This Dating Site Questions Your Credit to Help You Find Romance

More often than not, dating begins with the exchange of a number. But perhaps it’s the wrong one.

Instead of trading digits with someone you’re interested in, maybe the first information you offer up should be your credit score. (You can view two of your scores for free on Credit.com.)

It’s certainly a unique spin on the dating game, and one being championed by Niem Green, founder of the site Creditscoredating.com and author of a recently released book about dating and money called “Credit Score Dating: The Sexiness of Credit.” Yes, good credit is sexy, Green said. And bad credit doesn’t have to be a deal breaker, it should just be discussed upfront.

“One of the biggest causes of divorce is finances,” Green said. “The problem is that often people don’t talk about finances. So when I started this site, I figured at the very least I’m creating the icebreaker to have this conversation.”

Green may be on to something. Many surveys show money is one of the primary things couples squabble about. A 2016 study from the American Institute of CPAs found that money issues are a source of weekly and daily stress in relationships. In particular, 88% of adults 25 to 34 who are married or living with a partner said financial decisions are a source of tension in their relationship. Only 42% have discussed their long-term financial goals as a couple.

If the thought of discussing finances with a stranger, let alone on a dating website, makes you uneasy, here’s what you need to know.

How it Works

Green’s site is based on the honor system. Users are asked to provide their credit score as part of creating a profile, but the site does not check the accuracy of the scores. (You can learn how credit scores are calculated here.)

Green said he’s created an algorithm that uses a series of questions to suss out financial habits and whether they’re being honest about their score. The questions cover topics such as delinquent accounts in the past and what they would do with a sudden cash windfall. The answers are included on each user’s profile, alongside other pertinent dating information like age and hobbies. In addition, the information gleaned by the algorithm, which Green said has a 92% accuracy rate, is used to match compatible site users.

“I’ve trained my algorithm to think like me, a former underwriter, and based on the answers to your profile questions, the algorithm is able to asses what your credit score likely is,” Green said. “But it’s not about matching people who have the exact same credit score. It’s more about matching people who are financially compatible. It’s about how people handle their finances.”

As an underwriter, Green often found that couples sitting on the other side of the table had no idea of their partner’s credit score and had not had important conversations about each other’s financial history. Green’s dating site was an attempt to fix this. People need to know their potential partner’s weaknesses upfront so they can make informed decisions, Green said.

In addition, the answers to the algorithm’s questions indicate how well someone handles commitment and deals with pressure and more, Green said.

The site is free to use and has about 500,000 members, of which 60,000 to 80,000 are active on a monthly basis.

Beyond the Algorithm

No matter how you meet, Green and other financial experts said discussing your partner’s approach to money, credit and finances in general is critical. Green suggests financial role playing if you’re getting serious.

“If you’re thinking of having a baby with this person, then go through the role playing of ‘Let’s take a look at how much it would cost’ and how we would handle the costs,” he said. “You could do the same thing to determine how someone would handle an unexpected financial emergency if something really bad happens. You talk about how are we prepared for it and see how that person is really built.”

Ronit Rogoszinski, a certified financial planner, devoted a chapter in her book, “Money Talks: 100 Strategies to Master Tricky Conversations about Money,” to the topic as well. She said credit scores and attitudes about money will have a variety of impacts throughout the life of a relationship and like Green suggests establishing an open dialogue about finances from day one.

“If someone is coming into a relationship with, let’s say a huge student loan, that burden may in fact delay the purchase of that first home the couple may want to own down the road,” Rogoszinski said. “Knowing the numbers upfront and putting together a joint effort to address these individual debts is crucial and helps establish realistic expectations.”

Image: ArthurHidden

The post This Dating Site Questions Your Credit to Help You Find Romance appeared first on Credit.com.

Here’s How Many People Actually Have the Worst Credit Score

It is possible to have a rock-bottom credit score. Find out exactly how many U.S. residents meet this dubious threshold.

As confusing as credit scores can be, most people get the basic concept: You want a high score, not a low one. What qualifies as a good credit score depends on the scoring model you’re talking about (and there are dozens of them), but a common range is 300 to 850. The higher your score, the better. You don’t have to aim for an 850 to get the best terms on a loan or qualify for top-tier credit cards, but anywhere in the high 700s is a good place to be.

Ideally, you’re not anywhere near the bottom of the range, but it is possible to have a 300 credit score on a 300 to 850 scale. The good news: A very small portion of the population has such a score. The bad news: Some people do.

