These 15 States Have the Most Telecommuting Jobs

Image: Izabela Habur 

The post These 15 States Have the Most Telecommuting Jobs appeared first on Credit.com.

The 15 Best Jobs for Young People All Pay at Least $40,000

CareerBuilder ranked the top 15 best jobs for people between the ages of 19 and 24, based on the share of young workers in the field, average wage, and projected job growth.

You might love watching reruns of Law & Order, but just because you get a kick out of watching people duke it out in a courtroom on TV doesn’t mean you should go to law school. Yet 25% of high school students choose their future career based on something they saw on TV or in a movie, according to research from CareerBuilder.

Choosing a college major or career because it seems cool can backfire. A third of full-time workers come to regret their college major, CareerBuilder found. But by the time they realize they’ve made a mistake, doing a career reset is costly and complicated. Better to pick right the first time than have to start all over again in your 20s or 30s once you realize you’re not really cut out to be (or can’t make it as) a software engineer, salesperson, or screenwriter. But how to choose?

“There is a world of opportunity open to younger workers in business, technical and creative fields,” Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder, said in a statement. To narrow down the choices, you need to consider both your own passions and the potential salary and available job opportunities, Haefner added. “The more informed you are about your options and what it takes to get to where you want to be, the better the outcome,” she said.

To help college and high school students choose their path in life, CareerBuilder ranked the 15 best jobs for people between the ages of 19 and 24, based on the share of young workers in the field, average wage, and projected job growth. All pay about $40,000 – or more – annually, and they include jobs in tech, healthcare and the arts. Some require a bachelor’s degree, but others you can get with just a certificate or associate degree (check out numbers 12 and 4 on our list).

First up, a career for anyone who’s always glued to their laptop screen.

15. Web Developers

You wouldn’t be able to read this article if it weren’t for web developers, the people who design and create websites. It’s the perfect job for tech-savvy young people, especially since you don’t always need a bachelor’s degree to get your foot in the door. Many web developers have two-year degrees, while others are self-taught. More technical positions might require a bachelor’s degree, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Web developers earn an average of $34.09 an hour, or $70,907 per year. The number of jobs in this field grew by 19% between 2013 and 2017, and 8% of people in the field are younger than 24.

14. Public Relations Specialists

After presenters at the Oscars mistakenly handed the Best Picture statuette to the wrong film, you can bet there was a team of public relations specialists working behind the scenes at damage control. PR pros work to shape public opinion about the organizations for which they work, collaborating with journalists, managing social media and more. Most have a bachelor’s degree in public relations, communications or a related field. Entry-level PR specialists might write press releases, field media requests and help organize events. As you advance, you might be put in charge of managing public relations for an entire company or brand.

PR specialists earn $31.66 an hour, or $65,853 annually. The number of jobs increased by 7% over the last five years, and 9% of PR pros are under 24.

13. Sound Engineering Technicians

Did the band sound great at the last concert you went to? Thank the sound technician. They’re the ones responsible for maintaining and operating the sound equipment for concerts, radio shows, recording sessions and more. Some people land a job in this field and learn while they work, while others complete non-degree training or earn an associate degree. People with experience may be able to move up to bigger jobs (say, from a small local radio station to a bigger market) or to supervisory positions, according to the BLS.

Sound engineering technicians earn $29.87 an hour, or $62,130 per year. The number of people working in this field is relatively small – a little more than 15,000 – but the number of jobs increased by 8% from 2013 to 2017. Eleven percent of sound engineering technicians are under 24.

12. Surgical Technologists

When it comes to job growth, healthcare may be the hottest field. The U.S. added 374,000 healthcare jobs in 2016 alone, according to the BLS, and many of them don’t require a college degree. Surgical technologist – aka a scrub tech — is one. You can get a job in this fast-growing field after earning an associate degree or completing a certificate program from an accredited school.

Surgical technologists earn $22.17 an hour, equivalent to $46,114 per year. The number of jobs grew by 7% over the past five years, and 11% of people working in the field are between 19 and 24.

11. Automotive Service & Maintenance Technicians

Given that more than half of Americans don’t know how to change their car’s oil or fix a flat tire, let alone perform more complex maintenance, it’s no wonder that the number of jobs for automotive service and maintenance technicians is growing. These car repair gurus keep vehicles humming along, and they don’t need a degree to do it. Vocational training combined with on-the-job experience gets you in the door, making this field a good choice for people who don’t think college is the right choice for them.

