Why You Shouldn’t Take Out an 84-Month Auto Loan

Part I: The Truth About Long Term Auto Loans

When poor credit and high monthly payments are keeping you from buying the car you need, it may be tempting to lower your payments by signing up for a 72-, 84- or even 96-month term loan. Before you do, it’s important to know exactly what you’re signing up for — and be sure you’re making the right move for your finances.

Lower car payments with longer terms mean you’re paying more in interest, and loan companies love this for obvious reasons. Evidently, consumers do, too. In the first quarter of 2017, new car loans with terms from 73-84 months represented 34.9 percent of all auto financing. For used cars, they represented 19.5 percent.

Most of the big dealerships offer 84-month financing through banks like Ally Financial or Santander. Local dealers are also known to offer longer term financing offers, typically through 3rd party financing companies, credit unions, or insurers like Nationwide.

Let’s take a look at what you’re getting into when you choose a longer term on your auto loan…

Note: These numbers don’t include tax, title, or registration, which will only increase the amount of interest you pay if you include those costs in the total amount you borrow. These numbers also don’t include any down payment or trade-in you may have, which will decrease the amount of the loan and the amount of interest paid.

5 reasons long auto loan terms are a bad idea

  1. More interest. As you saw in the example above, you’re going to pay a lot more interest on a car loan with a longer term. If you spend more than those average amounts on a new or used car, the amount of interest you pay is only going to go up.
  2. Your loan will outlast your warranty. Most manufacturer’s warranties last 3-5 years, so you’ll be paying on your loan for an additional 2-4 years after the warranty runs out. Which leads to…
  3. New car payment, old car repair costs. Think about this. You’re going to be making your car payment for the next 7 years. With a shorter term, you’d have paid off your vehicle before you started paying for costly repairs. But with an 84-month loan, you’re going to be paying both your monthly loan and the inevitable repair costs that come with an older vehicle.
  4. Negative equity. Stretching out a car loan over time means you’re paying less on the principal and more in interest with each payment. As your vehicle continues to decline in value each year, you’ll continue to be upside-down on your loan unless you made a significant down payment.
  5. Unable to refinance. If you’re upside-down on your loan, meaning you owe more on your loan than the vehicle is worth, you’ll be unable to refinance your loan.

When it makes sense to get an 84-month auto loan

  • You absolutely can’t afford a car any other way. This is probably the number one reason why people choose to longer terms on their auto loan. An 84-month auto loan will lower your monthly payment, allowing you to purchase that vehicle that otherwise would be just out of reach. However, you should consider whether you’re borrowing too much if you can’t afford the monthly payment on a shorter term loan. Can you compromise by buying a used car at a lower price point? Or, could you scrounge up more money for a larger down payment to reduce the amount you need to borrow?
  • You have higher interest debt to worry about. If you have other loans at a higher interest rate, it may make sense to get a lower monthly loan payment so you can free up capital each month. That way, you can use the extra money you’re saving to pay down higher interest loans.

How to make the most of a long-term loan

  • Compare rates. Companies like LendingTree and MagnifyMoney allow you to compare auto loan rates from multiple lenders. So you can make sure you’re getting the best deal and a low APR. (Disclosure: LendingTree is the parent company of MagnifyMoney)
  • Buy now, refinance later. If you’re absolutely bent on getting a certain car now, you can always choose to refinance down the road, when your financial situation improves.
  • Make a larger down payment. Getting out of a bad car loan can be difficult when you’re upside-down. By putting more down on your vehicle up front, you’ll prevent this from happening while saving money in interest and avoiding gap insurance.
  • Buy used. The average used car payment is $145 less than the average new car payment, according to Experian, so save yourself some money with a more affordable monthly payment by buying a used vehicle.

5 tips to lower your costs of borrowing

  1. Keep your car after it’s paid off. Once your car is paid off, keep it — especially if it’s reliable and gets good gas mileage.
  2. Make an extra payment each month. By paying an extra $100 per month, you could save $1,819 in interest and own your car in a little over 5 years when you buy a $30,534 new car at 84-months. When it comes to that $19,126 used car, you’d save $1,598 in interest and pay it off in under 5 years.
  3. Compare rates. Shop around for the best rates, and get multiple offers from lenders to compare. A difference of 3 percent on your interest rate could save you $3,689 on that 84-month new car loan of $30,534 and $2424 on that $19,126 used car.
  4. Buy used. With used car payments an average of $145 less than new, you’ll save a lot when you buy used over new.
  5. Don’t finance extras. Pay up front for your license, tax, and registration. If you purchase an extended warranty or prepaid maintenance package, don’t finance those into your loan either.

Part II: Understanding the Auto Loan Process

84-month auto loan
Source: iStock

Most people do it backward—they go shopping for a car first, then shop for a loan. When you do this, you’re making yourself vulnerable to high-pressure sales associates and putting yourself at a disadvantage when it comes to financing your vehicle.

When you get pre-approved for auto loans before heading to a dealership, you have an understanding of how much money you can qualify for, so you’re not shopping for vehicles that are too expensive. You also have a loan amount and interest rate to compare any other financing that’s offered to you.

How to get pre-approved for an auto loan

You can get pre-approved with a bank, credit union, auto finance company, or dealership finance center.

