Watch Out for This 16% Student Loan Fee

The Trump administration has made it possible for debt collectors to once again charge hefty fees to some student loan borrowers who miss several payments in a row — even if those borrowers make an effort to get back on track right away.

These fees, which can be as high as 16%, are typically levied against the borrower’s entire outstanding loan balance and accrued interest charges. The so-called “collection charges” are meant to help recoup losses incurred by pursuing unpaid debts.

In a recent letter, the U.S. Department of Education rescinded an Obama-era rule that forbade guaranty agencies — debt collectors charged with recouping unpaid federal student loan debt — from charging defaulted borrowers collection fees if the borrowers began a repayment plan within 60 days of defaulting on their loans. In the new letter, the agency said the previous guidance should have included time for public comment and review before it was issued.

The reversal comes days after the Consumer Federation of America released an analysis of Department of Education data that shows the rate of student loans in default has grown 14% from 2015 to 2016.This certainly isn’t the first Obama-era rule or legislation the new administration has sought to undo, with an Obamacare replacement plan on its way to a vote in the House and plans to unravel regulations meant to crack down on for-profit colleges and universities.

A Department of Education spokesperson declined to comment.

Bad news for 4.2 million borrowers

The changes will impact borrowers who took out federal student loans under the old Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program. The FFEL Program was phased out in 2010 and replaced with the current Direct Loan Program, but millions of borrowers are still paying back FFEL loans issued prior to that change. Those who have loans under the Direct Loan Program will not be impacted by the changes.

As it stands, some 4.2 million FFEL borrowers are currently in default on loans that total $65.6 billion, according to Department of Education data. Loans are considered to be in default after 270 days of nonpayment.

The changes will raise the stakes for borrowers struggling to make payments on their federal student loans, and make it even more important for those borrowers to avoid missed payments.

Fortunately, federal student loan borrowers are eligible for several flexible repayment methods, as well as forbearance and deferment.

An Ongoing Debate

The debate over a servicer’s right to charge borrowers a default fee has gone on for several years.

In 2012, student loan borrower Bryana Bible sued United Student Aid Funds after she was charged more than $4,500 in fees after defaulting on her loans. She started a repayment agreement to resolve the debt within 18 days, but was still charged fees.

The Department of Education sided with Bible and said companies had to give borrowers 60 days after a loan default to start paying up before they are charged fees. The Obama administration backed the Department of Education and issued the letter when the court asked for guidance on the issue.

There is one clear winner with this rule change: debt collectors.

“Rescinding the [previous guidance on collection fees] benefits guarantee agencies at the expense of defaulted borrowers,” says financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz. He adds the change may increase the cost of collecting defaulted federal student loans, since borrowers will have less incentive to quickly rehabilitate their defaulted student loans.

What Happens If I Default on My Federal Student Loans?

Federal student loans are considered to be in default after a borrower misses payments for 270 days or more.

About 1.1 million federal student loans were in default status in 2016, according to Department of Education data.

The consequences of going to default are severe.

  • The entire balance of your loan + interest is immediately due
  • You lose eligibility for deferment, forbearance, and flexible repayment plans
  • Debt collectors will start calling
  • Your credit will suffer
  • And … your wages and/or tax refunds could be garnished

Are you missing federal student loan payments?

You’ve got options.

  • Contact your loan servicer ASAP
  • Find out if you’re eligible for a flexible repayment plan
  • Or ask about forbearance

Already in default?

  • Ask your loan service about loan rehabilitation
  • If you make 9 on-time payments over the course of 10 months, your default status will be lifted

You’ve only got one shot to rehabilitate your federal student loans after going into default. Don’t miss it.

 

The post Watch Out for This 16% Student Loan Fee appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

60 Years Old and Still Paying Off Student Debt

Like a growing number of student loan borrowers, 60-year-old Beatrice Hogg will be paying off her loans well into her 80s.

“I’ll probably die before I pay off the loan,” says Hogg, a social worker living in Sacramento, Calif. In total, she owes $45,000 in outstanding federal student loan debt. She borrowed the money in the early 2000s in order to finance her Master of Fine Arts degree in creative nonfiction, which she received in 2004 from Antioch University of Los Angeles.

With monthly payments of $251, Hogg says she doesn’t expect to pay off her loans until well into her 80s. That could easily change if she runs into the same bouts of unemployment that have dogged her over the last decade, leading her to defer her payments several times.

Hogg’s story is further proof that student debt has become a multi-generational issue. A recent report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found the share of Americans 60 years and older who carry federal student loan debt has quadrupled over the last 10 years — from 2.7% of all borrowers to 6.4%. In total, this group of borrowers carries roughly $66.7 billion — or 5.4% — of all outstanding federal student loan debt in the U.S.

According to the CFPB’s report, borrowers who carry student debt late into their lives have more trouble repaying them, reflecting other possible financial issues. Borrowers over the age of 60 were twice as likely to have missed at least one student loan payment compared to the same group in 2005, the CFPB found, and 2 in 5 of borrowers 65 and older have loans in default.

The CFPB reports older Americans burdened with student loan debt are also more likely to skip important health care purchases like prescription medication, doctors’ visits, and dental care because they can’t afford it. As an example, the report cites a separate, 2016 study that found 39% of older borrowers said they skipped those needs compared to 25% of those without a student loan in 2014.

As student loan borrowers have grown older, the number of borrowers who have their Social Security benefits garnished because of student loan payments increased from 8,700 to 40,000 from 2005 to 2015 according to the CFPB. The U.S. government can garnish up to 15% of a borrower’s Social Security benefits as long as the remaining balance is greater than $750 each month.

How did we get here?

Nearly two-thirds, or 73%, of student loan borrowers 60 and older said they took on student debt for a child’s or grandchild’s education. More than half (57%) of all those who co-signed student debt are 55 and older.

Adding to the burden of debt, says Betsy Mayotte, an expert in student loan repayment strategies at American Student Assistance, is the fact that families are now borrowing more than ever to pay for rising college costs. For example, between 2006 and 2016, in-state tuition and

fees at public four-year institutions outpaced inflation by about 3.5% per year according to the College Board. In 2016, the average in-state student at a public four-year institution paid $3,770 in tuition and fees compared to $2,220 in 2009.

“You can have families with a lower income level end up taking out six figures in student loan debt,” Mayotte says.

Another reason student loan borrowers are getting older is because they now have the option to extend their repayment terms if they are struggling to make payments. The Obama administration rolled out several of these income-driven repayment plans in the years after the Great Recession.

The lasting impact of senior student loan debt

It’s simple to understand how paying student loans leaves less to save for retirement.

“For every dollar that you pay toward your student loan payment, it’s a dollar that you’re not putting toward retirement,” says Mayotte.

Hogg now works as a county social worker and began making payments again in December 2015. She says she’s “been current ever since,” but she has yet to contribute to a retirement plan.

“I’m sure that if I didn’t have the [student] loans, I could have probably set myself up better for retirement,” says Hogg. “Hopefully I’ll be able to stay at my job until I’m vested in their retirement plan.”

Tips for struggling student loan borrowers

If you have federal student loans and are struggling with your payment each month, you may want to consider requesting an income-driven repayment plan through your loan servicer. The plans can reduce your payment to as little as $0. You can also request to defer your loans or place them in forbearance if you’re going through financial hardship. Just keep in mind that interest is still accruing.

“It could be tempting to try to get the lowest payment on your student loans,” says Mayotte. But remember, “you’re trying to win the war and not the battle. The longer you pay over the life of the loan, the more you pay in interest.”

Mayotte recommends creating a budget to figure out the most you can afford to pay toward your loans each month. The Department of Education has a calculator on its website that you can use to see your estimated payments under each repayment plan.

When you’re on a income-driven repayment plan, you should keep in touch with your loan holder, and don’t forget to apply for renewal each year.

Unfortunately, if you have private loans, there’s not much you can do to reduce your monthly payment outside of consolidating or refinancing your loans with a lender like SoFi, Earnest, or LendKey. Mayotte says she sees those with private loans and those who don’t complete their degree or program struggle most with repayment.

“The people that I haven’t been able to help almost exclusively have had private student loan debt,” says Mayotte. She says it’s because they don’t have the many repayment options federal student loans do and “life can happen.”

The final word

Despite her debt burden, Hogg says she’s happy as a social worker and says she doesn’t regret getting her master’s. She regrets that she used student loan debt to finance it.

“I regret that I had that big of a gap in my payments from being unemployed. I just wish there were more grants available for getting a higher degree,” says Hogg.

The post 60 Years Old and Still Paying Off Student Debt appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review

LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review

Updated February 9, 2016

Could you imagine trying to find the best student loan refinancing rate from community banks and credit unions on your own? How would you do it? Would you call every bank and credit union and ask for help? What a nightmare.

LendKey has relationships with 300+ community banks and credit unions all over the United States. LendKey* can issue loans to residents in any of the 50 states. This keeps you from having to pound the pavement by your lonesome. LendKey’s website will show you the best rate for refinancing your student loans.