Automotive service technicians earn $19.65 an hour on average, or about $40,872 per year. More than 650,000 people work in this field, and the number of jobs grew by 7% in recent years. Twelve percent of automotive techs are younger than 24.

10. Electronic Home Entertainment Equipment Installers & Repairers

Electronic home entertainment equipment installers and repairers install and repair home sound systems and entertainment systems. You don’t need a college degree to do this job, though you will need to complete some specialized training, usually at a community college or technical school.

Electronic home entertainment equipment installers make $19.12 per hour, or about $39,770 per year, just under the $40K threshold. The number of jobs grew by 7% from 2013 to 2017, and 13% of people in this field were 24 or younger.

9. Film & Video Editors

If you watch television or movies, you’ve benefited from the work of a film or video editor. Film editors assemble footage into a coherent sequence. The job typically requires a bachelor’s degree, and it’s one of the best-paying creative jobs out there, with top film editors earning more than six figures annually.

Film and video editing is a small but growing field. The number of jobs grew by 18% from 2013 to 2017, and there are now roughly 30,000 people working in this industry. With an average wage of $38.89 an hour, or $80,891 per year, it’s also one of the best-paying jobs for young workers. Thirteen percent of film and video editors are younger than 24.

8. Biological Technicians

Science-loving college students might want to consider a career as a biological technician. This job involves helping scientists conduct lab tests and experiments. Most have a bachelor’s degree in biology or a similar field, and they need hands-on lab experience to get the job. Some biological technicians become full-fledged scientists after earning a master’s or doctorate degree, according to the BLS.

The number of jobs for biological technicians grew 5% from 2013 to 2017. Of the roughly 76,000 people in this field, 14% are under 24, and they earn $21.77 an hour on average, or $45,282 a year.

7. Physical Therapy Assistants

Physical therapy assistants, or PTAs, work with physical therapists to help patients recover from injuries. To land the job, you’ll need an associate degree from an accredited program. You’ll also need to be licensed. A minority of PTAs eventually go back to school and become physical therapists, a job that requires an advanced degree, according to the American Physical Therapy Association.

Jobs for physical therapy assistants increased 13% over the past five years. About 15% of the 87,000 people working in this field are younger than 24, and they earn an average wage of $26.59 per hour ($55,307 per year).

6. Camera Operators

Camera operators capture images for television, film, and video. Most camera operators earn a bachelor’s degree in film or broadcasting. Roughly half of camera operators work in either the film or television industry, but others might film weddings or corporate events. Thirty percent are self-employed.

The nation’s 20,616 camera operators earn $27.85 an hour, or $57,928 per year. Jobs in this specialized field grew by 7% from 2013 to 2017, and 15% of workers are younger than 24.

5. Forensic Science Technicians

On shows like CSI and Forensic Files, forensic scientists solve crimes using DNA, fingerprints and other evidence. While the real-life job might not be as dramatic as it is on TV, there’s a growing demand for people trained in forensic science. You’ll need a bachelor’s degree in a field like chemistry or biology, and you might take specific courses in forensic science, according to the BLS. In addition to being able to analyze evidence, forensic scientists need to be very detail-oriented and good communicators, since they’ll sometimes have to testify in criminal cases.

Forensic science technicians earn an average of $29.04 per hour, equivalent to a salary of $60,403. Eighteen percent of the roughly 15,000 people working in this field are under 24. The number of jobs for forensic science technicians grew by 12% from 2013 to 2017.

4. Environmental Science Protection Technicians

You can thank environmental science protection technicians for the clean water you drink and the fresh air you breathe. These professionals monitor pollution and contamination and inspect businesses and public spaces for environmental hazards and violations. To get the job, you’ll need an associate degree or other post-secondary training in environmental health or sciences.

Environmental science protection technicians earn $22.28 per hour, or $46,342 per year. A fifth of the 35,352 people in this field are between the ages of 19 and 24, and the number of jobs grew by 7% over the past five years.

3. Adult Education & Literacy Teachers

If you have a passion for teaching but can’t picture yourself in an elementary or high school classroom, a career as an adult education or literacy teacher might be a good fit. These educational professionals work with adult students to help them master the English language, earn a high school diploma, or acquire other basic skills. You’ll need a bachelor’s degree to get a job in this field, and some people go on to earn master’s degrees in adult education or English as a second language.