  1. Research rates online. Many sites, like Lendingtree.com, will offer auto loan rates online. It’s a good idea to check them out so you have an idea of what’s being offered. Keep in mind that your creditworthiness will affect the rates you’re able to qualify for, and the credit score for an auto loan is a little different than other loans.
  2. Gather your documents. Get everything you need together before calling or taking a visit to your lender. This may include:
    1. Personal information, like your name, address, phone number, and Social Security number.
    2. Employment information, like your employer’s name and address, your title and salary
    3. Financial information, including what kind of credit you have available now, your current debts, and your credit score.
  3. Apply. Choose a few lenders and apply online or in person for your auto loan.
  4. Get a quote. Once you’ve completed the loan application and you’ve been pre-approved, you’ll receive a loan quote showing how much you qualify for, the interest rate and the length of the loan. You can take this to the dealership with you when you’re shopping and use it as a negotiating tool.

For more information on your loan choices, check out these resources:

Getting a cosigner for an auto loan

Having a cosigner can help you qualify for a loan you wouldn’t otherwise get. As long as the cosigner has a strong credit score, it’s likely you’ll qualify for a better interest rate using a cosigner too. And making on-time payments on this type of loan will help build your credit.

The drawbacks of having a cosigner are that the cosigner is responsible for the loan if you fail to pay. If this happens, chances are you’ll negatively affect your relationship with whoever cosigned for you. If that’s a friend or family member, (which it usually is) look out! Think twice about the responsibilities of having a cosigner, and the importance of paying back the loan, so you don’t leave your cosigner on the hook for money you borrowed.

Understanding your auto loan contract

Here are some key terms you’ll need to know when it comes time to signing a contract.

  • Sticker Price – a manufacturer’s suggested retail price that is printed on a sticker and affixed to a new automobile
  • Purchase Price – This may be less than the sticker price, and is the price you agree to purchase the vehicle for from the dealer.
  • Amount Financed – This is how much money you are borrowing and the amount you’ll pay interest on. Be careful about financing extras into your loan, as doing so may put you upside-down in the vehicle.
  • Down Payment – An amount of cash provided at the time of vehicle purchase and credited toward the Purchase Price of the Vehicle to reduce the Amount Financed.
  • Interest Rate – The amount of money charged for loaning money, expressed as a percentage of the Amount Financed.
  • Fixed Rate Financing – With a fixed rate, your Interest Rate will never change and you’ll always pay the same amount each month.
  • Variable Rate Financing – A variable Interest Rate is subject to change and may increase your monthly payment amount.
  • Monthly Payment Amount – This is how much you’ll pay each month.
  • Finance Charge – This is a fee, charged by the lender, for extending you credit.
  • Annual Percentage Rate (APR)APR includes both the interest and fees expressed as a percentage, making it easier for you to compare multiple loan offers.
  • Term. This is the length of the loan expressed in months, usually 36, 48, or 60.
  • Extended Warranty Contract – An extended warranty covers the vehicle beyond the manufacturer’s warranty for a fee.
  • Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) – If you owe more than the car is worth, you’ll be offered GAP insurance, which will cover the difference if the vehicle is lost, stolen, or totaled.
  • DMV Fees – These may include title, license, and registration.
  • Title. The legal document proving ownership of a vehicle.

Auto loan contract traps

Here are few traps dealers can use against you. Know them so you can protect yourself and avoid getting ripped off

  • Rate mark ups. Your dealer is getting financing from a bank, and they mark up the rate, charging you an extra percentage or two when you could have just gone directly to the bank in the first place.
  • Yo-yo financing. The dealer says you’re approved and you drive away. Later, the dealer says you were denied, and asks for a larger down payment or increases the interest rate. If you refuse, you must return the vehicle, and the dealer may try to keep any deposit you made.
  • Falsified credit application. Sometimes dealers will falsify information on your credit application, like increasing your income, to help you qualify for a vehicle you wouldn’t otherwise qualify for. Be sure to check your credit application before signing.
  • Selling extras. Whether it’s GAP insurance, prepaid maintenance, or extended warranties, the dealership is going to try to upsell you on some extras to rack up the charges and, if you agree to roll it into your financing, increase the amount of interest you pay. Be careful when selecting these extras and make sure it’s something you understand what you’re getting and know it’s a value.
  • Negative equity financing. If you owe more on your trade-in vehicle than it’s worth, dealers will try to offer you a deal where you roll the negative equity into your new auto loan.
  • Extra charges. Look over your contract for any extra charges. One way to spot these is if they’re pre-printed on the contract. Many of these charges are not required and can be negotiated down.

Using an auto loan to improve your credit

If you’re working toward improving your credit, there are two rules you must follow. And while going from good to excellent isn’t easy, there are a few ways your auto loan can help you improve your score.

  • Payment history. On-time payments are 35% of your FICO score, so paying your auto loan on time will help with your payment history.
  • Credit mix. Because having a mix of different types of credit (home loans, personal loans, credit cards) comprises 10% of your FICO, throwing an auto loan in there will certainly improve your mix.
  • Report to Credit Bureaus. Make sure the lender you’re working with reports your payments to the 3 major credit bureaus. Beware of “Buy here, pay here” dealerships who may or may not report your payments to the credit bureaus.

And if you want to prevent your credit from getting worse, make sure you don’t do any of the following:

  • Make late payments on your auto loan.
  • Stop making payments and get sent to collections or have your car repossessed.
  • Include your car loan in your bankruptcy (if applicable).

When it makes sense to lease vs. buy a car

If you’re taking out a longer term loan in order to lower the monthly payment, you may want to consider leasing as an option. There are some things you should know before leasing a car, especially if you’re comparing leasing to buying. And while leasing isn’t for everyone, it can be a viable alternative to taking out an 84-month lease. in fact, according to Experian data, the number of people taking out a lease continues to increase.