How Many People Have the Worst Credit Score?

There are 294 million “scoreable” consumers, and only 0.01% of them had a 300 credit score, according to data credit bureau TransUnion pulled for Credit.com in March 2017. (A scoreable consumer is someone with enough information in their credit files to generate a VantageScore 3.0. TransUnion said 4.28% of the population is not scoreable.) While 0.01% is a really small portion of consumers, it still means 29,400 people have the worst credit score (on the VantageScore 3.0 scale). In other words: It’s totally possible for your credit to hit rock-bottom. (You can see where you stand by getting two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

 

Though it’s uncommon to have the worst credit score, having bad credit isn’t. More than a quarter (27.66%) of consumers have a credit score between 300 and 600, which is considered bad credit or subprime credit. Conversely, 20% have a super prime credit score (781 to 850). The average credit score was 645 when TransUnion pulled the data.

How to Deal With Terrible Credit

TransUnion didn’t identify common factors among consumers with a 300 credit score, but they pointed out some characteristics of subprime credit files: “Generally speaking people with poor credit (300-600 score) usually make late payments, only contribute the minimum amount, carry high percentage balances on multiple cards and apply for multiple lines of credit within a short period of time,” said Sarah Kossek, a spokeswoman for TransUnion, noting that the factors vary by individual.

So if you want to avoid joining the population of people with bad credit (or you want to get out of the club), it’s smart to make credit card and loan payments on time, pay down your debts, use a very small portion of your credit card limits and apply for credit sparingly. It’s also a good idea to regularly review your credit reports for accuracy, as errors may be hurting your credit. You can pull your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com.

If your credit is the worst, figuratively or literally, well, you can find a full explainer on how to fix it right here.

Image: mikkelwilliam

The post Here’s How Many People Actually Have the Worst Credit Score appeared first on Credit.com.

Notice Something Different About Your Free Credit Report Card? Allow Us to Explain

Credit.com’s free credit report card has changed — Here's what that means for you.

Hey, credit-builder: The team here wanted to let you know that Credit.com’s free credit report card has changed. Don’t worry, you’ll still be getting two free credit scores, along with a letter grade for how you’re doing in the five key credit scoring categories: payment history, debt usage, credit age, account mix and inquiries.

But, starting April 11, the three-digit-number located in the upper left corner of your credit report card, along with your customized action plan, will reflect your VantageScore 3.0 Advantage Score. Previously, the credit report card was based off of your Experian National Equivalency Score (NES), which is your secondary score, visible once your click the “Other Scores” hyperlink.

Why are we making the switch? Well, as you may have heard, there are lots of different credit scores out there, but the most widely known models, including the VantageScore 3.0, follow a range of 300 to 850. The NES score, on the other hand, follows a less common range of 360 to 840. Plus, as you may have gathered, it’s used solely by Experian, whereas VantageScore 3.0 is used by all three of the major credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.

The swap will help us provide you better credit card recommendations as you monitor and improve your credit score. It should also clear up some confusion, as the 300 to 850 range is the one most people are familiar with.

You can find more on VantageScore here. And, to give you an idea of where your credit stands generally, here’s how the ranges on both scores break down.

Vantage 3.0 Score: 300 to 850

Excellent Credit: 750+
Good Credit: 700-749
Fair Credit: 650-699
Poor Credit: 600-649
Bad Credit: below 600

NES Score: 360 to 840

Excellent Credit: 750+
Good Credit: 700-749
Fair Credit: 650-699
Poor Credit: 600-649
Bad Credit: below 600

In either case, if your scores have been fluctuating, your credit report card should provide some valuable insights as to why. Remember, while scores and their associated algorithms vary, they are all based on information in your credit reports, so focusing on your risk factors or negative line items should help you boost your standing across the board.

We get it: All this credit stuff can be confusing and it’s easy to stress about whether you’re acing every score. However, instead of trying to track down all your digits (which is pretty much impossible anyway, given lenders buy proprietary algorithms), it’s a good idea to compare apples to apples by choosing a common score, like VantageScore 3.0, and monitoring your standing over-time.

Our credit report card will provide some helpful hints for how you can improve along the way.

