyday Card.

Here’s how it works out:

  • Blue Cash Everyday – $3,200 x 0.03 = $96 cash back
  • Blue Cash Preferred – $3,200 x 0.06 = $192 – $95 annual fee = $97 cash back

Yes, the difference initially may seem small.

But as you spend more on groceries, the cash back earned from the Blue Cash Preferred Card surpasses the Blue Cash Everyday Card at a higher margin. Plus, the Preferred card offers a higher 3% cash back on gas and department stores as well.

How I got $3,200.

In this review, we’ll first explain the basics of the Blue Cash Everyday rewards program. Then, we’ll give you a scenario of when it still makes sense to apply for the Blue Cash Everyday Card instead of other cash back cards, including the Blue Cash Preferred Card.

How Cash Back Works

Cash back earned from the Blue Cash Everyday Card is tracked in Blue Cash Rewards Dollars. You can redeem cash back through the account dashboard for statement credit in increments of 25. You can’t use cash back to make your monthly minimum payment.

How to Qualify for the Blue Cash Everyday Card

American Express is one of several credit card issuers that offers a pre-qualification screening. The benefit of this feature is you can find out whether you have a good chance of getting approved for an American Express card without impacting your credit score.

To see if the Blue Cash Everyday Card is one you pre-qualify for, go here. Then, scroll down to about the middle of the page where you’ll see the pre-qualified offers section. Here’s what it looks like:

Who the Blue Cash Everyday Card Is Best For

Your goal with the Blue Cash Everyday Card is to spend enough in the higher cash back categories to beat the flat 2% on all purchases you can get with a card like the Citi Double Cash Card.

To throw another variable in the mix, if you plan to shop big in the grocery category, you should compare the Blue Cash Everyday Card against the Blue Cash Preferred Card before making a decision.

So, how do these cards stack up against each other?

Here’s a real-world example of when the Blue Cash Everyday Card will benefit you more than the Blue Cash Preferred Card or the Citi Double Cash Card.

For a quick recap:

  • Blue Cash Everyday – 3% cash back on groceries up to $6,000 annually, 2% cash back on gas and department stores, 1% cash back on all other purchases
  • Blue Cash Preferred – $95 annual fee, 6% cash back on groceries up to $6,000 annually, 3% cash back on gas and department stores, 1% cash back on all other purchases
  • Citi Double Cash – 2% cash back on all purchases with no cap

The sample scenario

Marc is a family of one and lives a simple life. He commutes 30 minutes to and from work each day. He’s not a big credit card user. He uses the card primarily to feed himself, to fill up his gas tank, and to take his partner out to an affordable dinner at a place of her choosing once or twice a month.

Here are Marc’s spending specs:

  • $2,000 per year on groceries
  • $2,400 per year on gas
  • $1,500 per year on miscellaneous purchases

This is the cash back he would earn from the Blue Cash Everyday Card, Blue Cash Preferred Card, and Citi Double Cash Card:

Marc is a pretty reserved spender, so he’ll earn more cash back with the Blue Cash Everyday Card compared to the Blue Cash Preferred Card because there’s no annual fee eating away at his earnings.

Cash back from the Citi Double Cash Card comes close to the Blue Cash Everyday Card, but the 3% on groceries is more of a benefit to him than unlimited 2% cash back because of his spending habits.

Now, let’s say Marc had his partner move in and the grocery bill increased to $3,000 per year.

Here’s the updated specs:

  • $3,000 per year on groceries
  • $2,400 per year on gas
  • $1,500 per year on miscellaneous purchases

The Blue Cash Preferred Card with the $95 annual fee would take the earnings edge away from the Blue Cash Everyday Card in this second scenario. So, again, the Blue Cash Everyday Card may not be the best cash back deal available for someone who spends in the $3,000 range on groceries per year.

Although, every situation is unique, and small fluctuations in spending habits can make a huge difference in cash back potential. Do a similar cash back comparison on your own before settling on a rewards card.

