Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 699

In late 2016, American consumers hit an important milestone. For the first time in a decade, over half of American consumers (51%) recorded prime credit scores. On the other side of the scale, less than a third of consumers (32%) suffered from subprime scores.1 As a nation, our average FICO® credit score rose to its highest point ever, 699.2

Despite the rosy national picture, we see regional and age-based disparities. A minority of Southerners still rank below prime credit. In contrast, credit scores in the upper Midwest rank well above the national average. Younger consumers struggle with their credit, but boomers and the Silent Generation secured scores well above the national average.

In a new report on credit scores in America, MagnifyMoney analyzed trends in credit scores. The trends offer insight into how Americans fare with their credit health.

Key Insights:

  1. National average FICO® credit scores are up 13 points since October 2009.3
  2. 51% of consumers have prime credit scores, up from 48.1% in 2007.4
  3. One-third of customers have at least one severely delinquent (90+ days past due) account on their credit report.5
  4. Average Vantage® credit scores in the Deep South are 21 points lower than the national average (652 vs. 673).6
  5. Millennials’ average Vantage® credit score (634) underperformed the national average by 39 points. Only Gen Z has a lower average score (631).7

Credit Scores in America

Average FICO® Score: 6998

Average Vantage® Score: 6739

Percent with prime credit score: 51%10

Percent with subprime credit score: 32%11

Credit Score Factors

Percent with at least one delinquency: 32%12

Average number of late payments per month: .3513

Average credit utilization ratio: 30%14

Percent severely delinquent debt: 3.37%15

Percent severely delinquent debt excluding mortgages: 6.9%16

The Big 3 Credit Scores

Credit scoring companies analyze consumer credit reports. They glean data from the reports and create algorithms that determine consumer borrowing risk. A credit score is a number that represents the risk profile of a borrower. Credit scores influence a bank’s decisions to lend money to consumers. People with high credit scores will find the most attractive borrowing rates because that signals to lenders that they are less risky. Those with low credit scores will struggle to find credit at all.

Banks have hundreds of proprietary credit scoring algorithms. In this article, we analyzed trends on three of the most famous credit scoring algorithms:

  1. FICO® 8 Credit Score (used for underwriting mortgages)
  2. Vantage® 3.0 Credit Score (widely available to consumers)
  3. Equifax Consumer Risk Credit Score (used by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Each of these credit scores ranks risk on a scale of 300-850.

In all three models, prime credit is any score above 720.

Subprime credit is any score below 660. All three models consider similar data when they create credit risk profiles. The most common factors include:

  1. Payment history
  2. Revolving debt levels (or revolving debt utilization ratios)
  3. Length of credit history
  4. Number of recent credit inquires
  5. Variety of credit (installment and revolving)

However, each model weights the information differently. This means that a FICO® Score cannot be compared directly to a Vantage® Score or an Equifax Risk Score.

American Credit Scores over Time

Average FICO® Credit Scores in America are on the rise for the eighth straight year. The average credit score in America is now 699.

We’re also seeing healthy increases in prime credit scores. In the three major credit scoring models, a prime credit score is any score above 720.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 51% of all Americans have prime credit scores as measured by the Equifax Risk Score. Following the housing market crash in 2010, just 48.4% of Americans had prime credit scores.20

Credit Scores and Loan Originations

Following the 2007-2008 implosion of the housing market, banks saw mortgage borrowers defaulting at a higher rates than ever before. In addition to higher mortgage default rates, the market downturn led to higher default rates across all types of consumer loans.

To maintain profitability banks began tightening lending practices. More stringent lending standards made it tough for anyone with poor credit to get a loan at a reasonable rate.

Although banks have loosened lending somewhat in the last two years, people with subprime credit will continue to struggle to get loans. In February 2017, banks rejected 85% of all credit applications from people with Equifax Risk Scores below 680. By contrast, banks rejected 8.74% of credit applications from those with credit scores above 760.22

Credit Scores and Mortgage Origination

Before 2008, the median homebuyer had an Equifax Risk Score of 720. In 2017, the median score was 764, a full 44 points higher than the pre-bubble scores. The bottom tenth of buyers had a score of 657, a massive 65 point growth over the pre-recession average.23

Some below prime borrowers still get mortgages. But banks no longer underwrite mortgages for deep subprime borrowers. More stringent lending standards have resulted in near all-time lows in mortgage foreclosures.

Credit Scores and Auto Loan Origination

The subprime lending bubble didn’t directly influence the auto loan market, but banks increased their lending standards for auto loans, too. Before 2008, the median credit score for people originating auto loans was 682. By the first quarter of 2017, the median score for auto borrowers was 706.26

In the case of auto loans, the lower median risk profile hasn’t paid off for banks. In the first quarter of 2017, $8.27 billion dollars of auto loans fell into severely delinquent status. That means the owners of vehicles did not pay on their loans for at least 90 days. Auto delinquencies are now as bad as they were in 2008.28

Consumers looking for new auto loans should expect more stringent lending standards in coming months. This means it’s more important than ever for Americans to grow their credit score.

Credit Scores for Credit Cards

Unlike other types of credit, even people with deep subprime credit scores usually qualify to open a secured credit card. However, credit card use among people with poor credit scores is still near an all-time low. In the last decade, credit card use among deep subprime borrowers fell 16.7%. Today, just over 50% of deep subprime borrowers have credit card accounts.30

The dramatic decline came between 2009 and 2011. During this period, half or more of all credit card account closures came from borrowers with below prime credit scores. More than one-third of all closures came from deep subprime consumers.

However, banks are showing an increased willingness to allow customers with poor credit to open credit card accounts. In 2015, more than 60% of all new credit card accounts went to borrowers with subprime credit. 25% of all the accounts went to borrowers with deep subprime credit.