And, so long as you pull your full credit reports from each credit bureau regularly and/or right before you apply for a loan, you shouldn’t be in for any major surprises. (Remember: Viewing your own credit doesn’t damage your scores.) You can get your credit reports for free every 12 months by visiting AnnualCreditReport.com. Checking them will help you spot any errors or line items that might be on only one of your credit files. (Some lenders just report to one credit bureau.) If you find an error, be sure to dispute it. And don’t hesitate to reach out with any credit-related questions in the comments sections below. Our Credit Experts will do their best to help!

Image: Georgijevic

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A New Credit Scoring Model Is On the Way: Here’s What to Expect

VantageScore is rolling out a new version of its credit score model this fall.

A new credit scoring model — expected to roll out in fall 2017 — aims to more accurately measure credit risk by using more historical data and machine-learning techniques while culling less reliable information.

On Monday, VantageScore Solutions announced the release of the fourth version of its credit scoring model, to be used by the three national credit bureaus. (It may seem like these credit scoring models don’t change much, but they do update from time to time. You can find out 13 ways credit scores have changed in the past 20 years here.)

VantageScore 4.0 improves on its predecessor in three main ways, said Sarah Davies, senior vice president of product management and analytics for VantageScore. First, it looks at a consumer’s credit behavior over time, incorporating more of what’s known as “trended data.”

For example, the score takes into account how a consumer’s credit balance has changed over a period of months, rather than taking a single snapshot in time. This has made the score upwards of 20% more predictive than 3.0 for customers with good credit, Davies said.

The new model also excludes a lot of public record information, especially liens and judgments. In many cases, Davies said, this information was difficult to accurately link to individual consumers.

“In all likelihood, almost all civil judgments will be removed from credit files and a substantial portion of tax liens will be removed from credit files,” Davies said.

With this new model, medical collections won’t be reported on credit files until after six months have passed. That’s because there is often confusion as to whether the consumer or insurer is responsible for the payment, Davies said.

The third big update is the use of machine-learning techniques to help score consumers with thin credit files. VantageScore used large data-processing platforms to examine thousands and thousands of combinations of consumer behaviors to identify which ones were associated with people paying their bills on time.

Despite the high-tech method, this led to some intuitive conclusions, Davies said. For example, for consumers with big collections accounts, VantageScore was able to parse out that those who are looking for credit are higher risks than those who aren’t.

It seems obvious, but a human may not have identified this as a risk factor. Davies said the technique has made VantageScore 4.0 about 17% more predictive than its predecessor for people who haven’t used credit in the last six months and 30% more predictive for people who don’t have activity on any accounts, just collections.

What Leads to a Good Score?

VantageScore still rewards the same behavior as any other credit scoring model, Davies said. The model uses the same 300-to-850 scoring range familiar to many people. (You can find out more about what a good credit score consists of here.)

“You’ve still got to pay your bills on time,” she said. “You should still keep your credit card balances low. What this is going to do is look more thoroughly and holistically at some of the other pieces of data.”

VantageScore, which launched in 2006, claims to be able to assign scores to more than 30 million people than traditional models, like the widely used FICO score. The 4.0 version, however, will likely score about 500,000 fewer people than its predecessor because of the removal of many civil judgments and tax liens from credit files.

The removals are part of expected changes coming to credit reports as part of the National Consumer Assistance Plan, an effort by the three major credit reporting agencies expected to boost scores for many people. The agencies agreed to the plan in order to settle an investigation by 31 state attorneys general in 2015.

VantageScore vs. FICO

While Davies didn’t have numbers on how often VantageScore is used compared to FICO, she said VantageScore is increasingly popular. Version 3.0 was used 8 billion times in 2016, she said, up from 6 billion the prior year. (You can see your VantageScore 3.0 for free on Credit.com.)

More than 2,000 financial institutions use VantageScore and most credit issuers, she said. The fourth version of VantageScore has shown improvements in predicting mortgage risk, and Davies said the company hopes the new score will help them break into the mortgage market.

Davies said it would be naive to think that VantageScore could end the dominance of FICO, but the goal is to improve the scoring marketplace overall.

“The ideal world would be that we have meaningful market share, but that, more than anything, we’re an organization that’s about pushing all scoring organizations to deliver better products,” she said.

Image: NKS_Imagery

The post A New Credit Scoring Model Is On the Way: Here’s What to Expect appeared first on Credit.com.

Get The Highest Credit Score Possible: New Credit Card Study Reveals the Key

Getting a high credit score can make it easier for consumers to save on life’s biggest purchases. But many Americans who are stuck with average or below average credit may find it difficult to move up the credit score ladder.