Since 2007, LendKey has been a one stop shop for student loan refinancing. It also offers other types of loans. But for the sake of this review we’ll be focusing on how LendKey takes care of graduates looking to improve their debt situation. Fixed APRs range from 3.25% – 7.26%. Variable rates start as low as 2.22%. LendKey is one of the top four lenders in MagnifyMoney’s survey of where to refinance your student loan.

Who can benefit from using LendKey? Anyone hoping to refinance their student loans should consider LendKey. It is easy to apply:

Lendkey

Apply Now

 

If you’re on the fence about refinancing, here are some of the benefits to be gained:

Lower Payments

Refinance your way to a more manageable monthly payment.

Lower Rates

Spend less on interest by getting a lower rate than the aggregate of all individual student loans.

Simplified Finances

Making payments on multiple loans to multiple institutions at different times of the month can be quite the hassle. It’s much easier to remember just one payment. Many lenders even let you consolidate both private and federal loans.

Different Repayment Options

Different lenders offer different repayment options. It’s wise to explore all the options to determine what makes the most sense for your particular situation.

Pros of Using LendKey

A Unified Application Process

This is hugely important. With LendKey, you’re not shuffled through tons of screens on different domains – all using different logons and different (confusing!) user interfaces. Within 5 minutes, a person can navigate through LendKey’s application process. This means after 5 minutes, you can see how much you can save by refinancing. You can even choose what loan you want.

Cosigner Release Available

Yes, you can secure a low interest rate and then cut loose your cosigner. Once you prove you are responsible – LendKey no longer needs a cosigner tied to your account. This may help convince a cosigner to work with you initially. They won’t need to be on the hook for long. Once you’ve made 12 full and consecutive on-time payments, your cosigner may be released. LendKey does a credit check and examines your income to see if you are free to go it alone.

No Origination Fee

This is helpful since it means you are free to shop around without feeling committed.

Further Interest Rate Reduction

1% interest rate reduction once 10% of the loan principal is repaid during the full repayment period. This is subject to the floor rate.

0.25% ACH Interest Rate Reduction

Many lenders reduce interest rates by a quarter percent for borrowers who agree to automatic payments.

Federal and Private Loans Can Be Consolidated Together

However, you lose some federal benefits in doing so. Things like free insurance (provided with federal loans if you are killed or severely disabled), public service forgiveness and military service forgiveness as well as income-based repayment plans. Grace periods will likely be omitted when writing the new consolidated loan.

Over 40,000 Borrowers Serviced

As of January 2016, 40,000 people have used LendKey’s services.

Excellent Customer Support

According to cuStudentLoans (which LendKey owns so take this with a grain of salt), 97% of customers are satisfied. Customer support comes out of New York and Ohio. Phone support is available each day from 9AM to 8PM EST.

For what it’s worth, I called into support 5 times at random. The support I received from the sales team was really great. Even the gentleman with only 6 months of experience was quite knowledgeable.

Eligible Schools

This list of eligible schools is 2,200 and growing. Chances are your school is on the list. However, LendKey doesn’t encourage students to submit eligibility requests as other student loan refinancers do.

Return Policy

Yes, you can ‘return’ your loan. LendKey offers a 30 day no-fee return policy to allow you to cancel the loan within 30 days of disbursement without fees or interest. That’s pretty incredible.

Cons

LendKey Doesn’t Give You the Complete Picture

LendKey doesn’t help a lot with stacking institutions against each other. I suppose this is meant to not to play favorites. However, it would be nice to be able to read about each institution within the LendKey interface. I’d still advise opening up another tab to research the banks you are considering.

The Fine Print You May Miss

Since LendKey is a loan matchmaker, there isn’t a lot of fine print on the site. This means a person still needs to review the fine print of each institution before finalizing his or her loan as mentioned before. LendKey does a fantastic job of getting you 90% of the way. But that last 10% of fine print is between you and your lending institution. Read through everything before signing up for a new loan.

I read the Better Business Bureau complaint log for LendKey. There are only 11 complaints in the past 3 years. SoFi (a competitor) has 18 and another competitor, Earnest, has no complaints. These complaints were mostly small misunderstandings between the LendKey support team and the borrowers.

The Application Process

There are four steps to the simple application process. Step 1 is for estimating monthly payments for a private student loan. It’s simple. You identify the amount you’d like to borrow and fill in a radio button indicating your credit is fair, good, or excellent. The last part is where you enter which state you live in. This is because many programs are state specific. Step 1 takes 1 minute.

Step 2 takes 2 minutes. This is the step where you compare the rates and offers available to you. Choose what works best for your unique situation.

Step 3 again only takes 1 minute. This is the actual application. As mentioned earlier in this article, this process is done through the LendKey interface. And don’t worry, information inputted into LendKey is safe (privacy policy).

Step 4 takes 10 minutes. This is the step where a person verifies identity, school, and income (screenshots/pictures work so there’s no hassle with scanning!). You will know if you are approved during this step.

As with any company, there are competitors. Here are two worthy rivals also worth considering:

Alternatives to LendKey

SoFi

SoFi stands out with a job placement programs, free wealth management for borrowers and even a dating app. More importantly, SoFi has low interest rates, with variable rates starting at 2.355% and fixed rates starting at 3.375%.

SoFi logo

Apply Now

Earnest

If you have a low credit score but have potential to earn a good income, Earnest will treat you well. Earnest looks beyond a simple credit score. The application process examines employment history, future earning potential and overall financial situation.

Earnest seems to take a very personal approach to each customer. A customer states an amount they can pay each month and Earnest will give them a loan, accordingly. Earnest also lets borrowers skip a payment each year. This could come in handy if money gets tight around the holidays. Just keep in mind, this can increase your future payments to compensate for the missed on.

Fixed interest rates start at 3.75% and variable interest rates start at 2.55%.

However, Earnest isn’t available for all US residents.

Earnest

Apply Now

Final Thoughts

LendKey runs a fantastic student loan refinancing division. The company offers many, many customizable options with very few downsides. With no application fee, it’s worth seeing what this student loan refinancing powerhouse can do for you.

Lendkey

Apply Now

Customize Student Loan Offers with Magnify Tool

 *We’ll receive a referral fee if you click on offers with this symbol. This does not impact our rankings or recommendations. You can learn more about how our site is financed here.

The post LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

19 Options to Refinance Student Loans in 2017 – Get Your Lowest Rate

19 Options to Refinance Student Loans - Get Your Lowest Rate

Updated: March 4, 2017

Are you tired of paying a high interest rate on your student loan debt? You may be looking for ways to refinance your student loans at a lower interest rate, but don’t know where to turn. We have created the most complete list of lenders currently willing to refinance student loan debt.

You should always shop around for the best rate. Don’t worry about the impact on your credit score of applying to multiple lenders: so long as you complete all of your applications within 14 days, it will only count as one inquiry on your credit score. You can see the full list of lenders below, but we recommend you start here, and check rates from the top 4 national lenders offering the lowest interest rates. These 4 lenders also allow you to check your rate without impacting your score (using a soft credit pull), and offer the best rates of 2017:

LenderTransparency ScoreMax TermFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
SoFiA+

20


Years

3.38% - 6.74%


Fixed Rate

2.36% - 6.28%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
earnestA+

20


Years

3.75% - 6.74%


Fixed Rate

2.55% - 6.03%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
commonbondA+

20


Years

3.37% - 7.74%


Fixed Rate

2.35% - 6.27%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
lendkeyA+

20


Years

3.25% - 7.26%


Fixed Rate

2.22% - 5.85%


Variable Rate

$125k / $175k


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now

We have also created:

But before you refinance, read on to see if you are ready to refinance your student loans.

Can I Get Approved?

Loan approval rules vary by lender. However, all of the lenders will want:

  • Proof that you can afford your payments. That means you have a job with income that is sufficient to cover your student loans and all of your other expenses.
  • Proof that you are a responsible borrower, with a demonstrated record of on-time payments. For some lenders, that means that they use the traditional FICO, requiring a good score. For other lenders, they may just have some basic rules, like no missed payments, or a certain number of on-time payments required to prove that you are responsible.

If you are in financial difficulty and can’t afford your monthly payments, a refinance is not the solution. Instead, you should look at options to avoid a default on student loan debt.

This is particularly important if you have Federal loans.

Don’t refinance Federal loans unless you are very comfortable with your ability to repay. Think hard about the chances you won’t be able to make payments for a few months. Once you refinance, you may lose flexible Federal payment options that can help you if you genuinely can’t afford the payments you have today. Check the Federal loan repayment estimator to make sure you see all the Federal options you have right now.

If you can afford your monthly payment, but you have been a sloppy payer, then you will likely need to demonstrate responsibility before applying for a refinance.

But, if you can afford your current monthly payment and have been responsible with those payments, then a refinance could be possible and help you pay the debt off sooner.

Is it worth it? 

