Risks to Consider Before Co-signing Your Kid’s Mortgage

Homeownership is a cornerstone of the American Dream for most, but many millennials are finding it difficult to afford to buy in.

Overall, millennials are still far behind in homeownership compared to previous generations were at their age. Only 39.1% of millennials lived in a home they owned in 2016 compared with 63.2% of Gen Xers, according to an analysis by Trulia Economist Felipe Chacón.

Student debt and stagnant incomes could share some of the blame. Millennials earn 78.2 cents for every dollar a Gen Xer earned at their age, Chacón found. Nearly half of millennial homebuyers report carrying student loan debt, according to the 2016 National Association of Realtors Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends survey. They carry a median loan balance of $25,000.

Loan officers have to take a borrower’s total debt picture into account when running their application, and it’s become increasingly hard to qualify for a mortgage with a vast amount of student debt.

When they can’t get approved for a mortgage, it’s common for homebuyers to seek out a co-signer for their loan. Often, that person is a parent.

Co-signing a child’s mortgage loan is a serious decision, and parents should weigh all of the risks before making any promises. We asked financial experts what risks are worth worrying about to help clear out the noise.

  1. You’re on the hook if your kid stops making mortgage payments

When you co-sign a loan, you agree to be responsible for payments if the primary borrower defaults. If you’re expecting to retire during the life of the mortgage loan, co-signing is an even larger risk, as you may be living on fixed income.

Dublin, Ohio-based certified financial planner Mark Beaver says he’d be wary of a parent co-signing a mortgage for their adult child. “If they need a co-signer, it likely means they cannot afford the house, otherwise the bank wouldn’t require the co-signer,” says Beaver.

By co-signing, you effectively take on a risk the bank doesn’t want. And the list of potential scenarios in which your child may no longer be able to afford their house payments can be vast.

“What if your daughter marries a jerk and they get divorced, or he/she starts a business and loses money, or doesn’t pay their taxes. The risk is ‘what can happen that can make this blow up,’” says Troy, Mich.- based lawyer and Certified Financial Planner, Leon LaBrecque.

Bottom line: If you wouldn’t be able to comfortably afford the payments in case that happens, don’t co-sign.

  1. You’re putting your credit at risk

A default isn’t the only event that could negatively affect your finances. The mortgage will show up on your credit report, too, even if you haven’t taken over payments. So, if your child so much as misses one payment, your credit score could take a hit.

This may not be the end of the world for an older parent who doesn’t anticipate needing any new lines of credit in the future, Beaver says, but it’s still wise to be cautious.

You might think your child is ready to become a homeowner, but a closer look at their finances may reveal they aren’t yet that financially mature. Don’t be afraid to ask about their income and spending habits. You should have a good idea of how your child handles their own finances before you agree to help them.

“Sure, we don’t want to meddle and pry into our children’s business; however, you are putting yourself financially on the line. They need to understand that and be open about their own habits,” says Andover, Mass.-based Certified Financial Planner John Barnes.

  1. Your relationship with your child could change

Co-signing you child’s mortgage is bound to change the dynamics of your relationship. Your financial futures will be entangled for 15 to 30 years, depending on how long it takes them to pay off the loan.

Seal Beach, Calif.-based certified financial planner Howard Erman says not to let your feelings get in the way of making the correct decision for your budget. Think of how often you communicate and the depth and strength of your relationship with your child. If saying no might create serious tension in your relationship, you likely dodged a bullet.

“If your child conditions their love on getting money, then the parent has a much bigger problem,” says Erman.

Similarly, you should consider how your relationship would be affected if somehow your child ends up defaulting on the mortgage, leaving you to make payments to the bank.

  1. You might need to let go of future borrowing plans

Co-signing adds the mortgage to the debts on your credit report, making it tougher for you to qualify for additional credit. If you dreamed of one day owning a vacation home, just know that a lender will have to consider your child’s mortgage as part of your overall debt-to-income ratio as well.

Although co-signing a large loan such as a mortgage generally puts a temporary crimp in your ability to borrow, keep in mind you may be affected differently based on the dollar amount of the mortgage loan and your own credit history and financial situation.