In a new study, MagnifyMoney, a leading financial comparison and education website, partnered with  VantageScore Solutions to see how much credit consumers are using — and how that impacts their credit score.

In the study, VantageScore delved into the credit score profiles of U.S. consumers who are using credit cards in 2017. Scores analyzed were on a 300 – 850 scale, using the VantageScore 3.0 score model.

We decided to home in on utilization — that’s how much credit people are using compared to how much credit they have available to them. Then, we looked at how their credit utilization corresponded to their credit score.

What we found is that people with excellent credit share one main trait in common: They have incredibly low utilization rates.

If you want the highest score, you need to make sure you haven’t missed any payments in the past and don’t have any public records, collection items or judgments. However, what this data shows is that even if you have a perfect payment history, low utilization is critical to get the highest score.

Key findings include…

  • The best scores have 16x the credit limit of the worst scores: People with the best scores (above 800) have available credit of $46,735, 16x that of the $2,816 of those with the worst scores (below 450), but their outstanding balances are about the same at $2,231 (above 800) vs $2,653 (below 450)
  • People with scores 601-650 have the biggest credit card bills: People with scores between 601 and 650 carry the biggest balances, at over $10k, or nearly 2x the average of all consumers.
  • The average credit card holder has $29,197 in credit lines. With an average balance of $5,720, the average holder is using 20% of available credit.
  • Getting above 700 is the biggest hurdle. People with scores 701-750 have average utilization of 27% vs 47% for those with scores 651-700, the biggest utilization gap of any score band. Average balances for people with scores 651-700 are about $3,000 higher than those with scores in the 701-750 range.

The Power of the Utilization Rate

One of the most influential metrics in credit scoring is called “revolving utilization.” This metric, informally referred to as the debt-to-limit ratio, calculates just how leveraged your credit cards are at any given time by comparing your balances to your credit limits. According to VantageScore, and using data provided by the three credit reporting agencies, people with credit scores above 800 have an average debt-to-limit ratio of just 5%.

To calculate the debt-to-limit ratio you must do a little math. The first thing you’ll do is add up the balances on all of your credit cards, which includes retail store and gas credit cards. Now add up the credit limits of those same cards and any other unused credit cards. Now you’re ready to do the math. Divide the total credit card balance by the total credit limit, and then multiple that number by 100 and you’ll get your percentage.

NOTE: Do NOT include any balances or original loan amounts from installment loans like mortgages, student loans, or auto loans. Revolving utilization is only calculated from your revolving credit card accounts.

Inside the Wallet of Someone With Perfect Credit

As you can see from the chart below, those of you with VantageScore credit scores over 800 have an average debt-to-limit ratio of just 5%. The math it took to get to 5% looks something like this: you have an average total balance of $2,231 and an average total credit limit of $46,735. When you divide $2,231 by $46,735 you get 5% — 5% is a fantastic debt-to-limit ratio. This is where you want to be!

Inside the Wallet of Someone With Bad Credit

On the other end of the score range — those of you with the lowest possible scores, 450 and below — you have an average debt-to-limit ratio of 94%, which is very high and very poor. Your average total balance is $2,653 and an average total credit limit of $2,816. When you divide $2,653 by $2,816 you get 94%. Ninety-four percent is simply too high and a significant reason why your scores are so low. This is not where you want to be!

 

It is important to point out that the debt-to-limit ratio is just that, a ratio. It’s all about the relationship between the balance and credit limit, not so much how large or how small your balances are or how large or how small your credit limits are. In fact, the people whose scores are the very lowest don’t have that much more average credit card debt than the people with the highest scores — $2,231 for the high scorers and $2,653 for the low scorers.

The significant difference between the two populations is in the credit limits. The folks with the highest scores have the largest total credit limit, $46,735 as compared to $2,816 for the people with the lowest scores.

You can see just how problematic it is to have lower limits as it makes even modest credit card balances very problematic for your credit scores as they take up a considerable portion of your available credit. You get too close to maxing out your available credit too quickly.

Use These Findings to Boost Your Credit Score

Here are MagnifyMoney’s tips on improving a low credit score:

Step 1: Get a line of credit

In order to establish credit history, you need to have a form of credit. The simplest way for you to begin will be to open a credit card. If your score is low or non-existent, then you’ll need to apply for a secured card or a store card.