“Another reason why we see consumers increasingly choose to lease, is they’re generating around $100 lower payment. And the biggest difference is in non-prime, [where there’s a] $109 difference between a loan and a lease,” Melinda Zabritski, Senior Director of Sales at Experian.

The Pros and Cons of Leasing a Car

Pros:

  • Lower monthly payment. The payment to lease is an average of $100 less than buying according to Experian’s 2017 report.
  • Warranty coverage. The average lease lasts 36 months and during that time, you’ll have full warranty coverage for anything that goes wrong with the vehicle.

Cons:

  • Mileage penalties. Most leases have a limit on how many miles you can drive (10,000 per year for an average lease), and you’ll pay for additional miles you drive unless you secure an extra-mileage or unlimited-mileage lease upfront.
  • Wear and tear fees. Nicks, scratches, stains they all amount to extra wear and tear on your leased vehicle, and you’ll pay for them at the end of your lease. So if you’re hard on your vehicles, buying may save you some money here.

The Pros and Cons of Buying a Car

Pros:

  • Ownership. Once you’ve paid off your loan, the vehicle is yours.
  • No mileage penalties. Drive as much as you like, you won’t pay a dime for ‘extra’ miles you drive like you would with a lease.

Cons:

  • Maintenance and repairs. With ownership comes responsibility. In addition to being responsible for the maintenance, once the manufacturer’s warranty expires, you’ll be responsible for all any repair costs needed. That’s why some people consider buying an extended warranty.
  • Loss of value. Although you won’t pay fees for wear and tear, or extra miles you put on the car, those things will still lower the value of the vehicle when it comes time to sell it. And every year you own it, the value of the vehicle is likely to continue to decrease.

The Bottom Line: Is an 84-month auto loan ever a good idea?

In our opinion, no. Most people make the choice to take out a longer term auto loan in order to lower their monthly payments to afford the car they want. ‘Want’ being the operative word here. Chances are, you can purchase a less expensive car that would give you the same monthly payment. Although it’s difficult, putting your emotions aside can really help you make a financially sound decision when it comes to choosing the terms of your auto loan. If you know this is an area where you struggle, ask for help from a friend or family member who can be the voice of reason.

If you do choose to go with an 84-month auto loan, just understand that you’ll be paying more interest on your loan. And hopefully, you have a good job for the next 7 years to help you pay for it.

The post Why You Shouldn’t Take Out an 84-Month Auto Loan appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Shopping for a New Car? Use the 20/4/10 Rule

auto car driving drive

Imagine you’re in the market for a new vehicle. Where do you begin your car-buying process? Do you already have a dream make and model in mind? What’s your budget? Are you already browsing the interwebs for the car you want? If you are, you’re already starting off on the wrong foot — at least according to the 20/4/10 rule.

What is the 20/4/10 rule?

The 20/4/10 rule helps car shoppers figure out how much car they can actually fit into their budget before falling in love with a vehicle they can’t afford. It emphasizes calculating what you can afford before you set out shopping.

The rule might seem obvious — before you buy something, you should make sure you can afford it, right? — but it gets tricky when it comes to financing, and many don’t take the time to include annual ownership costs. If you don’t, you could end up with monthly transportation costs that could force you to live paycheck to paycheck or take on more debt.

Follow the 20/4/10 rule, and you might avoid accidentally biting off more than you can chew.

Rule #1: Put down at least 20%

A vehicle is a depreciating asset. The experts at Carfax estimate a new car loses 10% of its value the moment you drive off the lot. And the depreciation continues from there. Edmunds.com estimates a new vehicle loses over one-fourth of its value in the first year alone. For that reason, you should be prepared to put down at least 20% of the purchase price. If you do this, you’ll finance payments for the vehicle’s actual estimated value when you leave the lot instead of the full purchase price, which the vehicle isn’t worth anymore.

Take this example: You finance a new car for its full purchase price of $34,000, then lose your job the next day. Now, you might need to sell your new car, but you can sell it for only $30,600 — because the car already lost 10% of its value once it left the lot. Since you put $0 down at financing, you’ll still owe $34,000 after the sale. On the other hand, if you’d put down at least $6,800, you could sell the car that day for its estimated value and only lose out on half your down payment.

You might not be able to estimate exactly how much car you can afford, but if you are able to put down at least 20% of the purchase price, you should be in an OK financial position. On top of that, you’ll have smaller payments and possibly finance it for a shorter period.

Rule #2: Finance the vehicle for no more than four years

The longer your financing agreement is, the more you’ll pay in interest over time. So don’t be swayed by dealers or lenders who try to sell you on a lower monthly car payment — chances are your payment is so low because the term of your loan is long.

You can use the MagnifyMoney loan calculator to see this rule at work. If you borrow $25,000 to purchase a car (at a 4% APR) and agree to a six-year financing deal, you’ll wind up paying $3,161 in additional interest charges by the time you pay off the loan.

If you agree to a four-year loan instead, you’ll pay just $2,095 in interest — a savings of over $1,000. Of course, that shorter term loan also comes with a higher monthly payment — $564 versus $391 — but you are saving more over the long term.

Think of it this way: If you can’t afford the monthly payment required to pay off the car in four years or fewer, it’s probably outside of your budget.

Rule #3: Keep your total transportation costs under 10% of your monthly income

This last part is where it gets easy to overspend. You should try to keep your total transportation costs — your car payment, insurance, gas, and maintenance — under 10% of your monthly income.