Other Card Benefits

Besides cash back rewards, American Express cardholders get to take advantage of the following premium benefits:

  • Car rental loss and damage insurance
  • Roadside assistance
  • Global assistance hotline
  • Travel accident insurance
  • Extended warranties
  • Return protection
  • Purchase protection
  • Fraud protection

If you decide to apply for the Blue Cash Everyday Card, know that American Express is a card that you may have difficulty getting accepted by smaller retailers and abroad. However, American Express having limited acceptance may not be too problematic for Blue Cash Everyday cardholders.

Mom-and-pop corner markets that don’t accept American Express may not have a merchant code that qualifies for 3% cash back anyway. Plus, the Blue Cash Everyday Card has a 2.7% foreign transaction fee, so it’s probably not a card you’re going to take abroad frequently as your travel companion either.

That said, consumers who will benefit the most from this cash back card are ones who plan to shop primarily stateside at major supermarkets, gas stations, and department stores that qualify for the highest reward.

Rewards Cards: Frequently Asked Questions

No, Blue Cash points do not expire as long as your account is open and in good standing. So, you can save your points for higher value rewards including electronics and travel.

Anything over 1.5% cash back is a good deal. There are some cards that offer more — as much as 5% or 6% cash back on purchases. But sometimes those offers are too good to be true. Banks don’t like to lose money and will pepper the fine print with all sorts of limitations. For example, they may offer 5% cash back on only purchases at certain types of retailers and only for certain periods of time. And those categories may change every quarter, which can make it hard to keep track.

Don’t let those cash back promises pressure you into spending more than you can afford. If you don’t pay your statement balance in full each month, you could get slapped with sky-high interest charges. That would totally negate any benefit you might get from earning cash back. Cash back cards are only valuable if you can pay your bill in full and capture the entirety of your cash back rewards.

It depends on the card. Some cards allow you to redeem cash back dollar for dollar as a statement credit, which can help lower your total balance. Just keep in mind that applying cash back to your card statement does not count as a monthly payment. Other cards will increase the value of your cash back if you spend on certain categories, like travel. Review your terms carefully to be sure you’re getting the most bang for your buck.

Find the card that fits your day-to-day spending needs best, beyond the flashy sign-up bonus offers and cash back promises. Pay your bill in full each month (spend only what you can afford to pay off).

The post Amex Blue Cash Everyday Review: Good For Grocery Shoppers appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

7 Hacks for Using American Express’ Membership Rewards Program

Here's how to make the most of your Membership Rewards.

[Disclosure: Our partners are mentioned below.]

There are a few different transferable points programs available, but over the years one of the most popular has always been American Express’ Membership Rewards program. The reason is because of the ample ways points can be used and the wide selection of credit cards that can help you earn points quickly. Let’s take a deeper look into how you can earn Membership Rewards points and the different ways you can receive ultimate value.

1. Transfer Points to Loyalty Partners

One of the best ways to receive maximum value for your Membership Rewards points is to transfer them to one of the many loyalty partners. There is a large selection of both hotels and airlines and each of the following partners will transfer 1-to-1 unless noted.

  • Aeromexico — 1-to-1.6
  • Air Canada (Aeroplan)
  • Air France/KLM (Flying Blue)
  • Alitalia
  • All Nippon Airways
  • Asia Miles
  • British Airways — 250-to-200
  • Delta Air Lines
  • El Al Israel Airlines — 1,000-to-20
  • Emirates
  • Etihad Airways
  • Hawaiian Airlines
  • Iberia Plus — 250-to-200
  • JetBlue Airways — 250-to-200
  • Singapore Airlines
  • Virgin America — 200-to-100
  • Virgin Atlantic Airways
  • Choice Hotels
  • Hilton Hotels — 1-to-1.5
  • Starwood Hotels — 1,000-to-333

To get the most value out of each point, you could use them for one of the following redemptions.