  • Secured Card:  You’ll use your own money as collateral by putting down a deposit of a few hundred dollars with the bank. Typically, that amount will then be your credit limit. Once you prove you’re responsible, you can get back your deposit and upgrade to a regular credit card. [Read more here]

  • Store Card: People with a low credit score can often still get store cards because banks are more likely to approve users who apply through the store. The catch is that the interest rates are often very high if you can’t make your payments. [Read more here]

Step 2: Keep your utilization rate low

Utilization is the amount of your credit limit you spend each month. For example, if you have a $500 credit limit and spend $50 in a month, you’re utilization will be 10%. Your utilization is part of what determines your credit score.

Your goal should be to never exceed 30% of your credit limit. Ideally, you should be even lower than 30% because the lower your utilization rate, the better your score will be.

We recommend you make one small purchase (hello, pack of gum) a month to keep your utilization low and help increase your credit score at a faster rate.

Step 3: Pay in full, and on time, each month

The easiest way to prove you’re responsible is to only charge what you can afford. Never use your credit card to buy an item you won’t be able to pay off on time and in full each month.

Being late on your payments has a huge, negative impact on your credit score.

There is also no advantage to only paying the minimum amount due on your card. That will only result in you paying interest and does nothing to help your credit score. So just save yourself money and pay your entire bill.

Step 4: Avoid credit card debt

This goes hand-and-hand with step three. By only purchasing what you can pay off in full, you’ll never accumulate credit card debt.

If you’re already in debt from the misuse of credit cards, then make sure you continue to pay at least the minimum due on time each month. Paying on time is the number one indicator of a responsible borrower. You should consider applying for a personal loan, and using the money from the loan to pay off your credit card debt. Personal loan companies have interest rates that start as low as 4.25%, and they are approving people with credit scores as low as 550. You can shop around for a personal loan without hurting your score, because the lenders will approve you using a soft pull (which doesn’t impact your score). A recent study by Lending Club showed that people who paid off their credit card debt with a personal loan saw their score increase by 31% on average, right away. You can look for the best personal loans using this personal loan tool. After you pay off your credit cards with the proceeds on the loan, do not build up your debt again. Instead, just make one purchase each month and pay it off in full.

Once you pay off your cards, resist the urge to close them. Closing your cards will not only lower your utilization but remove history which damages your score in the “length of history” category.

Step 5: As your score improves, so do your options for better credit cards

You’ll start to get credit card offers as you begin to build your credit history and improve your score. Credit card companies still love sending snail mail.

Beware of any offers, especially for cash back cards, while your score is below 650. These cards typically provide little value and can smack you with high interest rates if you fail to follow step three.

Not sure if an offer is a good deal? Try checking it out in our cashback reward cards page. Our Magnify Transparency Score will let you know if it’s the real deal.

Once you get your credit score above 680, the good credit card offers will start rolling in. You can have your pick of the top-tier reward credit cards and start using your regular spending to get cash back or rack up points for travel.

Step 6: Protect your score

Once you’ve achieved a higher credit score, but sure to protect it by following these simple steps:

  • Always pay on time – late or missed payments will cost you dearly

  • Try to keep your credit used below 30% of your available credit

  • If you apply for a store card to increase your credit then immediately put in the freezer (literally if you have to) and avoid spending

  • Be sure to check your credit reports for accuracy and signs of fraud – you’re entitled to one free report per year from each of the three credit bureaus

If you have any questions or just want a helping hand, please reach out to us at info@magnifymoney.com or tweet us @Magnify_Money.

The post Get The Highest Credit Score Possible: New Credit Card Study Reveals the Key appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Credit Bureaus Announce Free Credit Freezes for Military Members

Active-duty military members are given a number of financial protections, and the major credit reporting agencies just added one more perk to that list.

Active-duty military members are given a number of financial protections that average consumers aren’t privy to, and this week the major credit reporting agencies added one more perk to that list — free credit freezes.

The move was announced Wednesday in a release from the Consumer Data Industry Association, a trade group that represents the major credit reporting agencies. Experian, Equifax and TransUnion are all participating in offering free credit freezes for active-duty military, which is expected to roll out in the first half of 2018.

Freezes are a tool used for identity theft victims to stop their credit from being used without their permission. It essentially blocks anyone from opening new lines of credit using the consumer’s identity, unless the consumer has the freeze temporarily lifted or removed.