Like any form of debt, your goal with a student loan should be to pay as low an interest rate as possible. Other than a mortgage, you will likely never have a debt as large as your student loan.

If you are able to reduce the interest rate by re-financing, then you should consider the transaction. However, make sure you include the following in any decision:

Is there an origination fee?

Many lenders have no fee, which is great news. If there is an origination fee, you need to make sure that it is worth paying. If you plan on paying off your loan very quickly, then you may not want to pay a fee. But, if you are going to be paying your loan for a long time, a fee may be worth paying.

Is the interest rate fixed or variable?

Variable interest rates will almost always be lower than fixed interest rates. But there is a reason: you end up taking all of the interest rate risk. We are currently at all-time low interest rates. So, we know that interest rates will go up, we just don’t know when.

This is a judgment call. Just remember, when rates go up, so do your payments. And, in a higher rate environment, you will not be able to refinance to a better option (because all rates will be going up).

We typically recommend fixing the rate as much as possible, unless you know that you can pay off your debt during a short time period. If you think it will take you 20 years to pay off your loan, you don’t want to bet on the next 20 years of interest rates. But, if you think you will pay it off in five years, you may want to take the bet. Some providers with variable rates will cap them, which can help temper some of the risk.

Places to Consider a Refinance

If you go to other sites they may claim to compare several student loan offers in one step. Just beware that they might only show you deals that pay them a referral fee, so you could miss out on lenders ready to give you better terms. Below is what we believe is the most comprehensive list of current student loan refinancing lenders.

You should take the time to shop around. FICO says there is little to no impact on your credit score for rate shopping as many providers as you’d like in a single shopping period (which can be between 14-30 days, depending upon the version of FICO). So set aside a day and apply to as many as you feel comfortable with to get a sense of who is ready to give you the best terms.

Here are more details on the 5 lenders offering the lowest interest rates:

1. SoFi: Variable Rates from 2.365% and Fixed Rates from 3.375% (with AutoPay)*

sofiSoFi (read our full SoFi review) was one of the first lenders to start offering student loan refinancing products. More MagnifyMoney readers have chosen SoFi than any other lender. Although SoFi initially targeted a very select group of universities (it started with Stanford), now almost anyone can apply, including if you graduated from a trade school. The only requirement is that you graduated from a Title IV school. You need to have a degree, a good job and good income in order to  qualify. SoFi wants to be more than just a lender. If you lose your job, SoFi will  help you find a new one. If you need a mortgage for a first home, they are there  to help. And, surprisingly, they also want to get you a date. SoFi is famous for  hosting parties for customers across the country, and creating a dating app to  match borrowers with each other.

Go to site

2. Earnest: Variable Rates from 2.55% and Fixed Rates from 3.75% (with AutoPay) 

EarnestEarnest (read our full Earnest review) offers fixed interest rates starting at 3.75% and variable rates starting at 2.55%. Unlike any of the other lenders, you can switch between fixed and variable rates throughout the life of your loan. You can do that one time every six months until the loan is paid off. That means you can take advantage of the low variable interest rates now, and then lock in a higher fixed rate later. You can choose your own monthly payment, based upon what you can afford (to the penny). Earnest also offers bi-weekly payments and “skip a payment” if you run into difficulty.

Go to site

3. CommonBond: Variable Rates from 2.35% and Fixed Rates from 3.37% (with AutoPay)

CommonBondCommonBond (read our full CommonBond review) started out lending exclusively to graduate students. They initially targeted doctors with more than $100,000 of debt. Over time, CommonBond has expanded and now offers student loan refinancing options to graduates of almost any university (graduate and undergraduate). In addition (and we think this is pretty cool), CommonBond will fund the education of someone in need in an emerging market for every loan that closes. So not only will you save money, but someone in need will get access to an education.

Go to site

4. LendKey: Variable Rates from 2.22% and Fixed Rates from 3.25% (with AutoPay)

lendkeyLendKey (read our full LendKey review) works with community banks and credit unions across the country. Although you apply with LendKey, your loan will be with a community bank. If you like the idea of working with a credit union or community bank, LendKey could be a great option. Over the past year, LendKey has become increasingly competitive on pricing, and frequently has a better rate than some of the more famous marketplace lenders.

Go to site

In addition to the Top 4 (ranked by interest rate), there are many more lenders offering to refinance student loans. Below is a listing of all providers we have found so far. This list includes credit unions that may have limited membership. We will continue to update this list as we find more lenders. This list is ordered alphabetically:

  • Alliant Credit Union: Anyone can join this credit union. Interest rates start as low as 3.75% APR. You can borrow up to $100,000 for up to 25 years.
  • Citizens Bank: Variable interest rates range from 2.37% APR – 8.16% APR and fixed rates range from 4.74% – 8.24%. You can borrow for up to 20 years.
  • College Avenue: If you have a medical degree, you can borrow up to $250,000. Otherwise, you can borrow up to $150,000. Fixed rates range from 4.75% – 7.35% APR. Variable rates range from 2.63% – 5.88% APR.
  • Credit Union Student Choice: If you like credit unions and community banks, we recommend that you start with LendKey. However, if you can’t find a good loan from a LendKey partner, this tool could be helpful. Just check to see if you or an immediate family member belong to one of their featured credit union and you can apply to refinance your loan.
  • DRB Student Loan: DRB offers variable rates ranging from 3.89% – 6.54% APR and fixed rates from 4.50% – 7.45% APR.
  • Eastman Credit Union: Credit union membership is restricted (see eligibility here). Fixed rates start at 6.50% and go up to 8% APR.
  • Education Success Loans: This company has a unique pricing structure: your interest rate is fixed and then becomes variable thereafter. You can fix the rate at 4.99% APR for the first year, and it is then becomes variable. The longest you can fix the rate is 10 years at 7.99%, and it is then variable thereafter. Given this pricing, you would probably get a better deal elsewhere.
  • EdVest: This company is the non-profit student loan program of the state of New Hampshire which has become available more broadly. Rates are very competitive, ranging from 3.94% – 7.54% (fixed) and 2.56% – 6.16% APR (variable).
  • First Republic Eagle Gold. The interest rates are great, but this option is not for everyone. Fixed rates range from 2.25% – 4.10% APR. Variable rates range from 2.43% – 4.23%. You need to visit a branch and open a checking account (which has a $3,500 minimum balance to avoid fees). Branches are located in San Francisco, Palo Alto, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Newport Beach, San Diego, Portland (Oregon), Boston, Palm Beach (Florida), Greenwich or New York City. Loans must be $60,000 – $300,000. First Republic wants to recruit their future high net worth clients with this product.
  • IHelp: This service will find a community bank. Unfortunately, these community banks don’t have the best interest rates. Fixed rates range from 4.75% to 9% APR (for loans up to 15 years). If you want to get a loan from a community bank or credit union, we recommend trying LendKey instead.
  • Navy Federal Credit Union: This credit union offers limited membership. For men and women who serve, the credit union can offer excellent rates and specialized underwriting. Variable interest rates start at 3.13% and fixed rates start at 4.00%.
  • Purefy: Only fixed interest rates are available, with rates ranging from 3.50% – 7.28% APR. You can borrow up to $150,000 for up to 15 years.
  • RISLA: Just like New Hampshire, the state of Rhode Island wants to help you save. You can get fixed rates starting as low as 3.49%. And you do not need to have lived or studied in Rhode Island to benefit.
  • UW Credit Union: This credit union has limited membership (you can find out who can join here, but you had better be in Wisconsin). You can borrow from $5,000 to $60,000 and rates start as low as 2.49% (variable) and 4.04% APR (fixed).
  • Wells Fargo: As a traditional lender, Wells Fargo will look at credit score and debt burden. They offer both fixed and variable loans, with variable rates starting at 3.99% and fixed rates starting at 6.24%. You would likely get much lower interest rates from some of the new Silicon Valley lenders or the credit unions.

You can also compare all of these loan options in one chart with our comparison tool. It lists the rates, loan amounts, and kinds of loans each lender is willing to refinance. You can also email us with any questions at info@magnifymoney.com.

*SoFi Disclaimer

Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet SoFi’s underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. To qualify for the lowest rate, you must have a responsible financial history and meet other conditions. If approved, your actual rate will be within the range of rates listed above and will depend on a variety of factors, including term of loan, a responsible financial history, years of experience, income and other factors. Rates and Terms are subject to change at anytime without notice and are subject to state restrictions. SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment or PAYE. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Finance Lender Law License No. 6054612. SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp., NMLS # 1121636. (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org)

SoFi Student Loan Refinance 

Fixed rates from 3.375% APR to 6.740% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 2.365% APR to 6.290% APR (with AutoPay). Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at either 8.95% or 9.95% depending on term of loan. See APR examples and terms. Lowest variable rate of 2.365% APR assumes current 1 month LIBOR rate of 0.79% plus 1.825% margin minus 0.25% ACH discount. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, the fixed or variable interest rate offered will depend on your creditworthiness, and the term of the loan and other factors, and will be within the ranges of rates listed above. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. *To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit inquiry. Unlike hard credit inquiries, soft credit inquiries (or soft credit pulls) do not impact your credit score. Soft credit inquiries allow SoFi to show you what rates and terms SoFi can offer you up front. After seeing your rates, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit inquiry. Hard credit inquiries (or hard credit pulls) are required for SoFi to be able to issue you a loan. In addition to requiring your explicit permission, these credit pulls may impact your credit score.

