How Transferring a Balance Affects Your Credit Score

Are you thinking about taking advantage of a balance transfer offer? They’re awfully tempting and can be an excellent way to efficiently pay off your debt.

Thinking of taking advantage of a balance transfer offer? It can be an excellent way to pay off your debt. But how will transferring a balance affect your credit score? And of what potential pitfalls should you be aware?

It’s impossible to predict exactly how any one financial decision will affect your credit score. We can guess based on what we know about credit-scoring algorithms, and credit score simulators are can show you how a particular choice might affect your score. But so many factors influence your score that an exact effect is difficult to predict.

With that said, we can look at two areas of your credit score a balance transfer will most likely impact: your credit utilization and new credit inquiries.

Balance Transfers & Your Debt-to-Credit Ratio

Your credit utilization, or debt-to-credit ratio, is the second most important piece of your credit score, behind your payment history. It’s essentially a measure of how much you owe versus how much credit you have available.

Say, for instance, you owe $1,000 on a card with a $2,000 limit. In this case, your debt-to-credit ratio is 50%. (You can see how your debt is impacting your credit by viewing two of your scores for free on Credit.com.)

If you’re approved for a new credit card with a balance transfer offer, you’ll wind up with a higher overall credit limit. This could be a good thing, since it will push your debt-to-credit ratio lower.

In the above example, if you’re approved for a new card with a $1,000 limit, your total credit limit will be $3,000. As long as you don’t accrue more debt, your total debt-to-credit ratio will be about 33%. Since that’s better than 50%, your credit score should be fine. Plus, with a lower interest rate, you can presumably pay off the debt quicker. As your debt decreases, so will your debt-to-credit ratio, which means your credit score will climb.

What About New Credit Inquiries?

A balance transfer’s effect on your credit score isn’t all good. To open a new credit card, the card issuer will pull your credit score, which will most likely add an inquiry to your credit file and cause a small but temporary decrease in your score. The impact won’t likely be large unless you apply for several balance transfer cards at once.

The Possible Pitfalls of Balance Transfers

A balance transfer card can be good in some circumstances, but it has potential drawbacks. Here’s what to avoid if you opt for a balance transfer:

Taking on More Debt 

If you’re already dealing with credit card debt because of your spending habits, a balance transfer may be the wrong choice. Opening a new credit card gives you access to more credit, and with that access can come the temptation to spend. If you’re likely to reach your credit limits, a balance transfer card may not be for you.

Paying Too Much in Balance Transfer Fees

Most balance transfer cards come with a one-time fee. This fee may be worth it if it gets you out of paying loads of interest every month. But it might also cost more than you’re willing to pay. Be sure you know what the fee is upfront.

Maxing Out a Credit Card

Scoring algorithms like FICO’s look at both your overall credit utilization and your per-card credit utilization. So maxing out a balance transfer card to take full advantage of a low- or no-interest offer may negatively affect your credit score, even if opening the new card decreases your overall debt-to-credit ratio.

Should You Transfer a Balance?

Is a balance transfer right for you? If transferring a balance helps you save money and pay off debt faster, it’s most likely the right choice. Just be careful if you’re preparing to apply for a larger loan, like a mortgage. Even a small ding at the wrong time can hurt you. Still, transferring a balance and efficiently paying off debt will have great consequences for your credit score over the long term.

Image: Geber86

The post How Transferring a Balance Affects Your Credit Score appeared first on Credit.com.

How a Balance Transfer Affects Your Credit Score

Paying no interest can save you a ton of money, but can applying for and getting a balance transfer credit card hurt your credit?

If you’re struggling with credit card debt that you just can’t seem to get out from under, one of the best ways to break free from that debt is to use a 0% balance transfer card. Doing so saves you money in the long run since you won’t be paying interest charges while you work on paying down that balance.

What You Need to Know

First, applying for a new credit card of any kind can end up dinging your credit just a little. That’s because credit card issuers do what’s known as a “hard inquiry” to determine if you qualify for their product. That check of your credit can have a small and temporary effect on your credit scores, but it’s typically more than offset when you’re approved for the new card because your credit utilization improves with the new line of credit. And as soon as you start whittling away at your outstanding debt with your new balance transfer card, your credit is likely to improve even more. (If you don’t know where your credit currently stands, you can get your two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

The five big factors in determining your credit score include your credit utilization, payment history, types of credit, credit inquiries and the age of your accounts. Here’s an explanation of each and how they are potentially affected when you apply for and use a balance transfer credit card:

The 5 Components of Your Credit Score

1. Credit Utilization
What it Is: This is basically the amount your currently owe on your revolving credit accounts, and makes up 30% of your total score. If you keep your balances to less than a 30% of your limit, and preferably 10%, you’ll be doing your credit scores a huge favor.
How it’s Affected: Suppose you owe $10,000 on Card A, which has a limit of $12,000. You’re using 83% of your available credit. But now you open Card B and move all $10,000 onto it (it has a limit of $10,000). You are now using a total combined available credit of 45% (a combined $22,000 on both cards). The new lower credit utilization could help boost your credit score.

2. Payment History
What it Is: This is the most important part of your credit scores and counts for 35% of your total. That’s why it’s so important to make your payments on time and avoid having your accounts go into collections at all costs.
How it’s Affected: If you made regular, on-time payments on the old card, and continue to make regular, on-time payments on the new card, you shouldn’t see any change here.

