CommonBond Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

CommonBond Grad Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

Updated September 7, 2017

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] was founded by three Wharton MBAs who felt the sting of student loans after they graduated. The founders decided to provide a better solution for graduates, as they thought the student loan system was broken and in need of reform. As a result, they strive to make the refinance (and borrowing) process as simple and straightforward for graduates as possible.

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL]* began by servicing students from just one school, and has rapidly expanded. Today, [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] loans are available to graduates of over 2,000 schools nationwide. Although the company traditionally offered loan refinancing to undergraduate and graduate students, [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] recently started offering loans for current students as well (both undergraduates and graduates).

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] is one of the top four lenders identified by MagnifyMoney to refinance student loans.

As you might be able to tell by the name, [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] thinks of its community as family. There is a network of alumni and professionals within the community that want to help borrowers. This alone sets it apart from other lenders, as members often meet for events.

While these are all great things, we know you’re more interested in how [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] might be able to help you make your student loans more affordable. Let’s take a look at what terms and rates they offer, eligibility requirements, and how they compare against other lenders.

Refinance Terms Offered

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] offers low variable and fixed rate loans. [CommonBondSLAPR]Variable rates range from 2.81% – 6.74% APR, and fixed rates range from 3.35% – 7.12% APR[/CommonBondSLAPR].

Note that these rates take a 0.25% auto pay discount into consideration.

There is [CommonBondSLLoanAmt]no maximum loan amount[/CommonBondSLLoanAmt]. [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] will lend what you can afford to repay. [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] offers fixed and variable rates with [CommonBondSLTerm]terms of 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 years[/CommonBondSLTerm].

The hybrid loan is only offered on a [CommonBondSLTerm]10 year term – the first 5 years will have a fixed rate, and the 5 years after that will have a variable rate[/CommonBondSLTerm].

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] has a great chart listing repayment examples based off of borrowing $10,000, which can be found on its rates and terms page.

To pull an example from that, if you borrow $10,000 at a fixed 4.74% APR on a 10 year term, your monthly payment will be $104.80. The total amount you will pay over the 10 year period will be $12,575.90.

The Pros and Cons

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] is available to graduates of 2,000 universities. While that is a very long list, not all colleges and universities are included.

One pro to consider is the hybrid loan option available. It might seem a little confusing at first – why would someone want a variable rate down the road?

If you’re confident you’ll be able to make extra payments on your loan and pay it off before the 5 years are up, you might be better off going with the hybrid option (if you can get a better interest rate on it).

This is because you’ll end up paying less over the life of the loan with a lower interest rate. If you were offered a 10 year loan with a fixed rate of 6.49% APR, and a hybrid loan with a beginning rate of 5.64%, the hybrid option would be the better deal if you’re intent on paying it off quickly.

What You Need to Qualify

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] doesn’t list many eligibility requirements on its website, aside from the following:

  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You must have graduated

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] doesn’t specify a minimum credit score needed, but based on the requirements of other lenders, [CommonBondSLCreditScore]we recommend having a score of 660+, though you should be aiming for 700+[/CommonBondSLCreditScore]. The good news is [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] lets [CommonBondSLCoSigners]you apply with a cosigner in case your credit isn’t good enough[/CommonBondSLCoSigners].

Documents and Information Needed to Apply

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond’s[/CommonBondSL] application process is very simple – it says it takes as little as 2 minutes to complete. Initially, you’ll be asked for basic information such as your name, address, and school.

Once you complete this part, [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] will perform a [CommonBondSLInq]soft credit pull[/CommonBondSLInq] to estimate your rates and terms.

If you want to move forward with the rates and terms offered, you’ll be required to submit documentation and a [CommonBondSLInq]hard credit inquiry will be conducted[/CommonBondSLInq]. [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] lists the following as required:

  • Pay stubs or tax returns (proof of employment)
  • Diploma or transcript (proof of graduation)
  • Student loan bank statement
  • ID, utility bills, lease agreement (proof of residency)

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] also notes it can take up to 5 business days to verify documents submitted, so the loan doesn’t happen instantaneously.

