Georgia’s Own Visa Classic Review: Good Choice for Rebuilding Credit

The Georgia’s Own Visa Classic card is made for those with low credit scores and helps you rebuild and re-establish your credit. If you’ve struggled in the past with getting approved for other credit cards due to poor credit, you may qualify for this card. By using this card, coupled with proper credit behavior, you will be able to improve your credit score.

Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

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on Georgia's Own Credit Union’s secure website

Visa® Classic from Georgia's Own Credit Union

Annual fee
$0 For First Year
$0 Ongoing
APR
12.99%-17.99%
Credit required
bad-credit
Bad
  • No annual fee
  • 2% foreign transaction fee
  • There is a balance transfer fee of 3% of the balance transfer; $10 minimum
  • Due date is 25 days after the close of each billing cycle. No interest if full balance is paid. Interest on cash advances and balance transfers begins on the transaction date.

How the Card Works

This is a relatively straightforward credit card. There is no annual fee and no rewards. Lack of a rewards program makes this card predominantly for rebuilding credit. Look at it this way — there are no tempting rewards to lead you to overspend, allowing you to focus on rebuilding your credit.

The APR for this card is a fair 12.99% to 17.99%. Other cards charge upward of 20%, so this is reasonable. However, a lower APR shouldn’t encourage you to accrue a balance month to month. Always make it a point to pay your balance in full and on time.

A good way to start rebuilding your credit with the Georgia’s Own Visa Classic is to add a recurring payment, like Netflix or Spotify. You can solely have your monthly Netflix or Spotify charge on your credit card statement and increase your credit score as long as you pay your bill in full and on time. This will give you a low utilization (the amount of your credit limit you use), which is a key factor in determining your credit score. For example, if you have a credit limit of $100 and charge your recurring $7.99 Netflix bill, then you will have a utilization of 8% (below 20% is ideal).

How to Qualify

In order to qualify for this card, you need to have a stable source of income, so a job is needed. This will prove that you can afford to make your monthly payments on time and are responsible.

In addition, since this card is provided by a credit union, you have to join Georgia’s Own Credit Union. Don’t worry if you reside outside of Georgia; anyone can become a member regardless of residence. There are four free eligibility options that can qualify you for free membership. Otherwise you will have to join the GettingAhead Association, with a $5 annual membership fee. The best bet is to speak to a Georgia’s Own loan officer (404-874-1166) and see if you’re pre-approved for the credit card. If pre-approved, you can join the GettingAhead Association while completing your credit card application. All members will also need to keep $5 in a savings account that must remain in the account while you have the card open.

A note on the application process for Georgia’s Own — when you apply for a credit card on Georgia’s Own website, you are directed toward an application that is for all the credit cards they offer. This means that depending on your creditworthiness, you may not be directed to the Visa Classic as an option. Therefore if you want to apply directly for the card, the best bet is to speak with a loan officer, who will tell you if you’re pre-approved for the Visa Classic card.

What We Like About the Card

Good chance of getting approved

Georgia’s Own tailored this credit card toward those needing to rebuild or re-establish their credit history. This gives those with bad credit a greater chance of being approved. Also, if your score is above 620, you are more likely to be approved.

Fair APR

This card has a fair APR ranging from 12.99% to 17.99%. This is significantly lower compared to other cards targeted to people with less than perfect credit, with APRs as high as 23.99%. Although your goal is to pay every bill in full and on time each month, if you keep a balance this low, APR won’t accrue as much interest as other cards.

What We Don’t Like About the Card

Have to join the credit union

In order to get this card, you have to join Georgia’s Own Credit Union. There are four free eligibility options, and if you don’t qualify for free membership, you will have to join the GettingAhead Association, with a $5 annual membership fee. You will also need to keep $5 in a savings account that must remain in the account while you have the card open.

2% foreign transaction fee

Make sure to leave this card at home when you travel abroad as you’ll be charged a 2% foreign transaction fee on all purchases. This is slightly lower than most cards, which charge a 3% foreign transaction fee, yet high enough to increase your bill significantly if you make purchases abroad.

No rewards program

There is no rewards program for this credit card. Georgia’s Own offers a Visa Platinum card that has a rewards program, but you may have a harder time qualifying if you don’t have a good credit score.

Who the Card Is Best For

If you’re someone who has a low credit score and doesn’t mind working with a credit union, this card may be right for you. We recommend this no-frills card for people who want to rebuild their credit with a credit card. While you won’t earn any rewards with this card, if you practice proper credit behavior, you’ll be rewarded by a better credit score.

Alternatives

Secured Card with Rewards

Discover it® Secured Card - No Annual Fee

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$0 Ongoing

Minimum Deposit

$200

APR

23.99% APR

Fixed

If you don’t want to join a credit union, you might want to consider a secured credit card to help you build credit. With a secured card, you make a deposit – and receive a credit limit based upon that deposit. The good news is that your secured credit card will report to the credit bureaus. That means your good behavior can help you improve your credit score over time. One of our favorite secured credit cards is from Discover.

Rewards Card with Good Approval Odds

Walmart® MasterCard<sup>®</sup>

Annual fee

$0 For First Year

$0 Ongoing

Cashback Rate

up to 3%

APR

17.65%-23.65%

Store cards are more likely to approve people with low credit scores, and the Walmart MasterCard is known to have approved applicants with scores as low as 520. In addition to promising approval rates for people with bad credit, the Walmart MasterCard has unlimited rewards with up to 3% cash back. Don’t worry if you don’t shop at Walmart since you can earn rewards on any purchase. Be aware that this card has a higher interest rate than the Georgia’s Own card, so compare which card is best for you.

Bottom Line

With no annual fee and fair interest rates, the Georgia’s Own Visa Classic credit card is a good option for those with bad to fair credit who are looking to improve their credit score. If you don’t mind working with a credit union, this card is a good option to rebuild credit.

FAQ

If you don’t qualify for the four free eligibility options, you will have to join the GettingAhead Association, with a $5 annual membership fee. The best bet is to speak to a Georgia’s Own loan officer (404-874-1166) and see if you’re pre-approved for the credit card. If pre-approved, you can join the GettingAhead Association while completing your credit card application. All members will also need to keep $5 in a savings account that must remain in the account while you have the card open.

You should work hard to make sure you make payments on time every month. A missed payment will lead to a late fee and interest accruing on the balance. This will ultimately leave a negative mark on your credit report and lower your credit score. Try not to spend more than you are able to and stick to a budget with these helpful budgeting apps in order to rebuild your credit score.

There is no one way to increase your credit score; rather, there are numerous behaviors responsible cardholders practice to establish good credit history. Good practices include paying all of your statements on time and in full and keeping a utilization below 20%; these will help you rebuild credit.

