The Best Options for Rebuilding Your Credit Score – December 2017

The Best Options for Rebuilding Your Credit Score

A strong credit score is a vital part of your overall financial health. But rebuilding a damaged (or non-existent) credit score can feel impossible. Don’t despair. There are plenty of avenues you can take in order to rehabilitate your credit score and it all begins with identifying your starting point. 

How Bad is Your Bad Credit Score? 

Before you start to panic about rehabilitating your bad credit score, let’s determine if it’s even bad. Where do you fall in the range of FICO and VantageScores?

  • Above 750: Excellent Credit
  • 680 – 749: Good Credit
  • 620 – 679: “Near Prime” or Acceptable Credit
  • 550 – 619: Sub-prime
  • Below 550: Bad Credit or No Credit Score/Thin File

Your credit score isn’t the only thing that will keep you from being approved for credit. These factors are common reasons for being declined.

  • Your debt-to-income ratio is above 50%
  • You have no credit score
  • You have been building up a lot of debt recently
  • You are unemployed

In order to focus on rehabilitating your credit score, you’ll need to start with getting a line of credit. This may sound impossible because you’re constantly getting declined. Fortunately, there are options tailored specifically for people looking to re-establish credit.

[Read more about bad credit scores here.]

Rehabilitating a Bad Credit Score (550 and under) 

Get a Secured Card

You’ll use your own money as collateral by putting down a deposit, which is often about $150 – $250. Typically, the amount of your deposit will then be your credit limit. You should make one small purchase each month and then pay it off on time and in full. Once you prove you’re responsible, you can get back your deposit and upgrade to a regular credit card. Read more about secured cards here.

[Check out our secured credit card database here.]

Rebuilding from a 551 – 619 score 

Apply for a Store Credit Card

You might be used to checking out at a store and being asked if you’d like to open a credit card. While these credit cards come with really high interest rates and are great tools to tempt you into buying items you don’t need, there is a big perk to store credit cards: they’re more likely to approve people with low credit scores. Just be sure to only use the card to make one small purchase a month and then pay it off on time and in full. Unsubscribe to emails about deals and don’t even carry it around everyday in your wallet if you can’t resist the desire to spend. Read more here. 

[Find all the details about how to improve your score here.]

If you’re unable to get a store credit card, you should apply for a secured card.

Rebuilding from the 620 to 650 score 

If you’re on the 620 end of the spectrum, you may want to consider applying for a store card or, if you’re rejected, a secured card. Store cards typically approve into the lower 600 range. Just be careful that you aren’t tempted into the spending traps like 30% off sales for card members. Just make one small purchase a month and pay it off on time and in full. 

650 really isn’t a terrible credit score. You’re average and even closing in on good credit, which starts at 680. Lower interest rates and better options will be available to you, which is why it’s important to get there.

If you’re looking to get a credit card with a 650 score, then you should consider checking to see if you’re pre-qualified for any cards. This will help minimize your chance of rejection upon applying.

It will be a harder to be approved with a debt-to-income ratio above 40%.

Otherwise, your goal in this bracket should be to use no more than 20% of your total available credit. Pay your bills on time and in full. And keep pumping that positive information onto your credit report until you reach the 700+ category. 

Who You Need to Avoid 

Access to credit and loans may come easier than you expect, but that should also be a danger sign. There are several lenders who are willing to provide lines of credits or loans to people with poor credit. These options are often very predatory. If you’re simply trying to rebuild your credit history and improve your credit score, then there is no need to take this offers. If you’re in desperate need of a line of credit for an emergency, but have bad credit, please email us at info@magnifymoney.com for a tailored response.

Here are the options you need to avoid when trying to rebuild credit:

1. Payday and Title Loan Lenders – There is never a need to take out a payday or title loan if you’re trying to merely rebuild or establish credit history. Most of these lenders don’t report to the bureaus and you’ll likely end up in a painful vicious cycle of borrowing and being unable to pay it down.

[How to get out of the payday loan trap.]

2. First Premier – The bank claims to want to offer people a second chance when it comes to their finances, but its fee structure and fine print prove the exact opposite. First Premier charges you a $95 processing fee just to apply for a credit card. Then it levies a $75 annual fee on the credit cards and most cards only come with a $300 limit. You’re paying $170 for a $300 credit line! The APR is a painful 36%. In year two the annual fee reduces to $45, but then you’re charged a monthly servicing fee of $6.25. And to top it all off, you’ll be charged a 25% fee if your credit limit is increased. Stay away from this card! Use the $170 it would take to open the card and get a secured card instead.

[Read more about First Premier here.]

3. Credit One – Credit One does an excellent job of confusing consumers into thinking they’re applying for a Capital One card. The logos are eerily similar and easily confused.

Creditone

Capital one

While Credit One is not as predatory as First Premier or payday loans, there is really no need to be using it to rebuild your credit score. Credit One makes it a bit tricky to get to its terms and conditions without either going through the pre-qualification process or accepting a direct mail offer. You’ll see this when clicking to look at its credit card option.

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 4.34.54 PM

A quick Google search yielded this terms and conditions sheet, which may be slightly different than the one you’d receive if you applied for a card. According to the one we found, Credit One charges an annual membership fee from $0 to $99. Credit line minimums are between $300 and $500. So you could be paying $99 for a $300 credit limit. APR is relatively standard, but on the high side, with 16.99% to 24.99%. Given the high annual fees, we recommend saving your money and using a secured card with no annual fee to begin rebuilding your credit score.

The post The Best Options for Rebuilding Your Credit Score – December 2017 appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Get a Mortgage With Bad Credit

Get a Mortgage With Bad Credit

While a 20% down payment and a great credit history are commonly recommended for buying a home, there are still ways you can be approved for a mortgage without them. The secret is finding your personal strengths as a potential homebuyer and overcoming your weaknesses.

Good and Bad Credit for a Home Loan

Getting a home loan with bad credit can be daunting. But even credit scores traditionally thought of as “bad” won’t stop you from being approved for a mortgage.

Credit Score Scale for Mortgage Approval

740–850 Outstanding
720–740 Great
700–720 Good
680–700 Mediocre
620–680 Less than perfect, but still approvable for a home loan
550–620 Needs improvement before applying
300–550 Unlikely to be approved for a home loan

If you have a score lower than 620, it’s unlikely you’ll be approved for a home loan. Take some time to improve your credit by paying debts on time before you apply for a loan. And while you may be approved for a mortgage with a credit score between 620 and 680, such a score will affect your loan program and pricing.

Effects of Bad Credit on a Home Loan

Your credit score determines two major things for a mortgage company: the loan program and pricing.

Loan Programs

There are various types of loan programs, including conventional, Federal Housing Administration (FHA), and Veterans Affairs (VA) loans. There are advantages and disadvantages to each of them. But unless you’re a US veteran or service member, or married to one, you won’t have access to VA loans.

Conventional loans are best for borrowers with good to outstanding credit, but if you have a large down payment, you might be approved for one even with bad credit. On the other hand, FHA loans are accessible to people with less-than-perfect credit scores, but these loans tend to come with higher expenses.

Pricing

When it comes to pricing, your mortgage interest rates will most likely be higher than those of someone with good credit. You may also face additional premiums and more expensive insurance.

Your credit history is another determining factor in whether your loan will be approved or not. Derogatory items, or negative indications on your credit report, such as patterns of previous credit delinquencies and balances on closed-out accounts will negatively affect your mortgage loan approval.

Lenders will look at credit scores first to determine which home loan you’re eligible for. Next, your complete credit overview, including credit history, will be taken into consideration to determine what the lender will look for in the underwriting process. This is when the lender tries to figure out what happened in your credit history and why, as well as if there’s a chance credit issues will occur again in the future.

Overcoming Common Credit Red Flags

These derogatory items will be a cause of concern for lenders—but may not be total deal breakers:

  • Patterns of Delinquencies: Lenders can work around a record of late payments, but they’ll likely require you to have a larger down payment and lower debt-to-income percentage.
  • Student Loan Late Payments: A late federal student loan payment within the past 12 months will make approval less likely for an FHA because government financing doesn’t take kindly to delinquent federal debt.
  • Mortgage Late Payments: Lenders usually overlook one late payment in the past 12 months, so long as you can explain and provide necessary documentation.
  • Foreclosure: After a foreclosure, it takes 36 months to be eligible for a 3.5% down FHA loan and 48 months for a no-money-down VA loan. However, it takes seven years to qualify for a conventional loan approval, no matter the size of the down payment.
  • Short Sale: Mortgage eligibility after short sale is 36 months for a 3.5% down FHA loan and 24 months for a no-money-down VA loan or a 20% down conventional loan.
  • Bankruptcy: With normal Chapter 7 bankruptcy you have 24 months until you’re eligible for a 3.5% down FHA loan and 48 months for a VA loan or conventional loan.

To determine which red flags to overlook, lenders use investor overlays. These are the guidelines mortgage brokers and banks follow to prevent potential mortgage losses.

Investor overlays vary from lender to lender, so while one lender might not approve your loan because of poor credit and a minimal down payment, another may in some instances. The key is to find a lender with minimal overlays who can work with your situation.

Not sure where to start looking for a mortgage? At Credit.com, we offer a helpful list of mortgage rates from lenders in your area.

Homebuying Takeaways

First, know your credit score. Obtain a copy of your free annual credit report to help you select an appropriate lender, and monitor your score for free through Credit.com’s Credit Report Card.

Second, gather documentation to explain your credit challenges. If you can explain derogatory items in your credit history to a lender, you’re more likely to receive a mortgage.

Finally, be very specific when speaking to a potential lender. Don’t be afraid to share every detail of your needs and concerns. You’ll save yourself a lot of headache later by finding out up-front if they have any investor overlays that could prevent them from lending to you.

You don’t have to have perfect credit to buy a home. Just be prepared and search carefully for the lender who can make your dream home a reality.

Image: Jupiterimages

The post How to Get a Mortgage With Bad Credit appeared first on Credit.com.

Credit Scores That Get Balance Transfer Credit Cards

If you’re someone who struggles with credit card debt and high interest rates, a balance transfer might be a way to dig yourself out of indebtedness. There are various balance transfer credit cards that offer long 0% intro APR periods that provide you with ample time to pay off your balance. Depending on your credit score, you may qualify for some of the cards we list below.

Keep in mind that the credit score ranges listed below don’t guarantee that you will be approved for a card simply because you fall within the given credit range. Lenders consider numerous factors when determining eligibility.