Once your documents are approved, you electronically sign for the loan, and [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] will begin the process of paying off your previous lenders. It notes this can take up to two weeks from the time the loan is accepted.

Who Benefits the Most from Refinancing Student Loans with [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL]?

Borrowers who are looking to refinance a large amount of student loan debt will benefit the most from refinancing with them.

Keeping an Eye on the Fine Print

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] [CommonBondSLPrepayFee]does not have a prepayment penalty[/CommonBondSLPrepayFee], and there are [CommonBondSLOrgFee]no origination fees[/CommonBondSLOrgFee] nor application fees associated with refinancing.

As with other lenders, there is a late payment fee. [CommonBondSLLateFee]This is 5% of the unpaid amount of the payment due, or $10, whichever is less[/CommonBondSLLateFee].

If a payment fails to go through, you’ll be charged a $15 fee.

It’s also noted that failure to make payments may result in the loss of the 0.25% interest rate deduction from auto pay.

Transparency Score

Getting in touch with a representative is simple and there is a chat and call option right on the homepage. Some lenders have this hidden at the bottom, or they don’t offer a chat option at all.

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] also lets borrowers know they can shop around within a 30 day period to lessen the impact on their credit.

It does not list its late fees on its website, unlike other lenders. However, after making a chat inquiry, the question was answered promptly.

[CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] does offer [CommonBondSLCoSigners]a cosigner release[/CommonBondSLCoSigners] and is ranked with a A+ transparency score.

Alternative Student Loan Refinancing Lenders

The student loan refinancing market continues to get more competitive, and it makes sense to shop around for the best deal.

One of the market leaders is [SoFiSL]SoFi[/SoFiSL]. It’s always worth taking a look to see if [SoFiSL]SoFi[/SoFiSL]* offers a better interest rate.

The two lenders are very similar – [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] offers “CommonBridge,” a service that helps you find a new job in the event you lose yours. [SoFiSL]SoFi[/SoFiSL] offers a similar service called Unemployment Protection.

[SoFiSL]SoFi’s[/SoFiSL] [SoFiSLAPR]variable rates are currently 2.815% – 6.740% APR with autopay, and its fixed rates are currently 3.35% – 7.125% APR[/SoFiSLAPR], which is in line with what CommonBond is offering.

[SoFiSL]SoFi[/SoFiSL] also doesn’t have a limit on how much you can refinance with them.

SoFi

APPLY NOW Secured

on SoFi’s secure website

Another lender to consider is [EarnestSL]Earnest[/EarnestSL]. There is [EarnestSLLoanAmt]no maximum loan amount[/EarnestSLLoanAmt], and [EarnestSL]Earnest[/EarnestSL] has a very slick application process. [EarnestSLAPR]Interest rates start as low as 2.81% (variable) and 3.35% (fixed)[/EarnestSLAPR].

Lastly, you could check out [LendKeySL]LendKey[/LendKeySL]. It offers student loan refinancing through credit unions and community banks, but only offers variable rates in most states and fixed rates in a select few. [LendKeySLLoanAmt]The maximum amount to refinance with an undergraduate degree is $125,000, and the maximum amount to refinance with a graduate degree is $175,000[/LendKeySLLoanAmt].

All three of these options provide forbearance in case of economic hardship and offer similar loan options (5, 10, 15 year terms).

Don’t Forget to Shop Around

As [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] initially conducts a [CommonBondSLInq]soft pull on your credit[/CommonBondSLInq], you’re free to continue to shop around for the best rates if you’re not happy with the rates it can provide. As the lender states on its website, if you apply for loans within a 30 day period, your credit won’t be affected as much.

Since [CommonBondSL]CommonBond[/CommonBondSL] does have strict underwriting criteria, you should continue to shop around and don’t be discouraged if you are not approved. The market continues to get more competitive, and a number of good options are out there.

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