People younger than 24 make up 22% of all adult education and literacy teachers. They earn $25.90 an hour on average, or $53,872 per year, and the number of jobs grew by 5% from 2013 to 2017.

2. Coaches & Scouts

Sports fanatics may find success as a coach or scout. To coach at the college or professional level, you’ll probably need a bachelor’s degree, according to the BLS, as well as playing experience. Scouts may have a degree in sports management or business. Younger people looking to break into the field might have part-time or summer jobs coaching at camps or youth sports programs.

Young people are well represented among the nation’s 233,107 coaches and scouts. Twenty-two percent are 24 or younger. They earn $19.50 an hour on average, or $40,560 per year. The number of jobs grew by 7% over the past five years.

1. Social Science Research Assistants

Social science research assistants help more senior-level scientists with surveys, data management, and preparing finding for publication. Many work in colleges and universities, others in the private sector. You’ll need a bachelor’s degree to get one of these jobs.

Twenty-eight percent of social science research assistants are younger than 24. They earn $21.96 per hour, or $45,677 per year. The number of jobs grew by 5% from 2013 to 2017, to nearly 30,000.

This article originally appeared on The Cheat Sheet.

Image: kali9

The post The 15 Best Jobs for Young People All Pay at Least $40,000 appeared first on Credit.com.

12 Jobs Working With Animals (That Actually Pay Pretty Well)

If you love animals and want to make a career out of it, one of these 12 jobs working with animals might be for you.

“When I grow up I want to be a veterinarian,” some children say when you ask about their dream job. Of course, considering the level of schooling this career requires, coupled with the student loan costs and the level of commitment, that changes for some people once they become adults. But the love for animals and the desire to work with animals might remain.

One of the more difficult tasks job seekers face is finding a career that pays enough money, as well as one they will enjoy. The old saying, “Do what you love, and the money will come,” is true to a point. But money also matters, and like it or not, it has to be a priority. The key is finding a balance. That is, doing what you love for money, as opposed to doing what you love in hopes that you will earn money.

If animals are your passion — the field that makes you want to get up and do something — then you can certainly achieve this balance. The typical job working with animals brings in about $55,775, according to 2015 U.S. Census data. Aside from a veterinarian career, there are a variety of jobs working with animals that also pay decent wages. These jobs bring in close to that median income or even higher. (Note: While your income doesn’t impact your credit scores directly — these are the five factors that do — but making higher wages can certainly help you pay for the items you need. Want to see how your credit is doing? You can see two of your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

Here are 12 jobs working with animals that could pay the bills.

1. Groomer

  • Median Salary: $21,260
  • Salary Range: $17,160 to $34,780
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Groomers help pets look their best by cleaning them and trimming fur. Those who make the highest salary earn more than $34,000 a year. Groomers who work in Hawaii, California and Rhode Island typically make the most money.

How to Become One: Animal caretakers must have at least a high school diploma. Most training takes place on the job, but some choose to study at a grooming school. Employers generally prefer candidates to have some experience working with animals. If you want to care for animals in a zoo, you will likely be required to have a bachelor’s degree in animal science, biology or a similar field.

2. Kennel Attendant, Pet Sitter & Dog Walker

  • Median Salary: $21,260
  • Salary Range: $17,160 to $34,780
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Kennel attendants, pet sitters and dog walkers care for pets while owners are traveling or unavailable. The highest-paid workers usually earn up to $34,780 a year. Those who work in states including Hawaii, California and Rhode Island usually earn the most.

How to Become One: Generally, most kennel attendants, pet sitters and dog walkers must a obtain a minimum of a high school diploma. They learn additional skills on the job. Most employers prefer candidates to have previous experience taking care of pets. Those who work in kennels or shelters can learn more about the job by taking classes through the Humane Society of the United States and the American Humane Association. Pet sitters can obtain additional education through the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters. The organization offers courses, such as caring for parrots, dogs and dealing with pet behavioral issues.

3. Veterinary Assistant

  • Median Salary: $24,360
  • Salary Range: $18,060 to $36,690
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Veterinary assistants work in a clinic or animal hospitals, helping veterinarians care for animals. They are responsible for helping veterinarians with routine tasks. The best-paid veterinarian assistants earn $36,690 a year. Those who work in states such as Massachusetts, Connecticut and Maine tend to earn the most.

