4 Credit Card Terms You Can Totally Negotiate

There are some terms that won't change with your credit card, but there are also some things you may be able to negotiate with your credit card provider.

If you’re looking at a new credit card, you may have noticed that there are a lot of rules and restrictions that come with these pieces of plastic. Of course, there are some things that have to remain that way, but you may be surprised to know there are also some items you may not be beholden to if you simply ask. If you want to negotiate, however, you can’t expect your credit card company to come to you. You’ll need to bring your requests to the issuer along with reasons they should work with you on the matter. 

Here are four things you may be able to negotiate with your credit card company.

1. Payment Date

Your payment due date is typically set when you first receive your card. But if you need to change this date along the way, many credit card providers will be happy to do so. When you go to the issuer, it’s a good idea to have a date in mind you’d like to change to. For example, if you know you get paid on certain days of the month, you may want to change the due date to being around one of these times so you’ll be more likely to have the funds to make your payment.

Remember: Having a strong payment history will not only make you appear as a better customer to your issuer, but also help improve your credit scores (which may even make you eligible for better interest rates). Which brings us to our next point …

2. Interest Rates

If you’ve had your credit card for a few years and have spent that time improving your credit and managing your card responsibly, you may be able to negotiate a lower interest rate. Credit card companies want to keep you as an active customer, so they might renegotiate your interest rate if you mention your upstanding history … and some better offers you’ve found elsewhere.

3. Late Fees

If you typically make timely payments but missed one, your credit card company might waive the fee if you promptly make the payment and call to request the fee be waived. While they have no obligation to do so, it doesn’t hurt to ask. Some cards even come with one-time or recurring late fee forgiveness, so be sure to check if that’s a feature with your card.

4. Credit Limit

Raising your credit limit increases your available card balance and can improve your credit scores because it improves your credit utilization rate. So even if you don’t plan to use the increased credit limit, it’s worth a request. (Just be aware, sometimes a request for a higher credit limit results in a credit pull and a credit inquiry on your credit report.)

Note: Just because you have a higher limit doesn’t mean you should be increasing your spending. Experts recommend keeping your debt levels at 30%, ideally 10%, of your credit limit. You can see how your credit card usage may be affecting your credit by viewing two of your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.

Image: gpointstudio

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