“Given the nature of the military lifestyle, with frequent location moves and overseas deployments, these brave men and women, and their families, may find it particularly challenging to address an identity theft situation,” said Eric J. Ellman, Interim President and CEO of CDIA.

Placing, lifting or removing a security freeze can cost up to $10 each time, depending on the state you live in and the bureau offering it. Active-duty military members already can place a one-year credit alert on their file for free, though this will not stop a new application for credit by default like a freeze would. The alert just requires the lender or creditor to take extra measures to ensure the applicant is legitimate.

Identity theft can do major credit score damage both upfront and in the long term. An identity thief with enough information to apply for credit in your name can make a bunch of applications for credit in a short period of time before you notice the theft. That will cause an immediate drop in your score by inflating your inquiries. And if the theft goes unnoticed, any new accounts that they’ve opened will go without payment, sinking your score even more.

The move by the bureaus to offer free credit freezes is especially important when you consider the long-lasting impact of identity theft on military members and veterans. Buying a home, getting credit cards, even starting a business (9% of U.S. businesses are veteran-owned, according to the Small Business Administration) are extremely difficult to do with a bad credit score, and identity thieves with personal information like your Social Security number can lie in wait for years since these numbers rarely change, hurting servicemembers long after the theft has occurred.

The best protection against identity theft is vigilance. Keep an eye on your credit reports and scores, checking for signs of identity theft. (You can see two of your credit scores for free right here on Credit.com.) Keep your personal identifying information on lockdown. And if you still find your information being used fraudulently, credit alerts or freezes can help keep you safe.

Image: AleksandarNakic

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What Everyone Should Know About the New VantageScore 4.0 Credit Score

View Your Free FICO Score for all 3 Credit Bureaus

In the world of consumer credit reporting and credit scoring moves at glacial speed. Every few years credit scoring systems are rebuilt or, more formally, redeveloped.  But, it’s rare that the newer versions of credit scoring systems are meaningfully different than their predecessors.

However, today VantageScore Solutions announced the release of the 4th generation of their VantageScore credit score which will become available from the three credit reporting agencies in the Fall of 2017, and it’s a game changer.

What is the VantageScore Credit Score

VantageScore Solutions was created by the three credit reporting agencies in 2006. The VantageScore credit score is a tri-bureau credit scoring model, meaning it is available for purchase and use from all three of the credit reporting agencies. The score is scaled 300 to 850, and the higher the score the better you look to lenders. According to VantageScore some 8 billion of their scores were used during the 12-month period between July 2015 and June 2016.

How is VantageScore 4.0 Different Than Prior Versions

VantageScore 4.0 is the only credit scoring system that considers your “trended” credit data.

What trended data says about the consumer is whether they’re paying their credit card balances in full each month, or if they’re just paying a small amount and revolving some or most of the balances to the next month. In the older form of credit reporting, prior to trended data, there was no way to distinguish between someone who paid in full each month from someone who paid a small amount and rolled the remaining unpaid balance to the next month.

Several years ago the credit reporting agencies began maintaining and reporting the historical balances and payments made on your credit card accounts. So rather than just reporting what your balance was last month, all three credit bureaus now report the historical balances and the amount you paid going back 24 months. This information is being called “Trended Data.”  You can see your trended data by looking at your credit reports via www.annualcreditreport.com.

Why does trending data matter?

In short, people who do not pay their cards in full each month are riskier than people who do pay them off in full each month.

That’s not anecdotal. TransUnion performed an analysis comparing the risk between transactors and revolvers and the results were staggering. People who do NOT pay their cards off in full each month are 3 to 5 times riskier than people who do pay in full each month. But until VantageScore 4.0, there was no difference in credit scores for someone pays in full each month versus not doing so. That’s why this is a big deal for lenders…it’s a materially better scoring model.

When Will Lenders Start Using the New Score?

This is the million dollar question…when? Converting to a new credit score is expensive and time consuming, and not mandatory.  Because of that, the industry tends to take a very long time fully adopting new scoring systems. Even FICO 9, the most current version of FICO’s credit score, doesn’t have a critical mass of users and it has been commercially available since late 2014. But, the features of VantageScore 4.0 are very compelling so it’s reasonable to expect lenders to be very interested as soon as the model goes live at the credit bureaus.

Having said that, VantageScore has partnerships with a variety of websites, like Credit Karma and Credit Sesame, that give their scores away to the sites’ registered users. Converting to newer score version is much easier for these websites because they don’t have the same barriers that lenders have. VantageScore 4.0 will likely be live and available from one or more of these websites not long after it goes live in the Fall of 2017.