Excellent credit

Chase Slate<sup>®</sup>

APPLY NOW Secured

on Chase’s secure website

Read Full Review

Chase Slate®

Intro BT APR
0%

Introductory rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$0 intro balance transfer fee when you transfer a balance during the first 60 days your account is open. After 5% of the amount transferred, with a minimum of $5.
APR
15.99%-24.74%

Variable

Duration
15 months
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

BankAmericard® Credit Card

Apply Now Secured

on Bank Of America’s secure website

BankAmericard® Credit Card

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$0 Intro balance transfer fee for the first 60 days your account is open. After that, 3% (min. $10)
APR
12.99%-22.99%
Duration
15 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Discover it® - 18 Month Balance Transfer Offer

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover’s secure website

Read Full Review

Discover it® - 18 Month Balance Transfer Offer

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
3%
APR
11.99%-23.99%

Variable

Duration
18 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi Simplicity® Card - No Late Fees Ever

APPLY NOW Secured

on Citibank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi Simplicity® Card - No Late Fees Ever

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 3% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
14.99%-24.99%

Variable

Duration
21 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

APPLY NOW Secured

on Citibank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 3% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
14.49%-24.49%

Variable

Duration
18 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

APPLY NOW Secured

on Citibank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 3% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
13.99%-23.99%

Variable

Duration
21 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Sphere® Credit Card from Santander

APPLY NOW Secured

on Santander’s secure website

Read Full Review

Sphere® Credit Card from Santander

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$10 or 4% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
13.49%-23.49%

Variable

Duration
24 months
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

Wells Fargo Platinum Visa® Card

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
3% Intro for 18 months, then 5%
APR
16.15%-25.99%
Duration
18 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Good credit

Chase Slate<sup>®</sup>

APPLY NOW Secured

on Chase’s secure website

Read Full Review

Chase Slate®

Intro BT APR
0%

Introductory rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$0 intro balance transfer fee when you transfer a balance during the first 60 days your account is open. After 5% of the amount transferred, with a minimum of $5.
APR
15.99%-24.74%

Variable

Duration
15 months
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

BankAmericard® Credit Card

Apply Now Secured

on Bank Of America’s secure website

BankAmericard® Credit Card

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$0 Intro balance transfer fee for the first 60 days your account is open. After that, 3% (min. $10)
APR
12.99%-22.99%
Duration
15 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Discover it® - 18 Month Balance Transfer Offer

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover’s secure website

Read Full Review

Discover it® - 18 Month Balance Transfer Offer

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
3%
APR
11.99%-23.99%

Variable

Duration
18 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi Simplicity® Card - No Late Fees Ever

APPLY NOW Secured

on Citibank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi Simplicity® Card - No Late Fees Ever

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 3% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
14.99%-24.99%

Variable

Duration
21 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

APPLY NOW Secured

on Citibank’s secure website

Read Full Review

Citi® Double Cash Card – 18 month BT offer

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 3% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
14.49%-24.49%

Variable

Duration
18 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Chase Freedom<sup>®</sup>

APPLY NOW Secured

on Chase’s secure website

Read Full Review

Chase Freedom®

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 5% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
15.99%-24.74%

Variable

Duration
15 months
Credit required
good-credit

Excellent/Good

Fair credit

We recommend using LendingTree, MagnifyMoney’s parent company, to shop for the best personal loan. With a single online form, you can see results from dozens of lenders and shop around for the best deal. By using LendingTree to look for a personal loan, a soft credit pull is performed, which means your credit score will not be negatively impacted. Here are options for fair credit:

MasterCard Platinum from Aspire FCU

APPLY NOW Secured

on Aspire Credit Union’s secure website

Read Full Review

MasterCard Platinum from Aspire FCU

Intro BT APR
0%

promotional rate

Balance Transfer Fee
$5 or 2% of the amount of the transfer, whichever is greater
APR
9.15%-18.00%

Variable

Duration
6 months
Credit required
fair-credit

Average

LEARN MORE Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree

Loan Amount
up to $35,000
Term
up to 60 Months
APR Range
5.99%-35.99%
Origination Fee
Varies
Credit Required
Bad or Could be Better/Average/Good/Excellent
Soft Pull
You can get your rate without hurting your score.

Bad credit

*The credit score ranges listed above are for FICO Scores and obtained from Experian.

FAQ

The amount of time your have to complete your transfer will vary by credit card. Many cards require you to complete your transfer between 30 to 60 days from account opening, but check your specific card agreement for specifics. A good rule of thumb is to complete your transfer as soon as possible; the 0% intro APR period often starts from the day your account is opened.

Many cards charge a balance transfer fee ranging from 3 to 5 percent of the amount you transfer. So if you transfer $1,000 to a card with a 3 percent fee, you will accrue a $30 fee and owe $1,030. But be advised: There are cards that have $0 intro transfer fees.

Any remaining balances will accrue interest. The rate depends on your card agreement.

The post Credit Scores That Get Balance Transfer Credit Cards appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Can I Get a Home Equity Loan with Bad Credit?

iStock

A less-than-perfect credit score isn’t necessarily a barrier between you and a home equity loan (definition courtesy of MagnifyMoney’s parent company, LendingTree). Why? Because unlike unsecured debts, such as personal loans or credit cards, you actually have some valuable collateral to offer the lender — your home. So while you may still face a difficult road ahead in pursuit of such a loan, for many it’s more than doable.

When applying for a home equity loan (HEL), you’re essentially leveraging the equity you’ve built up in your home. By equity, we mean the difference between the value of the home and whatever’s currently left on your mortgage. If, for example, an appraisal finds that your home is worth $150,000, and your mortgage balance is $100,000, then you have $50,000 of equity. (You can find a handy LendingTree equity calculator here.)

Generally speaking, more equity translates to more robust financing options, even if you have poor credit. That’s not to say you’ll get the best terms and interest rates. (We’ll get back to that.) But even if you’re squarely in this camp, there are options out there.

The application process for a HEL, which isn’t unlike that of a mortgage, can be lengthy. Get ahead of the game by gathering up all the relevant financial documentation. This includes your latest tax returns, proof of income and employment, home insurance documents, your home value estimate and the like. Any co-applicants ought to do the same.

What’s considered a “bad credit score” for a home equity loan?

Getting a home equity loan with bad credit is possible, but as with any other type of financing option, a good score is bound to work in your favor.

“Anything under 680 is going to be where things get a little difficult,” Nathan Pierce, a certified residential mortgage specialist and vice president of the National Association of Mortgage Brokers (NAMB), tells MagnifyMoney.

Of course, this isn’t a hard and fast rule Discover, for example, offers HELs to consumers with credit scores as low as 620.

If your score is on the lower side of the 600s, you aren’t necessarily out of the game. Lenders look at other factors besides your score. They also consider whether you have a history of responsible credit use, solid employment and income, and sufficient equity in your home.

Other factors that can impact your quest for a HEL

Debt-to-income ratio: Aim for 43 percent or less

Qualifying for a home equity loan with bad credit is about more than just your credit score. During the process, a number of factors come into play. Your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is a biggie. This basically provides a snapshot of what you owe versus what you earn.

Many lender sites specify the 43 percent threshold. According to Pierce, a DTI that exceeds 45 percent will likely work against you when applying for a home equity loan.

“You may see some lenders that may go up to 48 percent or 50 percent, but that’s on the rare side,” he adds.

In general, lenders tend to lean more conservatively here. And, as we said, 43 percent is a big number for many lenders. The maximum DTI for applying through both Chase and TD Bank, for example, is 43 percent.

Let’s say your monthly gross income stands at $4,000 and all your monthly debt payments (from your mortgage to credit cards to student debt to auto loans) adds up to $3,000. When we divide your debt by your income, it reveals a 75 percent DTI. That is an amount that’s considered high by HEL standards, which will probably impact your ability to qualify for a home equity loan in spite of bad credit.

Loan-to-value ratio: Aim for 85 percent or less

How much equity you have in your home is another big piece of the puzzle, as it affects how much money you’ll be able to borrow. Since you’re using the home itself as collateral, owing less makes you more desirable to lenders.

It’ll also help you get approved for a larger loan amount. If your mortgage debt exceeds 85 percent of the home’s value, qualifying for a home equity loan with bad credit might prove tricky. This calculation is called the loan-to-value ratio. (You may encounter the acronym LTV.)

“For most lenders, that’s the bottom number,” says Pierce. “When you get up to 90 percent, it gets a little bit thinner, but there are some institutions out there that are going to 100 percent these days.”

Most of these will be credit unions and small community banks, as opposed to traditional banks and mortgage companies. The big guys, according to Pierce, are usually limited to 85 to 90 percent.

Low equity, when coupled with poor credit, is likely to make qualifying for a HEL an uphill battle. That’s not to say you’re out of options; you just might have to take a different financing route.

Your credit report: Getting it right

That said, you’ll definitely want to take a good look at your credit report before applying for a HEL. According to a 2012 Federal Trade Commission report, roughly one in five Americans has potential errors on his or her credit report. If you’re one of these people, disputing errors with credit bureaus can give your credit score a nice boost in the right direction. Indeed, 13 percent of consumers experienced a change in score due to their dispute, the report said.

Legitimate red marks on your report, like delinquent accounts or a past bankruptcy, could indeed makes things harder, but every lender is different.

How to shop for a HEL with bad credit

Before making any big financial decision, it’s in your best interest to shop around. Don’t let having poor credit score or disempower you or make you feel like you need to jump at the first offer. Instead, leverage what equity you have in your home to negotiate multiple offers and try to score the best terms you can.

“With a home equity loan, there could be large variations between lenders, so I’d definitely suggest checking with multiple places, as you could get pretty different options from each,” says Pierce.

Just remember that the qualifying criteria for one lender might not match another’s. But that’s all the more reason to do your homework. (Oh, and by the way: if you sign loan papers and then change your mind, the Federal Trade Commission says you have the right to cancel the deal for any reason, without penalty, within three days.)

Additionally, Pierce says that large banks and mortgage brokers might not be your best option. So check out your local community banks and credit unions, which will likely be more open to working with people who have less-than-perfect credit.

What to expect during the HEL application process

iStock

After submitting the necessary paperwork, the application process typically takes a few weeks. This may vary depending on the complexity of the application, underscoring the importance of being prepared. If a lender needs to dive deeper to verify your income or look into other properties or assets you have, it’ll draw out the timeline.

That said, folks with good credit are more likely to snag financing options with better terms and lower interest rates. This doesn’t mean you’re out of luck if your credit score is on the lower end, but applying for a home equity loan with bad credit may result in being offered less or paying a bit more in the long run because of higher interest rates. This is when you really need to compare your options, which is why shopping around can pay off big time.

You also need to think about why you’re seeking the loan in the first place. For example, a home equity loan with a 10 percent interest rate that’s used for a home renovation — which could ultimately boost your home value — might make sense if you have room in your budget to easily absorb the monthly payment. But the same loan doesn’t add up if you’re looking to consolidate lower-interest debt. Sure, you might boost your credit score a bit, but you’ll pay more over the long haul.

Either way, be sure to really pay attention to the loan terms, especially the monthly payments. The good news is that HELs come with fixed rates, and the repayment window seem to fall in the five- to 30-year range. But if the payments are going to strain your budget, you might be better off going with an unsecured line of credit. You’ll pay more in interest, but defaulting on a HEL could result in you losing your house — no small thing.