All Nippon Airways From the United States to Japan

Until recently, the All Nippon Airways award chart was based on distances. That used to provide many sweet spots for award travel. Even though they have changed to a region based award chart, there are still some great deals. One of them is round-trip flights from the United States to Japan. You can fly round-trip in coach for just 40,000 miles during low season and business class for 75,000 miles, also in the low season.

All Nippon Airways From the United States to Asia Zone 2

You could use All Nippon Airways miles to fly round-trip from the United States to Asia Zone 2 for just 55,000 in coach or 100,000 in business class. Asia Zone 2 is classified as Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, Myanmar, India, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Flying Blue From the Continental United States to Hawaii

A great use of Flying Blue miles is to fly round-trip from anywhere in the continental United States to Hawaii for just 30,000 miles.

Aeroplan From the United States to Oceania

Transferring Membership Award points to Aeroplan will allow you to use 90,000 miles to fly round-trip from the United States to Australia, New Zealand or anywhere in the South Pacific. You could make this trip for 80,000 United miles, but what makes using Aeroplan miles worth it is that they will allow you to make two stopovers before reaching your destination. That means you could fly to Tahiti and make stops in both Australia and New Zealand on the way.

British Airways From Miami to Lima, Peru

If hiking to Machu Picchu is on your bucket list, you might want to consider flying British Airways from Miami to Lima, Peru. Because British Airways has a distance-based award chart, the flight in coach is just 12,500 miles each way.

2. Buy Gift Cards

Another way to use your Membership Rewards is to receive gift cards from different restaurants, retailers and for travel. The value you receive will be anywhere from a half-cent to one cent per point.

3. Go Shopping

You could also use your points to shop online with certain retailers. Amazon.com, Bestbuy.com and Newegg.com offer 0.7 cents per point. Other partner retailers give you a half-cent per point in value.

4. Use American Express Travel or Airbnb

There are a few different ways you can use your points on travel beyond transferring them to partners. You can book airfare on American Express Travel for one cent per point. You could also book with Airbnb for 0.7 cents per point.

5. Enjoy Entertainment

If you want to redeem your points for concert tickets or for a Broadway show you can do so through Ticketmaster.com, AXS and Telecharge.com. The value is a half-cent per point.

6. Ride With Uber

You could also use your Membership Reward points to pay for Uber rides. You will receive one cent value per point used.

7. Get a Statement Credit

Finally, you could choose to use your points to receive a statement credit. However, by doing this, you will only receive 0.6 cents value per point.

Cards That Earn Membership Rewards Points

There are quite a few different credit cards that give you the opportunity to earn Membership Rewards points. Below you will find a few of our favorite cards.

Platinum Card from American Express

The Platinum Card from American Express has been one of the elite cards available for a few years. When you sign up you will receive 60,000 Membership Reward points after spending $5,000 in the first three months. You can then receive five points per dollar spent on flights and hotels when booked through the airline and by using American Express Travel. All other purchases will receive one point per dollar.

Earlier this year, the annual fee on the Platinum card increased from $450 to $550. This will put the card out of reach for many people. But before you discard the idea of adding it to your wallet, you should consider the travel benefits. Not only will you receive a $200 airline fee credit, which will pay for things like change fees or baggage fees, you also receive a $200 Uber credit. You will receive up to a $100 statement credit to cover the cost of either Global Entry or TSA PreCheck. In addition, you will receive Starwood Preferred Guest and Hilton Honors Gold status. Plus, the next time you travel, it will be in comfort. You will have access to the Delta Sky Club, Centurion Lounges, Airspace Lounges and a Priority Pass Select membership.

Premier Rewards Gold Card from American Express

Another of the elite cards from American Express is the Premier Rewards Gold Card. When you sign up for this card, you receive 25,000 Membership Reward points after spending $2,000 in the first three months. You receive three points per dollar spent on any airfare purchased directly with airlines. You also receive two points per dollar spent at U.S. restaurants, gas stations and supermarkets. All other purchases will earn one point per dollar. There is a $195 annual fee, but it’s waived the first year. Other than the earnings potential, the other benefits can make the annual fee worthwhile to travelers. Each year you receive a $100 airline fee credit. You also receive two points per dollar when you book a hotel through the Hotel Collection. Plus, you receive a $75 hotel credit for qualifying charges.