So, if you earn $5,000 per month, your total transportation costs shouldn’t cost more than $500.

How to save on the cost of a new car

Try these tips to keep your overall transportation costs low.

Get pre-approved for financing

Avoid financing your vehicle through the dealer, and get pre-approved for financing at a lower rate before you show up at a dealership. Financing your auto loan at a lower rate can reduce your monthly loan payment. If you walk onto the lot with a pre-approved auto loan rate from a bank or credit union, you can use that as leverage for negotiation.

However, if you let the dealer find the loan for you instead, you’ll lose negotiating power, and there won’t be a way for you to tell if the dealer’s loan rate is the best offer you can get. Avoid making these other common mistakes when searching for a car loan.

Buy used

More people are purchasing used cars than ever before and saving a bundle in the process, according to Edmunds. Over 38 million vehicles sold in 2015 were used, a year-over-year increase of 5.6%.

When you buy used or certified pre-owned vehicles, you avoid financing a larger balance, and could even skip financing altogether if you’ve got enough cash on hand. If you buy used, avoid engine trouble by having the vehicle inspected by an independent mechanic before you sign off. You can use a resource like Car Talk to find a mechanic in your area.

Buy a car that holds its value

Depreciation is a car owner’s largest transportation expense during the first five years of ownership, more than fuel, maintenance, and even insurance.

A car that holds value well will depreciate less over time compared to the average vehicle, so you may not lose out on as much in depreciation costs if you sell the vehicle after a few years. Carmakers like Honda and Porsche are known for building vehicles that hold their value well over time according to Kelley Blue Book.

Lease instead

Leasing a car will usually result in a lower monthly payment, and you’ll likely save money with a lower down payment and lower tax fees over time. However, you could be subject to extra charges if you ding up the vehicle, or drive more miles than stated on the lease agreement. It doesn’t always work for everyone, so consider your personal needs first.

On the plus side, you’ll upgrade to a new vehicle every few years and won’t need to deal with the hassle of selling a car.

Look for gas savings

Gas isn’t always an unavoidable expense. You can make a few changes to your fueling habits like filling up before you hit “E” or signing up for a gas rewards credit card to save money. You could also cut down transportation costs by cutting back how often you drive or by carpooling some days to school or work. Learn more ways to reduce your gas spend here.

Comparison shop

Don’t get lazy with must-haves like maintenance and insurance for your vehicle. Comparison shopping is the best way to save on costs like these that may differ from provider to provider. Insurance companies have made it easier to compare quotes with online comparison portals like this one from Progressive. You could also try going through your bank or credit union for discounted rates with select companies.

Don’t just take the first estimate you get for a repair. Mechanics are known to pad the bill with unnecessary repairs from time to time. After you figure out what’s wrong with you vehicle, get an estimate from a few different mechanics in your area. That way you’ll make sure you’re getting the best value before paying for maintenance and repairs.

The post Shopping for a New Car? Use the 20/4/10 Rule appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

5 Lies Your Car Mechanic Might Tell You

 

By Kelsey Green

Whether you’re getting an oil change, having your tires rotated, or facing a more complicated repair, like replacing the alternator, it’s possible your visit to the auto repair shop will end up being more expensive than you anticipated.

Automobile maintenance costs an average $792 per year, according to the AAA’s 2016 “Your Driving Costs” study, and you don’t need mechanics padding their bills with unnecessary repairs and charges.

Most technicians genuinely want to help, says Lauren Fix, who is known as “The Car Coach” and is the spokesperson for the nonprofit Car Care Council. But there are times when you should question what the mechanic tells you.

Here are five common lies and ways to combat them.

1. “You can use any kind of oil in your car.”

Technicians often say you can use any oil in your car despite what your service schedule or car manual states.

“Run the oil that your service schedule tells you,” Fix says. “Running the wrong oil in your engine can void your warranty.”

If your car needs synthetic oil, which is for turbocharged, supercharged engines, or high-performance vehicles, make sure your technician uses that kind.

2. “You need to fix this now before it’s a problem.”

Sometimes a technician may exaggerate a problem because he wants to talk you into paying for a repair you may not need at that time.

Check your service schedule before saying yes, because it’s the “Bible for your car,” Fix says. If you’ve lost your service schedule or you bought a used car, check out carcare.org for a customizable service schedule specifically for your vehicle. This will act as your guide.

You can save more than $1,200 a year in repairs if you follow your service schedule and are proactive with any problems, the Car Care Council states.

Fix also warns that sometimes a technician will exaggerate to make you understand that there is actually a problem with your car. Ask for a second opinion if you’re unsure.

“Even if he finds a new problem with your car while working on a problem you have already discussed, you have to assume that it is possible,” Fix says.

3. “That damage didn’t happen here.”

Sometimes it’s just a small scratch or ding. Accidents happen, even by people who are paid to repair your car.

A California shop tried to cover up severe damage to Michelle and Albert Delao’s automobile after it fell several feet from a lift in 2015, the couple says. Employees didn’t tell the Delaos what happened to their car, instead saying that the shop was waiting on a part. The store offered to pay for a rental car while their vehicle was being worked on.

When they finally got their car, Michelle says she immediately knew something was wrong.

“I could tell from little things about the way the car was driving,” she says. “It was wobbly, and we could hear glass in the passenger window, which was weird, because we never had a glass or window problem before.”