What does this mean for you?

  1. It will become more important to pay your bill in full each month.

For you, this new model underscores the importance of paying your card in full each month. The average interest rate on a credit card is about 16% so it’s expensive to revolve balances. Notwithstanding the fact that you’re paying interest on the unpaid balance, now by not paying your balance in full your VantageScore 4.0 score is likely to be lower because you’re a riskier consumer. Conversely, those of you who do make it a practice to pay your cards in full each month, your VantageScore 4.0 score is likely to be higher because you’re a less risky consumer…and you’re not paying interest.

  1. Liens and judgments won’t hurt your score quite as much.

On or about July 1, 2017 the credit reporting agencies will remove most of the judgments and about ½ of the tax liens from credit reports. VantageScore 4.0 has been engineered to be less reliant on liens and judgments because, not surprisingly, there will be considerably fewer incidents where those public records find their way to credit reports. This isn’t really a big deal for consumers but it is a very big deal for lenders that will rely on the new score.

  1. Medical collections less than six months old won’t hurt your score at all.

Further, VantageScore 4.0 will ignore medical collections that are less than six months old, as in they won’t hurt your score at all. And the credit bureaus, as part of the NCAP, will remove medical collections that are paid or are being paid by an insurance company. The hypothesis, which makes perfect sense, is to avoid any unfair score impact caused by the inefficient insurance claim process. And for those medical collections that are older than six months and are not paid by insurance, which will remain on credit reports, VantageScore 4.0 will discount them so they don’t have as much of a negative impact as non-medical collections.

The Bottom Line: The VantageScore 4.0 is better for consumers and better for lenders.

The changes that were made benefit consumers who pay their cards off each month, and/or have medical collections. The changes benefit lenders because the score is considerably more powerful because of the consideration of the trended data information. It’s rare that a new scoring system is a true win-win for consumers and lenders…and VantageScore 4.0 is just that.

The post What Everyone Should Know About the New VantageScore 4.0 Credit Score appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Find a Starter Home in a Hot Housing Market

Here are five tips from experts on how best to snag a starter home right now.

An overheated real estate market is never good news for buyers in search of a budget-friendly starter home.

But thanks to increased confidence in the economy, leading more people to make large purchases like new homes, that’s exactly the type of real estate market 2017 is ushering in.

According to a recent report from the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the share of households that believe the economy is improving soared to 72% in the first quarter of 2017. “Forty-seven percent believe that strongly, up from 45% in Q4 2016 and 44% one year ago in Q1 2016,” NAR said.

When there’s increased competition for homes, prices generally go up. (Go here to see how much house you can afford.)

A new report from Redfin bears this out, revealing home prices in February increased 7.2% from a year earlier. What’s more, homes priced for less than $240,000 witnessed the highest appreciation — skyrocketing 8.4% year over year in February and 100% since the market lagged in 2012.

Combined with a lack of housing stock — Redfin reports a 6.4% decline in new listings in February — and you have what might be a daunting buying experience for newcomers.

With that in mind, here are five tips from experts on how best to snag a starter home right now.

1. Work With a Professional

This may seem like less-than-helpful advice, but it’s the first suggestion most experts offer when discussing the predicament faced by first-time home buyers.

“You want someone who knows the neighborhood,” said Jessica Lautz, managing director of survey research and communications for NAR. “It could be difficult if you go it alone.”

Seek out an agent who is knowledgeable about the areas in which you’d like to search so you can help avoid these first-time homebuyer mistakes.

2. Get Pre-Approved Before Starting a Search

Before discussing the pre-approval issue, it’s important to sort out your finances and to do it before embarking upon a search.

This effort should include reviewing your credit score. If it’s less-than-stellar, you can reach out to lenders for tips regarding how best to improve it, said Boston-based Redfin real estate agent James Gulden. You can view two of your credit scores for free, with helpful updates every two weeks, on Credit.com.

“Sometimes people see their credit score and don’t know where to go from there,” said Gulden. “All lenders have different thresholds for what they’re willing to take on in terms of a buyer’s credit score. And they will also look at your employment profile.”

When you’re ready, it’s wise to obtain pre-approval for a mortgage before wading into the market. Not only will it ensure you lose no time when you’re ready to make an offer, it will help clarify what you can realistically afford.