3. Types of Credit
What it Is: This is worth 10% of your score and in this area, diversity is key, so having a good mix of credit cards, auto loans, mortgage loans and even personal loans will help give you a good score.
How it’s Affected: Since you probably already have a credit card if you’re looking to transfer a balance to a new card, you likely won’t see much, if any, difference here.

4. Credit Inquiries.
What it Is: This area makes up 10% of your credit scores. Too many credit inquires at the same time can drop your score.
How it’s Affected: Applying for a new card will put an inquiry on your credit. As long as you’re not applying for multiple cards, a single inquiry will have a very small effect.  Probably only dropping your score by less than 5 points.

5. Age of Credit
What it Is: The longer you have been responsibly using credit, the better your score in this area. It accounts for 15% of your total score.
How it’s Affected: Once you get your new card, hang on to your old one. Don’t cancel it. Here’s why: You want to keep your oldest cards open so that your active credit has as long a history as possible. Plus, if you close the old card, you won’t get the benefit of a score boost in your credit utilization, as explained above.

Your Credit & Balance Transfer Cards: The Bottom Line

Opening a new account and transferring the balance over should save you money in the long run, and have a positive impact on your credit score — so long as you don’t transfer your old balance and then turn right away and charge up a new one. Don’t expect a huge jump at the very beginning, but as you continue to pay down your balance by making timely payments, you should see some incremental improvement.

But is a balance transfer right for you? There’s no one-size-fits-all answer here. It depends on the size of your debt, the interest rate, your income, your current credit score, and how soon you think you can wipe out your debt.

Some of the credit cards with the longest 0% introductory APR offers on balance transfers include:

  • The Citi Diamond Preferred leads the pack with 21 months interest-free financing for balance transfers and purchases. (Full Disclosure: Citibank advertises on Credit.com, but that results in no preferential editorial treatment.)
  • The Discover it card, also offers 21 months interest-free financing on balance transfers and six months for purchases
  • The Citi Double Cash card offers 18 months interest-free financing on balance transfers
  • The Chase Slate card offers 15 months interest-free financing, plus no transfer fee if you transfer your balance within 60 days of approval

One consideration is whether you can pay off your debt during the 0% introductory APR period. If you feel your debt is too big to pay off in 15, 18 or even 21 months or you’re worried about running up a balance on both cards, you could consider taking out a personal loan to pay it off. You won’t get the 0% interest offer, but you will likely get a significantly lower overall interest rate than the credit card will offer after the introductory period ends and you’ll have a set date that your debt will be paid off by. (You can learn more about getting an unsecured personal loan here.)

Whatever decision you make, you can rest assured that applying for an using a balance transfer credit card won’t severely damage your credit so long as it used it as intended. And, if used properly, there’s a very good chance your credit score will improve.

At publishing time, the Citi Diamond Preferred, Discover it, Citi Double Cash and Chase Slate credit cards are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for these cards. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

Image: gradyreese

The post How a Balance Transfer Affects Your Credit Score appeared first on Credit.com.

5 To-Dos Before Transferring Your Credit Card Balances

balance_transfer

If you’re considering transferring big credit card balances to a card with a lower, or even 0% introductory interest rate, good for you. You already know it’s a chance to pay less in interest charges and whittle away at your debt. What you might not know are some of the following tips that can help you find the card that best fits your needs.

1. Check Your Credit Score

First and foremost, check your credit score. Some of the credit cards with the best balance transfer offers are aimed at people with credit scores of 700 or higher. (You can see where your credit stands by viewing your free credit report summary at Credit.com.) Checking your credit is important because you don’t want to apply for cards that you won’t qualify for. When your credit report indicates you’ve been applying for multiple new credit lines in a short period of time, your credit scores can take a dent.

2. Look for the Longest Free Financing Term

Once you know your credit score, you’ll want to find a card with the longest free financing term available so you’ll have as much time as possible to pay down your debt without incurring interest charges. The law requires that cards offering a 0% introductory balance transfer fee do so for at least six months. Some issuers offer the 0% rate for up to 18 months. You can find some of the best balance transfer credit cards here.

3. Check for Balance Transfer Fees

Once you’ve found a card with a good free financing term that you can qualify for, check to see what their balance transfer fee is. Most issuers charge at least a minimum of 3%. Note: Do the math. If you’ll end up paying more by transferring your balance at 3% than you would continuing the payments to your existing credit card, you should skip the offer.

4. Apply for Additional Cards if Needed

Keeping in mind the credit score information above, let’s say you’ve applied for a great card that you qualify for, but the company won’t let you transfer the full amount of your balance. Now is the time you might consider applying for a second balance transfer card for the remaining balance or see if your existing card company will offer you a better rate.

5. Look for Promotional Financing on Purchases

Some cards that feature 0% financing on balance transfers also extend those terms to new purchases. Just be careful not to use it to create more debt. Read all the terms of conditions of each offer carefully, since there may be caveats that make the deal less favorable, like retroactive interest if you don’t pay your balances off in full by the time the low-to-no financing offers expires.

Be sure to check out these tips for avoiding balance transfer credit card mistakes and also keep on top of all statement due dates. A missed payment is one of the quickest ways to damage your credit scores.

More on Credit Cards:

Image: Dann Tardif/Fuse

The post 5 To-Dos Before Transferring Your Credit Card Balances appeared first on Credit.com.