Amex EveryDay Preferred

When you sign up for the Amex EveryDay Preferred card you receive 10,000 Membership Reward points after spending $1,000 in the first three months. When you use the card at U.S. supermarkets, you receive two points per dollar, on up to $6,000 in purchases each year, and one point per dollar on everything else. Also, if you use your card 20 or more times on purchases in a single billing period you’ll earn 20% extra points on those purchases minus returns and credits. Terms and limitations apply.

At the time of this writing, the EveryDay Preferred also offers a 0% introductory APR on purchases and balance transfers for 12 months. After that, your APR will be a variable 13.74% to 23.74%, based on your creditworthiness and other factors. This card has an annual fee of $95.

If you don’t already have one of these cards keep in mind you’ll need excellent credit to qualify. You can see where your credit stands by getting your two free credit scores right here on Credit.com.

Image: AleksandarNakic

At publishing time, the Platinum Card from American Express, Premier Rewards Gold Card from American Express and Amex EveryDay Preferred card are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

The post 7 Hacks for Using American Express’ Membership Rewards Program appeared first on Credit.com.

Your American Express Credit Card Can Now Message You on Facebook

Amex-facebook

Credit cards can already technically text or email you via spending alerts, so it shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that one issuer is now able to message its cardholders on Facebook.

American Express officially launched its Facebook Messenger bot late last week. The bot, previewed at the Cannes Film Festival back in June, is designed to monitor an enrolled cardholder’s credit card purchases and then message them about relevant benefits, reminders and services.

What might the bot say exactly? Well, that depends on what card you happen to have and what you’re using it for, but here are some examples to help you get the gist.

  • Someone purchasing an airline ticket out of New York with their American Express Platinum credit card (see full review here) would receive a reminder about the Centurion Lounge to which their card grants them access.
  • An American Express Gold credit cardholder booking a visit to Los Angeles could receive restaurant recommendations for their upcoming trip.
  • After buying a certain product, cardholders may receive a reminder about the purchase protection their card carries — which can potentially secure refunds for items stolen or accidentally damaged within a specified timeframe.

Of course, this current incarnation does it have its limitations; the Amex bot is not designed to handle customer service inquiries. You’ll have to call the issuer directly for that. And it won’t respond to messages that it’s unfamiliar with.

The service isn’t automatic —interested cardholders will have to connect their eligible American Express credit card using their account login and password. (You can find information on how to do so on American Express’ website and Messenger’s Facebook page.) Once you’re connected, messages will show up in your Messenger conversation on all devices logged into the Messenger account. Cardholders can also elect to receive push notifications.

Vetting Your Bots

Getting hit up by your credit card on social media may feel a little iRobot to some folks, but new wave notifications like this do have their upsides. Transaction alerts can help you avoid over-spending or quickly spot fraud. And they can also prove useful to people who are unfamiliar with the specific perks their credit cards carry. Of course, you’ll want to read the fine print associated with any of these services carefully before signing up to make sure you understand how it works, what data you may be sharing with your issuers and others, and how it’s protected.

Per its website, American Express and Facebook both collect certain data in accordance with their existing privacy policies. And the credit card company may share information with Facebook regarding the types of industries where you have recently made purchases (such as travel, dining or retail) and how much you spent on them using your connected card, but the social media company does have limits regarding how it can use this data. Information is not shared with non-affiliated third parties, and cardholders can disconnect the bot at any time. (Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment regarding data sharing and the bot.)

Doing Your Due Diligence 

Whenever you’re utilizing newfangled technology, it’s important to maintain good internet safety practices. That means protecting accounts with long and strong passwords, regularly monitoring accounts for signs of fraud and notifying your issuer immediately to have a card replaced if you have reason to believe that it or a linked account was compromised. (American Express recommends disconnecting the card if you think your Facebook account has been hacked. It also recommends deleting your conversations with the bot and changing your compromised credentials right away.)