3. Be Prepared to Make Compromises 

Even seasoned, older buyers make compromises. Whether it’s the price, condition or amenities, compromising is part of the process.

“It’s more common for millennials to make compromises on first homes, but all buyers really do compromise on something,” said Lautz.

Translation: Figure out what you are willing to let go of or do without.

4. Be Patient

Buying a home is a process, no matter how much money you have. So mentally prepare yourself for the process, including the ups and the downs. Preparing for the downs includes not getting too attached to any one house.

“It’s easy to lose a couple and say, ‘Forget this, we’ll keep renting,'” said Gulden. “A lot of people are losing out on the first five or six homes they submit an offer on before being successful. From a mental standpoint, it’s very easy to get connected to a place, and when you don’t win a place, it can be upsetting. But in this market, it’s important to be able to brush it off and realize there are other places that will be coming onto the market.”

5. Write a Personal Letter 

Gulden admitted this tip is not exactly novel, but it can give you an edge in a particularly competitive market.

Writing a personal letter to the seller, enclosed with your offer, can help set you apart when there are 10, 15 or even 20 more offers. And those numbers are no exaggeration, said Gulden, who recently helped clients submit an offer for a Cambridge property with 24 bids.

“If you don’t include a letter or something to differentiate yourself from others, then it’s all just numbers and dates on paper for the seller,” said Gulden. “Introducing yourself and telling the buyer who you are, why you like the property makes a big difference.”

Image: Tempura

The post How to Find a Starter Home in a Hot Housing Market appeared first on Credit.com.

4 Ways Your Credit Card Can Help You Build Credit (For Real)

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For plenty of people — and millennials especially — a credit card is a scary prospect. And we get why: Phenomenal spending power plus itty-bitty charging restrictions equals a major opportunity to go into debt.

But if you’re foregoing credit cards completely, you could be making it harder on yourself when it comes to another important facet of your finances: building a solid credit score. That’s because credit cards are fairly easy to qualify for — there’s actually a whole category of them designed specifically for people who need to build or rebuild. (You can monitor your progress by viewing two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Plus, while installment loans (think auto loan or mortgage) come with an automatic price tag and, more often than not, automatic interest, you don’t need to take on debt to build credit with a credit card. That’s actually a common misconception, but, trust us, no balance here required.

To help you how to best leverage your plastic, here are four ways a credit card can help you build credit.

1. You’ll Establish a Payment History

And that’s the number one most important factor when it comes to credit scores. Of course, to build good credit, you’ll want to make all of your credit card payments on-time. (One misstep can really cost you and your score.) To avoid any blemishes, set up alerts that reminds you when your due date approaches or even consider setting up auto-payments each month. Just be sure to keep an eye on your statements for any errors or fraudulent charges.

2. Its Limit Can Bolster Your Credit Utilization Rate

That’s how much debt you’re carrying versus your total credit. Experts generally recommend keeping your credit utilization below at least 30% and ideally 10% of your total available limit(s) — which is easier to do when you have a credit card you’re consistently paying off in full.

3. Your Credit Will Start to Age

And that’s a good thing because length of credit history accounts for about 15% of your credit scores. Length of credit history, also referred to as the age of your credit, is essentially how long you’ve had your credit lines. When it comes to building credit in this category, there’s little credit newbies can do, except, you know, wait. But because a credit card represents one of the easier points of entry into the financing world, that plastic in your wallet can help you get started.

4. You Could Be Rewarded for Having a Mix of Accounts

Credit scoring models like to see that you can manage different types of credit. So, if you’ve got an installment loan on your file — like, say, that student loan you took out to pay for college — adding a revolving line of credit, like a credit card or home equity line of credit, could improve your performance in this key credit category. Mix of accounts, or credit mix, accounts for roughly 10% of the points in your credit score.

Of course, there are ways to build credit outside of simply using your own credit card. That includes looking into credit-builder loans at your local bank or credit union or becoming an authorized user on a friend or family member’s credit card. (The account will appear on your credit file and bolster your performance in the aforementioned credit scoring categories, but you won’t be liable for the charges.) And if your credit is kind of shoddy, you can try disputing any errors on your credit report, limiting credit inquiries and addressing accounts in default. You can find a full 11 ways to improve your credit scores here.

Got a credit score question? Ask away in the comments section and one of our experts will try to help!

Image: g-stockstudio

The post 4 Ways Your Credit Card Can Help You Build Credit (For Real) appeared first on Credit.com.