The post 19 Options to Refinance Student Loans in 2017 – Get Your Lowest Rate appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Student Loan Borrowers: Here’s How to Renew Your Income-Driven Repayment Plan

If you are on an income-driven repayment plan, it’s important to know that you must renew your plan each year in order to remain enrolled. And waiting on your student loan servicer to remind you of that fact isn’t the smartest idea

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently filed a lawsuit against Navient, the country’s largest loan servicer. Among many other claims, the CFPB alleged Navient failed to adequately inform borrowers of their need to renew their income-driven repayment plans.

The outcome of the CFPB’s lawsuit is still unknown. Navient has already taken steps to improve communication with borrowers around repayment plan renewal time. Even so, the news serves as a prime example of why you should learn the details of the income-driven repayment renewal process on your own.

Here’s a quick guide on renewing your income-driven repayment plan. In this guide, we’ll cover:

Choosing an Income-Driven Repayment Plan

  • Income-Based Repayment Plan
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE) Plan
  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE) Plan
  • Income-Contingent Repayment Plan
  • Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan

How to Enroll in an Income-Driven Repayment Plan

How to Renew Your Income-Driven Repayment Plan

Choosing an Income-Driven Repayment Plan

The DOE began offering income-driven repayment, or IDR, in 2009 to help ease the burden of student loans on borrowers struggling to repay federal student loans. If you can meet certain income or family criteria, you could pay as little at $0. Another important benefit is for the first three years after enrollment, many borrowers qualify to have the federal government pay part of the interest charges if they can’t make payments.

In addition to the two standard repayment and graduated repayment plans, borrowers have five income-driven repayment plans to choose from. It’s important to note that under most IDR plans, you’ll pay more over time than you would under the standard plans.

Here’s a quick rundown of each:

  1. Income-Based Repayment Plan

The traditional income-based repayment plan generally caps your payment at either 10% or 15% of your discretionary income. Your payments will never be more than what they would be on the standard 10-year plan. Payments are recalculated each year and are based on your updated income and family size.

After 25 years of payments, your loan balance is forgiven, although you’ll have to pay taxes on the forgiven amount when you file your taxes for the year.

  1. Pay As You Earn (PAYE) Plan

Pay As You Earn increases your monthly payment as your annual earnings increase, but generally sets your monthly payments at about 10% of your discretionary income. Only those who took out their first federal loan on or after October 1, 2010, or who received a direct loan disbursement on or after October 1, 2011, can qualify for the PAYE plan. Applicants must also have a partial financial hardship (disproportionately high debt compared to current income). Your payment is recalculated annually based on your updated income and family size. The loan’s outstanding balance is forgiven after 20 years.

  1. Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE) Plan

The Revised Pay As You Earn Plan expanded the PAYE plan to about 5 million more borrowers. You may qualify for REPAYE regardless of when you took out your first federal student loan. It doesn’t require you to have a partial financial hardship. REPAYE generally sets payments at about 10% of your discretionary income and doesn’t cap income. Spousal income is considered in calculating payments no matter how you file your taxes. Under this plan, undergraduate loans are forgiven after 20 years, while graduate loans are forgiven after 25 years.

  1. Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan

This plan caps your monthly payment at either 20% of your discretionary income or the amount you would pay on a two-year fixed payment plan, adjusted for your income. The payments are recalculated each year and based on updated income, family size, and the amount you owe. After 25 years of payments, your balance will be forgiven.

  1. Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan

The income-sensitive repayment plan serves as an alternative to the ICR plan for those who received loans via the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). It makes it easier for low-income borrowers to make their monthly payments. Under the ISR plan, you can make monthly payments based on your annual income for up to 10 years. The payments are set at 4% to 25% of gross monthly income, and the payment must be larger than the interest that accrues.

Currently, Federal Direct loans and Direct PLUS loans qualify for both IBR plans, but private loans and Parent PLUS loans do not qualify. Read more about your repayment options here.

How to Enroll in an Income-Driven Repayment Plan

If you are unable to afford your loan payments, you can apply for an income-driven repayment plan. The first time you apply for an IBR plan, you can either do so through the government’s website at studentloans.gov or contact your student loan servicer to help you enroll. You’ll need to log in to the platform and follow directions to fill out the application. It should take about 10 minutes, although you may be asked to mail in supplemental documentation to your servicer for review.

You can use the studentloans.gov website repayment estimator to estimate how much your payments, interest, and total amount paid would be under each plan option.

Repayment estimator results from studentloans.gov

Your servicer will notify you once your request has been processed.

How to Renew Your Income-Driven Repayment Plan

IMPORTANT: If you are on an income-driven repayment plan, you have to renew your plan each year.

This will require you to submit updated information about your annual income and family size to your servicer. The time to renew your plan is typically a month or two before the 12-month mark.

If you do not renew your income-driven plan, you’ll get kicked out of your IDR plan and your payment may increase since it will no longer be based on your income.

There are two ways you can renew your IBR plan:

  1. Visit the Federal Student Aid website at studentloans.gov: This is the fastest and generally the most convenient way to renew your plan.

Steps:

  1. When you get to the website, follow the “Apply for an Income-Driven Repayment Plan” link. You will follow the same link if you need to renew your IBR. The form will prompt you to select a reason for your request once you begin.

Select “Apply for an Income-Driven Repayment Plan” to get started:

 

Choose “submit recertification”:

  1. The application will ask you for information such as your marital status, household size, employment, and income. Once you are on the “Income Information” section, you’ll have the option to retrieve and use your most recent income information from your taxes if you filed them with the IRS.

Choose the “annual recertification” option:

The application asks for your personal information:

  1. Follow up with your loan servicer. If you have loans with multiple servicers, you only need to submit the request once. They should all be notified when you renew online via the Federal Student Aid site. Below is an example of a completed submission with one servicer; your other servicers will be listed if you have multiple servicers.

Completed submission:

  1. Use the Income-Driven Repayment Plan Request form

Steps:

  1. Download the official income-driven repayment plan renewal form here on the Federal Student Aid website or on your servicer’s website.
  2. Once you print and complete the form, you can submit it to your servicer’s website if they allow. Navient allows you to upload the completed form. You also have the option to mail or fax the paperwork to your loan servicer.
  3. Your servicer should notify you once your request has been processed.
  4. You should be able to monitor the status of your renewal on your student loan servicer account.
  5. If you mail or fax the paperwork to your servicer, you’ll need to mail one to each servicer individually as they will not be automatically notified of your request.

The post Student Loan Borrowers: Here’s How to Renew Your Income-Driven Repayment Plan appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

The Ultimate FAFSA Guide: Maximize Federal Student Aid for College

college student loans bills graduate

Over the past decade, college tuition rates rose an average of 5% per year. The average bachelor’s graduate in 2015 had over $35,000 in student loan debt. To graduate without burdensome debts, students must maximize their aid options. This means understanding the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and using their knowledge to maximize student aid.

Starting with the 2017-2018 FAFSA, maximizing federal aid is easier than ever. The U.S. Department of Education now allows access to the FAFSA three months earlier (October rather than January). Applicants will also use an earlier year for income and tax information. This means it’s easy to incorporate FAFSA into the college application timeline.

What is the FAFSA?

The FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. It’s a dense form that students must complete to receive federal student aid.

The form ensures that federal student aid goes to students with the greatest need. However, this does not mean that only low-income families should fill out the form. Filling out the FAFSA is the only way to receive access to low-cost federal student loans. The FAFSA also gives families access to some scholarships, grants, and work-study programs. Some schools require a completed FAFSA for a student to apply for merit-based aid.

What do I need to fill out the FAFSA?

Filling out the FAFSA may seem daunting, but proper preparation will help families complete the application with minimal stress. One of the most important ways to ease the stress is to gather documents from the appropriate time. Use the chart below as a reference guide to understand the appropriate documents.

School attendance window FAFSA form FAFSA availability Income and tax year Assets and liabilities Born before this date for independent student status Homeless or self-supporting and at risk of homelessness after this date for independent status
July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 2016-2017 January 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 2015 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1993 July 1, 2015
July 1, 2017-June 30, 2018 2017-2018 October 1, 2016-June 30, 2018 2015 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1994 July 1, 2016
July 1, 2018-June 30, 2019 2018-2019 October 1, 2017-June 30, 2019 2016 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1995 July 1, 2017
July 1, 2019-June 30, 2020 2019-2020 October 1, 2018-June 30, 2020 2017 As of filing FAFSA January 1, 1996 July 1, 2018

Here’s a checklist of items you’ll need before filling out the FAFSA.