To try to resolve the problems, they purchased a new set of tires to stop the wobbling. But they got a call a month later from a technician at the shop, they say. The couple learned that the car fell several feet onto its side, piercing the bottom and shattering the front passenger window, along with other damage to the car’s body. When the technicians could not get the car off the lift, a tow truck was called to pull the vehicle down, causing more damage, they say.

When she called the manager and store to ask about the incident, Michelle says both denied anything happened until she showed the owner the pictures from the technician.

After finding out the true extent of the damage, the Delaos took their car to the dealership, which confirmed all the damage at over $20,000, totaling their car. The couple has filed a lawsuit against the auto repair shop.

The incident has given the couple a severe distrust of technicians, Michelle says.

“It’s just sad, really,” Albert says. “It’s like when people need to go to the doctor. We have to have our car. We don’t know anything about it. We’re not mechanics.”

4. “This part cost more than we anticipated.”

An easy way for technicians to make more money is by overcharging for a part or repair. If you’re not sure how much a repair will cost, get multiple quotes in writing.

“Never do anything without getting a quote in writing,” Fix says. “That is how you know someone knows what they’re talking about and will uphold that when you get it in writing.”

If you don’t like to go in blind, you can get a general idea of what a repair or part will cost with research.

“Education and information are power,” Fix says.

Fix suggests RepairPal.com, which helps people not well versed in car mechanics be more prepared for when someone gives them a quote. You can type in your car’s mechanical issue to research the problem and the reliable cost for the part and labor for your area.

5. “The cheap tires will be just fine.”

When it comes time for new tires, technicians may try to talk you into buying the cheapest brands. Don’t listen, Fix says.

“When people come in saying they need to replace tires, they need to use the same tire brand and size,” she says. “The size and brands of the tires impacts your handling, traction, and safety for your car.”

Tires recommended by Consumer Reports, for example, range from $64 to $121.

Tips for finding a reliable car mechanic

  • Go to a certified technician. Look for signs that state the shops are certified by the Automotive Service Association (ASA) or the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). “Find a master technician when you can,” Fix says. “They are the best in the business.”
  • Ask your friends and family. Personal experience is the best way to find a reliable technician, so ask the people you trust.
  • Check with a dealer. Along with specializing in your car, they can also help with recalls or possibly help find you a new technician if your warranty has expired.
  • If your vehicle is safe to drive, take it to another mechanic for a second opinion.
  • If your check engine light comes on, head to your local auto parts store, not a mechanic. Their equipment will find the issue, which empowers you with information before you schedule your car for service.

The post 5 Lies Your Car Mechanic Might Tell You appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How the Color of Your Car Can Affect Its Resale Value

color-of-your-car

It’s common knowledge that a car’s value begins to depreciate as soon as it leaves the sale lot. But did you know its color can affect its resale value as well?

According to a new study by iSeeCars.com, an automotive data and research company based in Boston, color plays a huge role in determining a car’s retained value.

To conduct the study, iSeeCars.com analyzed more than 1.6 million used 3-year-old cars (model year 2013) of all colors sold between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. It then calculated each cars’ depreciation over three years by comparing the average listing price to the average MSRP (adjusted for inflation) for each car color and body style/target market. Any colors with fewer than 1,000 cars, as well as colors and body styles/target market segments with fewer than 30 cars were excluded.

As iSeeCars found, the average car depreciated 29.8% over the first three years of ownership, while orange- and yellow-colored cars depreciated the least of any color (27.4% and 26.2% less than the average car, respectively). At the other end of the spectrum were beige- and gold-colored cars, which depreciated the most — 4.8% and 12.5% more than the average car, respectively.

You can see the average three-year depreciation rate for cars by color below.

Screen Shot 2016-08-15 at 10.16.20 AM

Charts via iSeeCars.com

Apparently, popular car colors like white, gray and black depreciated closer to the average car. “Because buyers shopping for such colors have a lot more choices, sellers may not have as much pricing power,” Phong Ly, chief executive of iSeeCars.com, explained in a press release. Conversely, consumers with an orange, yellow or green car may have more luck because those are more unusual colors.

Interestingly, while the average 3-year-old car takes 43.9 days to sell, the average for orange cars is 44.1 days and 44.9 for green cars. “In fact,” according to the release, “cars of almost any colors except beige sell within 6 days of the average car.”

Screen Shot 2016-08-15 at 12.23.55 PM

 

Need a Ride? 

With new cars losing anywhere between $3,000 to $5,000 the moment they drive off the lot, it’s no wonder many people find buying a car to be such a hassle. Just think, if you’re financing the car with an auto loan, that depreciation could mean you’re suddenly “upside-down” on the loan, owing more than the car’s even worth.

Of course, there are ways to get around the problem. You can research online at sites like Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds, which offer free information on models, safety and prices, and you can comparison shop for cars in your price range. Once you’ve got the right car in mind, you can dig up its history online. (Just make sure to grab its VIN number beforehand.)

Remember, buying a car is one of the biggest purchases you’ll make, so take the time to do it right. It can take minutes to set your eyes on a set of wheels, but paying for it is a whole other story. Whether you choose to lease or finance, you’ll want to make sure your credit’s in tip-top condition before you apply, as this will determine what terms you may qualify for. You can view two of your credit scores, updated each month, for free on Credit.com.

Image: Deklofenak

The post How the Color of Your Car Can Affect Its Resale Value appeared first on Credit.com.

Being Poor Can Cost You Big on Your Auto Insurance

 

Flickr/m01229
Flickr/m01229

If you’re single, a renter, out of work or haven’t owned a car in a while — even your perfect driving record won’t be enough to get a good auto insurance rate.