How to Say “No” to Co-signing Your Child’s Mortgage

There is a chance you’ll need to deny your child’s request to co-sign the loan. If you feel pressured to say yes, but really want to say no, Barnes suggests you say no and place the blame on a financial adviser.

“Having [someone like] me say no is like a doctor telling a patient he or she can’t run the marathon until that ankle is healed. It is the same principle,” says Barnes.

He advises parents facing the decision to co-sign a loan for a family member to meet with a financial planner to analyze the situation and give a recommendation for action.

If you choose to take the blame yourself, you may want to take the time to explain your reasoning to your child if you feel it’s warranted. If you said no based on something they can change, give them a plan to follow to get a “yes” from you instead.

LaBrecque suggests that parents who want to help out but don’t want to take on the risks of co-signing instead give the child a down payment and treat it as an advance in the estate plan. So if you “gift” your kid $30,000 to make the down payment, you would reduce their inheritance by $30,000.

The “gift the down payment” method grants you some additional benefits too.

“[The] method has a more positive parent/child relationship than the potential awkwardness of Thanksgiving with the kid(s) and late payments on the mortgage. Also, the ‘down payment gift’ is a quick victory. The kid’s now made their bed with the mortgage; let them sleep in it,” says LaBrecque.

Similarly, you could choose to help your child pay down their debts, so they’ll be in a better position to get approved on their own.

If you must say no, try to do so in a way that will motivate them toward the goal rather than deflate them. Erman recommends lovingly explaining to your child how important it is for them to be able to achieve this success on their own.

How to Protect Yourself as Co-signer

The best way to protect yourself against the risks of co-signing is to have a backup plan.

“If a child is responsible with money, then I generally do not see a problem with co-signing a loan, provided insurance is in place to protect the co-signer (the parent),” says Barnes.

He adds parents should make sure the child, the primary borrower, has life insurance and disability insurance in case the widowed son or daughter-in-law still needs to live in the home, or your child becomes disabled and is unable to work.

The insurance payments will also help to protect your own credit history and future borrowing power in case your child dies or becomes disabled. But these protections would be useless in the event your child loses their job.

If that happens, “insurance will not pay your bill unfortunately, so even if you are well insured, budgeting is vitally important,” Beaver says.

If you choose to take on the risk and co-sign, Barnes says to make sure you and your child have a plan in place that details payment, when to sell, and what would happen if your child is unable to make payments for any reason.

Additionally, LaBrecque recommends you get your name on the deed. Don’t forget to address present or future spouses. Ask your lawyer about having both kids sign back a quit-claim deed to the parent. If you get one, he says, you’ll be protected in case the marriage goes south, or payments are made late, because you would be able to remove a potential ex off the note.

The post Risks to Consider Before Co-signing Your Kid’s Mortgage appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Dating Someone with Bad Credit? Here’s How to Protect Your Score

These tips can help ensure their bad credit doesn't indirectly affect yours.

Building a strong credit score can take years of paying your bills on time, spending wisely and avoiding too much debt. If you’ve spent a lot of time and effort building a great credit score, you may be very protective of your credit.

But if you’re in a relationship with someone who has poor credit and you’re at a point that you’re moving in together or otherwise sharing expenses, your credit score could be in jeopardy. Not because your Valentine’s bad credit will directly impact yours: Credit reports don’t get merged, even after you’re married. But a person’s poor money habits can have an indirect effect of your financial standing and any joint accounts you decide to sign up for will appear on your credit file.

In other words, if your beloved has bad credit, you’ll want to take steps to avoid damaging your own. Here’s how you can safeguard your credit score from your partner’s bad credit.

1. Consider Keeping Your Funds Separate …

There are a number of reasons your partner could have poor credit, including unexpected financial hardship or identity theft.

“Someone with a low credit score could still be responsible with money and pay all the bills on time, but may just have some unexpected medical debt,” says Matt Gulbransen, owner of Callahan Financial Planning Corporation. But your partner could also have poor money-management skills. And, if that’s the reason for their credit score woes, you may want to keep your bank accounts separate for awhile. You can still split expenses while restricting access to your personal bank account.