The application process for someone with poor credit might also involve lenders limiting the amount of money they’ll let you borrow. And while hashing out loan terms and interest rates, Pierce adds that many lenders will set minimum loan amounts as well.

“You may have lenders that say they want a $25,000 minimum loan amount [if] they’re not interested in $10,000 or $15,000, which may be another factor that stops somebody from getting it,” he tells MagnifyMoney.

How to improve your chances of a HEL approval with bad credit

Reduce your DTI

If you’ve got a few strikes against you, rest easy; there are a number of things you can do to improve your odds of qualifying for a HEL. As we mentioned, reducing your debt-to-income ratio is a big one. Take a look at your monthly budget to see where you can free up extra cash to redirect toward your debt. Minor tweaks, from shrinking your cable bill to eating out less, can make a big difference; $50 here and $25 there, when used to accelerate your debt payments, will supercharge your efforts to improve your score.

While it may not be as easy to dramatically increase your salary, you can give your income a nice boost by picking up a side gig or taking on a roommate to reduce your monthly mortgage burden. The idea is to get creative and find something that works for your lifestyle. The freed-up cash can help dig you out of debt faster, which will also improve your credit score and bolster your chances of being approved for a HEL.

Bring on a co-signer

As with applying for a student loan or a traditional mortgage, introducing a co-signer can be a game changer.

Pierce says bringing a co-signer with good credit on board is a good move because lenders will feel a little safer taking a chance on you. Just do your homework, as different lenders have different qualifying options.

Wait until you have more equity

This might take a bit more time, but remember: More equity translates to a higher LTV (loan-to-value) ratio, which tips the scale in your favor when shopping around for a home equity loan.

Just as we discussed upping your take-home pay and trimming your budget to accelerate your debt payments, the same can be said for fast-tracking mortgage payments. Hacking away at the principal balance will cut the loan down quicker — and grow your equity at a faster clip. This tactic may prove tricky if you’re also tackling high-interest debt, but if you have the wiggle room in your budget, it could help reduce your timeline.

Alternatives to a HEL

Marcus Personal Loan Review: Goldman Sachs Takes on Online Lenders with Exclusive New Loan

If you’re having trouble qualifying for a home equity loan with bad credit, you also have some other financing options to explore:

Cash-out Refinance

  • What it is: A cash-out refinance lets you start over with a new mortgage that replaces your old one while letting you borrow extra that you can use as you wish.
  • Why might it be a good alternative? You’ll have one new monthly mortgage payment. If you refinance to a longer-term mortgage, that’ll also improve your credit utilization ratio, which can help boost your credit score.
  • Would someone with bad credit qualify? It depends on the situation. You may qualify, but with a higher interest rate. Pierce adds that, when compared with a HEL, there may be more limits in terms of how much cash you can take out

Personal loan

  • What it is: A personal loan is an unsecured loan. If you qualify, a lender will deposit cash right into your account that you can use any way you wish. It can be a good way to consolidate and pay off debt, so long as you can afford the monthly payment.
  • Why might it be a good alternative? No collateral. If keeping up with HEL payments means stretching your budget (and potentially defaulting), this option has an advantage: You won’t risk losing your home.
  • Would someone with bad credit qualify? Probably, but think carefully. Interest rates for people with bad credit can in some instances be upward of 35 percent. Lenders may also tack on an origination fee and/or prepayment penalty

Home equity line of credit (HELOC)

  • What it is: A little different from a HEL, a home equity line of credit (HELOC) is a revolving credit line extended to you by the lender.
  • Why might it be a good alternative? Your equity level dictates your credit limit, but you can borrow against a HELOC as much as you need to during what’s called the “draw period,” which usually lasts five to 10 years. (Side note: you’ll be on the hook for making interest payments during this time.)
  • Would someone with bad credit qualify? If you don’t have a lot of equity and/or you have a spotty credit history, getting approved for a HELOC is apt to be as challenging as snagging a HEL, Pierce says.

Last words

Getting approved for a home equity loan with bad credit is tough, but it is not impossible. The most powerful tool in your arsenal: to gradually improve your score by making consistent, on-time payments. This, in turn, will reduce your debt while improving your debt-to-income ratio. Keeping up with your mortgage payments will also help you steadily build more home equity.

Plus, you’ve got other options. Aside from potentially bringing on a co-signer, a cash-out refinance, personal loan or HELOC all represent viable alternatives, depending on what you need the money for and what terms and interest rates you can snag.

The post Can I Get a Home Equity Loan with Bad Credit? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Fingerhut FreshStart: Could This Program Jump-Start Your Credit?

Photo of a young couple going through financial problems

Are you trying to rebuild your credit? Fingerhut, an online mail-order retailer, says it wants to help you with its FreshStart program. It’s a new twist on the catalog card or magazine offers of yesteryear.

The program, which involves a special credit card used to shop from Fingerhut’s online product catalog, is designed for customers who don’t have the best credit. If that’s you, FreshStart could give you a second shot at proving your creditworthiness and qualifying for a regular credit card.

But does FreshStart deliver on its claims? First, here’s an overview of the program:

  • Good credit isn’t required. Do you have poor credit? With lenient application requirements, FreshStart could be a way to regain some credit traction.
  • You pay low payments and no annual fee. Unlike many credit cards, FreshStart has no annual fee and the payments tend to be low.
  • You may pay a high interest rate and other costs. If you don’t make your payments on time or don’t pay off the balance in full, you could be subject to FreshStart’s 25.90% annual percentage rate and other costs.
  • Your shopping power is limited. FreshStart lets you shop from Fingerhut’s catalog of products only; you can’t use it anywhere else. And you may be approved for only a small credit limit.
  • It’s not a traditional credit account. Although FreshStart lets you “graduate” to a traditional credit account after you pay off your balance, you don’t build credit with the major reporting agencies while you’re in the program.

How the FreshStart Program Works

How does FreshStart work, exactly? Fingerhut splits the program into three steps: order, pay off, and graduate. Once you’re approved for FreshStart, you place an order from the Fingerhut catalog for an item that costs at least $50 and at most your approved credit limit. You also have to make a $30 down payment. Once Fingerhut processes the order, your item is shipped.

For the next few months (the exact time depends on your program approval), you make payments toward the total balance on your account. Miss any payments and you risk paying late fees (up to $38 per incident) and interest—and you may not be eligible for a regular credit account.

If you adhere to FreshStart rules and pay off your balance, you’ll graduate to a traditional credit card account with WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage. This account lets you shop more often, build credit with the major monitoring agencies, and potentially qualify for credit line increases and other perks.

FreshStart resembles a more legitimate version of “catalog card” programs that are marketed as credit cards for rebuilding credit but can only be used to shop from the issuer’s catalogs. With those offers, the merchandise is often severely overpriced, and customers usually don’t benefit from these programs much because their credit scores scarcely change.

Fingerhut, on the other hand, has a popular catalog dating back to 1952. The catalog currently comprises over 700,000 items, including big brands like Sony, Dell, and KitchenAid. With its focus on issuing small credit limits to buy products, Fingerhut’s FreshStart program is often great for customers who have been turned down for the company’s Fingerhut Advantage credit card. From the company’s standpoint, it’s a brilliant move—shoppers with poor credit aren’t immediately turned away and Fingerhut gains a paying customer.

The Downsides of the FreshStart Program

Now for the costs. We’re concerned that some customers may focus on only the small down payment and monthly payments and lose track of how much they’ve spent in the long run. If you don’t pay off the balance within the set limits, you could pay high interest amounts. You’ll also pay up to $38 for late or returned payments.

Instead of saving money by purchasing an on-sale item, you could end up paying more than the item’s value by the time you pay off the balance. And with a 25.90% APR—which, honestly, is not unusual for a retail card or credit card if your credit is on the lower side—the potential costs could be higher than cards with the average rate of about 13% to 14%.

What’s more, you may not be able to get out of paying at least some interest on purchases. While Fingerhut says you can pay off your balance faster, the terms and conditions include this warning:

However, if you elect to pay your entire balance due at the same time as your down payment, then this will cancel your Loan and you may not be eligible to be considered for a WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account. You may not be eligible to be considered for a WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account if you die, file for bankruptcy, enter a consumer credit counseling service program, make any past due payments, or have any payments returned unpaid, or if you enter any other negative credit status.

Also, if you don’t read the offer carefully, you might miss the fact that you don’t build credit with any institution other than Fingerhut when using the FreshStart program. You must pay off purchases on time under this program before (possibly) graduating to a regular credit card. FreshStart isn’t designed as a way to build your credit with the major credit reporting agencies but as a way to build credibility with Fingerhut.

FreshStart Program Reviews

What do customers think about the Fingerhut FreshStart program? Unfortunately, when we searched for customer reviews, Fingerhut didn’t return stellar ratings. The FreshStart program has plenty of detractors online. We found several reviews that matched the tone of this one:

I opened a fresh start account. My credit increased due to opening a new account. Great! After paying off my items with every payment being 10 days early they closed and reopened a new fresh start account. Closing accounts decreased my credit by more points than the opening of a new account in the first place.

And this one:

Husband and I both have accounts, I pay at same time with one check and both payment stubs enclosed in envelope. They call me every time I use one check to make payment and say I didn’t make my payment, then charge late charge. Clearly it is marked on the check and both payment stubs are included. I do not always have the extra check that month to send, but regardless it is paid every month, I can’t wait till all accounts are paid and I will be DONE with this company!

Fingerhut also got into some trouble for its habit of using robocalls to solicit customers. A 2014 class action lawsuit against the company claimed that Fingerhut “negligently places multiple calls to consumers’ cell phones using autodialed robocalls, without prior express consent.”

So what’s our final take? If you love the idea of shopping from Fingerhut’s catalog and you can’t qualify for a traditional credit card, you may want to try the Fingerhut FreshStart program as a way to start building credit. It’s a good idea to limit yourself to a small purchase—perhaps something you’d buy anyway—and pay off the balance exactly on the program’s terms. Then Fingerhut may offer you its Advantage credit card that will help you build your credit with the major reporting companies.

If you’re really serious about getting a credit card to rebuild your credit, we recommend you get a secured credit card and pay the balance in full each month. To track your progress over time, you can get your free credit report summary every month on Credit.com.

Image: istock

The post Fingerhut FreshStart: Could This Program Jump-Start Your Credit? appeared first on Credit.com.

A Guide to Home Loans for Bad Credit

Getting a mortgage with bad credit isn’t easy. Banks and credit unions became ultraconservative with mortgage lending following the 2008 housing market crash. However, these days, tighter lending standards don’t have to force you out of the mortgage market. If you have a stable income, you may qualify for a mortgage, even with bad credit. We’ll explain the best home loans for people with bad credit, offer tips for cleaning up your credit histories and point out scams to avoid.