It’s no secret that auto insurers consider a lot more than just your driving record when they calculate your premium. New customers are routinely asked to provide personal details, such as whether they’re married or single, renters or homeowners, unemployed or employed, college- or high school-educated.

It is how you answer these personal questions — not your driving record — that can result in higher premiums, a consumer advocacy group argues in a new report.

In a study of five of the leading auto insurers in the U.S., the Consumer Federation of America found drivers with a good driving record pay 59% more — or $681 per year on average — when their answers to these personal questions point to a lower income status (e.g.: people who answer that they are single, out of work, or have only a high school education). The CFA has long studied how economic status can be tied to higher auto insurance premiums.

For this report, they used the online quote features at Geico, State Farm, Farmers, Progressive, and All State. They created four driver profiles to test — two men and two women, each pair including a high and low socioeconomic status — and requested quotes from each insurer in 15 major cities.

All four drivers shared characteristics in common. They each had a stellar driving record, with no prior accidents or traffic violations. They were each listed as 30 years old living at the same address in each city tested.

Where the two test groups (we’ll call them Group A and Group B, for simplicity’s sake) differed was in how they answered the personal questions on each quote request. In group A, one woman and one man were married homeowners with executive level jobs, a master’s degree and three years with the same insurance company.  In group B, the man and woman were single renters with high school degrees, and neither had owned a car in the last six months.

When the insurance quotes rolled in, an obvious trend emerged: across the board, Group B drivers were hit with higher premiums. On average, Group B drivers were quoted an average annual premium of $1,825. On the other hand, the married, home-owning, college-educated drivers from group A were quoted $1,144 per year.

Source: Consumer Federation of America
Source: Consumer Federation of America

GEICO and Progressive turned out to be the most costly option for drivers in Group B, charging premiums that were 92 percent and 80 percent more expensive, respectively, than premiums for Group A. In one extreme case from the report, GEICO quoted a man living in Minneapolis, Minn. from Group B two and a half times as much as the man from Group A – $1,840 per year compared to $528. The difference between premiums GEICO quoted for a low-economic status and high-economic status woman in Minneapolis was even more staggering — $2,158 vs. $528, amounting to a 300% upcharge.

MagnifyMoney reached out to all five insurers included in this report for comment. Each declined to comment.

James Lynch, senior actuary for the Institute, which represents the interests of insurers in the U.S., said insurers use personal information like marital status and education for a simple reason: they are highly predictive of whether a potential customer will cost the insurer in the future.

“Driving record is an important factor but it’s not the only predictor,” he added, noting insurers use upwards of 20 different factors to assess rates.

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Get the best auto insurance rate possible

Short of state regulator intervention, auto insurers will be able to assess risk in their customers however they see fit. It’s up to drivers to do their due diligence in order to get the best rate possible. Even then,

Start with your state’s insurance department website. Since insurance is regulated at the state level, Hunter recommends checking your state’s office of insurance website to find out what average premiums are like in your area. This website should also list a number of reputable insurers you can contact for quotes. Take those names and check them out on the National Association of Insurance Commission’s database, which maintains a history of service issues and complaints.

Never accept your first offer. Asking several different insurers for auto insurance quotes is an important yet often overlooked part of the shopping process. As the CFA found in this report (among others), premiums can vary widely by state by state and insurer by insurer.

Let your good driving speak for you. Some auto insurers today offer usage-based tracking technology that allows them to see just how often and how well (or, how poorly) you drive. This technology can be a boon to good drivers who have low annual mileage and aren’t hit with any traffic violations. You’ll likely qualify for insurance discounts. It is entirely optional to allow your insurers to track you, as it obviously requires you to forfeit some privacy while on the road.

Have a question for us? Send us a note at info@magnifymoney.com 

Mandi Woodruff is the Executive Editor of MagnifyMoney and host of Brown Ambition, a weekly podcast about career and finance. Follow her on Tumblr or Facebook.

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Could Driving Less Get You a Lower Car Insurance Rate?

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Imagine your car insurance bill was based on specifically how many miles you drove in a month instead of a blanket estimate. This is exactly what the auto insurance startup, Metromile, is offering drivers in the seven states it currently serves — California, Illinois, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington.

How Metromile Works

Metromile, which launched in 2011, is a usage-based car insurance provider where policyholders pay based on how often they’re on the road. The provider sends policyholders a wireless device called Metromile Pulse that plugs into the car’s diagnostic port and reports how many miles the car is driven each trip. An app also pairs with the service and can tell drivers details about their car, like how to optimize gas usage and where their car is parked.

Each month, Metromile customers are charged a base rate of $30. From there, there’s a per-mile driven rate, which is calculated by standard insurance establishing factors (explained in more detail below). At the end of each month, the Metromile Pulse reports how many miles you drove, and that gets multiplied by your mileage rate. Consumers aren’t charged for any miles they drive past 150 miles per day (except in Washington, where the cutoff is 250 miles per day), and there is no limit on how much (or how little) you drive. According to a Metromile spokesperson, bills are likely to be different each month because of the variance of time spent driving, but “rates will not change within the 6-month period unless you request a change.”

Establishing Your Car Insurance Rate

Customers provide Metromile with some of the same information most insurers ask for when pricing out a policy.

“Just like other insurance companies, several factors are considered when creating customers unique base and per-mile rate,” the spokesperson said in an email. “These can include: driver age, credit history (state specific), type of vehicle, driver history, and length of prior insurance (state specific).”