The post Georgia’s Own Visa Classic Review: Good Choice for Rebuilding Credit appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

A Guide to Getting Your Free Credit Score

As a consumer of financial products it is important to monitor your credit score on a regular basis. This will ensure that you know where you stand in the credit landscape when it comes time to apply for a new credit card, loan, mortgage, or other product. Monitoring your credit score regularly can also help notify you of any unexpected changes to your credit history such as fraud.

There are numerous free credit scores available for you to access; however, not all scores are considered equal. Credit lenders will often pull specific scores, depending on the product you are applying for. Therefore, we have created a simple chart for you to see where you can get specific credit scores from the top two companies — FICO® and VantageScore. The best part is, it’s all for free!

Read on for details on important aspects that make up your credit score and which score suits your individual needs.

 

Finding the Right Credit Score

Where to Access Your Credit Score for Free

The below chart lists some of the various versions of credit scores and where you can access them for free from a variety of banks, credit card companies, and personal finance websites.

FICO® Score vs. VantageScore

You may be wondering which score is better — FICO® score or VantageScore? We’re going to break down what the different versions of the two scores are best for in the next section, but for now here are several differences between the two major types of credit scores.

Find the Best Credit Score for Your Needs:

The credit score that you are looking for varies, depending on what type of credit you are looking to apply for. Each credit score version has different benefits, and lenders pull certain scores in accordance with your application.

Credit Score Monitoring

The best options: All VantageScores and FICO® scores

If you’re simply looking to monitor your credit score and stay on top of your credit, either VantageScore or FICO® score will suffice.

New Credit Card

The best options: FICO® Bankcard Scores or FICO® Score 8 primarily; FICO® Score 3

Where to get them: Get your FICO® Score 8 from Credit Scorecard by Discover or freecreditscore.com

When applying for a new credit card, these scores are most likely to be pulled by credit card issuers. Lenders may pull your score from one or all three bureaus.

Mortgage Loans and Mortgage ReFis

The best options: FICO® Scores 2, 4, 5

Where to get them: myFICO for $59.85

These scores are used in the majority of mortgage-related credit evaluations, with lenders pulling your score from all three bureaus. However, these scores are not free and can only be purchased at myFICO.

Auto Loans

The best options: FICO® Auto Scores 2, 4, 5, 8, 9

Where to get them: myFICO for $59.85

Auto scores are industry-specific and used in the majority of auto-financing credit evaluations. Lenders may pull your score from one or all three bureaus. Unfortunately, these scores are not free and need to be purchased at myFICO.

Personal Loans, Student Loans, and Retail Credit

The best option: FICO® Score 8

Where to get it: Credit Scorecard by Discover or freecreditscore.com

For other financial products such as personal loans, student loans, and retail credit, FICO® Score 8 is best. This is the credit score most widely used by lenders, and they may pull your score from one or all three bureaus when making a decision.

Other Scores and Their Value

FICO® Score 9 is the newest model and not widely used yet. It is also not available for free at this time. The benefits of this score are that it doesn’t penalize you for paid collections and reduces the ding you get from unpaid medical collections. See our review for more information.

The FICO® NextGen score is used to assess credit risk, but only a small number of lenders use it due to its 150-950 scoring range and older model.

Credit Score Basics

What are the three credit bureaus?

There are three credit bureaus that report your credit score to financial institutions and personal finance websites. The bureaus are TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax. They collect credit information from a plethora of lenders and data providers and then consolidate it into a credit file, with your credit score being the key piece of information. You can’t get your credit score directly from the bureaus, but earlier in this article we discussed numerous resources where you can access your credit score — for free.

What is a FICO® score?

A FICO® score is a number that predicts how likely you are to pay back a loan or other credit products in a timely manner. FICO® scores range from 300 to 850. The higher your score, the more likely you are to be approved for credit cards, loans, mortgages, and other financial products. FICO® scores are the most widely used credit scores — influencing over 90% of U.S. lending decisions.

How is a FICO® score calculated?

FICO® scores are calculated from data in your credit reports and made up of the following five key factors:

Source: ficoscore.com
  1. Payment history (35%):
    Your payment history is simply a record of your on-time or missed payments. It’s the largest component of your FICO score — and therefore the most important aspect to focus on if you want to improve it.
  2. Amounts owed — aka utilization (30%):
    Utilization is the amount of your credit limit you use. It is ideal to have a utilization below 20%. If you have two credit cards, one with a $10,000 limit and the other $5,000, then your total credit limit is $15,000. If you have a combined $3,000 debt across both cards, then your utilization would be 20%.
  3. Length of credit history (15%):
    The total length of time that you’ve had credit across all products you have. For example, expect your credit score to be slightly lower if you have had credit for six months versus six years.
  4. New credit (10%):
    Frequency of credit inquiries and new account openings. When you open a new account, your credit score will take a slight dip for about six months, then it will rise — as long as you’re responsible in the other four factors mentioned.
  5. Credit mix (10%):
    This is the different types of credit you have. This includes credit cards, retail accounts, installment loans, and other financial products. The more variety of credit you’re responsible with, the better your score will be.

What is a VantageScore?

A VantageScore is also a number that measures your credit risk. These scores typically range from 300 to 850 (501-990 for earlier models) and are used by 20 of the 25 largest financial institutions. VantageScores are in line with FICO® — the higher your score, the better. VantageScores are more widely available for free from online resources than FICO® scores; however, a majority of lenders pull your FICO® score when making decisions.

How is a VantageScore calculated?

VantageScores are calculated from data in your credit reports and influenced by the following six key factors:

Source: your.vantagescore.com

FAQ

Credit scores are typically updated every 30 days. Depending on your activity, your score may remain the same or fluctuate.

No, checking your score will not do any damage to your score.

Your credit scores differ based on the information that each bureau pulls. Most information is the same, but one bureau may use unique information that another bureau doesn’t have, creating a difference in scores. Also, if you compare your FICO® scores and VantageScores, they will differ because they use different criteria when pulling your score.

A FAKO score is a non-FICO score that is known as an “equivalency score” or “educational score.” FAKO scores give you a general picture of where you stand, but aren’t used by lenders when making a credit decision and therefore aren’t accurate in predicting if you’ll be approved.

The post A Guide to Getting Your Free Credit Score appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 699

In late 2016, American consumers hit an important milestone. For the first time in a decade, over half of American consumers (51%) recorded prime credit scores. On the other side of the scale, less than a third of consumers (32%) suffered from subprime scores.1 As a nation, our average FICO® credit score rose to its highest point ever, 699.2

Despite the rosy national picture, we see regional and age-based disparities. A minority of Southerners still rank below prime credit. In contrast, credit scores in the upper Midwest rank well above the national average. Younger consumers struggle with their credit, but boomers and the Silent Generation secured scores well above the national average.

