It’s Now Easier for Millions of Student Loan Borrowers to Get a Mortgage

Student loan borrowers who are making reduced income-driven repayments on their loans will have an easier time getting mortgages under a new policy announced recently by Fannie Mae.

Nearly one-quarter of federal student loan borrowers benefit from reduced monthly student loan payments based on their income, Fannie Mae says. However, there’s been some confusion about how banks should treat the lower monthly payments when they calculate a would-be mortgage borrower’s debt-to-income ratio (DTI): Should banks consider the reduced payment, the payment borrowers would have to pay without the income-based “discount,” or something in between?

It’s a tricky question, because student loan borrowers have to renew their qualification for the lower payments each year, meaning a borrower’s monthly DTI could change dramatically a year or two after qualifying for a mortgage. The banks’ confusion over which payment amount to use can mean the difference between a borrower qualifying for a home loan and staying stuck in a rental apartment.

There’s even more confusion when a mortgage applicant qualifies for a $0 income-driven student loan payment, or when there’s no payment amount listed on the applicant’s credit report. Previously, in that situation, Fannie Mae required banks to use 1% of the balance or a full payment term.

As of last week, Fannie has declared that mortgage lenders can instead use $0 as a student loan payment when determining DTI, as long as the borrower can back that up with documentation.

That announcement followed another Fannie update issued in April telling lenders that they could use the lower income-based monthly payment, rather than a larger payment based on the full balance of the loan, when calculating borrowers’ monthly debt obligations.

“We are simplifying the options available to calculate the monthly payment amount for student loans. The resulting policy will be easier for lenders to apply, and may result in a lower qualifying payment for borrowers with student loans,” Fannie said in its statement.

Taken together, the two announcements could immediately benefit the roughly 6 million borrowers currently using income-driven repayment plans known as Pay As You Earn (PAYE), Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE), Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR), and Income-Based Repayment (IBR).
Freddie Mac didn’t immediately respond to an inquiry about its policy in the same situation.

What This Means for Student Loan Borrowers Looking to Buy

Michigan-based mortgage broker Cassandra Evers said the changes “allow a lot more borrowers to qualify for a home.” Previously, there was a lot of confusion among borrowers, lenders, and brokers, Evers said. “[The rules have] changed at least five or six times in the last five years.”

The broader change announced in April, which allowed lenders to use the income-driven payment amount in calculations, could make a huge difference to millions of borrowers, Evers said.

“Imagine you have $60,000 in student loan debt and are on IBR with a payment of $150 a month,” she said. Before April’s guidance, lenders may have used $600 (1% of the balance of the student loans) as the monthly loan amount when determining DTI, “basically overriding actual debt with a fake/inflated number.”

“Imagine you are 28 and making $40,000 per year. Well, even if you’re fiscally responsible, that added $450-a-month inflated payment would absolutely destroy your ability to buy a decent home … This opens up the door to a lot more lenders being able to use the actual IBR payment,” Evers said.

The Fannie Mae change regarding borrowers on income-driven plans with a $0 monthly payment could be a big deal for some mortgage applicants with large student loans. A borrower with an outstanding $50,000 loan but a $0-a-month payment would see the monthly expenses side of their debt-to-income ratio fall by $500.

It’s unclear how many would-be homebuyers could qualify for a mortgage with an income low enough to qualify for a $0-per-month income-driven student loan repayment plan. Fannie did not have an estimate, spokeswoman Alicia Jones said.

“If your income is low enough to merit a zero payment, then it is probably going to be hard to qualify for a mortgage with a number of lenders. But, with the share of IBR now at almost a full 25% of all federally insured debt, it’s suspected that there will be plenty of potential borrowers who do,” Jones said. “The motivation for the original policy and clarification came from lenders’ requests.”

The post It’s Now Easier for Millions of Student Loan Borrowers to Get a Mortgage appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Buy a House When You Have Too Much Debt

move_in_celebration

When you fill out a mortgage application, lenders look for income to offset debt. If your monthly debt payments consume too much of your income, you may have a tough time qualifying for a home loan.

Underwriting, which is the decision-making of whether or not to grant credit, determines what your income is with supporting documentation like pay stubs, W-2s and tax returns. (It also looks at your credit scores to decide whether you qualify. You can get your two free credit scores, updated each month, on Credit.com.)

Fortunately, a lender may be willing to look at more than just your regular salary when it comes time to calculate your debt-to-income ratio. Here are various forms of income most mortgage banks will sign off on.

1. Annuities

If you’re eligible, you can purchase an annuity, a contract sold by a life insurance company that provides regular monthly income in return for an initial lump-sum deposit.

The income derived from this annuity will be used to determine how much mortgage and/or house you can qualify for. An annuity can be brand new — you need not have a long history of this income as long as it’s set to continue for the next 36 months or longer.

2. Social Security Income

If you’re eligible for Social Security, you might want to consider taking it early as this income can easily be used to help you qualify for a mortgage. You may be also able to “gross up” this income by up to 1.25%, depending on whether or not you pay taxes on it.

3. Notes Receivable 

Generally, you’ll need to earn income from a note receivable (a credit extended to a business) for at least 6 months for it to count on a mortgage application. Notes receivable income has to be based on the market rate and it’s the interest on the note that is used to determine your eligibility for your desired borrowed amount. For example, if you have a note receivable at 5.5% based on a principal balance at $50,000 that income would be $229.16 per month used for a mortgage.

4. Purchasing a Rental Property

If you are looking to purchase a rental property, you’re in luck. You can use projected fair market rents to qualify for its mortgage. Lenders will use up to 75% of gross market rents to offset the mortgage payment. In other words, because the renters are making the mortgage payment, you don’t need to earn as much to get a green light on your loan application.

5. Renting Your Current Home

If you are trying to buy a new primary residence, but don’t have enough income to support two mortgage payments, you can rent out the property. A rental agreement and tenant security deposit allows you to offset the mortgage payment on your current home to qualify for a mortgage on a new home. The concept is almost identical to purchasing a rental property, with the exception of needing to have a rental agreement in place for your current home.

6. Self-Employment Income

A history of self-employment income is required for it to count on your mortgage application. Generally, Schedule C Sole Proprietor income needs to be in place for at least 12 months in order for that income to count. Note: If you have been self-employed for the past two years and you had one bad year, followed by a good year, your income will be averaged by your lender.

More on Mortgages & Homebuying:

Image: Purestock

The post How to Buy a House When You Have Too Much Debt appeared first on Credit.com.