When Shopping for Car Insurance

Remember, it’s important to read the terms and conditions of any insurance policy you are considering before signing up. You also may want to comparison shop to be sure you’ve found the best policy for you.

And whoever you opt to go with for car insurance, you should be aware that your credit score can influence your rate, depending on where you live.

“In every state except Hawaii, California and Massachusetts, credit impacts your car insurance rates,” Neil Richardson, an insurance agent and advisor for The Zebra, as well as a Credit.com contributor, said in an email. “Your credit and driving history combine to determine your ‘insurance score,’ which is what insurance companies use to determine your rates. The better the insurance score, the better the rate.”

It’s a good idea to check your credit report before you shop around for new car insurance or an auto loan so you know where you currently stand and what you might need to do to improve your score. You can get your free annual credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com and then review it for any errors or areas to work on improving. To monitor how any changes you make to your spending habits are affecting your credit score, you can see two of your scores for free, updated each month, on Credit.com.

[Offer: Your credit score may be low due to credit errors. If that’s the case, you can tackle your credit reports to improve your credit score with help from Lexington Law. Learn more about them here or call them at (844) 346-3296 for a free consultation.]

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How to Avoid Car Repair Gotchas

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A captive consumer is someone who isn’t in a position to bargain and, in turn, could overpay. For example, a traveler purchasing Wi-Fi on an airplane is captive because there’s only one option and a pay TV subscriber is captive if there’s only one cable company in the area, or if it’s difficult to install a competitive satellite service.

Drivers facing car repairs are often captive, too. When your car breaks down and you have it towed to a repair shop, you don’t have a lot of options but to get it repaired. And, for most drivers, pulling into a car dealership shop for “regular” repairs can create almost the same situation. Few consumers are car-savvy enough to know if they really need new brake rotors or a transmission fluid flush, so they end up doing what they are told by the expert, and paying the bill.

Gotcha.

Car repair shops routinely attract a high level of complaints at state and federal offices related to overcharging and “gotcha” methods. (Read this guide to find out 7 ways to avoid getting overcharged by your mechanic.) Auto mechanics may work on commission or at an hourly rate, which may incentivize them to perform unnecessary repairs that can turn $40 oil changes into $600 bills. Plus, repair shops have the advantage of using the “safety” tactic in their sales pitch (as in, “Well, you don’t have to change your brake pads, but they are below 50%. I would, to be safe.”)

Consumer Reports’ chief mechanic John Ibbotson puts it this way: “High scare equals high profit.”

It’s hard to give anti-gotcha advice in the face of safety warnings – I have no intention of suggesting that you do anything to make you or your family less safe. But it is possible to do that and avoid ripoffs.

It’s Not The Nickels & Dimes — It’s The Dollars

You’ll probably end up overpaying for a repair at some point in the life of your car. That’s not the end of the world. What’s important is to not get routinely ripped off, and discover that you’ve spent $1,000 or more year after year on repairs that may not be essential. AAA reports the average driver pays $766 per year on maintenance and repairs, which of course can vary based on the age of the car. But if you are spending more than that, ask yourself why. And remember, the nice service manager at your repair shop is in the sales business. If your oil changes routinely end up costing $500, you may want to consider breaking up with the shop.

The Medium Bills Are What Will Get You

Transmissions fail and engines give up the ghost. It happens. Major repair bills often have as much to do with bad luck as anything else, so I’m not going to dwell on them. This repair tech at Edmunds.com revealed that shops often don’t make that much money on big, expensive and complex jobs. Where the real financial win comes into play for them are on the medium-sized jobs that are easy and can be done quickly. They make money on brake jobs, engine flushes, and so on. Keep that in mind for your next visit to the mechanic and you’ll likely have more confidence as a consumer, giving you an advantage.

“Service advisors are wary of customers who look like they know what they’re doing,” the shop worker told Edmonds.com.

Just Say No

Repair shops may tell you your bill is about to balloon, and get your permission, usually with some friendly language like, “You should really get this taken care of now.” But do you really need that transmission flush? There’s a big difference between dealer recommended service and manufacturer recommended service. A good rule of thumb is to follow the later, which you can find in service manuals and on carmaker websites.

Diagnostic Fees

One of the most popular and lucrative gotchas at repair shops is the dreaded “diagnostic fee,” a service charge for establishing the problem with your vehicle. Sometimes it genuinely takes an hour or two to diagnose a repair problem. But Kristin Brocoff of CarMD.com said that it is also possible for techs to plug into the car’s computer and get a diagnosis in seconds.

“It takes less than two minutes for the service writer or tech to use a scan tool on your car,” Brocoff said. “If the problem ends up being something simple like a loose gas cap, most shops waive or discount the diagnostic fee, but some charge upwards of $100. Ask a lot of questions and know what tests they’re running on your car.”

If you want to run a test yourself and compare your results to what a service tech is telling you, you can purchase a OBD2 reader that can read the car’s computer diagnostic codes. It’s important to note that the codes they generate don’t always tell the whole story, and they can be misinterpreted.

Brake for Second Opinions

Car brake repairs range from simple and cheap (brake pad replacement) to the really expensive (rotor and even caliper replacement). It’s easy for shops to say you need the expensive work when you could get away with the cheaper job. They might even show you what looks like a terribly dirty, worn rotor. But rotors can be repaired (turned) instead of replaced, for example. If a shop tells you that you need a full brake replacement, go to another shop and get a second opinion. The variety of quotes you’ll receive for repairs like this can be eye-opening. (Last time I replaced my tires, I was told I needed $500 worth of repairs on my front brakes. A month later, they were fixed elsewhere for $200.)