In a new report on credit scores in America, MagnifyMoney analyzed trends in credit scores. The trends offer insight into how Americans fare with their credit health.

Key Insights:

  1. National average FICO® credit scores are up 13 points since October 2009.3
  2. 51% of consumers have prime credit scores, up from 48.1% in 2007.4
  3. One-third of customers have at least one severely delinquent (90+ days past due) account on their credit report.5
  4. Average Vantage® credit scores in the Deep South are 21 points lower than the national average (652 vs. 673).6
  5. Millennials’ average Vantage® credit score (634) underperformed the national average by 39 points. Only Gen Z has a lower average score (631).7

Credit Scores in America

Average FICO® Score: 6998

Average Vantage® Score: 6739

Percent with prime credit score: 51%10

Percent with subprime credit score: 32%11

Credit Score Factors

Percent with at least one delinquency: 32%12

Average number of late payments per month: .3513

Average credit utilization ratio: 30%14

Percent severely delinquent debt: 3.37%15

Percent severely delinquent debt excluding mortgages: 6.9%16

The Big 3 Credit Scores

Credit scoring companies analyze consumer credit reports. They glean data from the reports and create algorithms that determine consumer borrowing risk. A credit score is a number that represents the risk profile of a borrower. Credit scores influence a bank’s decisions to lend money to consumers. People with high credit scores will find the most attractive borrowing rates because that signals to lenders that they are less risky. Those with low credit scores will struggle to find credit at all.

Banks have hundreds of proprietary credit scoring algorithms. In this article, we analyzed trends on three of the most famous credit scoring algorithms:

  1. FICO® 8 Credit Score (used for underwriting mortgages)
  2. Vantage® 3.0 Credit Score (widely available to consumers)
  3. Equifax Consumer Risk Credit Score (used by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Each of these credit scores ranks risk on a scale of 300-850.

In all three models, prime credit is any score above 720.

Subprime credit is any score below 660. All three models consider similar data when they create credit risk profiles. The most common factors include:

  1. Payment history
  2. Revolving debt levels (or revolving debt utilization ratios)
  3. Length of credit history
  4. Number of recent credit inquires
  5. Variety of credit (installment and revolving)

However, each model weights the information differently. This means that a FICO® Score cannot be compared directly to a Vantage® Score or an Equifax Risk Score.

American Credit Scores over Time

Average FICO® Credit Scores in America are on the rise for the eighth straight year. The average credit score in America is now 699.

We’re also seeing healthy increases in prime credit scores. In the three major credit scoring models, a prime credit score is any score above 720.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 51% of all Americans have prime credit scores as measured by the Equifax Risk Score. Following the housing market crash in 2010, just 48.4% of Americans had prime credit scores.20

Credit Scores and Loan Originations

Following the 2007-2008 implosion of the housing market, banks saw mortgage borrowers defaulting at a higher rates than ever before. In addition to higher mortgage default rates, the market downturn led to higher default rates across all types of consumer loans.

To maintain profitability banks began tightening lending practices. More stringent lending standards made it tough for anyone with poor credit to get a loan at a reasonable rate.

Although banks have loosened lending somewhat in the last two years, people with subprime credit will continue to struggle to get loans. In February 2017, banks rejected 85% of all credit applications from people with Equifax Risk Scores below 680. By contrast, banks rejected 8.74% of credit applications from those with credit scores above 760.22

Credit Scores and Mortgage Origination

Before 2008, the median homebuyer had an Equifax Risk Score of 720. In 2017, the median score was 764, a full 44 points higher than the pre-bubble scores. The bottom tenth of buyers had a score of 657, a massive 65 point growth over the pre-recession average.23

Some below prime borrowers still get mortgages. But banks no longer underwrite mortgages for deep subprime borrowers. More stringent lending standards have resulted in near all-time lows in mortgage foreclosures.

Credit Scores and Auto Loan Origination

The subprime lending bubble didn’t directly influence the auto loan market, but banks increased their lending standards for auto loans, too. Before 2008, the median credit score for people originating auto loans was 682. By the first quarter of 2017, the median score for auto borrowers was 706.26

In the case of auto loans, the lower median risk profile hasn’t paid off for banks. In the first quarter of 2017, $8.27 billion dollars of auto loans fell into severely delinquent status. That means the owners of vehicles did not pay on their loans for at least 90 days. Auto delinquencies are now as bad as they were in 2008.28

Consumers looking for new auto loans should expect more stringent lending standards in coming months. This means it’s more important than ever for Americans to grow their credit score.

Credit Scores for Credit Cards

Unlike other types of credit, even people with deep subprime credit scores usually qualify to open a secured credit card. However, credit card use among people with poor credit scores is still near an all-time low. In the last decade, credit card use among deep subprime borrowers fell 16.7%. Today, just over 50% of deep subprime borrowers have credit card accounts.30

The dramatic decline came between 2009 and 2011. During this period, half or more of all credit card account closures came from borrowers with below prime credit scores. More than one-third of all closures came from deep subprime consumers.

However, banks are showing an increased willingness to allow customers with poor credit to open credit card accounts. In 2015, more than 60% of all new credit card accounts went to borrowers with subprime credit. 25% of all the accounts went to borrowers with deep subprime credit.

State Level Credit Scores

Consumers across the nation are seeing higher credit scores, but regional variations persist. People living in the Deep South and Southwest have lower credit scores than the rest of the nation. States in the Deep South have an average Vantage® credit score of 652 compared to a nationwide average of 673. Southwestern states have an average score of 658.

States in the Upper Midwest outperform the nation as a whole. These states had average Vantage® Scores of 689.

Unsurprisingly, consumers across the southern United States are far more likely to have subprime credit scores than consumers across the north. Minnesota had the fewest subprime consumers. In December 2016, just 21.9% of residents fell below an Equifax Risk Score of 660. Mississippi had the worst subprime rate in the nation. 48.3% of Mississippi residents had credit scores below 660 in December 2016.35

These are the distributions of Equifax Risk Scores by state:37

Credit Score by Age

In general, older consumers have higher credit scores than younger generations. Credit scoring models consider consumers with longer credit histories less risky than those with short credit histories. The Silent Generation and boomers enjoy higher credit scores due to long credit histories. However, these generations show better credit behavior, too. Their revolving credit utilization rates are lower than younger generations. They are less likely to have a severely delinquent credit item on their credit report.

Gen X and millennials have almost identical revolving utilization ratios and delinquency rates. Compared to millennials, Gen X has higher credit card balances and more debt. Still, Gen X’s longer credit history gives them a 21 point advantage over millennials on average.