State Level Credit Scores

Consumers across the nation are seeing higher credit scores, but regional variations persist. People living in the Deep South and Southwest have lower credit scores than the rest of the nation. States in the Deep South have an average Vantage® credit score of 652 compared to a nationwide average of 673. Southwestern states have an average score of 658.

States in the Upper Midwest outperform the nation as a whole. These states had average Vantage® Scores of 689.

Unsurprisingly, consumers across the southern United States are far more likely to have subprime credit scores than consumers across the north. Minnesota had the fewest subprime consumers. In December 2016, just 21.9% of residents fell below an Equifax Risk Score of 660. Mississippi had the worst subprime rate in the nation. 48.3% of Mississippi residents had credit scores below 660 in December 2016.35

These are the distributions of Equifax Risk Scores by state:37

Credit Score by Age

In general, older consumers have higher credit scores than younger generations. Credit scoring models consider consumers with longer credit histories less risky than those with short credit histories. The Silent Generation and boomers enjoy higher credit scores due to long credit histories. However, these generations show better credit behavior, too. Their revolving credit utilization rates are lower than younger generations. They are less likely to have a severely delinquent credit item on their credit report.

Gen X and millennials have almost identical revolving utilization ratios and delinquency rates. Compared to millennials, Gen X has higher credit card balances and more debt. Still, Gen X’s longer credit history gives them a 21 point advantage over millennials on average.

To improve their credit scores, millennials and Gen X need to focus on timely payments. On-time payments and lower credit card utilization will drive their scores up.

A report by FICO® showed that younger consumers can earn high credit scores with excellent credit behavior. 93% of consumers with credit scores between 750 and 799 who were under age 29 never had a late payment on the credit report. In contrast, 57% of the total population had at least one delinquency. This good credit group also used less of their available credit. They had an average revolving credit utilization ratio of 6%. The nation as a whole had a utilization ratio of 15%.39

Sources

  1. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  2. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  3. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  4. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  5. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian, Accessed May 24, 2017
  6. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  7. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  8. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  9. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  10. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  11. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  12. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 90+ Days Past Due, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  13. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Late Payments, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  14. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Average Revolving Credit Utilization Ratio, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  15. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type, All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  16. Calculated metric using data from “Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type and Total Debt Balance and Its Composition. All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.Multiply all debt balances by percent of balance 90 days delinquent for Q1 2017, and summarize all delinquent balances. Total delinquent balance for non-mortgage debt = $284 billion. Total non-mortgage debt balance = $4.1 trillion $284 billion /$4.1 trillion = 6.9%.
  17. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  18. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  19. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  20. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  21. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  22. Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2017 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). The SCE data are available without charge at http://www.newyorkfed.org/microeconomics/sce and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.
  23. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  24. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Mortgages, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  25. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Number of Consumers with New Foreclosures and Bankruptcies, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  26. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  27. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Credit Score at Origination: Auto Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  28. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  29. Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Flow into Severe Delinquency (90+) by Loan Type, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  30. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  31. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  32. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  33. Graham Campbell, Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klauuw, “Just Released: Recent Developments in Consumer Credit Card Borrowing,” Federal Reserve Bank of New York Liberty Street Economics (blog), August 9, 2016. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  34. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  35. 2016 State of Credit Report” State 2016 Average Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  36. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  37. Community Credit: A New Perspective on America’s Communities Credit Quality and Inclusion” from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  38. 2016 State of Credit Report” National 2016 Vantage® Credit Score, Experian. Accessed May 24, 2017.
  39. Ethan Dornhelm, “US Credit Quality Rising … The Beat Goes On,” Fair Isaac Corporation. Accessed May 24, 2017.

The post Average Credit Score in America Reaches New Peak at 699 appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Here’s How to Prepare Your Credit for a Job Search

Don't let your credit hold you back from your dream job.

Conducting a job search after graduating from college can seem like a monumental task, one filled with challenges and uncertainties. But here’s one thing recent grads shouldn’t be uncertain about when embarking on the journey to secure a job — what’s on their credit report.

Just as hours and days are devoted to creating a professional resume and poring over every last word on a LinkedIn profile, your credit report also needs to be reviewed and, if necessary, improved. The importance of one’s credit history during a job search will of course vary by profession, but there are employers who will look at your credit report as part of their application process. And if you’re applying for a job that requires you to handle cash or balance books, a blemish could hurt your chances of securing the position.

Why Does an Employer Want to See my Credit? 

“Employers will look at credit history as a measure of responsibility,” said Deidre Davis, vice president of marketing and communications for the university-based MSU Federal Credit Union. “They’re looking to see if that potential employee has successfully managed their financial obligations, because that will tell them how someone might manage overall workload and deadlines.”

According to credit-industry experts, it’s most often within the banking and financial services industry that a credit report review is part of the application process, as well as for some government jobs that require security clearance, law enforcement officers and those seeking executive-level positions. It’s important to note, however, there are about a dozen states where local laws either prohibit or severely limit the use of consumer credit reports as part of an application, according to the site Employment Screening Resources.

Plus, employers are not allowed to check your credit report without your consent, which you must provide in writing. And they won’t have access to your actual credit score, explained Davis. They’ll be looking at the credit report, which is slightly different. It shows such things as whether you’ve missed payments and are delinquent on accounts, and whether you carry large balances.

Having a clean credit report isn’t just important to a job search, post-college. Prospective landlords, insurers, cell phone companies, utility providers and more will check your credit when deciding whether to do business with you and/or what to charge. Of course, you’ll also need good credit to get an affordable loan.

With that in mind, here’s some advice from credit experts on getting your credit profile ready for the interview process.