Quick guide to checking your credit score

If you’re just starting to shop for home mortgages, it pays to know if banks think you have bad credit or not. Here’s how FICO, the main credit score provider in the U.S., breaks down credit scores:

  • 800-plus: Exceptional
  • 740-799: Very good
  • 670-739: Good
  • 580-699: Fair
  • 579 and lower: Poor

A credit score above 740 is optimal for finding the best mortgages, but you can often secure a mortgage with a much lower score. You might find an FHA mortgage with a credit score as low as 500 (albeit with a 10 percent down payment rather than 3.5 percent rate for scores above 580), but a credit score of around 650 gives you a decent chance of qualifying for a home mortgage. Getting a mortgage with a truly bad credit score will be difficult, and improving your credit to “fair” status could make it much easier.

Where can you check your credit score? Banks and credit unions use the FICO Scores 2, 4 and 5. These are not the same scores you will find through a free credit scoring site. Unfortunately, we haven’t found a free option for checking your FICO Scores 2, 4 and 5. The best option for checking these is checking them on MyFICO, which costs $59.85.

If you don’t want to pay for a credit score, consider using a free scoring site. But don’t put too much stock in the number it offers. It may overestimate your credit score (for mortgage shopping), especially if you’ve paid off debt in collections recently, and some free scores don’t use the 300-850 scale FICO often uses. Instead, focus on the information about what’s helping and hurting your credit score, if the tool offers those insights, and use that knowledge to make improvements where you can.

You can get a free credit score through our parent company LendingTree.

Home loan programs for people with bad credit

FHA loans

FHA Loan Details

Credit score required

500, but banks have minimum underwriting
standards

Down payment required

Credit score between 500-579: 10 percent
Credit score above 580: 3.5 percent

Upfront financing fee

1.75 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.45 to 1.05 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally, $275,665 for single-family units, but it
varies by location and you should check the limits in your area

Fine print

Mortgage insurance premiums are paid for the life of the loan,
except when putting 10 percent or more down. If your down payment is
less than 20 percent but 10 percent or more, you must have
mortgage insurance for 11 years.

Quick take

If you have bad credit, an FHA loan offers a more accessible mortgage. While credit standards vary by lender, you may qualify for the FHA loan with a credit score as low as 500. With a credit score above the 580 threshold, you may qualify for the 3.5 percent down payment.

Unfortunately, an FHA loan can be expensive because of mortgage insurance fees. In addition to paying ongoing mortgage premiums for the life of the loan, you’ll have to pay a 1.75 percent upfront financing fee.

Pros:

  • 3.5 percent down payments (for those above the 580 credit-score mark)
  • Credit scores as low a 500
  • Can buy up to four units

Cons:

  • 1.75 percent upfront mortgage premium
  • Ongoing mortgage insurance
  • Smaller loan limits

Where to get an FHA loan

You can use the comparison tool on LendingTree or Zillow to find offers from FHA-approved lenders in your area willing to work with people with bad credit. If an online search doesn’t yield the results you want, you may need to work directly with a mortgage broker who specializes in finding mortgages for people with bad credit. You can use a site like Find A Mortgage Broker or Angie’s List to find brokers in your community.

Be sure to check the National Multistate Lending System (NMLS) to see if your broker has had any regulatory action filed against them. Regulatory actions against the broker are red flags that indicate you may want to take your business elsewhere.

Fannie Mae HomeReady Mortgage

HomeReady Mortgage Details

Credit score required

A minimum requirement of 620 generally applies
to Fannie Mae products.

Down payment required

3 percent for credit scores above 680
(for single family homes). 25 percent for credit scores
between 620-680 (for single family homes).

Upfront financing fee

None

Mortgage insurance

0.125 to 3 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100, though it varies by location

Fine print

You must earn less than the median income in
your ZIP code to qualify,
or buy a home in a low-income zip code.
You must take a homeowner’s education class to qualify for the mortgage,
mortgage insurance can be canceled when you reach a
loan-to-value ratio of 80 percent.

Quick take

If you’ve got a fair credit score but a big down payment, the Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgage is the best conventional mortgage for you. With a 620 credit score and a 25 percent down payment, you meet HomeReady eligibility requirements, and you’ll pay no mortgage insurance. Fannie Mae offers a 3 percent down payment option, but you need a credit score of at least 680.

HomeReady mortgages also allow for cosigners who won’t live at the address with you. That means a parent or grandparent with a high credit score could help you purchase the property by co-signing. If you can find a cosigner, you may qualify for the 3 percent down payment even if your credit score falls below 680.

Pros:

  • Can qualify with credit score as low as 620
  • A low 3 percent down payment if you have a 680 credit score
  • Down payment doesn’t have to come from personal funds
  • Mortgage insurance premiums are cancellable
  • Non-occupant cosigners are permitted

Cons:

  • Up to 25 percent down payment required in some instances
  • Not all lenders offer Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgages, so you might struggle to find a bank with this offering.

Where to get a Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgage

Fannie Mae doesn’t publish a list of lenders who offer the HomeReady mortgage, so you will need to work with your lender specifically to see if they offer it. Most major banks and credit unions will be approved to underwrite Fannie Mae mortgages, but the specific product offering will vary by bank.

Consider using an online mortgage comparison engine including LendingTree or Zillow to compare offers in your area. However, once you find lenders that will work with you, you’ll have to ask them about the HomeReady mortgage, especially if you want to use the 3 percent down or co-signing feature.

The Housing and Urban Development office of housing counseling may also help you connect with lenders who offer the HomeReady Mortgage.

VA loans

VA Loan Details

Credit score required

Credit standards set by lender

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1.25 to 3.3 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

None

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100, though it varies by location

Fine print

Must obtain a certificate of eligibility
(for military members and spouses)
before applying for a VA loan

Quick take

For people with a military background, the VA loan is a top mortgage option. The upfront financing fee can be hefty, but it’s a good deal if you plan to live in the house for several years. That said, not all VA lenders work with buyers with bad credit, so you may struggle to find a reputable lender in your area.

Pros:

  • No down payment required
  • No mortgage insurance
  • No firm credit minimums
  • Can buy up to four unit multi-family property.

Cons:

  • Upfront funding fee
  • Not all lenders issue VA loans to borrowers with bad credit
  • Must buy home with the intent to occupy for at least 12 months

Where to get a VA loan

To take out a VA loan, you must get a certificate of eligibility (COE) through the Veterans Administration eBenefits platform. Once you get the COE, you can use the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s interest rate data to learn about interest rates for VA loans.

To find a VA lender who works with bad-credit clients, you’ll probably want to work with a mortgage broker. You can find mortgage brokers online or through your state’s housing finance agency. Be sure that your broker has no regulatory action filed against them before you commit to working with them.

USDA loans

USDA Loan Details

Credit score required

As low as 580, but generally 640

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1 percent (can be financed)

Mortgage insurance

0.35 percent annually

Mortgage limits

No limits, but must meet standards of affordability based on moderate incomes

Fine print

You must meet income eligibility requirements,
and the property must be in a qualified rural area

Quick take

If you’re planning to buy in a rural area (and you may be surprised what qualifies, so check), a USDA loan offers a low cost, low money down loan. Technically, the absolute minimum credit score for this loan is 580, but most lenders won’t issue USDA loans to borrowers with scores below 640. USDA loans tend to be a better deal than FHA loans, but they may have higher costs compared to VA or conventional loans. If you’ve got fair credit, but you don’t have a big down payment, the USDA loan makes sense for you.

Pros:

  • No down payment
  • Only 1 percent upfront mortgage fee

Cons:

  • Ongoing financing fee cannot be canceled
  • Finding lenders who work with bad credit borrowers can be difficult
  • Must meet location and income criteria

Where to find USDA loans

If you meet the USDA eligibility requirements, you can start shopping for USDA loans through LendingTree, but you may not find many offers if you have a credit score below 640. If you can’t easily find a lender, you’ll want to work with an independent mortgage broker who will have insider access to multiple lenders in your city. You can find reputable brokers online through Find A Broker, Angie’s List or the Better Business Bureau (search for mortgage brokers, your city). Before committing to a broker, check that your broker has no regulatory action filed against them.

Manufactured home loans for bad credit

Manufactured homes are houses constructed off-site, transported and anchored to a permanent foundation at a new home site. On average, manufactured homes cost 80 percent less than site-built single family homes, but taking out a mortgage for a manufactured home can be expensive, even if you have good credit. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, almost 68 percent of all loans for manufactured home purchases were considered higher priced mortgages. On top of already high rates, bad credit will drive your interest rate even higher. However, thanks to the lower upfront price, people with bad credit may have an easier time finding home financing for manufactured homes than for site-built homes.

FHA Title I loans (Chattel loans)

FHA Title I Loan Details

Credit score required

No credit score minimums, but
must meet ability to pay criteria

Down payment required

5 percent down for credit scores above 500,
otherwise 10 percent down

Upfront financing fee

Up to 2.25 percent

Mortgage insurance

Up to 1 percent

Mortgage limits

  • Home only: $69,678

  • Lot only: $23,226

  • Home and lot: $92,904

Mortgage term limits

  • 20 years for home only

  • 20 years for single-section home and lot

  • 15 years for lot only

  • 25 years for a multi-section home and lot

Titling requirements

Manufactured homes can be titled as personal property.

Fine print

Manufactured homes must be situated on a lot that meets
FHA property standards (such as hookups for water and electricity,
and foundation anchors) that is owned or leased by the primary
mortgage holder. Manufactured home must be at least 400 square feet.

Quick take

The FHA Title I loan is an obvious choice for people with bad credit looking to buy a manufactured home, but you need to do your research before you commit to this loan. According to the CFPB, Chattel loans had 1.5 percent higher APRs than standard mortgages. These loans also come with expensive mortgage insurance fees that can be passed on to you.

However the Chattel loan makes sense if you’re buying a used manufactured home or if you plan to rent the lot where your home sits.

Pros:

  • No credit standards
  • Flexible terms for land ownership
  • Can title home as personal property

Cons:

  • Maximum loan is $92,904
  • Some lender restrictions
  • 5-10 percent down payment requirement
  • Must be a fixed term mortgage

Where to find Chattel loans

Chattel loans are a niche product that few banks and credit unions offer. Half of all Chattel loans are issued by five banks: 21st Mortgage, Vanderbilt Mortgage, Triad Financial Services, U.S. Bank, and Credit Human (formerly San Antonio Federal Credit Union), according to a 2014 report from the CFPB. You can also find local lenders through the Manufactured Housing Association’s lender search.

FHA loan

FHA Loans Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

500 (varies by bank)

Down payment required

Credit score between 500-579: 10 percent
Credit score above 580: 3.5 percent

Upfront financing fee

1.75 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.45-1.05 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally $275,665

Titling requirements

Manufactured homes must be titled as real
property and you must own the lot.