All Students

  • Social Security number
  • Alien registration number (if you are not a U.S. citizen)
  • Student’s federal income tax returns from the appropriate year
  • Student’s prior year W-2 or other earning statements from the appropriate year
  • Student’s records of untaxed income from the appropriate year
  • Student’s bank statements (checking, savings)
  • Student’s non-retirement investment account statements (after tax brokerage, 529 accounts, Coverdell ESA accounts, CDs, money market accounts)
  • Student’s record of non-taxed income (including income gifts that come from 529 plans owned by grandparents, income gifts to pay tuition, etc.)
  • Student’s records for investment real estate
  • An FSA ID to sign electronically

Dependent Students Only

  • Parent’s federal income tax returns from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s W-2 or other earning statements from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s records of untaxed income from the appropriate year
  • Parent’s banking and checking account statements
  • Parent’s non-retirement investment account statements (after tax brokerage, 529 accounts, Coverdell ESA accounts, CDs, money market accounts)
  • Parent’s records for investment real estate (not personal home)

Most students will be considered dependents. This is true even if a student is self-supporting for a period of time prior to starting college.

To be classified as independent, a student must meet one of these qualifications:

  • Student turns 24 prior to January 1 of FAFSA start year (see chart above)
  • Student is starting postgraduate studies
  • Student is on active military duty (not for training purposes or for state service only)
  • Student is a military veteran
  • Student supports dependent children
  • Student is a legally emancipated minor
  • Parents died after age 13, foster child after age 13, or dependent or ward of the state after age 13
  • Student is homeless or self-supporting and at risk of homelessness after July 1 in the year prior to start year (see chart above)

When are the FAFSA deadlines?

College students need to fill out the FAFSA every year that they want to receive federal financial aid. A traditional student who spends four years in school can expect to fill out the FAFSA four times through their college career.

Starting with the 2017-2018 FAFSA, the U.S. Department of Education extended the FAFSA deadlines. Previously, the U.S. Department of Education released the FAFSA on the January 1 prior to the attendance window. Applicants could complete the form from January 1 through the end of the attendance window.

when-are-the-fafsa-deadlines

Now, the U.S. Department of Education releases the FAFSA on October 1 prior to the attendance window. You may complete the FAFSA from the date it is released until the end of the attendance window. You can retroactively receive grants and loans for the school year provided that you complete the FAFSA by the end of the attendance window.

Deadlines for state and institutional aid

State and institutional aid organizations are not as lenient as the U.S. Department of Education. Most states require aid applicants to complete their FAFSA as soon after October 1 as possible. You can check your state-specific deadline on the FAFSA website.

Most states have just one FAFSA deadline, even if you plan to attend school on a delayed schedule. Often states give out aid on a first come, first served basis. Do not delay completing the FAFSA. You can work out changes based on your attendance after you’ve completed the FAFSA.

In general, you want to file the FAFSA as soon as you can to maximize institutional aid. Many universities grant institution-specific aid shortly after accepting students. Submit your FAFSA to all potential schools soon after you apply. Even if a school hasn’t accepted you yet, you should allow them to see your FAFSA responses.

Filling out the FAFSA alone may not be enough to get aid from your state or school. Many states require that you fill out additional forms to receive state-based aid. The most common form is the College Scholarship Service (CSS) profile. The CSS profile considers more data, and it offers students and their families the opportunity to flesh out their financial situation.

The CSS profile and other financial aid applications DO NOT replace the FAFSA. To get any federal student aid, you must fill out the FAFSA. You may also need to fill out additional forms. The Edvisors Network maintains a comprehensive list of state-based scholarships and grants. Students can research the forms that their state requires.

Students who are seeking college-based aid may have to complete institutional applications. These applications may be in addition to the FAFSA or in lieu of it. If aid details aren’t clear from the school’s website, contact the financial aid department to learn more. Many students find that their best chance at institutional aid comes right after applying to the school.

What happens after I fill out the FAFSA?

Three to five days after you complete the FAFSA, you will receive a Student Aid Report via email. This report is what schools will use to determine your eligibility for federal (and sometimes other) student aid.

Decoding your Student Aid Report

The most important number on the FAFSA is your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Your family’s EFC is the amount parents and students are expected to allocate toward educational expenses. This amount can vary from zero dollars to more than the expected cost of college. This number is in the upper right-hand corner of the Student Aid Report.

In general, the lower your EFC, the more federal aid you will receive. Your specific eligibility for federal aid depends on your school’s cost of attendance.

The Student Aid Report also includes a Data Release Number (DRN). You will need this four-digit code to allow your school to change certain information on your FAFSA.

In addition to these two numbers, you will see your responses to questions on the FAFSA. If you find a mistake, you will need to correct it on FAFSA.gov. You can use your FSA ID to log in and submit changes. If your situation changes (such as the number of people in your parents’ household or your dependency status), you will need to update your FAFSA because it will change your EFC.

Schools submit awards packages to you

The U.S. Department of Education will send your Student Aid Report to any schools you have listed on your FAFSA. If you apply for another school after completing the FAFSA, you should log in to FAFSA.gov to submit your Student Aid Report to that school.

Once you’ve been accepted to the school, the school will use the EFC and their cost of attendance to determine your eligibility for federal aid. The school will send you a report that includes your eligibility for federal grants, subsidized and unsubsidized loans, and work-study programs. They may also send you details about other financial awards that you’ve received from the state or the institution.

You may need to contact the financial aid office at a school to see if you’re eligible for any scholarships or grants that they didn’t list. Be proactive in meeting other financial aid deadlines defined by your school’s financial aid office. Completing the CSS profile or institutional applications may allow you to earn more scholarships or grants or better loan rates. Check with schools where you’ve been accepted and your state’s website to learn more.

You can receive awards packages from multiple schools, even if you haven’t enrolled. Compare the awards packages to find the most cost-effective education. The federal aid will remain the same in every package, but the state and institutional aid can have a huge effect on your out-of-pocket costs.

Accept or decline aid

Once you choose a school, you will need to decide whether or not to accept the various forms of aid. Most people will accept grants and scholarships since those do not need to be paid off.

You will need to decide if accepting federal work-study or loans is best in your circumstances. You can work closely with a financial aid officer from your school to understand the pros and cons behind these options.

Once you make a decision, you’ll have the option to accept aid (including loans) through an online platform offered by your school.

what-happens-after-i-fill-out-the-fafsa

How is my federal aid package determined?

Federal aid is awarded based on expected family contribution (and to a lesser extent the cost of attendance at your chosen university). A lower expected family contribution means you’ll get more aid, including subsidized loans and possibly a Pell Grant for low-income students.

The expected family contribution accounts for four variables:

  • Student’s income (and spousal income for independent students)
  • Student’s non-retirement assets (and spousal income for independent students)
  • Parent’s income (for dependent students)
  • Parent’s non-retirement assets (for dependent students)

Parents and students can shelter a limited amount of their income and assets from the EFC. The sheltering limits change each year, and they are published within the FAFSA application.

Students are expected to contribute 50% of their income after sheltering. They are expected to contribute 20% of nonsheltered assets to their educational expenses. Students cannot shelter as much income or net worth as parents.

Parents are expected to contribute 22% to 47% of income after sheltering. They are expected to contribute 12% of nonsheltered assets.

Using the EFC and an expected cost of attendance, the U.S. Department of Education appropriates funds. The FAFSA4caster will help you determine your current EFC and an expected aid package based on current costs of attendance. This is a useful tool for students who are more than one year out from starting college.

Full-time students with an EFC less than $5,200 can expect to receive a Pell Grant worth between $600 and $5,185.

Students who demonstrate financial need (those with a cost of attendance greater than their expected family contribution) will be eligible for either direct subsidized or direct unsubsidized loans. Both loans for undergraduate students have an interest rate of 3.76%. Graduate students will pay 5.31% on their direct unsubsidized loans.
The federal government places limits on direct borrowing. The limits are in the table below. If you need to borrow more money, you will have to look to federal PLUS Loans (higher interest rates), private loans, or covering educational expenses through other means.

Year Dependent Student Limit Independent Student Limit
First Year Undergraduate $5,500 (up to $3,500 subsidized) $9,500 (up to $3,500 subsidized)
Second Year Undergraduate $6,500 (up to $4,500 subsidized) $10,500 (up to $4,500 subsidized)
Third Year + Undergraduate $7,500 (up to $5,500 subsidized) $12,500 (up to $5,500 subsidized)
Undergraduate Student Total Limits $31,000 (up to $23,000 subsidized) $57,500 (up to $23,000 Subsidized)
Graduate Students N/A $20,500 (unsubsidized only)
Graduate Student Total Limits N/A $138,500 (up to $65,500 in subsidized loans). Aggregate amount includes totals from undergraduate studies.

How can I maximize my federal aid?

You must use accurate information when you complete the FAFSA. However, careful planning and understanding the FAFSA can help you maximize your aid. Keep these steps in mind as you apply for aid.