1. Know What’s on Your Credit Report

The first step is to pull your credit report and conduct a thorough review of everything on it. Under federal law, you’re entitled to one free credit report every 12 months from each consumer credit reporting agency. You can pull your free annual credit reports from AnnualCreditReport.com. (And, if you’re looking for your digits, you can view two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

“Know your starting point,” said Kevin Gallegos, vice president of Phoenix operations for Freedom Financial Network. “Many young adults already have credit profiles and don’t realize it. Start by finding out if you do.”

Once you’ve reviewed your report(s), correct any inaccuracies and dispute any erroneous items. (You can learn more about disputing errors on your credit report here.) Under the terms of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, credit bureaus must investigate disputed items and remove them from the report if they cannot be verified, Gallegos explained.

2. Seek Guidance From a Finance Professional

If the credit report turns up negative factors, or you simply don’t have a firm understanding of the key aspects of a credit profile, consider obtaining the advice of a professional.

“Get some tips to improve things going forward,” said Davis of MSU Federal Credit Union. “Talk to someone who can tell you, ‘For the next six months these are the behaviors that will improve your credit score.’ Sometimes people need some basic advice and guidance. That’s where going into a local financial institution can help. You can say to them, ‘Here is my credit report, how can I make it better?’ ”

According to the site LendEDU, many college students know very little about building, maintaining or repairing consumer credit. In 2016, the site surveyed 668 current college students at both two-year and four-year public and private institutions, and found that 59.3% of students could not define a credit score. In addition, 45.5% were unable to identify any of the factors used to determine a credit score, and 42.4% were unable to identify at least one way to improve a credit score.

Building good credit is important, so don’t be afraid to seek assistance.

3. Improve Your Credit

One of the most critical things you can do to improve your credit report moving forward is pay bills on time, said Gallegos.

“On-time payments are the most important factor in developing good credit, accounting for 35% of one’s credit score,” he said.

In addition, maintaining a low balance, or using only about at least 30% and ideally 10% of your available credit, will improve your score. You should also aim to pay your bills in full each month, if possible. Likewise, paying student loans on time, which are considered installment loans, can help improve your credit score. (You can find more ways to improve your credit here.)

What If You Haven’t Established Credit?

Some college graduates may not have an extensive credit history to show a prospective employer. If this is the case, there are a few ways to help establish a solid record fairly quickly.

One approach is to be added as an authorized user on a parent’s credit card, ideally a card the parent has had for a long time and kept in good standing. By being added to such a card, the payment history on the account will become part of your credit report as well.

Be aware not all credit card companies report authorized users’ names to credit bureaus because there’s a fee involved in doing so, says Davis. That means being added to the card won’t accomplish your goal of establishing a solid credit history. Always find out first if the card reports authorized users to credit bureaus.

Another approach is to open a secured credit card in your name. Secured credit cards require a cash deposit as collateral, which then becomes the line of credit. The key when opening the card, or any card for that matter, is being responsible, said Davis.

“Only use the card for small dollar purchases that can be paid when the bill comes in so that you’re not getting into debt but are showing responsible use,” she said. “Buy a pizza with the card, and pay it off. Buy a pair of tennis shoes, and pay it off. Don’t go open 15 cards. Open one and use it responsibly.”

Trying to get a full-time gig now that college has ended? We’ve got your covered. Here’s a full 50 things recent graduates can do to score their first job

Image: vgajic

The post Here’s How to Prepare Your Credit for a Job Search appeared first on Credit.com.

Are You Hack-Proof? Here’s How to Make Sure

If you see a story about a data breach or a security compromise on a device you use, consider that an action item for your day.

While the writing has been on the wall for a long time, last Friday it was in the news wires when a new strain of ransomware called WannaCrypt raged like an out-of-control wildfire across Europe and Asia, ultimately impacting computers in 150 countries.

For many affected by this hack, a few hundred dollars in ransom money is a pittance when compared to the cost of hiring someone to attempt the recovery of your files after they’ve been encrypted. These ransomware attacks would cease to be profitable were there easy workarounds. But at this time, it is highly likely that if you happen to get got by one of these attacks, you should assume your files could be gone for good.

That’s why it’s critical you learn how to protect yourself.

Cyber Hygiene

If you’re like most people, you spend about 40 minutes a day on personal hygiene. While that’s a considerable amount of time, you probably don’t consider it to be an issue. It is not the same thing when it comes to cybersecurity. Were it as simple as downloading and installing software updates, the time spent on cyber grooming would be minimal (though the patches do seem to come fast and furious these days).

The issue really is that cyber hygiene is something one should practice 24/7/365. Come to think of it, it requires about the same amount of commitment and mindfulness as it takes to make sure your hair is OK and there’s no spinach in your teeth.

Here are some things to consider including in your daily cybersecurity routine.

1. Install Updates

When you are trying to find something online or use an app, an update notice can be like a mosquito that’s overly interested in you, but the last thing you should ever do is swat that notice away. It is often the only thing standing between you and the bad guys out there who are looking for a way to exploit weaknesses in the security features of the devices you use on a daily basis.

2. Use Standard Encryption

Both Apple and PC now offer a way to protect the content stored on your hard drive, and it’s so easy there’s no reason not to use it. It’s called FileVault on Apple and BitLocker on PCs. It is easy to set up, and renders everything on your machine unreadable by a hacker who gains access to it.

3. Back Up Your Digital Life on an External Drive

For less than $60, you can purchase an external hard drive large enough to store an immense amount of data. That’s where you want to keep your most sensitive personal information. The reason is simple: It is air-gapped (not connected to the internet) most, if not all, of the time. There is no need to be online to backup your hard drive to an external drive. Extra points if you encrypt your data.