Fine print

All manufactured homes must meet standards set by the
FHA including foundation anchors, water and electrical hookups and more.

Quick take

A standard FHA loan makes sense if you’re planning to buy a manufactured home and land. While credit standards vary by lender, you may be able to qualify for the FHA loan with a credit score as low as 500. If you can raise your credit score to 580, you may even qualify for the 3.5 percent down payment.

This loan isn’t as easy to get as the Chattel loan, but some people with bad credit may qualify. If you want to use an FHA loan for a manufactured home, work with your loan officer closely, so your financing is in place before your home is completed.

Pros:

  • 3.5 percent down payments
  • Credit scores as low a 500
  • Up to $275,665 in financing

Cons:

  • 1.75 percent upfront mortgage premium
  • Must pay ongoing mortgage insurance
  • Must buy owner-occupied home

Where to get an FHA loan

The Manufactured Housing Association’s lender search will also provide a list of lenders who may offer FHA loans for manufactured homes in your state. If that list doesn’t provide the results you need, work with a HUD office of housing counseling center to learn about lenders who offer FHA loans for manufactured homes.

USDA

USDA Loan Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

580 and below is considered a no-go;
generally 640 and up

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.35 percent annually

Mortgage limits

No limits, but must meet standards of
affordability based on moderate incomes

Titling requirements

Home must be titled and taxed as real estate

Fine print

You must own the lot where your home is located and meet
income eligibility requirements and the property must be
in a qualified rural area

Quick take

If you’re purchasing a new manufactured home in a rural area, the USDA loan may make sense for you. The manufactured home must be new, and you have to own the site where the home is located. However, with the lowest acceptable credit score being at the 580 threshold, USDA loans aren’t suited for bad-credit borrowers. Improving your credit to “fair” could be the difference between rejection and approval..

Pros:

  • As low as no money down
  • Low financing fees
  • Competitive interest rates

Cons:

  • Higher credit underwriting standards
  • Must own lot
  • Must buy new manufactured home

Where to get a USDA loan

If you meet the USDA eligibility requirements, connect with the HUD office of housing counseling in your state. If the USDA loan is a good fit for you, staffers there will help you find lenders who work with USDA borrowers that want in on manufactured homes.

VA loans

VA Loan Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

Credit score standards set by lender

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1.25-3.3 percent depending on your military status,
home buying experience and down payment.
This fee can be financed.

Mortgage insurance

None

Mortgage limits

$424,100

Titling requirements

The house must be titled as real property,
and you must own the lot where the house is located.

Fine print

Must obtain a certificate of eligibility
(for military members and spouses) before applying for a VA loan.

Quick take

The VA loan offers a down payment of 0 percent (even for manufactured homes) as long as you own (or will buy) the lot where the home is located. The drawback to the VA loan is that most lenders set their credit score standards in the 600-range, which means that people with bad credit might not qualify. On top of that, not every VA lender offers loans for manufactured homes. Those two factors mean the you may struggle to find a lender in your area who will work with you.

If you find the lender, the VA loan is a great choice, but if you can’t, consider an FHA loan instead.

Pros:

  • No down payment required
  • No mortgage insurance
  • No firm credit minimums

Cons:

  • Upfront funding fee
  • Not all lenders offer VA loans for manufactured housing
  • Must buy home with the intent to occupy for at least 12 months
  • Must own lot

Where to get a VA loan

To take out a VA loan, you must get a certificate of eligibility (COE) through the Veterans Administration eBenefits platform. Once you get this, find an independent mortgage broker who specializes in VA loans for manufactured homes or VA loans for people with bad credit. These brokers work with multiple banks and can help you find better deals than you might find on your own. Before committing to a particular broker, check for regulatory action filed against them. You don’t want to work with a broker who fails to meet the standards set by your state.

Conventional mortgages

Conventional Mortgage Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

620

Down payment required

5 percent (10 percent for people with insufficient
credit for traditional scoring)

Upfront financing fee

None

Mortgage insurance

0.5 percent annually

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100

Titling requirements

Must own land, and home must
be titled as real property.

Fine print

You’ll have to pay mortgage insurance until your
home reaches at least an 80 percent loan-to-value ratio.

Quick take

If you’ve got a 20 percent down payment and at least a 620 credit score, and your home meets underwriting standards, the conventional mortgage is the best choice for you. This loan has competitive interest rates and no mortgage insurance for people with a loan-to-value ratio of at least 80 percent. Your home must be at least 600 square feet and meet HUD standards for manufactured homes, and you must own your lot. However, you can use this loan to purchase an existing manufactured home (built after 1976) if it is permanently affixed to an approved foundation.

Another advantage to this loan is that they do accept borrowers with thin credit files, provided they don’t have derogatory marks on their credit file.

Where to find conventional mortgages

Before you start shopping, you can use the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s interest rate data to learn about interest rates in your state. Compare real offers from local lenders using LendingTree, or work with your state’s housing finance agency to find reputable lenders in your area.

Other common financing deals

Aside from those mortgages, manufactured home buyers with bad credit might consider two other options. First, you might consider a retail installment contract. A retail installment contract is issued by the manufacturer (or installer) or your home. If you’re working directly with the manufacturer to take out a loan, you should take the time to understand upfront and ongoing fees, APR and what happens if you miss a payment. The Manufactured Housing Institute provides detailed information on buying and living in manufactured houses and on how to find manufacturers and lenders who can help you finance a manufactured home.

Borrowers with bad credit might also consider owner-held financing option. Owner-held financing is a readily available form of credit, but it is risky. Before signing a lease to own agreement, find a real estate lawyer who can help you uncover title issues and explain the loan. To learn more, you can either find a lawyer through your employer (who may offer legal benefits), the American Bar Association or by contacting HUD office of housing counseling in your state.

Clean up your credit before mortgage shopping

In 2016, the average new home cost $372,500, but that’s before paying interest. According to Informa Market Research, the average interest rate for a person with a credit score between 620 and 639 is 5.115 percent, but a person with a score of at least 760 gets a 3.527 percent rate. Does just a point and a half translate to much cost difference? Absolutely. If both people finance $298,000 on a new home, then the person with great credit will pay $1,343 per month. The person with lesser credit will pay $278 more, $1,621 per month. That translates to more than $100,000 more over the life of the loan.

Tips to improve your credit score

To repair your credit before taking out a mortgage, and qualify for better terms and more options, start with these three simple steps:

  1. Pay all your current debt accounts on time, each month.
  2. Reduce your credit card utilization by paying down your credit card debt.
  3. Stop applying for credit six months before mortgage shopping.

These three factors alone account for 75 percent of your credit score.

As you take care of those items, you’ll want to check your credit report from the three major credit bureaus through AnnualCreditReport.com.

You want to be sure that you recognize all the information on your credit report, and that there are no duplicate entries. Dispute any errors or duplicates. For further guidance, use the Federal Trade Commission’s free guide to disputing errors on your credit report. If you believe you’ve been a victim of identity theft, follow the Federal Trade Commission’s advice on identity theft recovery.

Disputing errors on your credit report may prevent a bank from issuing you a mortgage, so start disputes at least 90 days in advance of applying for a mortgage. While the credit bureaus should clean up the errors within 30 days, the process sometimes takes longer

Getting a mortgage after bankruptcy or foreclosure

Bankruptcy stays on your credit report for up to seven or 10 years, depending on the type, and foreclosures stay on your credit report for up to seven years, but you don’t have to wait that long to take out a mortgage. If you take steps to improve your credit, you can qualify for some mortgages one to four years after your bankruptcy is dismissed, or two to four years following foreclosure.

 

Conventional

FHA

VA

USDA

Chapter 7

Four years from discharge or dismissal (except in extenuating circumstances)

Two years (or one year in extenuating circumstances)

Generally, two years (though it is not a disqualifying standard)

Generally, three years

Chapter 11

Four years from discharge or dismissal (except in extenuating circumstances)

Must meet credit standards

Generally, two years

Must meet credit standards

Chapter 13

Two years after discharge or four years after dismissal

Two years (or one year in extenuating circumstances)

One year of payments

Generally, one year

Foreclosure

Seven years, except if foreclosure was discharged in bankruptcy (then use bankruptcy limits)

Three years except in extenuating circumstances

Generally two years

Generally, three years

Even if you can get a new mortgage just a year or two after bankruptcy or foreclosure, it makes sense to wait longer in most cases. By waiting around three or four years, the damage of the bankruptcy and foreclosure fades, and you’ll have that extra time to revive your credit score.

To get your credit in shape after bankruptcy or foreclosure, you’ll want to continue to make bankruptcy payments as agreed and consider opening a secured credit card to rehabilitate your damaged credit. Use the credit card for daily expenses, and pay it off in full each month.

Improve your shot at approval even if you have bad credit

If you’ve got bad or fair credit, and you don’t have a lot of time to improve it, you can still take out a mortgage in some cases. These are a few things that can help you get approved with a low credit score.

  • Choose a house well within your budget. If you’ve got a strong income and a low monthly payment, the bank may be more likely to approve your loan.
  • Come up with a larger down payment. While the median down payment is just 5 percent, a person with bad credit may need quite a bit more (up to 25 percent) to get a loan.
  • Work with your loan officer: Give them paperwork in a timely manner, and follow their instructions regarding credit repair, collection repayments and debt repayments. If you’re close to gaining approval, the loan officer can help you take the last few steps to meet the bank or government’s underwriting criteria. Loan officers may take advantage of manual underwriting provisions for FHA, VA, USDA and conventional loans, but that requires more information and participation from you.
  • Ask for rapid rescoring if you’re disputing errors on your credit report, or paying down credit card debt.

Rapid rescoring

A rapid rescore is a method for “re-checking” your credit score on an accelerated time scale. Banks usually only check your credit score once when they’re considering your for a loan, but they may pay a fee to see a new score if you’ve paid down debt or removed negative information from your report, according to Experian. The bank will use the new information to recalculate your credit score to see if you qualify for a loan.

Should I keep renting?

A bad credit score by itself shouldn’t stop you from buying a home. You’ll pay more in interest costs over the life of the loan, but you’ll also start building equity sooner. Plus, a few years of paying on a mortgage will help you raise your credit score, so you can refinance later on.

However, a bad credit score can be a symptom of a bad financial situation. If you’re struggling to pay your bills on time, buying a house isn’t usually a good idea. During financial stress, a new mortgage bill is more likely to be a curse than a blessing.

Watch out for these scams targeting people with poor credit

Financial scammers are always on the prowl for desperate people who might become their next victims. These are a few pitfalls that all homebuyers need to avoid as they shop for homes and mortgages.

Mortgage closing scams

Mortgage closing scams are pernicious schemes that involve falsifying wiring instructions, the FTC warns. In a mortgage closing scam, a hacker poses as a title closing agent. He or she may email you fraudulent information about where to wire the money, or claim that there’s been a last-minute change to the details.