To improve their credit scores, millennials and Gen X need to focus on timely payments. On-time payments and lower credit card utilization will drive their scores up.

A report by FICO® showed that younger consumers can earn high credit scores with excellent credit behavior. 93% of consumers with credit scores between 750 and 799 who were under age 29 never had a late payment on the credit report. In contrast, 57% of the total population had at least one delinquency. This good credit group also used less of their available credit. They had an average revolving credit utilization ratio of 6%. The nation as a whole had a utilization ratio of 15%.39

Sources

  1. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  2. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  3. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  4. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  5. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017
  6. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  7. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  8. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  9. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  10. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  11. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  12. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  13. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Late Payments, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  14. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Revolving Credit Utilization Ratio, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  15. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type, All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  16. Calculated metric using data from “Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type and Total Debt Balance and Its Composition. All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.Multiply all debt balances by percent of balance 90 days delinquent for Q1 2017, and summarize all delinquent balances. Total delinquent balance for non-mortgage debt = $284 billion. Total non-mortgage debt balance = $4.1 trillion $284 billion /$4.1 trillion = 6.9%.
  17. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  18. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  19. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  20. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  21. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  22. Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2017 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). The SCE data are available without charge at http://www.newyorkfed.org/microeconomics/sce and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.
  23. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  24. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  25. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Number of Consumers with New Foreclosures and Bankruptcies, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  26. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  27. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  28. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  29. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  30. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  31. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  32. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  33. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  34. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  35. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  36. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  37. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  38. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  39. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.

The post Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 699 appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Do a Balance Transfer with Citi

Here's the Right Way to Use a Student Credit Card

A balance transfer can be a great way to consolidate debt and reduce your interest rate. Citi credit cards offer some of the best options for balance transfers. If you’re looking for a balance transfer card that has low fees and a long 0% introductory APR, you might want to consider the Citi Diamond Preferred.

The Citi Diamond Preferred card currently has a 0% balance transfer offer good for 21 months. There is no annual fee; however, Citi will charge $5 or 3% of the total amount transferred to the card, whichever is greater. The card does offer some perks. Citi cardholders can access their FICO score for free and have access to the Citi Easy Deals portal, which provides discounted shopping items for everything from clothing and accessories to household goods. In this guide, we’ll explain exactly how to apply for a balance transfer with the Citi Diamond Preferred credit card. Although Citi offers balance transfers on other Citi cards, this is one of the best offers out there at this time.

If you are ready to take advantage of the Citi Diamond Preferred card balance transfer offer right now, you can click on the green “Go To Site” button below.

If you have a Citi card and want to complete a balance transfer, keep reading and we will explain the process step by step.

Why You Should Consider a Balance Transfer

Setting up a balance transfer is pretty simple, and a great way to get rid of the high interest rate on your credit card debt. At the very least, a balance transfer can buy you time to catch up on old debts. With a 0% APR, every dollar you put toward paying off your debt will go toward the principal balance. And because interest charges won’t continuously work against your progress each month, you should be able to pay down your debts a lot faster.

How to Apply for a Balance Transfer with Citi

With the Citi Diamond Preferred card, you can apply for a balance transfer by phone or online. If approved, you can opt to receive a balance transfer check easily and quickly by phone or online. A balance transfer check is similar to a regular check only it’s issued by the bank (Citi in this case) and used to withdraw cash from your credit line.

With the check, you’ll need to send the money directly to the company that has the debt you’d like to pay off. With the Citi Diamond Preferred card, you can even set up direct deposit for your balance transfer so the funds will go directly into your account if you are trying to pay off a credit card online.

What You Need

To get started, you’ll need the account number and amount(s) you wish to transfer from your current credit card.

The account you are transferring is considered the “transfer from” account, while the Citi credit card will be the “transfer to” account.

If you choose to have the money deposited directly into your account, you’ll also need your bank account and routing number. With direct deposit, the funds can be deposited into your account within 1 to 2 business days. Checks are received within 10 business days.

Keep in mind that you cannot transfer the balance from other accounts issued by Citibank or its affiliates.

Completing a Balance Transfer Online

Like many other banks, Citi allows you to complete a balance transfer conveniently online. Once you receive your card and sign up for online banking, you’ll be able to complete a balance transfer online. Here are the steps you’ll need to take.

  1. Log in to your account. On the main dashboard, you should see an account summary and a link to view a balance transfer offer. Click on “View Offer.”
  1. Next, you’ll be taken to a balance transfer request page where you can review the offer and accept it by clicking “Select Offer.”
  1. Now, you’ll need to enter the transfer information, such as the amount you need to transfer, the account number, and the creditor. At this stage, you can pay up to four creditors at once under the same offer if you wish ($100 minimum amount per transfer).

If you’d like to receive a check transfer, you can also choose if you’d prefer direct deposit or a check by mail. After you’ve finished filling out all the required fields and read the terms and conditions, move to the next step.

  1. Next, you’ll be taken to a summary page where you can verify that all the information you entered was accurate. If everything looks OK, look over the terms and conditions once more and check the box at the bottom, then press the green “Submit” button.
  1. Once you click “Submit,” your balance transfer request will be complete, and you’ll be taken to a confirmation page that you can print for your records.

If you sent a payment to your creditor electronically, keep in mind that it will be received in 2-4 business days. If a balance transfer check was sent, your creditor should receive it in 7-10 business days.

Completing a Balance Transfer by Phone

If you prefer to request a balance transfer by phone, you can call the number on the back of your card and speak to a customer service representative, who can help submit the balance transfer request on your behalf.

To complete your balance transfer request over the phone, you’ll need:

Name the account is held in
Type of card/account
Card/account number
Amount to be transferred
Name of issuing organization

Balance Transfer Best Practices

Remember to keep these things in mind before you do a balance transfer:

  • Make sure you request a balance transfer within 60 days of receiving your new credit card or receiving an offer.
  • Check to make sure the terms of the balance transfer match the offer you received.
  • Keep making payments on your credit card debt even after submitting a balance transfer request. If the request takes a few days to process and your credit card bill is due, you don’t want to be stuck with a late fee for not paying on time.
  • If your sole goal of setting up a balance transfer is to pay off existing credit card debt, you may want to avoid receiving a check or direct deposit payment as you could be tempted to use the money you receive on something else instead of paying off the creditor.
  • Read the fine print carefully before you make purchases on your Citi card. Some introductory 0% balance transfer offers do not apply to purchases. In that case, you would be charged the regular APR.
  • Make sure you pay your bill on time or you may lose your balance transfer offer.