4. Use a Password Manager

If you’re not using long and strong passwords, or still using the same password across multiple platforms and websites, you need to read this. For those who get over that rather low bar, it’s time to improve your game. It used to be that people made cheat sheets with their passwords and stored them in their desks (bad) or on an encrypted thumb drive (way better). That’s no longer necessary. Password managers take away the risk associated with having your passwords written down where they can be found and used. You need only remember one. As far as services go, there are many, and all are better than older methods of managing passwords. Research them online and make sure to read their reviews.

5. Read the URL Address

There are more spoof sites out there than you may realize, and they are there to do harm, not good. Always look at the URL to be sure you are on the site you intended to visit and not a clone — the clone will often have a very similar address, so look closely. For an additional layer of security, you might want to consider downloading HTTPS Everywhere, a plug-in that works on Chrome and Firefox and enables HTTPS encryption automatically on sites that support it.

6. Think Before You Click

The number one way people get got is thoughtless clicking. Whether it is a fake or corrupted website designed to plant malware on your device or a phishing email that looks like it came from a trusted institution or a friend but is in reality from a cyber fiend, you must have a pause in place — and it has to be automatic — when it comes to clicking on anything that comes your way from “out there,” even — or especially if — it looks like a friend or family member sent it.

7. Make Your Security a Seamless Part of Your Day

If you see a story about a data breach or a security compromise on a device you use, consider that an action item for your day. Just take a second to find out if you are affected, and then take whatever precaution you can. The 40 minutes that average person spends on personal grooming is a good rule of thumb. Think of your cyber hygiene like a glance in the mirror.

8. Use Two-Factor Authentication

Increasingly, two-factor authentication is available on the accounts we use daily, and it is essential that you set it up. It means that if a person hijacks one of your accounts, there isn’t much damage they can do without also having possession of your mobile phone or access to your email account. It’s an easy measure anyone can take to improve their personal cybersecurity.

In my book Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers and Identity Thieves, I go into greater detail about the various ways your information can be got and what you can do to protect it. The main lesson: Practice what I call “The Three Ms,” which are as follows:

  • Minimize Your Exposure. Don’t authenticate yourself to anyone unless you are in control of the interaction, don’t overshare on social media, be a good steward of your passwords, safeguard any documents that can be used to hijack your identity, and consider freezing your credit. (Here’s how to decide if you need a credit freeze.)
  • Monitor Your Accounts. Check your credit report religiously, keep track of your credit score, read Explanation of Benefits statements from your health insurer and review major accounts daily, if possible. (You can check two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.) If you prefer a more laid-back approach, sign up for free transaction alerts from your bank, credit union and credit card companies or purchase a sophisticated credit and identity monitoring program.
  • Manage the Damage. Make sure you get on top of any incursion into your identity quickly and/or enroll in a program where professionals help you navigate and resolve compromises. These are oftentimes available for free or at a minimal cost through insurance companies, financial institutions and HR departments.

Worried about getting hacked? You can find a full 50 ways to avoid (and deal with) a cyberattack on Credit.com. 

Image: LightFieldStudios

The post Are You Hack-Proof? Here’s How to Make Sure appeared first on Credit.com.

5 Tricks to Make Your Identity Portfolio More Secure

Here are five things you can do to improve your identity portfolio.

I’ve written extensively about the importance of building a credit portfolio. Credit equals buying power, which, when used wisely, can lead to increased net worth. Put simply, bad credit means fewer consumer choices and a staggering number of lost opportunities in the way of deals, car-factory incentives and other credit-based transactions. No matter the purchase type, the lowest interest rates and the biggest loans go to those with the strongest credit portfolios. You can read about building your credit portfolio here.

Another portfolio is the one most people neglect, if they even know it exists: the identity portfolio. Your identity portfolio is not something you can buy, trade or sell. It’s not as easy to assign a value to it. You can manage it badly and (most likely) not go bankrupt. In most situations, you won’t even lose any money — though you may not be able to get your hands on whatever was stolen by identity thieves for a while. That said, a poorly managed identity portfolio can cost you big time.

First of all, the longer your money is tied up (it can take between six months to almost one year to get a stolen tax refund), the longer it will lie dormant. You can’t invest accounts that are still receivable. Second, you lose something that’s hard to quantify — your peace of mind and your ability to get through your day undistracted.

In more concrete terms, while the crime committed against you is getting sorted out, your credit will take a hit. You will lose the chance to take advantage of credit-based purchases while you are resolving the fallout from identity theft. (Not sure if you’ve been the target of identity theft? You can check for signs by viewing two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Here are five things you can do to improve your identity portfolio to make sure that doesn’t happen.

1. Adopt Two-Factor Authentication

Increasingly, the websites you visit most — the ones that require authentication — will offer two-factor authentication. Whether the process triggers a code being sent to your phone via SMS or it fires off an email with that information, this simple security precaution makes it more difficult for a hacker to take over your accounts. The reason: They need more than the answers to your security questions or your login credentials. Two-factor authentication works because the scammer needs control of your email or access to your SMS messaging, which in most cases requires actual possession of your phone (and the security code to unlock it).

2. Make Your Login/User ID Complex

Hackers and scam artists are very good at cracking the virtual safes where you keep your money, and they know how to slip past the gates protecting your social media activity. Many sites still insist on making people use their email addresses as a user ID. While it’s not as quite as risky as a Social Security number or a name/date of birth combination, your email is personally identifiable information (PII). If you are given the choice to make up a user ID, there is no reason it has to be your name. Get creative or treat it like a password (but don’t get so creative that you are tempted to share your clever inventions with friends and strangers via social media). Always assume the bad guys are watching — they are.