Closing for a home is an incredibly busy time, especially if you’ve struggled to qualify for the mortgage in the first place. To prevent mortgage closing scams, ask your title agent to send the wire information in an encrypted email. You can also request a call with the details.

Anyone who has been a victim of a mortgage closing scam should report it to the FBI immediately, and log a complaint in the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

Complex lease-to-own deals

Owner financing isn’t necessarily a scam, but it can be complex. Many owner financing deals don’t put the title into your name until you’ve paid off the entire loan, and some deals require balloon payments after a few years, the FTC warns. If you can’t cover the balloon payment, you lose every cent of equity you’ve paid.

Even worse than difficult loan terms are situations when the owner can’t legally issue a first-lien loan. If the owner has used the house to secure any other loan, then the bank has a first-lien position on the loan.

Don’t sign an owner financing agreement until a lawyer explain the details of the loan to you. You must take steps to protect yourself from owner fraud if you want to own the house in the end.

Hard money loan scams

Hard money loans are real estate loans for investors interested in flipping a property. Hard money loans come with high interest rates, hefty down payments and short payback periods. Most of the time, hard money lenders evaluate project quality rather than investor credit when issuing loans.

If you’re considering a hard money loan at all, you should have plans to flip a property for a profit. If you can’t earn a profit on the house, then a hard money loan doesn’t make sense.

If you are considering a hard money loan because you can’t find traditional financing, be careful. There’s little oversight of hard money loans, so it’s important you know what you’re getting into with these products. You can check out this guide to hard money loans if you want to learn more.

FAQs

If a bank turns you down for a mortgage, you can ask for an explanation. When you ask, the lender has 30 days to prepare an answer in writing, as required by the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Credit Reporting Act. A few common responses include:

  • We don’t think you can afford the payment (for instance, you’ll have to high of a debt-to-income ratio).
  • Your credit score’s too low.
  • You have an insufficient down payment.

Anyone struggling to find a mortgage should consider working with a licensed mortgage broker in his/her county. Mortgage brokers work with multiple local banks and credit unions, and they can often help if a banker cannot.

The best credit score to get a mortgage is any score above a 740, but most people with credit scores above 620 will qualify for some mortgages. And yes, it’s possible to qualify for a mortgage if you have a score of 500-620.

Yes. If you took out a loan when you had bad credit, you may qualify for a much better rate by improving your credit after just one to two years of on-time payments on all your lines of credit, according to research from VantageScore Solutions. However, if your bad credit score is the result of foreclosure or bankruptcy, your credit score may not fully recover for seven to ten years, so don’t count on a massive rate drop right away if those are the reasons for your bad credit score.

Given how much easier it is to qualify for a mortgage and how much you can save when you have good credit, waiting to buy often makes sense.

VA loans don’t require a down payment, and they have no firm credit minimums, but you’ll still need to meet a bank’s underwriting standards (which could be as high as a 640 credit score). If you have a credit score of 580-640 and you meet other qualifying standards, you may qualify for a no-money-down USDA home loan..

Outside these options, the only no-money-down mortgages for people with bad credit include owner-held mortgages or rent-to-own deals. Do your homework.

Not all mortgages allow cosigners, but a cosigner could help you qualify. Asking someone to cosign essentially means asking that person to pay your mortgage if you’re ever unwilling or unable to pay the bill. We generally don’t recommend becoming a cosigner unless you plan to live in the house.

An adjustable-rate mortgage makes a lot of sense if you have bad credit and you are confident you can improve your credit score within seven years before your interest rate adjusts (in the case of a 7/1 ARM). If your credit improves, you may be able refinance at a lower, fixed rate before the interest rate adjustment takes place. However, this option is risky. You may be stuck with higher interest rates if your credit doesn’t improve or if interest rates rise by the time you need to refinance.

The post A Guide to Home Loans for Bad Credit appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit December 2017

If you have bad credit, it can be difficult to get approved for loans and credit cards. But it is not impossible. Even people with bad credit have options – which we will now explain.

What exactly is a bad credit score? When we’re talking about obtaining credit via credit cards, the magic number is somewhere between 620 and 650. If your credit score falls below 650, you’re going to have a difficult time obtaining credit from some of the larger lending institutions, and if it’s below 620, you’re going to have a difficult time obtaining credit from anyone — including smaller financial institutions like credit unions and independent marketplace lenders.

There are, however, some products for which you’ll have an easier time qualifying. Before you apply, make sure you’re prepared to be responsible with your new line of credit so you can boost your score and credit history rather than damaging it further. The best way to do this is to spend within your means by creating a budget and sticking to it. Here are some helpful tools to help you do just that. Remember to always pay your bill off in full on or before the due date each month to establish good credit.

Here are the products and topics we’ll be discussing today:

Check if You’re Pre-qualified

Before you apply for a credit card check if you’re pre-qualified from a variety of institutions. This does not hurt your credit score. Sites such as CreditCards.com provide good tools that can match you to offers from multiple credit card companies without impacting your credit score. This is a good first step when looking to apply for credit. You can read our complete guide to getting pre-qualified for a credit card here.

Build Credit with Secured Credit Cards

If you are trying to rebuild your credit, one of the best approaches is to get a secured credit card. In order to get the card, you will have to write a check to deposit with the credit card company. This money will be your line of credit.

In order to effectively rebuild your credit, you must actually use the card, and we recommend not charging more than 20% of your credit line. For example, if you have a $500 credit line, you should not charge more than $100. Then, pay off your balance in full every single month. You can even build credit with $10 a month on a secured card and see your credit score rise.

After you’ve consistently managed your secured card well over a period of time, you may be able to increase your credit line beyond your initial deposit or migrate to an unsecured credit card. With most companies, this is a tedious process that you’ll have to initiate. You also aren’t guaranteed to get results even after you’ve made a request.

Discover operates differently than most companies in this realm, making it our number one pick for secured cards.

Discover it® Secured Card

If you’re looking for a secured credit card, look no further than Discover it® Secured Card. On top of being great for people with a bad credit score, Discover will also accept applicants who have no credit history at all. Discover offers great ways for you to rebuild your credit and be on the way to an unsecured card.

Build Credit with Secured Cards

Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

APPLY NOW Secured

on Discover’s secure website

Read Full Review

Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

Annual fee
$0
Minimum Deposit
$200
APR
23.99% APR

Variable

Credit required
bad-credit
Bad

Also Consider

OpenSky® Secured Visa® Credit Card from Capital Bank N.A.

OpenSky Secured Visa

This card does not do a credit check, and no bank account is needed to apply. This is beneficial for those with low credit scores or no access to a bank account. If you’ve filed for bankruptcy, you’re in luck because they don’t care to know, unlike other institutions. However, OpenSky charges a $35 annual fee, which Discover does not. This can be a deal breaker if you don’t want to pay a fee, since there are many secured cards without fees.

Read MagnifyMoney’s full Secured Credit Card Guide.

Our Credit Union Favorite

If you’re looking to open a credit card with bad credit, it can be hard to find a card you qualify for. That’s where credit unions come in. They are sometimes more accepting of your credit history and have cards especially designed for people with low credit scores — helping your approval chances.

Georgia’s Own Visa Classic

Georgia’s Own Credit Union offers a variety of credit cards all with low interest. Their Visa Classic unsecured card is positioned toward those who need to rebuild credit and boasts a low APR. When you apply for a credit card on Georgia’s Own website you are directed toward an application that is for all credit cards they offer. This means that depending on your creditworthiness, you may not be directed to the Visa Classic as an option. Therefore, if you want to apply directly for the card, the best bet is to speak with a loan officer who will tell you if you’re pre-approved for the Visa Classic card.

Our Credit Union Favorite

Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

APPLY NOW Secured

on Georgia's Own Credit Union’s secure website

Read Full Review

Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
APR
12.99%-17.99%

Fair Variable

Credit required
bad-credit
Bad

Best for Cash: Personal Loans

If you’re looking to get some cash in your pocket, credit cards in general aren’t your best answer. Cash advances are not ideal, and putting a purchase you can’t currently afford onto a credit card with a high interest rate attributable to your not-so-great credit score is going to be an expensive venture.

Instead, you’ll want to consider personal loans. They’re admittedly a little more work up front with the application process, but the savings can be worth it. YOu can check to see if you are prequalified without impacting your credit score at most lenders. And [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL] (the parent company of MagnifyMoney) has created a tool that lets you compare rates from dozens of lenders at once, without impacting your score.

[LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL]

LendingTree, our parent company, offers a one-stop tool that can help borrowers find numerous personal loan offers. After entering some basic information, you can receive offers from lenders in a matter of minutes. If you prefer to go directly to the lender’s site you can use one of the options listed below.

LEARN MORE Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

LendingTree

Loan Amount
up to $35,000
Term
up to 60 Months
APR Range
5.99%-35.99%
Origination Fee
Varies
Credit Required
Bad or Could be Better/Average/Good/Excellent
Soft Pull
You can get your rate without hurting your score.

Pros Pros

  • Check Multiple Offers at OnceYou can check personal loan offers from a wide range of lenders including Avant, LendingClub and Best Egg. The entire process happens online for free and is fast and easy.
  • Soft Pull on Your CreditLendingTree performs a soft pull on your credit in order to give you accurate loan offers. This does not affect your credit score and can give you a good picture of what to expect if you're approved for a loan.

Cons Cons

  • Need to Create and Account to View OffersThe only way to view your personal loan offers is to create and account at LendingTree. This is a minor step, but it does allow you the ease of saving your offers so you can review them later.
Bottom line

Bottom line

LendingTree offers a great tool that lets you easily check your rates for a variety of lenders, all in a matter of minutes. This is a great way for you to see what rates you may get and allows you to shop around for the best offer, without the hassle of going to multiple websites.

[AvantPL]Avant[/AvantPL]

[AvantPL]Avant[/AvantPL] offers personal loans even to those with less-than-desirable credit. Because [AvantPrepayFee]there is no prepayment penalty[/AvantPrepayFee], you can pay off your loan before the end of your term without consequence.

APPLY NOW Secured

on Avant’s secure website

Avant

Loan Amount
$2,000 – $35,000
Term
up to 60 Months
APR Range
9.95%-35.99%
Origination Fee
4.75%
Soft Pull
Checking your Loan Options will not affect your credit score.

Pros Pros

  • Apply Online The entire Avant application process happens online. This saves you the hassle of filling out paperwork and visiting a local branch.
  • Check Your Loan Options Before You Apply Avant allows you to check your Loan Options that you would be offered with a soft pull on your credit. This will not impact your credit score. This is helpful if you’re shopping around for different rates and gives you a realistic picture of what to expect should you choose Avant.
  • Could Save Money over Subprime Credit Cards Depending on the interest rate and upfront fee percentage you are offered, a personal loan from Avant could save you money over putting purchases on a subprime credit card. The ability to preview your interest rate can also help you compare between personal loans and other possible options.