Avoid common FAFSA errors

It’s easy to make errors when you’re filling out a 100+ question application, and the wording on the FAFSA can be unclear. These are mistakes to avoid.

  • Factor deductions out of your adjusted gross income (AGI): Questions 36 and 85 on the FAFSA ask for adjusted gross income.
    • A lot of people forget to take out their deductions when they report AGI. Your AGI should not include contributions to certain retirement accounts, contributions to a health savings account, or college tuition, fees, or student loan interest (with limitations). Use these directions to be sure you’re using the right numbers.
  • Some income from work is sheltered: Questions 39, 40, 88, and 89 ask about income earned from work.
    • This is not the same as your adjusted gross income. The FAFSA uses this number to determine how much of your income can be sheltered. The more income you earn from work, the more you can shelter. Use these formulas to list the correct number.
  • Understand the value of your investment assets: Questions 42 and 91 request the value of your investment assets.
    • Don’t include retirement accounts or educational accounts. The value of real estate should factor in debt (and your personal home should be excluded). Cash value in life insurance policies are not considered investment assets.
  • Your business and farm values are likely zero: Questions 43 and 92 ask for the value of investment farms or small businesses.
    • Most families will have a value of zero. Unless you employ more than 100 employees or your family has less than 50% of the voting rights, you don’t need to declare this. Likewise, farms can be excluded if you live and work on the farm.

If you’re not sure, what a question means, use the guide Completing the FAFSA to understand the definition. The wording of questions leads a lot of people to overestimate their EFC.

In addition to avoiding errors, careful planning can help you reduce your EFC and maximize your aid.

Reduce your assets

One of the best ways to reduce your EFC is to reduce the assets that you declare on the FAFSA. You can do this without destroying your wealth. These are a few options to consider.

  • Pay down consumer debt (reduces available cash).
  • Don’t cash out a life insurance policy.
  • Carry debt on rental properties rather than a personal house (your personal house isn’t an asset that the FAFSA considers, but rental properties are).
  • Accelerate needs-based purchases (reduces cash for spending you would have done otherwise).
  • Contribute money to retirement accounts.

Reduce your income

Smart income planning will help keep your EFC low. These are a few ideas that can help reduce the amount of income counted on the FAFSA.

  • Ask grandparents to delay financial help until the last year of school. Gifts from relatives are untaxed income that need to be declared on the FAFSA. The last year of school won’t appear on the FAFSA, so a gift in the last year goes a long way.
  • Avoid realizing capital gains (selling a rental property or a brokerage account) until the last year of college. Capital gains cannot be sheltered, and they are counted toward income. Most families should not realize capital gains during the college years to avoid FAFSA penalties.
  • Contribute to a pre-tax retirement plan like a 401(k) or a Traditional IRA.
  • Contribute to a health savings account.

Increase your ability to shelter income and assets

The FAFSA allows families to shelter some portion of their income and assets. Taking full advantage of these shelters may lead to more aid. These are a few things to consider.

  • Parents with small businesses should hire their students for up to $6,400 worth of work. This reduces parents’ income by $6,400 and increases the student’s income up to the sheltered amount for dependent students.
  • Parents of dependent students should keep assets in their name. Dependent students have to contribute 50% of available assets as opposed to 12% of parents’ available assets.
  • Delay college until independence. Students who get married or wait until age 24 to start college will not have to consider their parents’ income or assets.
  • Invest more in the family farm or business. A family farm or family business can help you build wealth, and you don’t have to declare these on the FAFSA.

Avoid high-cost strategies

Some families get tricked into high-cost strategies that don’t pay off. These are a few that you should avoid.

  • Don’t take out a whole life insurance policy. A whole life insurance policy reduces your available cash, but it comes at a high commission cost. Don’t bother purchasing one unless you actually want whole life insurance coverage.

Don’t try to shelter assets in a trust. A trust where you or your child is a named beneficiary needs to be declared on the FAFSA. It’s difficult to get around this. Unless you have a specific need for a trust, don’t create one.

How can I use FAFSA to plan for college costs?

The FAFSA is not a college-cost planning tool, but you can use other tools to plan for upcoming college costs. College Navigator offers free information on current college costs. Using it with estimated aid from the FAFSA4caster will give high school students a good idea of their aid options. You could also consider using a paid tool like EFC Plus for an easier college-planning tool.

Parents and students looking to keep student loan debt low will benefit from using the Family Budget Analyzer, which can help you find places to cut expenses. A college cost projector will help you know the costs that your family needs to cover. Sallie Mae also offers a long-range planning calculator that can help you estimate your total indebtedness upon college graduation.

Understanding the FAFSA is one small part of planning for college costs. It will pay for you to understand it, but federal aid is just one component of the college-planning picture. Most students will need to devote time to finding a cost-effective education and applying for grants and scholarships to supplement federal aid.

The post The Ultimate FAFSA Guide: Maximize Federal Student Aid for College appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Don’t Miss This Deadline to Renew Your Income-Driven Student Loan Repayment Plan

Clock time deadline

Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) Plans can be a lifeline for borrowers who are struggling to make their student loan payments on their current income. IDR plans take into account your household size and income and can reduce your monthly payments to as little as $0.

In order to enroll in an IDR plan, you must call your lender and apply. What many borrowers don’t realize, however, is that enrolling in IDR is not a one-time task. Borrowers must renew their enrollment each year by submitting a new IDR request form.

This annual update, in which you report any differences in income and household size over the last 12 months, is called a renewal or recertification. The new information is used by loan servicers to recalculate your monthly loan payment for the upcoming year.

The consequence of not renewing your IDR Plan before the annual deadline is severe. Your payments will no longer be based on your income. As a result, your loan payment can increase substantially.

Here’s how to renew each year to keep your payments manageable:

Step 1: Make sure you qualify for an Income-Based Repayment Plan

There are four Income-Driven Repayment Plans available, including:

  • The Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE) and Pay As You Earn (PAYE) Plans – Payments are generally 10% of your discretionary income
  • The Income-Based Repayment (IBR) Plan – Payments are generally 10% to 15% of your discretionary income depending on whether you’re a newer or older borrower
  • The Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan – Payments are the lesser of either 20% of your discretionary income, or what you would pay on a repayment plan with a fixed monthly payment over 12 years

If you’re interested in an IDR Plan, the first step is seeing if your student loans are eligible. You can find out what student loans qualify for each IDR Plan here.

Step 2: Ask for your renewal deadline

Your loan servicer may or may not notify you before the renewal deadline. So, be sure to call your loan servicer if you’re unsure when you need to update your family size and income.

When you get the date, put a reminder on your calendar to begin investigating the renewal process a few months before the deadline. Getting a head start on renewing the plan will give you time to reach out to your loan servicer if you have any questions or need help filling out the paperwork.

Step 3: Gather renewal documentation

Renewing your IDR Plan is similar to the initial application. You need to report the size of your family and the taxable income you’re bringing in. Examples of taxable income include:

  • Employment income
  • Unemployment income
  • Tips
  • Alimony

Examples of income that isn’t taxable and that won’t be considered when calculating your IDR payment include:

  • Supplemental Social Security income
  • Child support income
  • Federal or state public assistance

You can submit a tax return to report earnings if your income hasn’t significantly changed since you last filed taxes. If your income has changed significantly since your last tax filing, you need to submit other documents such as pay stubs or a letter from your employer to show what you’re currently earning.

For other sources of income, you can submit a separate statement.

Step 4: Renew online or with the paper form

There are two ways you can go about renewing your IDR Plan. You can go online through the StudentLoans.gov website or you can get the Income-Driven Payment (IDR) Plan Request form from your loan servicer to send in.

Renewing online

To renew online, go to the Income-Driven Payment page of StudentLoans.gov here. This page will look familiar. It’s the same webpage you go to when initially signing up for an IDR Plan. Returning users click on “Submit Re-certification.”

Using the online form can make your life easier in two ways. You can grab your IRS tax forms electronically for submission through the StudentLoans.gov online dashboard. And if you have multiple loan servicers, StudentLoans.gov will notify each one of the updates you submit.

Sending in the IDR request form

The other option for renewal is completing the paper Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) Plan Request form and mailing it or faxing it to your loan servicers. Some loan servicers like Navient allow you to upload paper documents to your online account as well.

The drawback of using the paper form instead of the StudentLoans.gov website is that you need to submit the request to all loan servicers separately.

Step 5: Follow up

After turning in your IDR request, you’re not in the clear until your renewal has been processed. You may not hear back right away if additional documentation is needed to process your renewal. So, follow up to make sure your request doesn’t get held up beyond the deadline because of missing information. Even if online it shows the status of your request as received, you should call to confirm you’re all set for the next year.

What should you do if you miss the renewal deadline?

As previously mentioned, your monthly payment will no longer be based on your income and family size if you miss your annual IDR renewal deadline. If you receive a student loan bill that’s much higher than you expect and realize your IDR renewal request didn’t go through, take a deep breath.