3. Answer Security Questions Creatively

Security questions are a real problem. After decades of oversharing on social media, your mother’s maiden name, what high school you attended, the make of your first car and your favorite action movie are all up for grabs. Think you’ve been careful? What about your friends? Are you tagged? Mentioned? Even if you don’t have an account, chances are good that the people closest to you — those sharing biographical information with you — are active on social media. To avoid the possibility of a crook guessing his or her way into your life, your answers to security questions should always be lies. As above, let your spirit fly. But don’t be so creative that you can’t remember your lies. If you’re afraid of losing track, create a cheat sheet and store it on an encrypted thumb drive.

4. Store Your PII on an Encrypted Thumb Drive

Losing your most essential personally identifiable information is a real drag. I recommend scanning the most crucial documents, as well as your login information if you don’t use a password manager, encrypting that information, and storing it on an air-gapped device, a category that includes the humble thumb drive. Keep one at home and store the other in a safe deposit box or a safe. This is particularly useful when you’re traveling.

5. Choose Built-in Biometric Authentication

Speaking of thumb drives, for a reasonable price you can buy one that requires your fingerprint to access the information stored on it. Whether it’s a new smartphone or a gun safe, there are an increasing number of products that offer biometric security features.

Remember, as I discuss at length in my book SWIPED, don’t share too much information with folks you don’t know, whether in person, on the phone or online via social media, and never authenticate yourself to anyone unless you are in control of the interaction.

Bear in mind, micro-trends on social media (10 concerts I’ve been to, one is a lie; top 10 favorite movies, important books you’ve never read, etc.) are not only a fun way to get to know your friends better. They offer hackers information that can be used to answer security questions. In fact, you never know the origin of these digital stadium waves. It’s wise to assume they were started by identity thieves looking to harvest useable information. So resist the urge to answer them.

It’s also critical to set long and strong passwords and properly secure all computers, smartphones and tablets used by you and your family. As mentioned, use two-factor authentication when possible and shred sensitive documents.

Too much to remember? The nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has created a simple set of protocols called SHRED:

  • Strengthen passwords
  • Handle PII with care
  • Read credit reports annually
  • Empty your purse/wallet
  • Discuss these tips with friends

I encourage you to do all of the above and make good privacy and security hygiene a part of your daily life. Change the way you think about identity theft and your personally identifiable information. Over time, you will naturally become more vigilant. You will bear in mind what happens when people overshare on social media. You will be careful about who you tell what and why. You will not let down your guard, and before you know it, your identity portfolio will have a triple-A rating.

Image: andresr

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Creditor Gets a Judgment Against You — Now What?

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It’s a scary prospect: a creditor securing a judgment against you — which is probably why we get so many reader questions about the issue. A judgment represents a legal obligation to pay a debt, meaning a creditor or collector sued you over an outstanding debt and won. But that court win isn’t necessarily written in stone. Judgments can be appealed, reversed, amended or, at the very least, settled for less, depending on the circumstances and what you do next. (First step: Consider visiting a consumer attorney. Some offer free consults —and many will represent you for free if they think a collector has broken the law.)

If you’re dealing with debt collectors and facing a judgment — or are already (perhaps unexpectedly) saddled with one — we’ve pulled together answers to all the major questions that may be on your mind and where you can go from there.

How Does a Creditor or Collector Get a Judgment Against You?

In order to get a judgment against you, the creditor or collector must take you to court. If you don’t respond to a summons, or if you lose, the court will issue a judgment in favor of the creditor or collector. The judgment will be filed with the court, and once that happens, it is public record. That means it will likely end up on your credit reports as a negative item. (You can check your credit for judgments by viewing your free credit report summary on Credit.com.)

How Are Judgments Collected?

One of the main reasons you want to try avoid getting a judgment against you is that creditors may have additional ways to collect once a judgment has been issued. As we mentioned earlier, depending on your state’s laws, they may include going after your bank accounts or other property, or trying to garnish your wages. But as the saying goes, “you can’t get blood from a stone.” As the National Consumer Law Center points out in its book, “Surviving Debt:”

Even if you lose a lawsuit, this does not mean you must repay the debt. If your family is in financial distress and cannot afford to repay its debts, a court judgment that you owe the money may not really change anything. If you do not have the money to pay, the court’s judgment that you owe the debt will not make payment anymore possible.

If you aren’t sure what a judgment creditor can do to collect from you, it’s a good idea to consult a bankruptcy attorney who can help you understand what may be at risk if you don’t pay. The attorney can explain what property you own is “exempt,” or safe from creditors. You can also check out this article on how to get out of debt.

Can a Judgment Be Reversed?

Yes. In certain circumstances, you can ask the court to re-open a judgment or you can formally file an appeal. t’s also possible to have the terms of a judgment altered. And, with a few exceptions, a judgment can be discharged in bankruptcy. However, laws (and the timelines for their implementation) vary by state, so, again, if a creditor secures a judgment against you, it can be in your best interest to consult a local consumer attorney. You can find more about your legal rights post-judgment here.

Can I Settle a Judgment?

The answer to this question is often “yes.” Most judgment creditors know it is often difficult to collect judgments, especially if the debtor doesn’t have wages that can be garnished or assets they can go after. If you are able to get a lump sum of money from, say a relative, you may be able to offer that to the creditor to pay off the judgment. Just make sure you get any agreement in writing before you pay. Make sure the agreement spells out all the terms of the settlement, including the fact that you will not owe any more money after you make the agreed upon payment.

Can I Avoid a Judgment?