Smell, Listen, Look, Feel

This leads to perhaps the most important piece of gotcha-fighting advice. You have a relationship with your car. Treat it like a friend, and it’ll do the same for you. Listen to it; look at it; smell it; feel it. Listen to the sounds it makes. Hear a sound like an airplane landing when you press on the brakes? Take it in before a cheap repair becomes and expensive repair. See a puddle stain in your parking spot? Get help. Smell something unusual when you turn it off? Open the hood and look around. Feel a drop in performance when you accelerate on a highway? Notice a drop in gas mileage? Take it in. The most important way to avoid overpaying is to avoid the captive consumer situation. A good rule of thumb: You want to drive to a repair shop, not get towed there. Avoid letting things go until the situation is dire, and it’s not really possible to get second opinion quotes.

Question Line Items

When Popular Mechanics interviewed an anonymous repair tech a few years ago, he shared that many shops add annoying tack-on fees like “shop supplies.” That means you might be getting charged $20 for a shop rag. Feel free to ask and challenge the shop on these charges. Doing so is fair and can put the shop on notice that you aren’t a pushover.

Use Online Tools for a Reality Check

Finally, there are plenty of clever tools now that can give you a rough idea of what repairs should cost in your area. Consumer Reports has one; So does RepairPal.com. They won’t be exact, but you’ll have a good idea if the quote you are getting is fair. Also keep in mind that if the quote is too low, ask questions to help make sure your shop isn’t planning a bait and switch.

Even if you do avoid a car repair gotcha, it’s important to have an emergency fund so a pricey repair doesn’t turn into unwanted debt. Having outstanding or large debts can hurt your credit score and you’ll want a strong score in the event that your car is damaged beyond repair and you need to get a new one. Having a good credit score may make it easier to get approved for an auto loan with an affordable interest rate. You can keep an eye on your credit score by viewing two of your credit scores for free each month on Credit.com.

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

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Why Your Car Insurance Rates Could Go Up This Year

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Lower gas prices equals more road traffic equals more car crashes equals more insurance claims equals higher premiums. That’s the not-so-short story of why your car insurance rates could go up this year, but let’s break it down.

Gas prices in 2015 were substantially lower than prices throughout both 2014 and 2013, according to AAA, and the new year is ringing in the lowest gas prices for this time of year since 2009.

That kind of money adds up, and consumers have taken notice: Forbes reports that the increase in miles driven on U.S. roads has been substantial, likely due in a large part to lower gas prices. Maine, for example, saw more drivers pass through their tolls in June and July of 2015 than they have ever seen. And increase in road traffic impacts many things, one of the most important being car crashes. The simple truth is that the greater abundance of cars on the road increases the occurrence of crashes, which generate more insurance claims.

The Auto Insurance Industry Is Losing Money

Official crash statistics take time to compile. However, while hard numbers about how many traffic crashes happened during 2015 isn’t yet available, we do have other indicators that 2015 was especially dangerous for drivers. According to Forbes, major auto insurance companies are bleeding money, reporting significant revenue decreases and even losses in underwriting profits from last year.

Some auto insurance companies are placing the blame for their loss in revenue on more claim payouts to customers because of more traffic crashes. Others say the increase in economic activity over the past couple of years has put more cars on the road, which has led to more car accidents and crashes.

What the Insurance Industry’s Losses Mean for Your Policy

Insurance companies must estimate risk and expenses: Insurers maintain complicated algorithms to help them determine how much different types of customers are likely to cost them. And, even though their data is based on a lot of past evidence and careful evaluation, adjustments sometimes need to be made — and, according to Forbes, at least one major insurer is planning them with more providers likely to follow suit. Fortunately, potential rate hikes won’t happen over night. Per Forbes:

The process of adjusting property and casualty insurance rates in the United States is heavily regulated. Insurers first need to submit a proposal for a rate change with each state’s Department of Insurance. This request needs to then be approved by the department — a step that can take several months.

Still, the math is simple: More drivers on the road leads to more crashes, which leads to increased insurance company payouts, which means less money for insurers, which they will likely make up for by ultimately increasing premiums for everyone. Ouch.

How to Avoid a Rate Hike

Whenever your car insurance policy is up for renewal, whether it’s been a bad year for the auto insurance industry or not, the absolute best thing you can do to keep your premium as low as possible and ensure you secure the coverage you need is to shop around. Comparing the different policies insurers have to offer, their prices and potential discounts, and even sharing the prices you’re offered at one company with a competitor can ensure you don’t overpay and aren’t a target for the questionable practice of price optimization.

Other ways to save on insurance include:

  • Improving your credit score. You can see where yours currently stands by viewing your two free credit scores each month on Credit.com.
  • Take a defensive driving course to lower rates by as much as 10%.
  • Consider bundling your auto insurance with other insurance policies you carry, like homeowners insurance.
  • Consider adjusting your deductible if you are quoted rates that exceed your budget. But don’t necessarily take the highest deductible/lowest premium combo. Instead, carefully consider how much you can afford to pay out of pocket should an emergency arise.
  • See if you might qualify for low mileage rate reductions or consider if usage-based insurance might be right for you.
  • Look into every discount you might qualify for (often insurers don’t offer them up without being asked). Options to look into include good student, recent graduate, age-based discounts, discount for married couples and discounts for veterans.

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