If you followed the submission instructions and confirmed the processing of your IDR renewal beforehand, call your loan servicer to see if there is a system error. Some borrowers on IDR Plans have reported errors in the renewal process that caused their payment to increase by mistake.

On the other hand, if you forgot to send in your IDR request altogether, ask what options are available. You can recertify after the deadline if you’re under the PAYE Plan, the IBR Plan, or the ICR Plan.

If you’re under the REPAYE Plan, you’ll be booted off to an alternative plan that’s not based on your income, but you are able to apply for another IDR Plan if you qualify.

The problem with renewing late (or applying for another plan if you were on the REPAYE Plan) is you may get stuck with an increased payment for a month or two until you get approved for reduced payments again.

Forbearance may be a short-term solution if you cannot afford the higher payment. Forbearance postpones your payments and can hold you over until the IDR Plan begins. The drawback of forbearance is that during this period interest on your loan may be capitalized. This means interest may accrue and increase your loan balance.

Speak with your loan servicer about the implications of forbearance and what alternatives there could be if you cannot afford your loan payment without the IDR Plan you had.

Final word

For borrowers taking advantage of an Income-Driven Repayment Plan, the recertification deadline is one of the most important dates of the entire year. Set multiple calendar and mobile reminders if that’s what it’ll take for you to remember it.

Also, be sure to review the information you need to provide for renewal a few months beforehand if it’s your first time around. Finally, don’t be afraid to call your loan servicer before the renewal deadline to double- and triple-check that the information you submit is sufficient for recertification.

The post Don’t Miss This Deadline to Renew Your Income-Driven Student Loan Repayment Plan appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How Does Student Loan Deferment or Forbearance Affect Your Credit Score?

LendKey Student Loan Refinance Review

According to the latest annual report from the Institute for College Access and Success, 2015 college graduates showed a 4% increase in student loan debt over 2014 graduates. Among 2015 seniors, 68% who graduated had student loan debt, with the average balance being $30,100 per borrower.

With more college students graduating with student loan debt and balances continually increasing, it’s no wonder many are seeking deferment or forbearance. But if you are considering these options, there are some things you need to know first, including how it might affect your credit score.

What Is Deferment?

Student loan deferment is a period of time when the repayment of your loan’s principal and interest is temporarily delayed.

Unlike forbearance, when your student loan is in deferment, you do not need to make payments. And in some cases, the federal government may even pay the interest portion of your student loan payment. In order to qualify, you must have a federal Perkins Loan, a Direct Subsidized Loan, or a Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan.

Interest on your unsubsidized student loans or any PLUS loans will not be paid by the federal government. You will be responsible for interest accrued during deferment (if it’s not paid by the federal government), but you don’t have to make payments during the deferment period. If you’re not paying interest during deferment, it’s important to know interest may still be added to your principal balance. This may result in higher future payments.

There are several situations in which you may be eligible for student loan deferment:

  • If you are enrolled in college or career school at least half-time
  • If you are in an approved graduate fellowship program
  • During a period where you have qualified for Perkins Loan discharge or cancellation
  • During a period of unemployment
  • During a time of economic hardship (including Peace Corps)
  • During active military duty
  • During the 13 months following active military duty

Most deferments are not automatic, and you will need to submit a request for deferment to your student loan provider. If you are still in school at least part-time, you can apply through your school’s financial aid office.

What Is Forbearance?

If you are unable to make your student loan payments and don’t qualify for deferment, your loan officer may allow forbearance. When your student loans are in forbearance, you may be able to make smaller payments or skip payments altogether for up to 12 months.

However, before you apply for forbearance, keep in mind that interest will continue to accrue on all types of loans. This means your balance will grow, increasing the amount of time and money it will take to pay off your student loans. You can choose to pay the interest-only portion during forbearance. If you choose not to, the interest may be capitalized and added to the principal balance of your loan.

According to the Federal Student Aid office at the U.S. Department of Education, there are two types of forbearance, discretionary forbearance and mandatory forbearance.

Discretionary forbearance is when you, the borrower, request forbearance from your lender due to financial hardship reasons or illness. Ultimately, the lender decides whether or not to grant your discretionary forbearance request.

With mandatory forbearance, your lender is required to grant you forbearance on your student loans if you request it. However, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You are completing a medical or dental internship or residency program, and meet specific requirements.
  • The total you owe each month for all the student loans is 20% or more of your total monthly gross income.
  • You are serving in a national service position and received a national service award.
  • You are a teacher and qualify for teacher loan forgiveness.
  • You qualify for partial repayment of your loans under the U.S. Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program.
  • You are a member of the National Guard and have been activated by a governor, but you are not eligible for a military deferment.
  • Similar to deferment, forbearance doesn’t happen automatically. You must apply for forbearance and may be required to show proof of these situations in order to be granted forbearance.

What Happens to Your Credit Score When Your Student Loans Are in Deferment or Forbearance?

As long as you continue making your student loan payments on time and in full until your request for deferment or forbearance is approved, your credit score should not be affected.

According to Rod Griffin, Director of Public Education at Experian, “When a student loan is in forbearance it is not in a repayment status. As a result, the late payments would not be reported. If it is reflected as current and not in repayment, it likely would not have a negative effect on credit scores.”

What Happens if You Default on Your Student Loans?

If you miss a payment between the time you apply for and are approved for deferment or forbearance, you will be considered to be in default on your student loans, and your credit score could be negatively impacted by this missed or late payment.

“Defaulting on a student loan is no different than defaulting on any other installment loan. Failing to pay as agreed will severely damage your credit history and, therefore, your credit scores,” Griffin said.

Being 60 days late or more on a student loan or credit card payment could damage your credit score as much as 100 points.

The Bottom Line

If you are unable to afford your student loan payments, deferment or forbearance may be options to consider. However, it’s important to remember that your student loans will continue to accrue interest, which could result in your paying more over the long run. Between the time of application and the time you are approved for deferment or forbearance, you must continue to make your student loan payments in full and on time in order to avoid potential damage to your credit score.

The post How Does Student Loan Deferment or Forbearance Affect Your Credit Score? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Where Students Can Cover College Tuition with a Part-Time Job: Study

Students Studying Learning Education

Affordability was a major factor when 19-year-old Bintou Kabba was considering colleges to attend after high school.  She enrolled at CUNY Lehman, a four-year public university in her native Bronx, N.Y. The 10-minute commute from her home, where she lives with her parents and six siblings, was part of the allure. But the low cost of tuition was essential for Kabba, an ambitious student with dreams of becoming a neonatal gynecologist but without the financial means to afford a pricey university. Most CUNY Lehman students pay just $2,374 out of pocket for a year of schooling.

But before she began classes, Kabba needed a job. “I was broke and I needed money so badly,” she told MagnifyMoney. So, she joined the ranks of so-called “working learners” attempting to counter the costs of college with part-time jobs. About 40 percent of undergraduates and 76 percent of graduate students work at least 30 hours a week throughout the school year, according to the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce.

As college costs have skyrocketed in recent years, the old adage “Work your way through college” has become increasingly out of touch with reality. Students who work rarely earn enough to truly cover the costs of their education.

MagnifyMoney sought to find out which colleges are still affordable enough for working students to afford on part-time wages. In a new study released Nov. 9, we found a student earning the federal minimum wage ($7.25/hr) would have to work full-time — nearly 44 hours per week — to afford the average annual net tuition at a four-year public institution today.

We then wanted to see how far a student working 20 hours per week at their state’s minimum wage could get toward covering their net tuition. Their post-tax annual earnings were compared with the net tuition price at more than 2,500 public and private non-profit institutions.

Key findings:

  • We found it is impossible to cover the tuition gap at most four-year schools, both private and public.
  • Students can afford to cover their net tuition costs with a part-time job at only 50 out of 645 (7.75%) of four-year public institutions. Students can feasibly cover net tuition costs with a part-time job at just 24 out of 1,208 private nonprofit four-year institutions (2%).
  • Two-year public institutions were significantly more affordable — it was feasible for part-time working students to cover net tuition at 287 out of 656  two-year public schools (56.25%). On average, a student earning the federal minimum wage would only need to work roughly 25 hours per week to cover net tuition costs at a two-year public institution.
  • Less than 5% of private two-year and private four-year institutions are affordable enough for a part-time working student, MagnifyMoney found.

The cost of going to college has outpaced the rise in wages by a staggering amount over the last decade. When faced with a gap in college costs and earnings, families typically have just one place to turn – student loan debt.

Kabba wanted to avoid student debt at all costs. That drove her decision to enroll at CUNY Lehman. The school is the fourth most affordable four-year public college on our list. Earning the New York state minimum wage of $9/hour, a part-time working student could pocket more than enough to cover their expenses.

Still, working long hours to cover college expenses is far from the ideal college experience.

Research has shown demanding work schedules can all too easily conflict with student’s academic performance. Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce warns against any job that demands more than 30 hours per week from a full-time student.