Another option is to settle the debt before it goes to court. The creditor may be willing to settle for part or all of the money you owe. Of course that only works if you can manage to pull together money to pay them. If you can, make sure you have a written agreement from them that states they will not pursue the debt in court if you make the payment as agreed. Then check with the court to make sure the matter has been dropped.

How Long Can Judgments Appear on Credit Reports?

Unpaid, they can remain on your credit reports for seven years or the governing statute of limitations, whichever is longer. Once judgments are paid, they must be removed seven years after the date they were entered by the court. But soon those parameters are changing: Beginning in July, the credit bureaus will exclude judgments that don’t contain complete consumer details or have not been updated in the last 90 days. (Wondering how long other stuff stays on your credit report? We’ve got you covered here.)

How Long Can Judgments Be Collected?

There is a specific time period for collecting judgments, and it also varies by state. This “statute of limitations” is often 10-20 years long. In addition, in most states it can be renewed. For that reason alone, it’s best to try to avoid getting a judgment against you in the first place. And if it does happen, it’s best to try to resolve the debt.

Can Interest Accumulate on a Judgment?

Yes. In most states, interest may be charged on a judgment, either at any rate spelled out in state law, or at the rate described in the contract you signed with the creditor. In addition, the judgment may include court costs and attorney’s fees.

Anything Else I Should Know About Judgments?

A debt collector that threatens to get a judgment against you or to garnish your wages or seize your property may be making an illegal threat. Talk with a consumer law attorney to find out if that’s the case.

And just because you haven’t heard anything about a judgment in a while, that doesn’t mean you should assume it has gone away. It’s possible that the creditor could decide at a later time to try again to collect from you. Plus, an unpaid judgment may prevent you from buying a home or getting credit at a decent interest rate. So it’s a good idea to try to resolve the judgment, either by filing for bankruptcy or by paying off or settling the judgment when you are able to.

Remember, when dealing with debt collectors, it pays to know your rights. You learn more about them in our Managing Debt Learning Center.

Reminder: This post is meant as educational information, not legal advice. Please consult an attorney for legal advice.

This article was updated. It originally ran on January 25, 2012. 

Image: walknboston, via Flickr.com

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Financial Literacy: Are you at the head of the class?

How would you grade yourself when it comes to financial literacy and credit? If you haven’t given it much thought, April is the perfect time to do so, as it is National Financial Literacy Month.

 

In a recent survey conducted by Equifax, most consumers do not place themselves at the head of the class when it comes to financial literacy. According to the findings, one-third of the respondents grade themselves a “C” when looking at their financial literacy knowledge.

 

Additionally, one in five surveyed consumers said they know more about national politics than their own credit histories. Thirteen percent said they knew more about their favorite sports teams, 7 percent said they knew more about this season of their favorite TV series, and 6 percent knew more about the latest fashion trends.

 

The good news is, most consumers are taking steps to educate themselves when it comes to financial literacy. When asked to select the steps they’ve taken to improve their financial literacy within the last year, 45 percent of the consumers said they read news articles on financial websites, while 28 percent sought guidance from family and friends.

 

While parents were the most popular source of information, the second most common source was a personal finance course during high school or college. Ninety percent of survey respondents saw value in teaching personal finance, saying they thought it should be a required course to graduate high school.

 

The survey also found:

 

  • Most surveyed consumers correctly selected the factors that can impact credits scores. Specifically, 87 percent knew paying bills on time is one factor that impacts a credit score.
  • Additionally, 42 percent of surveyed consumers knew that most types of negative information can stay on a credit report for seven years. This is up slightly from the 40 percent of surveyed consumers who knew this same information in 2016.
  • A majority of surveyed consumers felt confident about their short- and long-term financial futures. Sixty-one percent indicated they were confident or extremely confident about their short-term financial futures, and 54 percent indicated they were confident or extremely confident about their long-term financial futures.
  • Respondents 60 years of age and older were most confident about their financial futures, while respondents aged 45 through 59 were least confident.

 

If you, too, would give yourself a “C,” here are some things to consider doing to turn those Cs into better grades:

 

  • Pay your bills on time every time – no matter what;
  • Create and stick to your budget;
  • Check your credit report at least once a year. You can get a free copy of your credit report from each of the three nationwide consumer credit reporting agencies every 12 months by going to www.annualcreditreport.com. You won’t be able to see a credit score, but you’ll be able to check your information and even might spot signs of identity theft; and
  • Pay attention to your credit card balances, and always understand the commitments you’re making.

Stuck With a Huge Tax Bill? Here’s How to Deal

Here's what to do if you're facing down a big payment to Uncle Sam.

This year I owe quite a bit of money in taxes.

This amount (let’s call it “in the many thousands”) doesn’t come as a complete surprise since I made more cash last year than I did the year before, but still, it’s a large amount. As a freelancer I’ve learned to sock away 30% to 40% of each paycheck into a savings account set aside for taxes, so I’ll be OK to pay it. Other people might not be so lucky when Uncle Sam comes calling. A recent survey by the Federal Reserve found that 31% of people couldn’t even pay for a $400 emergency expense and 28% said they would need to borrow that money from friends or family

Luckily there are a few things you can do if you’re saddled with a tax bill you can’t pay.

1. Start at the Source

If you can’t pay your tax bill in full come April, fear not — you won’t be thrown in jail. (At least not yet!) The IRS offers a few ways to potentially alleviate the sticker shock. You could apply for an online payment agreement that allows you to pay your tax liability over time, or you could work with the IRS to settle for less than the full amount owed. That’s called an Offer in Compromise, and you can learn more about it — and if you qualify — here.

2. Ask to Have Your Penalties Reduced

Under certain circumstances — as in you or your spouse dealt with a serious illness last year or had an unusual tax event — the IRS has been known to work with taxpayers to waive certain penalties. Try writing a letter to explain the situation in detail, and be sure to specifically ask for an abatement. It’s worth a try.