 

The post How to Do a Balance Transfer with Citi appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Build Your Credit Score: 6 Best Secured Cards With No Annual Fees

Build Your Credit Score

Updated: May 1, 2017

Applying for a secured card is a simple way to begin building (or rebuilding) your credit history. Secured cards are a way to prove to a lender you can be responsible without a lender having to take much risk. When you open a secured card, you put down a deposit and the lender gives you a line of credit. Typically, your line of credit matches the amount of your deposit. But just like credit cards, not all secured cards are created equal. Below are the five secured cards that don’t charge an annual fee, thus save you money as you build credit history.

Our #1 Pick from Discover

Discover it® Secured Card – No Annual Fee

Discover offers our favorite secured credit card. Unlike most credit card companies, Discover is ensuring that benefits and rewards traditionally associated only with unsecured credit cards will be available on the secured card. This card is best for people with no credit, or with scores of 670 or less. Here are the reasons why this card is our favorite:

No annual fee: There is no annual fee on this card. You do need to make a security deposit of $200 or more to establish your credit line. If you want a bigger limit, you will have to make a bigger deposit.

Bankruptcy? No problem: If you have filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the past, you can still qualify for this card. It is a great way for people to rehabilitate their credit.

Automatic monthly reviews: Discover will start automatic monthly reviews at month 7. If you qualify, you could be transitioned to an account with no security deposit. Even better, you could potentially be eligible for a bigger credit limit. This feature really sets Discover apart from the competition – and your goal should be to get back your deposit as quickly as possible through responsible credit behavior.

Earn cash back: Most secured credit cards do not offer any rewards. With Discover it, you have the opportunity to earn cash back while earning rewards. You can earn 2% at restaurants and gas stations (on up to $1,000 of spend each quarter). Plus, get 1% cash back on all your other purchases. Earning cash back is not the primary reason to select a secured credit card, but it is a nice option to have available.

Free FICO Credit Score: Discover will provide you with a copy of your official FICO credit score. If you use a secured credit card properly, you should expect to see your score increase over time. And by providing your FICO score for free, you will be able to watch your improvement.

You can learn more and apply by clicking on the link below:

Learn more

Citi Secured MasterCard with $0 Annual Fee

Citi® Secured MasterCard® – No Annual Fee

citi-secured-credit-cardCitibank has just eliminated the annual fee on its secured credit card. If you are declined by Discover, this could be a good back-up option. In order to qualify, you cannot have filed for bankruptcy in the last two years. Citi will hold onto your deposit for 18 months. Unlike Discover, there is no cash back available and Citi will not perform annual eligibility checks to see if you can be approved for a standard card. Here are the key facts:

  • $0 Annual Fee
  • Provide a security deposit between $200 and $2,500. Your credit limit will be equal to the amount of the security deposit you’ve submitted.
  • 22.49% Variable APR

LearnMore

Option Two – Your Local Credit Union

If you belong to a credit union, go there and ask. They probably have a no annual fee option and could set you up right away. It doesn’t hurt to ask a bank either, but they are less likely to have a no annual fee option.

Option Three – Credit Unions “Anyone Can Join”

If you don’t belong to a credit union, or don’t like the secured card options your bank offers, below are three no fee cards from credit unions anyone can join. While it may cost as much as an annual fee to join the credit union, there is also an added benefit of being a credit union member for life.

These are ranked by lowest to highest minimum deposit

JFCU-LOGO-2C

Justice Federal: Visa Classic Secured Credit Card

  • Cost to join – $5 to join JFCU or $43 if you need to join another organization to become eligible
  • Minimum deposit – $110

Eligibility

Unfortunately, not everyone can easily join Justice Federal Credit Union. JFCU provides financial services to employees of Justice, Homeland Security and the Law Enforcement Community, as well as their family members. If you believe you may qualify, then check the credit union’s member eligibility page. Those who qualify, will need a five dollar deposit and to fund their account.

However, there is a loophole.

One of the eligible associations for membership is the National Sheriff’s Association. It costs $38 to join the NSA as an auxiliary member or student. By joining the NSA first, anyone can then become a member of the Justice Federal Credit Union. This brings the cost of membership to $43.

The Secured Card

Visa Classic Secured Credit Card

  • No annual fee
  • 16.90% APR
  • Credit limits ranging from $100 up to 110% of pledged shares

State Department

 

 

 

 

State Department Federal Credit Union 

  • Cost to join – $1 to join the credit union (which the SDFCU usually covers) + $5 (or $15) to join American Consumer Council, if you don’t work for the Department of State.
  • Minimum deposit – $250

Eligibility

You are eligible to join the SDFCU if you’re an employee of the Department of State or one of the extensive organizations with ties to the credit union (all listed here under “who can join”). If you don’t work for the Department of State, you may also be eligible through the American Consumer Council. You can join the ACC for only $5 if you’ve used any major consumer product or service within the past 12 months – and you probably have.

The Secured Card

EMV Savings Secured Visa Platinum Card

  • 7.49% APR
  • No annual fee
  • Minimum deposit –$250

  DCU

 

 

 

Digital Federal Credit Union (DCU)

  • Cost to join – $5 to join DCU + membership costs to join eligible organization if you aren’t eligible
  • Minimum deposit – $500

Eligibility

You must be a member of DCU in order to apply for the secured card. You can be eligible to join DCU if a relative is already member, if your employer offers membership or your community is included within field of membership. If none of these apply, you can join an organization with member privileges. Joining these organizations range in membership cost from $25 to $120. Once you join DCU, you have a lifelong membership, so you could cancel a membership with the other organization after joining.

The Secured Card 

Visa Platinum Secured Card

  • No annual fee
  • 12.00% APR (18% penalty APR)
  • Minimum deposit – $300

Option Four – Banks

If you don’t want to join a credit union, these banks offer instant online applications with no annual fee.

Harley Davidson Visa Secured Card from US Bank

Harley

 

 

 

We know it seems a little strange, but the Harley Davidson Visa Secured Card from US Bank offers a good option for those not interested in paying to join a credit union.

  • 23.49% APR – so don’t carry a balance
  • Minimum deposit – $300
  • No annual fee

Capital One secured card

Capital One secured cardIf you currently can’t afford the $110 – $500 deposit, consider the Capital One  secured card with a $49 minimum deposit for a $200 line of credit. Capital One used to have an annual fee of $0.

However, this deposit is based on what Capital One deems as “creditworthy.” It is possible it will ask for a deposit of $99 or $200.

Understand how to use your secured card properly

Once you’re approved, be sure to use your secured card responsibly. You can find more tips on how to use a secured card and build your credit history here.