On a tip from her high school counselor, Kabba landed a $10/hour gig soliciting telephone donations at a midtown-New York charity. During her freshman year, she worked 20 hours most weeks. With a full course load to juggle as well, it wasn’t long before Kabba started to feel the pressure of conflicting responsibilities.

“It was just too much,” she said. To get to work each day, she took a 45-minute train ride from the Bronx to midtown. Rather than working around her class schedule, she had to work her class schedule around her job, because the charity had strict guidelines on when workers could call donors. By the end of her freshman year, her grades started to reflect her strain.

“I decided I’d rather be unemployed and actually do well in school,” says Kabba. She quit before her sophomore year.

Not long after leaving her inflexible charity job, Kabba found another solution. Through a special program offered at CUNY Lehman, she landed a job on campus that paid $9/hour and only required 10 hours of work per week. Reducing her hours and pay meant smaller paychecks, but a better chance she’ll earn the grades she needs to achieve her goal of going to medical school. “It’s on campus and it’s convenient,” she said.

Behind the data

To make our findings more exact, we used the minimum wage of the state in which each school resides to determine the annual earnings of working students. Next, we analyzed data from the National Center for Education Statistics to determine the net tuition costs of each school. The net price is more accurate than a college’s sticker price because it factors in financial aid, scholarships and grants. The net price is what students and families actually pay out of pocket.

We stuck to a 20-hour part-time work schedule because we thought it was unrealistic to assume students could juggle a full-time course schedule and a full-time job. In fact, Georgetown recommends students work no more than 30 hours per week in order to maintain good grades in college.

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Student Loan Payoff Calculator

Use this calculator to find out how long it will take you to pay off your student loans.

Tips for working college students

It is virtually impossible to “work your way through school” anymore. The old adage just doesn’t apply to today’s college students, who are paying more than ever for college tuition and can’t feasibly cover their expenses with part-time income alone.

However, there are still benefits to working while in college. Here are some tips on how to maximize savings as a working student.

How to save on college costs with a part-time job

  1. Start small. Try going to a lower cost community college and transferring your credits to a larger institution later. As our study shows, it’s possible for students working part-time to cover net tuition at the majority of two-year public institutions (56.25%). By covering tuition and fees with a part-time job at a two-year school, you can reduce your need for financial aid by half and still graduate from a four-year institution.
  2. Work part-time at a campus job or through a work-study program. Jobs tied to campus are more likely to work around your course schedule and be flexible during unusually demanding times of year, such as quarterly exams and finals.
  3. Stay close to home. Not only will you save on tuition by enrolling at an in-state school, but if you are close enough to continue to live with your family while you’re studying, you could save big on housing expenses. If living at home means commuting by car or public transit for classes, factor in those additional costs.
  4. Don’t rely on student loan debt for expenses you can cover with part-time work. Save the student debt for tuition and other fees that are usually required in one lump-sum payment at the beginning of the semester. When it comes to extra expenses, like your trip to Key West for spring break, or moving to an off-campus apartment, lean on income earned from a part-time job. If you move off campus, you might find it is possible to afford rent (with support from roommates) with income from a part-time job.
  5. Choose your job wisely. If possible, find work in your area of study, which can give you an early jump start in the job market before you even graduate. If you have several years of job experience under your belt at graduation, you’ll be light years ahead of your peers graduating with a comparatively thin resume. Another study by Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce found college students who worked or took internships while in college were more upwardly mobile after graduation and more likely to move into managerial positions.
  6. Take advantage of in-state tuition rates even if you are not a permanent state resident. Each state has its own residency requirements for students looking to qualify for in-state tuition rates, which can be significantly lower than out-of-state rates. Some states will allow students to qualify for in-state tuition if at least one of their parents has been a resident for at least one full year before the student enrolls. If the student is independent — meaning they do not receive financial assistance from a parent to attend college — most states require at least one year of residency in the state. There are other documentation requirements, which can be found at FinAid.org.
  7. Don’t sacrifice your studies for a paycheck. At a certain point, the financial benefits of working part-time might not be worth the additional stress and attention a job might demand. The majority of working students ages 16-29 work 20 hours or less per week. However, research has shown both working and non-working college students graduate with similar levels of student loan debt — 34% of working college students graduate with $25,000 or more in student loan debt, compared to 37% college students who don’t work while in school.
  8. Graduate early (or on time). Dragging out your time in college is a quick way to add thousands of dollars to your student debt load. And it happens more often than you might think. Only 40% of students graduate within four years of enrollment across all types of institutions, according to the Department of Education. Less than one-third of college students graduate on time at public institutions. Save additional tuition expenses by completing your degree in four years or less.

 

The post Where Students Can Cover College Tuition with a Part-Time Job: Study appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Will You Get Real Value from an Online Degree?

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In search of higher education, lucrative careers and better credentials, nearly 6 million Americans are enrolled in some kind of online course, according to data from the Online Learning Consortium. Distance learning programs tout online courses as an efficient and low-cost way to complete a degree. But are they worth the time and financial investment?

Here’s what to consider before you enroll in an online learning program:

What it really costs

For students looking to complete distance learning programs at in-state schools, the cost probably won’t vary much from traditional students attending classes in person. However if you’re comparing for-profit online schools to out of state public universities, for-profit schools tend to have lower tuition costs on average ($15,610 vs. $23,893 per year). Before you enroll in a for-profit university you should note that it is more difficult to obtain scholarships and grants when studying at a for-profit school.

Degree mills (for-profit schools that aren’t accredited such as American Central University or Golden State University) offer the lowest degree prices, but these institutions offer little in the way of education, and they drag down the appeal of all online degrees. Check to see if your school is accredited here.

A lower sticker price for an online degree might not translate to a lower out of pocket to you as a student. Before committing to an online institution, consider cost saving measures such as attending a Community College for two years and applying for scholarships at an in-state, public school. In many cases, this will end up being your lowest cost option.

However, if distance learning is right for you, you will qualify for subsidized loans if you attend any accredited school (this includes some for-profit online schools). If the school you plan to attend is accredited by one of the national or regional accrediting commissions (see this list to learn more), you will be eligible to receive the Pell Grant and Stafford or Perkins loans.

Online Degree Completion

Students in online only programs complete courses and degrees at a slightly lower rates than students in traditional programs. This may be due to a lower level of student support for online students, or the fact that more distance learners have both career and family demands in addition to their education.

Because online degrees have lower completion rates, you should ask yourself whether you have the time and resources that you need to complete your degree; if you don’t, it’s not worth the money. If your primary goal is to learn and continue your education, you may that Massive Open Online Course (MOOCs) through Khan Academy or Coursera fit your needs with negligible out of pocket costs.

What you won’t get from an online program

If you earn an online degree through a traditional university, employers will perceive your degree as on par with traditional degrees from that school. For example, a Master’s Degree in Statistics from Texas A&M is equally valuable if you earned the degree through their distance education program or while attending class on campus. However, not every employer views online for-profit universities favorably. Top tier online schools are working to change sentiments, but you should research the acceptance in your field before pursuing a degree from a for-profit institution.

Distance education programs offer fewer networking opportunities compared to traditional schools. Online students do not have as much access to professors or peers as traditional students which is a drawback during the learning process and the job search process, but recently, high quality online schools offer new technology to help their students network and job search.

You also shouldn’t expect as much hands-on help in your coursework as an online student. Distance learners need to be self-directed, and able to pick up complex concepts on their own. Students may need to teach themselves computer programs, and they will be expected to do labs or other physical projects on their own.

Advantages of online degrees

Online programs from top-tier online universities and not-for-profit universities offer high quality education that may increase your marketability. You can earn your degree with greater flexibility than in a traditional education model, and you may be able to earn your bachelor’s degree even while you hold down a full-time job and raise your family.

Depending on the school you choose and your financial aid package, an online degree may have a lower out of pocket cost compared to a traditional classroom setting. Online universities accept more transfer credits than traditional universities which can help you complete your degree faster and reduce your costs.

Especially for adults hoping to complete a degree, distance learning and online universities offer advantages that traditional schools cannot.

Is an online program for you?

The value of an online degree depends upon how you want to use it. If a degree will allow you to advance in your company or your industry, and you want to earn your degree while working then an online degree offers value above what a similarly priced brick-and-mortar school offers. Distance learners have increasing opportunities to study in a field that aligns with their personal and career goals.  Popular degrees for distance learners include healthcare administration, business administration, information systems and psychology, but hands on fields like nursing and elementary education continue to make inroads for students pursuing their degree online.

On the other hand, if you’re not a self-directed learner, or your industry frowns on online education then the money will be wasted. Degrees from non-accredited universities aren’t going to be worth the money for most people.

If you choose to pursue an online degree, be sure to compare the out of pocket cost to you (including fees), consider whether you have the time and resources to complete the degree, and line up your funding ahead of time. It’s also important to weigh your expected increase in income against the cost of the degree. Online degrees aren’t a slam dunk in value, but you may find that it’s the right choice for you.

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