3. Consider a Loan

If you’re in good financial standing otherwise, a personal loan through your bank with a decent interest rate could help you pay off a large tax bill right away. A better credit score will help secure a lower interest rate. You can view two of your scores for free on Credit.com.

4. Take out a HELOC 

A HELOC — or home equity line of credit — often offers interest rates that are lower than credit cards or potentially even personal loans, plus your interest could be tax deductible. The downside is that defaulting could mean losing your home — not something to take lightly. Be sure you know what you’re getting into before taking this course of action — learn more about it here.

5. Put It on Your Credit Card

While it should only come as a last resort, paying your bill on a credit card allows you to pay your debt on time (at least as far as the government is concerned), while giving you some time to pay it off in full on your credit card. If this is the way you’ll pay your taxes, it’s worth researching credit cards with 0% APR introductory offers that can allow you to take your time paying off the bill without paying interest. Keep in mind there will be an additional fee — which could be quite substantial, depending on how much you owe.

Whatever option you take, be sure to research all the options before jumping in to understand which one is best for your financial situation.

Image: jacoblund

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Financing a DIY Remodel Project? Here’s How Home Depot & Lowe’s May Help

Home Depot and Lowe's both offer ways to finance home improvement projects. Here's how to pick between them.

Now that spring is here, you might be thinking about tackling home improvement projects. Whether it’s a new deck or a remodel of your kitchen, you’ll need to figure out how to pay for the work. And if you’re taking on these projects yourself instead of hiring a contractor, you may be headed to your local hardware store.

If you’re debating between Home Depot or Lowe’s for supplies, perhaps considering their different financing options may help in your decision-making process. (Before you look for financing options, it’s a good idea to take a look at your credit to see how it’s doing and what terms and conditions you may qualify for. You can check two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Home Depot Consumer Credit Card

With the Home Depot consumer credit card (which you can read a full review of here), you will receive 0% financing for six months on any purchase of $299 or more. After the promotional period ends, the annual percentage rate (APR) will change to a variable rate of 17.99%, 21.99%, 25.99% or 26.99%, depending on your creditworthiness. There is no annual fee with this card, but it charges deferred interest, calculated from the purchase date if you don’t pay your balance in full by the end of the promotional period.

Home Depot Project Loan

If you need a longer window to pay off your project, especially if you’re doing a large project (think projects like entire room remodels or additions), a Home Depot project loan could be another option. You can borrow up to $55,000 and have up to 84 months to pay off the loan. The first six months are considered a purchasing period during which you only pay interest on the amount borrowed, based on a 7.99% APR. The APR stays the same after this introductory period, but you’ll start to pay off the balance in monthly installments as well.

Why You Might Choose Home Depot Financing

The options at Home Depot and Lowe’s are similar, but there are key differences that could push you in either direction, depending on your preferences. With the Home Depot consumer credit card, there will be times throughout the year when Home Depot offers extended promotional financing beyond the standard six months. Some offers could be as long as 24 months. If you make your purchase during this period, you’ll have more time to pay for your project with no interest.

Lowe’s Consumer Credit Card

When using the Lowe’s consumer credit card there are a few options. You can either elect to receive a 5% discount on your purchase or special financing on purchases of $299 or more. One special financing option is to receive 0% APR for six months. If you go this route you will be charge deferred interest if the balance is not paid by the end of the six-month period. If you think you will need more time, you can choose to borrow for up to 84 months with a fixed 7.99% APR. Just be aware that if you take advantage of the special financing offers, you will not be able to receive the 5% off offer as well.

Why You Might Choose Lowe’s Financing

If you don’t need special financing and just want a discount, the Lowe’s consumer credit card might be the best choice. Because you can earn 5% off every purchase, the overall cost of your project could be considerably reduced.

Alternatives to Home Depot or Lowe’s Financing

If you want to earn rewards for your purchases or extend the 0% APR period, you might want to consider a credit card instead. Here are a couple of options.

Chase Freedom Card

This card allows you to earn rewards on purchases and offers an introductory 0% APR for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers. After the introductory period, the APR will change to a variable 15.49% to 24.24%. When you sign up for the card, you receive a $150 bonus after you spend $500 within the first three months. The card also comes with rotating 5% cash back categories each quarter. There is a limit of $1,500 per quarter on bonuses, which typically include home improvement stores once a year. All other purchases earn 1% back. This card comes with no annual fee.

Citi Simplicity

If you want to boost the time you have to pay off your home improvement project, the Citi Simplicity card might be an option. (Full Disclosure: Citibank and Chase advertise on Credit.com, but that results in no preferential editorial treatment.) With this card, you receive an introductory 0% APR for 21 months on purchases and balance transfers. Once the introductory period is over, the APR changes to a variable 14.24% to 24.24%. This card also comes with no annual fee and will not charge a late fee.

Looking for more ways to spruce up your house? Check out our annual homeowner to-do list.

Image: andresr

At publishing time, the Chase Freedom and City Simplicity cards are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

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5 Basic Credit Lessons to Teach Your Kids

Your parents may have prepared you as best they could for the financial realities of adulthood, or they could have left you to figure it all out for yourself. But if you were taught the basics of finance and credit before you left the nest, you may have encountered less of a learning curve than your clueless counterparts. No matter your level of understanding, you likely have to do some learning yourself.

But now, if you’re the parent, one of your priorities is to prepare your kids for adulthood. Just as you would teach your children to dress themselves, ride a bike or do their laundry, you may want to impart lessons about credit to them to help them become successful and financially independent.

Here are five credit lessons you may wish to impart.