How to Become One: If you want to become a veterinary assistant, you should at least have a high school diploma. It also doesn’t hurt to love animals. Most veterinary assistants learn their trade on the job. Certification isn’t required, but it may help you get promoted or obtain an advanced position.

4. Laboratory Animal Caretaker

  • Median Salary: $24,360
  • Salary Range: $18,060 to $36,690
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Laboratory animal caretakers work in labs with animal scientists, biologists or veterinarians. They feed, care for and monitor the well-being of lab animals. The best-paid laboratory animal caretakers can earn as much as $36,690 a year. Those who work in states such as Massachusetts, Connecticut and Maine, earn the most.

How to Become One: Laboratory animal caretakers are required to at least have a high school diploma. Most laboratory animal caretakers learn their trade through on-the-job training. Certification isn’t required to become a laboratory animal caretaker, but some employers prefer it. Having a certification could also help you get promoted or obtain an advanced position.

5. Trainer

  • Median Salary: $26,610
  • Salary Range: $18,160 to $57,170
  • Minimum Qualifications: no formal education requirements

Animal trainers are responsible for training animals for tasks, such as riding, performance, obedience or assisting the disabled. They also help animals become more comfortable with human interaction. The highest-paid animal trainers can earn an annual salary of up to $57,170. Those who work in states such as Minnesota, New York and California can make the most money.

How to Become One: There are no formal education requirements to become an animal trainer. Those who work in the animal-training field usually receive on-the-job training. In addition, animal trainers can receive education through organizations such as the Humane Society of the United States.

6. Veterinary Technicians

  • Median Salary: $31,800
  • Salary Range: $21,890 to $47,410
  • Minimum Qualifications: an associate degree

Veterinary technicians perform medical testing with the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. They help diagnose an animal’s injury or illness. Veterinary technicians who are in the 90th percentile of earners take home an annual salary of more than $47,000. Those who work in states such as Alaska, Massachusetts and New York earn the most.

How to Become One: Those who desire to become veterinary technicians are required to complete a college-level program with the American Veterinary Medical Association. Candidates must enroll in either a two- or four-year program. Technicians are required to pass an exam and become registered, licensed or certified, depending on the state where they are employed.

7. Animal Control Worker

  • Median Salary: $33,450
  • Salary Range: $20,830 to $53,190
  • Minimum Qualifications: varies by location

Animal control workers help ensure the proper treatment of animals, investigate cases of mistreatment, and locate abandoned animals. Those who are among the top earners can make more than $53,000 a year. Animal control workers who work in states, such as Nevada, California and Washington, earn the most.

How to Become One: Animal control workers are required to have a minimum of a high school diploma or the equivalent. Additional training usually takes place on the job. The National Animal Care & Control Association offers training programs. In addition, some states require certification in animal control.

8. Conservation & Forest Technicians

  • Median Salary: $35,430
  • Salary Range: $25,430 to $54,860
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Conservation and forest workers keep track of wildlife, gather data, suppress forest fires and work to improve the health of forests. The top earners make more than $54,000 a year. Those who work in states such as Massachusetts, New York and Georgia earn the most.

How to Become One: A valid driver’s license and a high school diploma are the minimum requirements to become a forest and conservation worker. Most workers receive on-the-job training, such as the proper procedure for planting or thinning trees. They also learn how to safely operate and maintain forestry equipment. Some employers prefer candidates to have an associate degree in forestry technology or a related field. Programs should be accredited by the Society of American Foresters. In addition, some states require that employees receive training and sometimes obtain a license in the appropriate use of commercial pesticides.

9. Breeder

  • Median Salary: $39,380
  • Salary Range: $20,430 to $75,210
  • Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent

Breeders select and breed animals according to characteristics and genealogy. The top earners make more than $75,000 a year. Those who work in Ohio, South Dakota and Kentucky earn the most.

How to Become One: Animal breeders are required to have a minimum of a high school education. In addition, breeders learn their skill through short-term on-the-job training. Those who want to breed zoo animals are required to have a bachelor’s degree in veterinary science and, depending on one’s career goals, postgraduate study in zoology.

10. Biological Technician

  • Median Salary: $41,650
  • Salary Range: $26,610 to $69,180
  • Minimum Qualifications: bachelor’s degree

Biological technicians help medical scientists in the laboratory. They are responsible for the setup, operation, and maintenance of laboratory equipment. They also monitor experiments. The top earners make more than $69,000 a year. Those who work in states, such as California, Connecticut and Massachusetts earn the most.