You can also monitor your credit if you ever have reason to worry about identity theft. (You can do so by pulling your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com and viewing two of your credit scores for free every 14 days on Credit.com.) Signs of identity theft include a sudden drop in scores, unfamiliar addresses and mysterious credit accounts you don’t remember opening.

At publishing time, the American Express Platinum credit card is offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment.

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

Image: AntonioGuillem

The post Your American Express Credit Card Can Now Message You on Facebook appeared first on Credit.com.

Your American Express Credit Card Can Now Message You on Facebook

Amex-facebook

Credit cards can already technically text or email you via spending alerts, so it shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that one issuer is now able to message its cardholders on Facebook.

American Express officially launched its Facebook Messenger bot late last week. The bot, previewed at the Cannes Film Festival back in June, is designed to monitor an enrolled cardholder’s credit card purchases and then message them about relevant benefits, reminders and services.

What might the bot say exactly? Well, that depends on what card you happen to have and what you’re using it for, but here are some examples to help you get the gist.

  • Someone purchasing an airline ticket out of New York with their American Express Platinum credit card (see full review here) would receive a reminder about the Centurion Lounge to which their card grants them access.
  • An American Express Gold credit cardholder booking a visit to Los Angeles could receive restaurant recommendations for their upcoming trip.
  • After buying a certain product, cardholders may receive a reminder about the purchase protection their card carries — which can potentially secure refunds for items stolen or accidentally damaged within a specified timeframe.

Of course, this current incarnation does it have its limitations; the Amex bot is not designed to handle customer service inquiries. You’ll have to call the issuer directly for that. And it won’t respond to messages that it’s unfamiliar with.

The service isn’t automatic —interested cardholders will have to connect their eligible American Express credit card using their account login and password. (You can find information on how to do so on American Express’ website and Messenger’s Facebook page.) Once you’re connected, messages will show up in your Messenger conversation on all devices logged into the Messenger account. Cardholders can also elect to receive push notifications.

Vetting Your Bots

Getting hit up by your credit card on social media may feel a little iRobot to some folks, but new wave notifications like this do have their upsides. Transaction alerts can help you avoid over-spending or quickly spot fraud. And they can also prove useful to people who are unfamiliar with the specific perks their credit cards carry. Of course, you’ll want to read the fine print associated with any of these services carefully before signing up to make sure you understand how it works, what data you may be sharing with your issuers and others, and how it’s protected.

Per its website, American Express and Facebook both collect certain data in accordance with their existing privacy policies. And the credit card company may share information with Facebook regarding the types of industries where you have recently made purchases (such as travel, dining or retail) and how much you spent on them using your connected card, but the social media company does have limits regarding how it can use this data. Information is not shared with non-affiliated third parties, and cardholders can disconnect the bot at any time. (Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment regarding data sharing and the bot.)

Doing Your Due Diligence 

Whenever you’re utilizing newfangled technology, it’s important to maintain good internet safety practices. That means protecting accounts with long and strong passwords, regularly monitoring accounts for signs of fraud and notifying your issuer immediately to have a card replaced if you have reason to believe that it or a linked account was compromised. (American Express recommends disconnecting the card if you think your Facebook account has been hacked. It also recommends deleting your conversations with the bot and changing your compromised credentials right away.)

You can also monitor your credit if you ever have reason to worry about identity theft. (You can do so by pulling your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com and viewing two of your credit scores for free every 14 days on Credit.com.) Signs of identity theft include a sudden drop in scores, unfamiliar addresses and mysterious credit accounts you don’t remember opening.

At publishing time, the American Express Platinum credit card is offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment.

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

Image: AntonioGuillem

The post Your American Express Credit Card Can Now Message You on Facebook appeared first on Credit.com.