Cons Cons

  • High Interest Rates Because you’re a subprime borrower, you’re not likely to qualify for the lowest interest rate offered. You’re more likely to be offered something closer to the 35.99% rate. This is a very high rate, and it’s important that you make all of your payments on time to avoid paying interest and damaging your credit score.
Bottom line

Bottom line

While there’s only one con for Avant’s personal loans, it’s a pretty big one. The interest rate can be extremely high, so do your math before deciding if this is a good product for you. And be sure to take advantage of the fact that they’ll let you check your interest rate before officially submitting your application. Use this feature to shop around for best offers and check if you qualify for a better loan

[OneMainFinancialPL]OneMain Financial[/OneMainFinancialPL]

Avant is easier to apply for as the application process will take place online, but if you’re willing to go somewhere in person, you can also apply with OneMain. Its application is also online, but in order to be approved, you’ll have to show up at a local branch with documentation backing the information you submitted at home.

APPLY NOW Secured

on OneMain Financial’s secure website

OneMain Financial

Loan Amount
up to $25,000
APR Range
17.59%-35.99%
Origination Fee
No origination fee
Credit Required
Average/Good/Excellent

Pros Pros

  • Talk to a Loan Officer At OneMain you have the benefit of talking to a loan officer and explaining your personal situation. This is a positive experience that can help you explain anything that can’t be seen on an application.
  • Receive Money Same Day If you apply online before noon, you usually will receive the loan the same day. This is helpful if you need money quickly. After the loan is approved, you have 14 days to change your mind and return the loan proceeds. If you do that, you will not be responsible for any of the accrued interest.

Cons Cons

  • High Interest Rates Accrued Daily Even though the interest rates may be more reflective of your situation, they are still high. Interest accrues daily, which could add years to your loan if you don’t pay on time. Be sure to make your payments on time each month to avoid paying high interest rates.
  • Must Meet in Person You have to physically bring your paperwork into a OneMain branch after applying online. You will also have to complete an interview with a loan officer. This can be a tedious process if there is no OneMain branch located near you.
  • Must Borrow a Minimum of $1,500 Depending on how much cash you need, the $1,500 minimum may be too high if you only need a couple of hundred dollars. There is no maximum loan amount offered.
Bottom line

Bottom line

OneMain locations can be a good choice if you want to have your loan the day you apply. If you’re okay meeting someone in person and have the transportation to get to your closest branch, this may be an option worth exploring. Make sure you decide if this offer is right for you and if you need a loan over $1,500. Check to see if you’re pre-qualified for a better offer from other institutions.

Last Resort: Subprime Credit Cards

Subprime credit cards are those that lending institutions issue to those with “bad” credit. They are not a good solution to your credit woes. They almost always come with high interest rates and a litany of fees — both of which make it difficult to use this product responsibly.

For example, First Premier makes a business out of lending to subprime borrowers with bad credit. Most of their applicants are only awarded a $300 line of credit. That’s after they pay a $95 fee just to apply (which is not a common practice in the credit card industry) and a $75 annual fee. If you are approved for a higher credit limit, your annual fee for the first year may be higher ($79-$125). In the second year, the annual fee drops ($45-$49), but at this point you are charged a $6.25-$10.40 account servicing fee every single month.

The cherry on top? The card’s APR is 36%. Heaven forbid you are ever late on a payment — your balance will skyrocket with the insanely high interest rate. Don’t forget about the late payment fee — up to $38.

Another example is Credit One Bank — not to be confused with Capitol One Bank, though their logos do look eerily similar. Not every Credit One Bank credit card comes with outrageous fees. In fact, there are 26 separate possible card agreements. But if you are a subprime borrower, you’re likely to qualify for higher rates.

Your credit may not be great, but that doesn’t make subprime credit cards a “fair” product. You may qualify for other, better options that aren’t as laden with fees. That’s why we recommend you first check if you’re pre-qualified for offers then look at store cards and personal loans before choosing a subprime credit card.

Bad Credit FAQs

Store cards can be used as payment anywhere the credit card company, such as MasterCard or Visa, is accepted. Private label cards can only be used at the branded company’s store. For example, if you get a private label card for New York & Company, you can only use it for purchases at New York & Company. You would not be able to use it at any other store.

Your best bet is to ask. If you are applying online, pick up the phone and call or use the company’s online chat if available.

If you have a physical card in front of you, you’ll notice that store cards always have the associated credit card company shown on the front, whether that be Visa, American Express, MasterCard, or another.

Private label cards tend not to display this information, though a major financial institution that a lot of companies work with for their private label cards is Comenity. If you have a card associated with Comenity Bank, it is likely a private label card.

No. Most businesses have an online application for their store cards.

Personal loans are typically issued by more reputable lenders who aspire to more transparency than those in the payday loan space. Payday loans are often advertised as having interest rates somewhere between 10% and 30%, but that interest is charged over a short period of time, making their effective APR (annual percentage rate) much higher. Some payday loans have an effective APR of 400% or more.

The lender isn’t likely to tell you that, though. Many businesses in this space are predatory. Payday loans also tend to come with outrageous fees.

While rates and fees on personal loans for those with bad credit aren’t ideal, they’re more than substantially lower than those of payday loans. Make no mistake about it: despite enticing advertising promises of deceptive payday lenders, personal loans are an infinitely better option.

Borrowing cash from your credit card company often comes with a fee of 1%-5%. That may not seem terrible when you look at the upfront fees of many personal loans, but you also have to account for interest.

Unlike purchases you charge to your card, interest on cash advances starts accruing immediately. You do not get to wait for your next statement to be issued. The interest rate for cash advances is also often higher than that of regular purchases.

A personal loan is an installment loan with a balance that will go down if you pay the minimum payment each month. This makes it far easier to manage than debt accrued via a cash advance. If you only pay the minimum payment on a cash advance each month, your balance will go up at a quick pace, potentially spiraling out of control.

First of all, the less you charge, the easier it will be to pay back. Since you have a bad credit score, you may have had issues with charging too much in the past and being unable to pay it off.

Secondly, around 30% of your credit score is made up of your credit utilization ratio. You find this ratio by dividing the amount of credit extended to you by the amount you have borrowed. By borrowing only 20% of your available credit, you reduce the risk of having your current balance negatively impacting your credit score.

It can sometimes take a year or more to see your score improve by 100 points if you are doing everything correctly and responsibly.

Yes, but only if you use them responsibly, paying the balance off in full every month. Keep in mind your credit utilization ratio here, too.

Potentially. Ten percent of your credit score is made up of something called “credit mix.” You don’t need to have every single type of credit in your credit report, but you should have more than one type. Here are the five that count:

  • Credit cards
  • Installment loans
  • Retail accounts
  • Finance company accounts
  • Mortgage loans

Conceivably, if you have a mortgage or business debt tied to your Social Security number or EIN, you might be able to get away with rebuilding your score through a personal loan (which is an installment loan). The key is to manage all of those debts well — and to do so consistently — especially since you already have bad credit.

No. Transactions on prepaid debit cards do not get reported to the credit bureaus. Also, it’s important to remember than many prepaid cards come with a ton of fees.

The post Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit December 2017 appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

11 Reasons Why Cash Is Still King

Here are 11 reasons why you might want to pay with cash — or at least keep some on hand.

All I wanted was some cilantro and onions, and I didn’t have the money. Correction: I had the money, but it was in my bank account, not in my pocket. The corner fruit market I go to when I need a couple of quick ingredients only accepts cash for small transactions. My plastic wasn’t going to help me.

My wallet was empty, but my husband had a couple bucks in his pocket, so dinner was saved. But the experience made me remember sometimes it pays to have old-fashioned currency on hand.

Not all Americans agree cash is still king. About a third of people in the U.S. never or rarely carry cash, and 34% said they would go completely cashless if they could, a 2017 ING International survey found.

These days, you can use cards or mobile payments for everything, from taxis to paying the babysitter, meaning it’s easier than ever to live without cash. At some stores — such as Amazon’s brick-and-mortar bookshops — paying with cash isn’t an option. But a fully cashless society isn’t here yet, and there are still good excuses for keeping a few bills tucked in your wallet.

Here are 11 reasons why you might want to pay with cash — or at least keep some on hand.

1. It’s Accepted (Almost) Everywhere

Unlike your American Express or Discover Card, cash is accepted almost everywhere. Most merchants in the U.S. happily take greenbacks for payments, even as they refuse to run your credit or debit cards for smaller purchases. Of course, the flip side of the cash-only (or cash-preferred) business is the one that requires you to pay with a card. That’s a perfectly legal practice, and one common in certain industries. So it’s smart to carry both cash and plastic. (Here are the best low-interest cards to consider.)

2. It’s Useful in Emergencies

Credit cards are convenient, until they don’t work or aren’t available. If the power goes out or your wallet is stolen, you’ll be happy you have some paper money tucked in a cookie jar. In fact, the government includes cash on its disaster supplies list, along with essentials such as food, water and prescription medications. Although you shouldn’t hide your life savings under your mattress, $100 or $200 will buy gas or food if the unexpected happens.

3. It Can Save You Money & Hassle When Traveling

You need cash if you’re on the road, especially if you’re venturing abroad. Not only are cards not accepted everywhere, but pockets get picked, ATMs eat debit cards and other misadventures can befall you. Cold, hard cash can get you out of a jam almost anywhere. It’s best to carry a small traveler’s emergency fund on you separate from your main wallet and leave the rest of your cash and a backup credit card in the hotel safe.

4. Your Server Will Love You

You can add your tip to your credit card receipt when you pay the bill for dinner, or you could make your server smile and leave the cash on the table. Your waiter or waitress will be able to collect their earnings right away, rather than waiting for your tip to show up on their paycheck. Plus, restaurant managers sometimes take credit card fees out of tips that show up on cards, which means less for your hard-working server.

Cash is also useful for other tipping situations. The maid or bellhop at the hotel isn’t carrying a Square reader in their pocket, and if you want to tip your Uber driver, you’ll need bills because there’s no way to tip in the app.

5. You Might Get a Discount

Card issuers charge businesses a small fee for processing transactions. Some businesses pass the charge on to customers in the form of an extra fee. Others, especially in states where such surcharges aren’t allowed, offer cash-payment discounts. For consumers, the difference is one of semantics, but the point is sometimes cash will save you money. Cash discounts are especially common at gas stations in certain areas, where you’ll usually save 5 to 10 cents a gallon if you pay with paper rather than a card.

Gas stations aren’t the only ones cutting prices for those with greenbacks. Doctors might slash bills for uninsured patients if they can pay their bill in cash. Jewelry stores might also offer cash discounts.

6. You’ll Spend Less

Do you really spend more when you pay with plastic instead of cash? Studies say yes. Researchers at MIT found people who were told to use a credit card instead of cash were willing to pay more for purchases. Another study found people paying with cash were more likely to focus on an item’s cost, rather than its benefits. In a third study, consumers who were urged to pay cash for small purchases had less debt after six months than those who didn’t receive the same advice.