How to Become One: Biological technicians generally need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a similar field. Technicians must also acquire laboratory experience. In addition, it’s important to take computer classes because laboratories have computers and other high-tech equipment.

11. Zoologists & Wildlife Biologists

  • Median Salary: $59,680
  • Salary Range: $39,180 to $97,390
  • Minimum Qualifications: bachelor’s degree

Zoologists and wildlife biologists study animals and wildlife and how they interact with their environment. The top earners make more than $100,000 a year. Those who work in states such as Maryland, Connecticut and Rhode Island earn the most money.

How to Become One: A bachelor’s degree is necessary for those seeking entry-level positions. A master’s degree is usually required for advanced or scientific positions. Those who want to lead independent research or work at a university must have a doctoral degree.

12. Conservation Land Managers

  • Median Salary: $60,220
  • Salary Range: $37,380 to $91,830
  • Minimum Qualifications: bachelor’s degree

Conservation land managers work with conservation groups, landowners or other entities to protect specific wildlife and land. The top earners tend to make more than $90,000. Those who work in states such as Alaska, Rhode Island and New Jersey make the most money.

How to Become One: Conservation land managers must obtain a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, preferably in natural resource management. In addition, experience can be gained through internships and volunteer work. Some states require those desiring to become foresters to obtain a license.

This article originally appeared on The Cheat Sheet.

Image: M_a_y_a

The post 12 Jobs Working With Animals (That Actually Pay Pretty Well) appeared first on Credit.com.

Here’s Why You Should Be Sleeping With Your Co-Workers (Not Like That)

Would you take a nap at work if your boss allowed it? If you’re like most workers, you could probably use one, but unless you work for one of a handful of companies that actually encourage napping at the office (Ben & Jerry’s, Nike, Google, Zappos, to name a few), chances are you’re just going to have to muddle through with a yawn and another cup of coffee.

Two recent surveys show that American workers aren’t as well-rested as they think they should be — and it’s likely costing both the employees and the firms they work for.

Nearly three-quarters (74%) of U.S. workers surveyed by staffing firm Accountemps said they work while tired, with nearly a third (31%) saying they do so very often. Survey respondents, made up of more than 1,000 U.S. office workers aged 18 or older, said they lack focus, are easily distracted, procrastinate more, are grumpy and make more mitakes — whoops, mistakes — when they are tired.

Another survey, this one from Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder, found that more than half of workers (58%) feel they don’t get enough sleep, and 61% say lack of sleep has a negative impact on their work.

More than 3,200 workers across industries in the private sector participated in the nationwide survey, and just 16% said they actually get eight hours of sleep each night. The majority (63%) log an average of six to seven hours each night during the workweek, while 21% average five hours or less. Worst of all? 44% said thinking about work keeps them up at night.

Forty-three percent of respondents said they’d caught someone sleeping at work, so it’s no surprise that 39% said they would take advantage of a designated “nap room” if offered at their place of work.

“Rest is an undervalued necessity these days,” Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder, said in a press release. “We see more and more workers check into the office at all hours of the day, give up vacation time and work even when they’re sick. Yet it’s not necessarily making us more productive, and companies are starting to recognize that. We’re starting to see companies put more emphasis on employee wellness and work/life balance – whether it’s providing designated ‘nap rooms’ for employees, encouraging them to take advantage of their vacation time or simply giving them more flexibility in their work schedules.”

Lack of Sleep Is Bad for Business

Sleep-deprivation doesn’t just hurt workers – it hurts business, too: 61% of survey respondents said lack of sleep has had an impact on their work in some way. And the workers surveyed in the Accountemps survey admitted to some pretty major mistakes due to lack of sleep, including a $20,000 mistake on a purchase order, the deletion of a project that took 1,000 hours to put together and ordering 500 more computers than were needed.

Productivity is even worse the week after the transition to daylight saving time. (Reminder: don’t forget to set your clocks ahead this weekend). One research study found, per the New York Times.

“…workers tend to ‘cyberloaf’ – that is, they use their computers and internet access to engage in activities that are not related to work – at a substantially higher rate on the Monday following the shift to daylight saving time than on other Mondays. What’s more, we found that for every hour of interrupted sleep the previous night, participants in our lab cyberloafed for 20 percent of their assigned task. When extrapolated to a full day’s work, that would mean daylight saving time and lost sleep can result in substantial productivity losses. In fact, a recent estimate of this effect put the cost to the American economy at over $434 million annually, simply from a subtle shift of the clocks. Unfortunately, we don’t regain that productivity when the fall change adds an hour to our schedules.”