The post Build Your Credit Score: 6 Best Secured Cards With No Annual Fees appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Got the Worst Credit? These Cards Can Help You Rebuild It

Sounds counterintuitive, we know, but a new credit card can help you re-establish your payment history. Just use it wisely.

Chances are, your credit isn’t actually the worst. According to data furnished to Credit.com by TransUnion, only a very tiny portion of the U.S.’s scoreable population has the lowest VantageScore possible. Of course, escaping the dreaded 300 won’t get your credit out of the woods. Any score below 600 is considered, well, bad, and even a score in the 650 to 699 range will cost you in interest.

Still, there’s no need to despair: Nothing lasts forever, including a terrible credit score. You’ve just got to take steps to rebuild it. Paying down high balances, shoring up delinquencies, paying collection accounts and disputing errors on your credit report are great places to start. (The further you get from 300, the better. You can track your progress using Credit.com’s free credit report summary.)

After that, consider getting a new credit card. It sounds counterintuitive, we know, but that plastic can be instrumental when it comes to reestablishing a solid payment history. Just be sure to pay all your bills on time and keep balances as low as possible.

Here are five cards designed to help people with bad credit rebuild their scores. (See card agreements for full terms and conditions.)

1. OpenSky Secured Visa Credit Card

Annual Fee: $35

Purchase Annual Percentage Rate (APR): Variable 18.14%

Why It’s a Good Option: Yes, secured credit cards are designed for people with bad credit, but most still require a credit check, and there’s no guarantee you’ll be approved. The OpenSky Secured Visa Credit Card foregoes pulling your credit and doesn’t require a checking account either, so if your finances are really damaged, you may want to take up their offer. OpenSky reports to all three credit bureaus, so you’re covered there. And there’s a wide range for a security deposit: You can put down as little as $200 and up to $3,000.

Beyond that, the terms of the card are decent, especially given that there’s no credit check. (There are certainly secured credit cards out there touting higher APRs and annual fees.) One drawback worth mentioning: There’s no built-in way to upgrade to an unsecured credit card, so you’ll have to improve your scores and apply elsewhere.

2. Discover it Secured

Annual Fee: $0

Purchase APR: Variable 23.74%

Why It’s a Good Option: Back in Dec. 2016, Discover announced that Chapter 7 bankruptcy would no longer automatically disqualify Discover it Secured applicants, so someone with that big blemish on their credit report could conceivably get approved. That’s great news for people with bad credit, because this card is pretty tops, as far as secured credit cards go.

There’s no annual fee, account reviews begin at seven months to determine whether to refund your deposit (a minimum of $200 is required to open an account), and there’s even a rewards program. Cardholders earn 2% cash back at restaurants and gas stations on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter, and 1% cash back on everything else. Plus, Discover is currently matching all the cash back you earn at the end of your first year.

Other Big Perks: Discover reports to all three credit bureaus, waives the late fee on your first missed payment and won’t impose a penalty APR if you miss a bill. Just be sure to pay your balances off in full: That APR is on the high side and will quickly negate any rewards you do earn.

3. First Progress Platinum Select MasterCard Secured Credit Card

Annual Fee: $39

Purchase APR: Variable 14.99%

Why it’s a Good Option: There’s no credit history or minimum credit score required for approval — so long as you don’t have a pending bankruptcy. First Progress reports to all three major credit bureaus, offers a flexible deposit range ($200 to $3,000) and features a reasonable annual fee and low APR. Again, the potential drawbacks are that you don’t have a built-in option to upgrade and the card isn’t currently available in Arkansas, Iowa, New York or Wisconsin.

4. primor Secured Visa Gold Card

Annual Fee: $49

Purchase APR: Fixed 9.99%

Why It’s a Good Option: This card touts guaranteed approval so long as your monthly income exceeds your monthly expenses by $100 or more. Plus, while that $49 annual fee can be bested, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a secured credit card with an APR lower than primor’s. There’s no penalty APR either, though you’ll still want to pay your bills on time and ideally in full. Your card use will be reported to all three credit bureaus, and you can put down a deposit of $200 to $5,000. There are no built-in upgrades with an unsecured credit card, however.

5. CreditOne Bank Visa

Annual Fee: $0 to $75, the first year; $0 to $99 thereafter, based on your credit

Purchase APR: Variable 15.90% to 24.40%

Why It’s a Good Option: OK, if you’ve got really bad credit, you’re probably going to pay a high annual fee and receive a high APR with the CreditOne Bank Visa. But it’s an unsecured credit card, meaning you won’t have to put down a deposit that serves as your credit limit. Plus, it’ll let you pre-qualify without incurring an inquiry (which would damage your already-hurt credit score), so it’s worth considering if you don’t want to go the secured-credit-card route. There are also rewards — 1% cash back on eligible purchases, including gas, groceries, mobile phone, internet, cable and satellite TV services. Just be extra careful about paying your balances off in full, and prepare for a fee when looking to get a higher credit limit, as one may apply.

At publishing time, the OpenSky Visa Secured, Discover it Secured, First Progress MasterCard Select Secured, primor Secured Visa Gold and CreditOne Bank Visa credit card are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for these cards. However, these relationships do not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

Image: mapodile

The post Got the Worst Credit? These Cards Can Help You Rebuild It appeared first on Credit.com.

These 4 Credit Cards Are the Best for New Graduates

Whether you want cash back rewards or no annual fees, these cards have you covered — if you swipe wisely.

With graduation around the corner, you’re probably looking for ways to build up your credit. After all, it plays a big role in many financial decisions.

You could always start with a secured credit card, which is ideal for those with a thin credit file or no credit. Or you could spring for one of the cards listed here, which were designed for new graduates. Whether you want cash back rewards or no annual fees, these cards have you covered as long as you swipe wisely.

BankAmericard Travel Rewards 

Why We Picked It: Graduates eager to see the world will jump at the chance to earn 1.5 points for every dollar they spend. There are no blackout dates or restrictions, and points don’t expire. There are also no foreign transaction fees.

Other Perks: Swipe at least $1,000 in the first 90 days, and you’ll earn a 20,000-point signup bonus. Bank of America checking or savings customers can get a 10%-point bonus as well.

Annual Fee: None

APR: 0% for the first 12 months, variable 15.74% to 23.74% thereafter

Capital One Journey Student Credit Card

Why We Picked It: Geared toward those with average credit, this card offers access to a higher credit line after you make your first five payments on time. This card has no foreign transaction fees.

Rewards Details: With this card, grads earn 1% cash back on every purchase. If they pay on time, they can boost their rewards to 1.25% for that month.

Annual Fee: None

APR: Variable 20.74%

Citi ThankYou Preferred Card for College Students

Why We Picked It: Great rates of return and a nice signup bonus.