7. You’ll Enjoy Your Purchases More

Not only will you spend less when you pay with cash, you’ll also get more enjoyment out of what you buy. We have greater emotional attachment to purchases we make with cash than those we put on credit, a study published in the Journal of Consumer research found.

8. You Won’t Run up Debt

If you’re one of the many Americans who have trouble using credit responsibly, going cash-only has a significant benefit: You won’t be able to run up more debt on your cards. Give yourself a cash budget for the week and stick to it. If the money isn’t in your wallet, you can’t spend it.

9. It’s Perfect for Certain Types of Budgeting

Some people give themselves a cash budget to control discretionary spending, but they still use cards for other purchases. Others go all-in with cash, switching over to what’s commonly called the “envelope system.” Popularized by author Dave Ramsey, this approach to budgeting involves dividing all your money for a month into different envelopes — say, $400 for groceries, $200 for gas and $100 for lunches at work.

You only use money from the grocery envelope to pay for groceries, and when it’s gone, it’s gone. The rigidity of the envelope system doesn’t appeal to everyone, but for those trying to live within a strict budget, it works.

10. Your Bad Credit Won’t Be an Issue

So reckless credit card use or other financial problems have tanked your credit score. That means you’ll pay a premium in the form of higher interest next time you need to borrow money. But if you can pay cash instead, you can minimize or avoid the bad-credit penalty. (Not sure where your credit stands? You can view two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Use hard currency for your next used car and you won’t have to deal with crummy loan terms. At the furniture store, you might not qualify for the special financing, but showing up with a wallet full of $100 bills could earn you an even better deal: a cash discount.

11. Your Purchases Stay Private

There’s a reason criminals like to do business in cash: It’s hard to trace. But even law-abiding citizens who value their privacy appreciate the anonymity of cash transactions.

Aside from the possibility of identity theft, credit card companies and retail stores sell your purchase data, which marketers then use to try to sell you more stuff. In one infamous case, a teen’s purchases at Target clued the store in to the fact she was pregnant. The chain then sent the mom-to-be some coupons for baby stuff, much to the surprise of her parents.

The Cons of Paying With Cash

Cash has advantages, but there’s a reason most of us don’t rely on it exclusively. For one, it’s difficult or impossible to use it in certain situations. If you want to pay cash for your plane ticket, you’ll need to make a special trip to the airport, and renting a car without plastic is difficult.

There are drawbacks to cash that go beyond inconvenience. Cash can be lost or destroyed. You won’t get perks, such as purchase protection, that you get with some credit cards. Rewards points are nonexistent, and some people find it harder to keep track of cash purchases than those on cards. The disadvantages of sticking strictly to cash are enough to make a hybrid solution — cards for some purchases, cash for others — the right choice for most people.

This article originally appeared on The Cheat Sheet.  

Image: LarsZahnerPhotography 

The post 11 Reasons Why Cash Is Still King appeared first on Credit.com.

7 Red Flags to Look for When Choosing a Credit Card for Bad Credit

All credit cards are not created equal, particularly those for people with bad credit.

Digging yourself out of a bad credit situation can seem tough but there are tools to help. Credit cards are one of the chief ways to improve your credit, but they can be difficult to attain when your credit has a checkered past.

That’s not to say it’s impossible to get a secured credit card or even unsecured credit card if you have bad credit. There are cards that can help you get back on the right track, but you’ll want to watch out for problematic cards, like those that offer predatory terms and policies that can actually worsen your situation. Choosing the right credit card requires knowing what to avoid.

Here are seven red flags to look for when you evaluate credit cards for bad credit.

1. Sky-High Interest Rates

People with bad credit usually can’t qualify for the same interest rates as people with good or even fair credit. It’s the industry’s way of protecting itself against risky customers. But some cards aimed at people with bad credit charge unnecessarily high interest rates, sometimes more than twice what someone with good credit can get.

The best way to avoid sky-high interest rates is to shop around, and find the cards for bad credit that offer lower rates.

2. High Annual Fees

Some credit cards for bad credit charge no annual fee, while others charge fees, but keep them on the lower end. Then there are cards that may charge upwards of $100, which is comparable to annual fees for some rewards credit cards. As you pay down those balances, look for a card with little or no annual fees so you can put that money toward getting out of debt faster.

3. Tacked-On Fees

Some credit card issuers will tack on suspicious fees that most credit cards don’t include. These may include processing or application fees required to open your card or monthly maintenance fees that add to your annual cost.

While annual fees and late payment fees are commonplace, look out for excessive fees that would lead you to pay much more for the card than you bargained for. Make sure you understand the card’s fee structure before you apply.

4. Incomplete Credit Reporting

The purpose of these types of cards is to improve your credit. For that to happen, your credit card activity should be reported to all three major credit bureaus — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. If your card doesn’t do that, you can’t improve your credit to its full potential.

This is why a secured credit card, which requires a security deposit, is preferable to a prepaid debit card, which does not typically affect your credit because your use of this card isn’t reported. You should make sure any card you’re considering reports to all three of the main credit bureaus.

5. High Credit Limits

High credit limits sound great. But when it comes to credit cards for bad credit, you may want to be wary. For one thing, you may have to pay a lot of fees or an excessive interest rate to access a high credit limit. For another, high credit limits can quickly spiral out of control if you have trouble managing your debt. Be wary of any card promising high credit limits out of the gate for people with bad credit.

6. A Lack of Monitoring

People with bad credit need to pay extra attention to their finances. If a card offers no way to monitor your credit progress or keep track of payments, you may want to keep looking. Opt for a card that has the option to send you an email or text alert when you have an upcoming payment so you can amp up the payment history portion of your credit profile — it counts for 35%, after all.

7. No Room for Improvement

Cards for bad credit should be designed to improve your credit and reward you for responsible behavior. If they don’t, you should look for a card that does. For instance, secured credit cards may offer the ability to earn an unsecured card after a period of responsible use and timely payments. Or, they’ll offer to raise your credit limit without requiring an additional deposit.

You can start your research on credit cards that can help to improve your credit by checking out our roundup of credit cards for bad credit. Remember, before applying, you’ll want to find out where your credit stands by reviewing your free credit reports at AnnualCreditReport.com or taking a look at two of your free credit scores on Credit.com.

Image: AntonioGuillem

The post 7 Red Flags to Look for When Choosing a Credit Card for Bad Credit appeared first on Credit.com.

5 Things to Know if You’re Trying to Get a Mortgage With Bad Credit in 2017

hopping for the right mortgage lender is key to getting the best loan terms, especially if you have less-than-stellar credit.

Believe it or not, your credit doesn’t have to be stellar to get a mortgage. Many banks and lenders will extend a mortgage to applicants with at least a 640 credit score. However, not all lenders are created equal — and, even if you can score a home loan, bad credit is going to seriously cost you in interest.

What Credit Score Do I Need to Get a Mortgage in 2017?

There are two main types of mortgages: conventional and Federal Housing Administration, or FHA, loans.

Some lenders will offer conventional mortgages to consumers with a credit score of just 620. Other lenders will go even lower, but the process for getting that mortgage will be difficult and involve thorough explanations of your credit history.

For FHA loans, some lenders will go as low as 580, with just 3.5% in equity. However some folks can get a new mortgage or even do a cash-out refinance with a credit score as low as 550 — but there’s a catch. You’ll need at least a 10% equity position. This means you need 10% down when buying a home or 10% equity when refinancing.

Keep in mind, though, not all lenders will extend a mortgage to someone with a bad credit score — it has to do with their tolerance for risk. (From an underwriting perspective, poor credit indicates a higher risk of default.) The more risk a bank is willing to take on, the higher your chances of getting approved with a not-so-hot score. You can see where you currently stand by viewing your two free credit scores on Credit.com.

Here are some things to keep in mind if you have a low credit score and are shopping for a mortgage.

1. It’s a Good Idea to Rebuild Your Credit

If you are looking to increase your credit score to have an easier time getting a mortgage, you’ll need to be able to clear the 620 mark to see any significant difference. Hitting that threshold (and beyond) will likely make better mortgage rates and terms available to you, plus keep you from going through the type of scrutiny a lower tier credit score bracket often requires. You can generally improve your credit score by disputing errors on your credit report, paying down high credit card balances and getting any delinquent accounts back in good standing.

2. Down Payment Assistance Will Be Hard to Come By 

Down payment assistance programs are currently quite scarce. Beyond that, to be eligible for down-payment assistance, a borrower would typically need at least a 640 credit score. You can expect this across the board with most banks and lenders. It is reasonable to assume you are ineligible for assistance if your credit score is under 640.

3. Previous Short Sale, Bankruptcy or Foreclosure Are Subject to ‘Seasoning Periods’

If you have one of these items on your credit report, it’s going to impact your ability to get a mortgage. There’s typically a three-year waiting period — also known as a “seasoning period” — before you can qualify for a mortgage after you’ve been through a foreclosure or short sale. The waiting time after a bankruptcy is two years. Note: There are some loan programs that have shorter seasoning periods. For instance, VA loans can get approved at the two-year mark following a foreclosure.

4. Higher Debt-to-Income Ratios Make it Harder

It’s no secret that FHA loans allow debt-to-income ratios in excess of 54%. In order to be eligible for this type of financing, your credit score should be around 640 or higher. That’s not to say your credit score of 620, for example, will not work. It’s almost a guarantee, though, that if your credit score is less than 600 you’re going to have a difficult time getting a loan approved with a debt-to-income ratio exceeding 45%.

5. Cash-Out-Refinancing Is On the Table

This is a big one. If you already own your own home, you could use your equity to improve your credit. How? You could do a cash-out refinance with your home. This would allow you to pay off installment loans and credit cards, which often carry a significantly higher rate of interest than any home loan. Wrapping them into the payment could end up saving you significant money, and it’s still an option for borrowers with lower credit scores. (As I mentioned earlier, some lenders will do a cash-out refinance for borrowers with a credit score as low as 550, so long as they’re in a at least 10% equity position.) However, if this is something you’re considering, be sure to read the print and crunch the numbers to determine if you’ll come out ahead. Cash-out re-fis require you to pay closing costs and your bad credit might not merit a low enough interest rate to make this move worthwhile. You’ll also want to make sure the new monthly mortgage payment is something you can handle.

Remember, just because you can technically get a mortgage with bad credit, doesn’t mean it’s the best move for you. You may want to improve your standing, lower your debt-to-income ratio and bolster your down payment funds before hitting up the housing market. Still, it can be done and if you’re currently looking for a home loan, be sure to ask prospective lenders or mortgage brokers lots of questions to find the best deal you can get. To help you through the process, good credit or bad, here’s 50 full ways to get ready for your house hunt.

Image: AntonioGuillem

The post 5 Things to Know if You’re Trying to Get a Mortgage With Bad Credit in 2017 appeared first on Credit.com.