Nap at Your Own Risk

While you may now feel armed with enough data to petition your boss for a “nap room,” it might not be a move any better for your career than getting caught napping. You certainly don’t want to lose hours, get demoted or, worse, get fired.

Without a regular source of income, you face the risk of defaulting on loan obligations, incurring late fees on a slew of bills or worse. Your income isn’t generally listed on your credit report, but your ability to repay a loan is often considered when a lender reviews a credit application. If unemployment prevents you from paying bills, you could see the effects of that in your credit scores and, ultimately, your access to credit products and decent interest rates.You can see how your payment history and debt levels have affected your credit by getting two of your credit scores for free each month on Credit.com.

More Money-Saving Reads:

Image: IPGGutenbergUKLtd

The post Here’s Why You Should Be Sleeping With Your Co-Workers (Not Like That) appeared first on Credit.com.

4 Things to Do (and Not Do) When You Want to Switch Careers

Female Woman Sitting At Interview

If you’ve been feeling uninspired or unappreciated in your current job for a while now, it could be time to start thinking about looking for a new one. Whether you’re interested in a new gig within the same industry or something that’s unlike anything you’ve ever actually done before, every job searcher should have a couple things in order before even beginning a new job search.

We checked in with some experts to find out what the most important things are to have on hand and in place before throwing your hat in the ring for a new job.

1. Put some numbers behind your experience


An updated resume is a given for someone who’s looking for a new job. In order to give your resume a laser focus that’s sure to grab the attention of your next boss, you’ll need to ask yourself some questions. For example, consider how well you did your current responsibilities, and how your work contributed to the benefit of your employer. “Try to use numbers and percentages to quantify your results,” says Jane Roqueplot, owner and director of JaneCo’s Sensible Solutions, a national career advancement firm.

On top of your paper resume, Susan P. Joyce, president of NETability, Inc., a training, consulting and development company, and publisher/editor of Job-Hunt.org and WorkCoachCafe.com, reminds you that in this digital age it’s equally as important to also bring your LinkedIn profile up-to-date, but to do so gradually, in case someone from your current job might be paying attention. “Be sure it is labeled as ‘All Star’ [within the sites own rating system], complete with a picture,” she suggested.

2. Get the word out


While it’s obviously not a good idea to ask your current boss if she’s heard of any interesting openings lately (unless you have that kind of relationship, of course), if you’re in the market for a new job, it’s best to dust off your networking skills. Let trusted people know that you’re putting together your professional portfolio, and tell your references that you would like to list as points of contact. “There’s real value in asking for help from others about what they know,” says Roqueplot. “In fact, asking others for information is networking. Ask for informational interviews to demonstrate you have an active interest in your own success, and show up well researched. Talk with others about what they know about their own jobs … you never know who might be acquainted with someone who is looking for someone with your qualifications.”

3. Be humble


As you’re going through the process of your job search, it might be all you can do to keep your mouth shut from your closest colleagues to brag about all the wonderful opportunities you’re coming across — but you should. “Looking for a career change is not the time to brag to your boss, or even your co-workers, about your decision to leave, your goal and thoughtful transition plan,” says Roqueplot. Joyce agrees, and suggests putting off any and all job searching during the hours when you’re at your current job. “Employers can easily monitor employee use of technology — computer, the Internet, the company WiFi, etc. — while they are simply managing the company network, so do your job search using your own computer or smart phone.” Using discretion during the whole process will also eliminate unwanted stress from your current job and will keep you from putting yourself in jeopardy until you’re ready to submit your appropriate notice.

4. Work on your flexibility


Starting a new job is always stressful, and the more you can prepare for this huge change ahead of time, the better your first impression will be after you get your dream job. “Prepare to develop new habits,” says Roqueplot. “All companies have their own acronyms and systems that can make you feel like you’re on the outside looking in when you enter the door. In any job there will be things you don’t know, but don’t shy away from these. Mistakes lead to experience, experience leads to wisdom and wisdom leads to instinctive behaviors.”

The post 4 Things to Do (and Not Do) When You Want to Switch Careers appeared first on MagnifyMoney.