Rewards Details: Grads earn two points per dollar spent on dining and entertainment and one point on other purchases. Spend $500 in the first three months, and you’ll receive a 2,500-point bonus.

Annual Fee: None

APR: 0% for the first seven months, variable 14.74% to 27.24% thereafter

Discover it Chrome Student Card

Why We Picked It: This card offers one of the highest rates of return and throws in some extras.

Rewards Details: Grads earn 2% cash back on up to $1,000 in dining and gas purchases, and an unlimited 1% on everything else. At the end of your first year, Discover will match all the cash back you’ve earned. For those heading to grad school, the issuer offers $20 cash back each year your GPA is 3.0 or higher for up to the next five years.

Annual Fee: None

APR: 0% for the first six months, variable 13.74% to 22.74% thereafter

Before You Apply 

Remember, before you apply for any credit card it’s a good idea to check the terms and conditions to make sure it’s the right fit. Checking your credit is also another wise move, as you’ll want to know if you’re able to qualify. (You can view two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.) If the APR is too high or you struggle with making payments on time, it may be best to wait until your credit’s improved to apply or open a secured credit card designed for those with average credit.

Image: SrdjanPav

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

At publishing time, the Capital One Journey Student Credit Card and Discover it Chrome Student Card are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

The post These 4 Credit Cards Are the Best for New Graduates appeared first on Credit.com.

Which Credit Cards Allow a Co-Signer (And What to Do If You Can’t Get One)

There may be no greater misconception in the financial world than the notion that “anyone” can get a credit card. Getting approved for a traditional credit card is no sure thing. In fact, a recent study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found the approval rate for general-purpose credit cards to be less than 40%.

All of which means many borrowers, particularly those who are routinely denied new credit, need another way to access credit if they want to build or improve their credit history. Finding a reliable co-signer is one option. The concept is simple. If you can’t get approved for a traditional credit card on your own, you find a co-signer with a stronger credit profile who is willing to agree (in writing) to bear full responsibility for the card’s balance should you not pay, thus easing the lender’s concerns.

Joint accounts work much the same way, but there’s a big difference: joint account holders have charging privileges, meaning they can use the card as they want, whereas co-signers usually do not. At the end of the day, whether someone is a co-signer or a joint account holder, they’re every bit as liable as you for any outstanding debt on the card and, for better or worse, the resulting impact on their credit history.

Banks That Accept Co-signers

Among the major credit card providers, only a few, such as Bank of America and U.S. Bank, allow for joint or co-signed accounts, while most others, such as American Express, Capital One, Chase, Citi, and Discover, do not.

Should You Ask Someone to Co-sign Your Credit Card?

According to most credit experts, however, it’s not really a question of can you get a co-signed credit card, but rather, should you?

The answer, according to those same experts, is virtually unanimous.

Experts Agree: Avoid Co-signed Credit Cards

“Few people realize what they’re asking when they ask someone to co-sign,” says Ben Woolsey, president and general manager of CreditCardForum. “They think the bank just needs someone as a credit reference. It’s way beyond that, and something that’s never really a good idea.”

Among the many drawbacks to pursuing a co-signed or joint account is the significant risk you’re asking that co-signer to accept, according to Michelle Black, a credit expert with HOPE4USA, an organization that specializes in helping consumers and businesses repair and access credit. Ultimately, the co-signer has nothing to gain and everything to lose. If you fall behind on payments, they must either pick up the slack or see their own credit dragged down by your failure to stay current.

“Co-signing is like playing Russian roulette with your credit scores,” says Black. “It’s extremely dangerous and typically ends badly.”

The fact that all of the risk associated with a co-signed credit card generally falls on the shoulder of the co-signer often creates challenges that go beyond the financial realm, according to Woolsey.

“It’s something people should approach carefully with respect to the ethical position you’re putting someone in,” Woolsey says. “Aside from the financial risk, there’s also the dynamic of potentially hurting the personal relationship, and that’s something people don’t really think about.”

Fortunately, there are many alternatives to co-signed credit cards, most of which are equally effective at providing access to credit and building your overall credit profile, without the financial and moral hazards.

Alternatives to Getting a Co-signed Credit Card

Become an authorized user on someone else’s account

One of the best alternatives to a co-signed credit card is to have someone add you as an authorized user to an already existing account, says Woolsey.

“It gives you all the benefits of getting a card in your own name, but it gives the primary account holder the control they don’t have as a co-signer, because they can revoke that privilege any time they want,” he says.

Whereas only some of the aforementioned credit card companies allow for co-signed credit cards, all allow for the addition of authorized users to an account.

Get a secured credit card

If you’re strictly looking to build or improve your credit, the secured credit card is another alternative. With a secured credit card, you put down a cash deposit that in turn becomes the line of credit for your account. If you put down a $1,000 deposit, you have $1,000 against which to spend and build credit. As you make “payments” on your secured card over a set period of time (usually 6 to 12 months), the lender will report your good behavior to credit bureaus. Some lenders may even upgrade you to a traditional credit card once you’ve proven you can make on-time payments.

Most major credit card companies offer secured credit cards, as do most credit unions.

“Secured cards can be a wonderful credit-building tool when managed responsibly,” says Black.

Take out a personal loan

If you’re looking to build your credit profile while also gaining access to cash, a personal loan is another option to consider, says Tim Hong, SVP of Products at MoneyLion.

“When you agree to a personal loan, you get your funds upfront and have a steady, predictable payment schedule,” Hong says. “You know exactly how much it will cost over time and when you’ll be done. That’s a dramatically different and more predictable experience than a credit card.”

Apply for retail credit cards

Finally, borrowers needing to build their credit profile can always fall back on the old-fashioned store credit card. Though not everyone is a proponent of store credit cards, most such cards, especially those from retailers, tend to have a lower barrier to entry than standard credit cards, says Ryan Frailich, a financial coach and planner based in New Orleans, La.

“Of course, since they’re taking on more risk by approving cards for those without a great track record, they also have the highest interest rates,” says Frailich. “If you go this route, you have to be absolutely certain you can pay off the full balance monthly.”

The Bottom Line

Whether you find a co-signer for your credit card or pursue one of the many alternatives, the experts agree your primary focus should be on building your credit to the point where banks will approve you on your own.

“What it boils down to is that co-signing is really just one option amongst many,” says Hong. “In the big picture, it’s about showing that reliable payment history and improving your credit score so you avoid having the need for the co-signed card to begin with.”

 

The post Which Credit Cards Allow a Co-Signer (And What to Do If You Can’t Get One) appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

4 Ways Your Credit Card Can Help You Build Credit (For Real)

build_credit_credit_card

For plenty of people — and millennials especially — a credit card is a scary prospect. And we get why: Phenomenal spending power plus itty-bitty charging restrictions equals a major opportunity to go into debt.