2. … the Same Goes for Other Accounts

You can apply the same strategy to other accounts, including credit cards, loans and any accounts with monthly payments. Missed payments on shared accounts will inflict mutual damage to both of your credit scores. Your partner’s poor credit could be due to a history of late payments or accounts in collections, so think twice before sharing. (And, if you do decide to share, keep a close eye on those accounts.)

“I suggest you don’t join credit cards until you build the credit of the other party,” says Gulbransen.

It’s also risky to co-sign a loan, which can have the same impact on your credit as sharing a joint account.

3. Avoid Applying for Credit Together

If you want to apply for a credit card or loan, you may be better off doing so independently. If you apply together, your partner’s poor credit could result in higher interest rates, poor loan terms or even an outright rejection. You should use your own good credit to negotiate the best terms.

“Banks remain wary of making loans to borrowers with tarnished scores,” says Gulbransen. “And low scores can deny one access to a mortgage.”

Even adding your partner as an authorized user on your credit cards can be risky if your partner runs up your credit card balances. That’s because the amount of debt you owe can directly impact your credit scores. (Plus, the primary accountholder is the one responsible for actually paying the bills.)

4. Work on a Credit Improvement Plan

Poor credit doesn’t have to doom a relationship. It can be challenging, but you can help your partner by understanding their situation and working together to create a credit improvement plan.

If you’re both committed to the relationship, you may want to merge finances and share financial decisions in the future. The best way forward is to openly discuss what led to your partner’s poor credit, and come up with a plan to improve it together.

The details of the plan will depend on the factors contributing to your partner’s poor credit score. Improving their credit score for your partner could require monitoring his or her credit report, building a solid history of timely payments and paying down debt. There are also a number of tools, such as secured credit cards that are ideal for people who have struggled with managing their credit. And, if your beloved discovers their credit is being affected by a boatload of errors, credit repair could be an option.

Bottomline: By working to improve your partner’s credit, you can both move toward a greater financial future together.

Image: g-stockstudio

The post Dating Someone with Bad Credit? Here’s How to Protect Your Score appeared first on Credit.com.

How Can I Get Off of a Co-Signed Credit Card?

co-signed-credit-card

Q. I co-signed a credit card for my son when he started college. I’d like to get off of that account now. What should I do, and will it hurt his credit report? — Dad

A. Many parents who co-sign a credit card for their child do so in an effort to help the child build good credit.

But it’s common for the parent to later worry about their own credit score.

That’s one of the pitfalls of co-signing, said Jeff Rossi, a certified financial planner with Peak Wealth Advisors in Holmdel, New Jersey.

“As a co-signer, you accepted full and equal responsibility for the debt under contract,” Rossi said. “The account will appear on your credit history along with any late payments.”

He said you, in a sense, have put your good credit history in your son’s hands.

Given that you’re still concerned about your son’s credit scores, Rossi said, it sounds like everything has gone fine so far, and the move probably helped his credit score.

It’s not always easy to just get removed from a co-signed credit card, Rossi said.

That’s because the credit card provider may have required a co-signer for your son because he did not qualify for the credit card alone.

“By co-signing, you agreed to make the credit card payments if he did not,” Rossi said. “The bank may still see that situation the same way, and in order to get you off of the account, you may need to shut down the account.”


If there isn’t a balance, some credit card issuers are willing to remove your name, provided the remaining account owner has decent credit, Rossi said.

He recommends you call the card issuer — or have your son call — and ask if this is an option. If they oblige, that’s the best option for your son’s credit, because a longer positive history is beneficial to credit scores.

Credit scores are generally based on five different factors:

  1. Payment history
  2. Accounts owned
  3. Length of history
  4. Credit mix
  5. New credit

“If you wind up having to close the account and have your son re-establish a new account, it will definitely impact the length of history category, but the silver lining is the weighting is not as high as the first two items,” Rossi said.

[Editor’s note: You can see how changes in your accounts — like closing a a credit card — affect your credit by getting two free credit scores, updated monthly, on Credit.com.]

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Image: digitalskillet

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