1. It’s Important to Regularly Check Your Credit Reports & Credit Scores

Credit reports and credit scores may seem like abstract concepts to teach your children. But you can use simple metaphors. School-age children can understand the concepts of grades and report cards, and these concepts apply to credit. The work you put into your credit is reflected in your credit report and credit score, which “grade” your performance. These grades can then be used to help you get “rewarded,” like by getting the best rate on a credit card or a loan, like for a car or home. (You can check out your free credit report summary on Credit.com, which includes grades on how you’re doing in the five key areas that make up your scores.) This brings us to our next lesson …

2. Credit Affects Their Life

Once your child understands the concept of a credit report and credit score, you can demonstrate how credit has affected your lifestyle. Many of your possessions — your home, car or credit card, for instance — were obtained using credit, and are examples of the power of credit. Of course, credit is not just a way to get “things.” It’s a tool that can help provide shelter, comfort and freedom.

3. There Are 5 Main Influencers of Credit

As your kids get older and have a firmer grasp on these concepts, they may be able to better understand how they can make credit work for them. You can show them credit is determined by five main factors:

  • Payment history
  • Debt usage
  • Age of accounts
  • Types of accounts
  • Credit inquires

If you own credit cards, have loans and monitor your credit report, you have teachable moments built into your financial routine. When your children are old enough, you can involve them as you pay a bill or check your credit report, explaining the process as you go.

4. Mistakes Can Cost You

Mistakes can be valuable life lessons for young people. But when it comes to credit, mistakes can be costly and their effects can be long-lasting. One late payment can cause your credit score to drop dramatically. And negative items such as accounts in collections and judgments can stay on your report for at least seven years. To a young person, seven years can be a long time to have difficulty obtaining loans or credit cards. You can also show them how errors on your credit report can be fixed by using this guide.

5. Credit Cards Are Merely Tools

Credit cards are not a magic wand for reckless spending, but they are also not inherently risky items to be avoided. They are tools. They can be invaluable to build credit and financial independence, but they can also be damaging if wielded incorrectly.

It’s no secret that young people can have trouble with impulse control. But you may want to impart that credit cards can be used responsibly or irresponsibly. The results will depend on the user.

Image: Liderina

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Stop Living Paycheck to Paycheck

A 2015 study by SunTrust Bank found that it’s not just those in a lower-income tax bracket that are living paycheck to paycheck. According to the online study, which was conducted by Harris Poll, nearly one-third of households earning $75,000 annually found themselves with more month than money. Perhaps even more worrisome, according to the study, a whopping 71 percent of millennials making $75,000 also had difficulties with their monthly spending.

One of the biggest factors to which these survey respondents attributed their spending problems wasn’t related to transportation or housing—or even medical expenses. More than two-thirds of retiree households earning $75,000 or more blamed their issues on dining out, and the same went for 70 percent of millennials making more than $75,000. Money spent on clothing, entertainment, and hobbies also made up a large portion of the drain on monthly cash flow.

If you’re finding that you don’t have as much left at the end of the month as you want, here are a few ideas to consider that may stretch your paycheck dollars further:

  1. Stop dining out as much.

You don’t have to be a financial expert to figure out that this approach can help put your spending on a diet, but the key phrase here is “as much.” You can still dine out, but instead of eating out every night, consider cutting back to once or twice a week. The same goes for weekends. Don’t go out on both Saturday and Sunday; instead, pick one day. The key is to go out less than you are now because a restaurant meal usually costs significantly more when compared to going to the grocery store and then fixing a meal at home.

  1. Spend less when eating out.

If you enjoy adult beverages consider switching to water. Not only will you leave the restaurant with more money in your wallet but also your body will likely appreciate it because you will be ingesting fewer calories. You can also consider ordering lower-cost lunch or appetizer portions instead of the larger dinner portions or splitting a meal with your friend or significant other. Finally, consider order desserts for special occasions only.

  1. Be smarter when clothes shopping.

Even though you may have been out of school for many years, you can still take advantage of a tax-free weekend in the dog days of summer. Depending on your state, sales tax is usually not collected on selected items, such as clothing, typically the weekend or a few days just before school starts. You may also want to consider other clothing options such as consignment stores, which often offer budget-friendly options.

  1. Find alternatives for entertainment and travel.

Instead of paying the big bucks watching professional sports at an overpriced stadium, consider visiting a local minor league, college, or high school football or basketball game. Tickets can be substantially cheaper or even free, as are the items at the concession stand. If you like traveling and consider yourself a little adventurous, take a train trip. Trains can be comfortable, you can see the sights, and the trips usually won’t be too hard on your pocketbook. If you like reading or watching movies, check out your local library. Find your nearest beauty school for a discounted haircut, manicure, or perhaps even a massage.

  1. Make hobbies pay.

If you’re retired and you have more time than money, consider turning a hobby into a fun side job. For example, if you enjoy home renovations, woodworking, painting, or do-it-yourself activities, you might be able to turn those hobbies into some extra money from your friends and neighbors. If you have a talent in stained glass, jewelry making, sewing, or knitting, you may be able to sell your unique goods to local craft stores or online using marketplaces like Etsy.

If you enjoy an expensive hobby like golf, you might consider exploring a cheaper alternative, such as biking, swimming, or tennis. You could take up chess or cards and join a local group, or you may want to try bird watching and nature walks, which usually don’t cost a thing. Whether you are retired or are just starting out your career, living on a budget doesn’t mean you can’t have fun!

Steve Repak is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional, CFP® Board Ambassador, and financial literacy speaker. He is also an Army veteran and the author of 6 Week Money Challenge: For Your Personal Finances. Follow him on Twitter: @SteveRepak