But if you’re foregoing credit cards completely, you could be making it harder on yourself when it comes to another important facet of your finances: building a solid credit score. That’s because credit cards are fairly easy to qualify for — there’s actually a whole category of them designed specifically for people who need to build or rebuild. (You can monitor your progress by viewing two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Plus, while installment loans (think auto loan or mortgage) come with an automatic price tag and, more often than not, automatic interest, you don’t need to take on debt to build credit with a credit card. That’s actually a common misconception, but, trust us, no balance here required.

To help you how to best leverage your plastic, here are four ways a credit card can help you build credit.

1. You’ll Establish a Payment History

And that’s the number one most important factor when it comes to credit scores. Of course, to build good credit, you’ll want to make all of your credit card payments on-time. (One misstep can really cost you and your score.) To avoid any blemishes, set up alerts that reminds you when your due date approaches or even consider setting up auto-payments each month. Just be sure to keep an eye on your statements for any errors or fraudulent charges.

2. Its Limit Can Bolster Your Credit Utilization Rate

That’s how much debt you’re carrying versus your total credit. Experts generally recommend keeping your credit utilization below at least 30% and ideally 10% of your total available limit(s) — which is easier to do when you have a credit card you’re consistently paying off in full.

3. Your Credit Will Start to Age

And that’s a good thing because length of credit history accounts for about 15% of your credit scores. Length of credit history, also referred to as the age of your credit, is essentially how long you’ve had your credit lines. When it comes to building credit in this category, there’s little credit newbies can do, except, you know, wait. But because a credit card represents one of the easier points of entry into the financing world, that plastic in your wallet can help you get started.

4. You Could Be Rewarded for Having a Mix of Accounts

Credit scoring models like to see that you can manage different types of credit. So, if you’ve got an installment loan on your file — like, say, that student loan you took out to pay for college — adding a revolving line of credit, like a credit card or home equity line of credit, could improve your performance in this key credit category. Mix of accounts, or credit mix, accounts for roughly 10% of the points in your credit score.

Of course, there are ways to build credit outside of simply using your own credit card. That includes looking into credit-builder loans at your local bank or credit union or becoming an authorized user on a friend or family member’s credit card. (The account will appear on your credit file and bolster your performance in the aforementioned credit scoring categories, but you won’t be liable for the charges.) And if your credit is kind of shoddy, you can try disputing any errors on your credit report, limiting credit inquiries and addressing accounts in default. You can find a full 11 ways to improve your credit scores here.

Got a credit score question? Ask away in the comments section and one of our experts will try to help!

Image: g-stockstudio

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12 Million People Are About to Get a Credit Score Boost — Here’s Why

12 Million People Are About to Get a Credit Score Boost

Some serious tax liens and civil judgments will soon disappear from millions of credit reports, the Consumer Data Industry Association announced this week. As a result, millions of consumers could see their FICO scores improve dramatically.

(This post was originally published on March 15, 2017.)

The CDIA, the trade organization that represents all three major credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — says they have agreed to remove from consumer credit reports any tax lien and civil judgment data that doesn’t include all of a consumer’s information. That information can include the consumer’s full name, address, Social Security number, or date of birth. The changes are set to take effect July 1.

Roughly 12 million U.S. consumers should expect to see their FICO scores rise as a result of the change says Ethan Dornhelm, vice president of scores and analytics at FICO. The vast majority will see a boost of 20 points or so, he added, while some 700,000 consumers will see a 40-point boost or higher.

Even a small 20-point increase could improve access to lower rates on financial products for these consumers.

“For consumers, the news is all good,” says credit expert John Ulzheimer. “Your score can’t go down because of the removal of a lien or a judgment.”

The change will apply to all new tax lien and civil-judgment information that’s added to consumers’ credit reports as well as data already on the reports. Ulzheimer says consumers who currently have tax liens or judgments on their credit reports that are weighing down their credit scores will be able to reap the rewards of removal almost immediately

“The minute the stuff is gone, your score will adjust and you’re going to find yourself in a better position to leverage that better score,” says Ulzheimer.

But, importantly, he notes that just because credit reporting bureaus will no longer count tax liens or civil judgments against you, it does not mean they no longer exist at all. Consumers could still be impacted by wage garnishment and other punishments associated with the liens and judgments.

“This is the equivalent of taking white-out and whiting it out on your credit report. You can’t see it any longer, but you still have a lien, you still a have a judgment,” Ulzheimer says.

Solution to a longstanding problem

Many tax liens and most civil judgments have incomplete consumer information.

The changes are part of the CDIA’s National Consumer Assistance program that has already removed non-loan-related items sent to collections firms, such as past-due accounts for gym memberships or libraries. The program also has set a 2018 goal to remove from credit reports medical debt that consumers have already paid off.

“Some creditors may have liked having inaccurate credit reports, as long as they were skewed in their favor. That’s not the way the system is supposed to work. This action is just one more proof that the CFPB [Consumer Financial Protection Bureau] works, and works well, and shouldn’t be weakened by special interest influence over Congress,” says Edmund Mierzwinski, consumer program director at the U.S. Public Interest Research Group.

The move is likely the result of several state settlements and pressure from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the federal financial industry watchdog.  Beginning in 2015, the reporting agencies reached settlements with 32 different state Attorneys General over several practices, including how they handle errors. The CFPB also released a report earlier this month that examined credit bureaus and recommended they raise their standards for recording public record data.


Time to start shopping for better loan rates?

High credit scores can lead to long-term savings. Borrowers who expect their scores to improve as a result of these changes may find better deals if they can wait a few months to buy a new house, refinance a mortgage, or purchase a new car. Even a 10-point difference can lead to lower rates on loans.

If you expect the credit reporting changes might benefit you, Ulzheimer suggests holding off on taking out new loans or shopping for refi deals, such as student loan refinancing.

“Let it happen, pull your own credit reports to verify the information is gone, then take advantage of the higher scores,” Ulzheimer says.

Ulzheimer also says the changes may not be permanent. “There is a possibility that if the credit reporting bureau is able to find the missing information, the negative information could reappear on consumer credit reports,” he says.

There isn’t anything in the law that forbids the reporting of liens and judgments anymore, and lenders can still check public records on their own to find missing information.

Ulzheimer says if he were the CEO of a reporting agency, that’s exactly what he would do.

“I would embark on a project to get this information immediately back in the credit reporting system,” he says, then adds all he’d need to do is find an economic way to populate the missing data.

“From a business perspective, I would do it in a New York minute. Because I would immediately have a competitive advantage over my two competitors,” says Ulzheimer.

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