Baby Boomer Student Debt by State

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Millennials aren’t the only ones racking up billions of dollars in student debt.

Turns out, in three out of every four states, “the total outstanding student debt held by borrowers over age 60 increased by more than 50 percent [since 2012].” This data comes from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which also found that from 2012 to 2017, the number of baby boomers with student debt has increased by “at least 20 percent in every state.”

What’s even more shocking is the actual dollar amount of total baby boomer student debt for each state—Texas comes in at $6,760,220,000, and it didn’t even make the top three.

See how much baby boomer student debt your state has accumulated. (Hint: at the very least, it’s in the hundreds of millions of dollars.)

50. Wyoming

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $111,834,100

49. Alaska

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $147,871,000

48. North Dakota

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $185,125,700

47. South Dakota

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $266,013,100

46. Idaho

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $325,985,500

45. Montana

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $346,712,800

44. Vermont

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $347,352,700

43. Hawaii

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $387,892,000

42. West Virginia

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $416,178,800

41. Utah

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $467,623,300

40. Nebraska

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $521,516,000

39. Delaware

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $536,479,200

38. Maine

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $588,882,100

37. New Mexico

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $603,955,600

36. Rhode Island

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $609,235,400

35. Arkansas

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $620,612,800

34. Mississippi

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $672,880,700

33. Kansas

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $718,827,000

32. Nevada

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $735,935,000

31. New Hampshire

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $807,447,200

30. Kentucky

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $865,166,500

29. Iowa

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $881,100,300

28. Oklahoma

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,050,950,000

27. Louisiana

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,177,845,000

26. Oregon

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,249,198,000

25. Alabama

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,299,578,000

24. South Carolina

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,538,660,000

23. Wisconsin

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,542,771,000

22. Tennessee

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,653,585,000

21. Missouri

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,717,022,000

20. Arizona

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,854,555,000

19. Minnesota

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,873,396,000

18. Connecticut

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,902,854,000

17. Colorado

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $1,915,617,000

16. Indiana

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $2,029,478,000

15. Washington

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $2,056,024,000

14. North Carolina

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $2,489,550,000

13. Virginia

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $2,748,123,000

12. Georgia

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $3,345,422,000

11. Michigan

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $3,421,531,000

10. Maryland

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $3,559,640,000

9. Massachusetts

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $3,668,714,000

8. Ohio

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $4,637,882,000

7. New Jersey

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $4,742,573,000

6. Illinois

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $5,103,916,000

5. Texas

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $6,760,220,000

4. Pennsylvania

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $6,830,725,000

3. Florida

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $7,132,025,000

2. New York

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $9,181,882,000

1. California

Total student balance for borrowers age 60 and older: $11,274,120,000

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The Average American Has 7.2 Jobs by Age 28

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Feel like you’re bouncing around between jobs? Have no fear, you are hardly alone. A typical young adult in the U.S. has held an average of 7.2 jobs by age 28, new research shows, which is roughly equivalent to having one new employer each year.

The study, released Friday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, examined a nationally representative group of 9,000 young men and women born between 1980 and 1984.

As you’d expect, the job change rates slow as young adults age, but not much: “Individuals held an average of 3.9 jobs in the four-year period from ages 18 to 21. The number of jobs individuals held dropped to 2.7 in the three-year period from ages 22 to 24, and then dropped further to 2.5 in the four-year period from ages 25 to 28,” the report said.

In other words, even into their late 20s, young adults held onto their jobs, on average, for only about 18 months. A “job” in the survey is defined as a period of work with a specific employer; being promoted at the same place of employment would not constitute a new job in this research.

Surprisingly, the rapid rate of job change doesn’t vary much among gender and doesn’t change much among men despite their level of educational attainment. On the other hand, women who spent more time in school changed jobs more frequently.

“Women with a bachelor’s degree held eight jobs from ages 18 through 28, compared with 5.6 jobs for female high school dropouts,” the study found.

People with lower levels of educational attainment see their jobs end quicker. Female high school dropouts held jobs for the shortest duration, with 52% of jobs ending in less than six months, for example.

Job change rate didn’t vary much among race. Hispanic or Latino individuals in the group held 6.5 jobs during the 10-year span while African Americans held 6.8 and whites held 7.5. Education levels didn’t affect whites or Hispanics but did affect African-Americans. Members of that group held only five jobs when failing to earn a high school diploma, but 7.1 when earning a college degree or higher.

Of course, the better question is: Are people job hopping more in today’s economy? Job hopping data isn’t actually that easy to come by. The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not have data on the number of jobs held during an average American’s lifetime, for example, despite persistent conventional wisdom that adults today will undertake multiple careers — up to seven! — before they retire.

However, a similar study released last year offers some helpful context. Baby boomers born between 1957 and 1964 held 11.7 jobs from ages 18 to 48. They also held 5.5 jobs from ages 18 to 24. There was no 18 to 28 calculation, so an apples-to-apples comparison isn’t possible. But data on the boomers suggests millennials aren’t job hopping that much more than their parents.

No matter your demographic, it’s a good idea to check your credit before your start a job search, since some employers pull a version of your credit report as part of the job application process. You can see where your credit currently stands by pulling your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com or viewing your free credit report summary, updated each month, on Credit.com.

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Image: Randy Faris/Fuse

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