20 Credit Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

Credit Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

If you have a credit card, your financial institution has likely mailed you checks for cash advance purposes. Understanding this aspect of your available credit is incredibly important, as it can be much more expensive than simply making a purchase.

Taking a cash advance gives you money now in cases where you can’t use a credit card (perhaps paying rent), or have otherwise maxed out your purchasing power. Many financial institutions will charge you a fee between 1% and 5% just for making this transaction.

But some cards have no fees for cash advances.

The catch is, interest starts accruing immediately on cash advances, meaning that even if you pay your statement balance in full by the due date, you will still incur interest charges in the interim. So if you do a cash advance, try to pay it off as quickly as possible, even before the due date, to minimize the interest you pay.

Best Cards with No Cash Advance Fees

These credit unions offer no cash advance fees on all their credit cards. While you’ll pay interest from the day you take out the cash, as a last resort it’s a better bet than paying an upfront fee. These are all credit unions anyone can join, but many of them require excellent credit to qualify for a card.

PenFed Credit Union

PenFed Credit Union CDs Pentagon Federal Credit Union, commonly known as PenFed, offers five different credit cards with no cash advance fees. None of them charge a foreign transaction fee, and all interest rates are the same for purchases and cash advances.

Anyone can join PenFed Credit Union simply by making a one-time donation of $14 to Voices for America’s Troops, or a one-time $15 donation to the National Military Family Association.

  • PenFed Platinum Rewards Visa Signature Card
  • PenFed Promise Visa Card
  • PenFed Gold Visa Card
  • PenFed Premium Travel Rewards American Express Card
  • PenFed Power Cash Rewards Visa

American 1 Credit Union

American 1 Credit Union American 1 Credit Union offers four different credit cards with no cash advance fees. Interest rates on purchases and cash advances are the same, though there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

Anyone can join American 1 Credit Union by joining Community 1 Cooperative. You pay $3 for membership, which includes a litany of discounts on consumer products and services across an array of industries.

  • American 1 In-House Visa

CapEd Federal Credit Union

 CapEd Federal Credit Union CapEd Federal Credit Union offers one card with no cash advance fees. It also carries the same interest rate for purchases and cash advances, but does have a foreign transaction fee that varies depending on if the transaction is in USD or requires conversion into a foreign currency.

To join CapEd, all you have to do is make a one-time $20 donation to the Idaho CapEd Foundation.

  • Visa Platinum Card by CapEd Federal Credit Union

First Tech Federal Credit Union

First Tech Federal Credit Union First Tech Federal Credit Union offers three different cards that come with no cash advance fees. The interest rates on these transactions will be higher than the interest rates on regular purchases, however. There are no foreign transaction fees.

Anyone can join First Tech through membership in the Financial Fitness Association, which costs $8 per year, or a digital membership to the Computer History Museum, which will run you $15 per year.

  • Odyssey Rewards World Elite MasterCard
  • Platinum Rewards MasterCard
  • Choice Rewards World MasterCard
  • Platinum Secured MasterCard

ISU Credit Union

ISU Credit Union ISU Credit Union offers two cards that have zero cash advance fees. Interest rates on cash advances are higher than those on regular purchases for the first year only, and there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

To join ISU Credit Union if you don’t live, work or study in Southeastern Idaho, you can qualify through paid membership at a number of Southeastern Idaho organizations including humane societies and educational cause groups.

  • Platinum MasterCard by ISU Credit Union
  • Platinum Plus MasterCard by ISU Credit Union

Mid-Illini Credit Union

Mid-Illini Credit Union Mid Illini Credit Union offers two different cards that come with no cash advance fees. Interest rates for purchases and cash advances are identical, and there is a foreign transaction fee of 1%.

Anyone can join Mid Illini Credit Union by making a one-time $1 donation to Dollars for Scholars, an organization that provides scholarships to students of McLean County, Illinois.

  • Visa Classic Card by Mid Illini Credit Union
  • Visa Platinum Card by Mid Illini Credit Union

Stanford Federal Credit Union

Stanford Federal Credit Union Stanford Federal Credit Union offers a singular card with no cash advance fees for which the general public qualifies. There are no foreign transaction fees, and rates are the same for purchases and cash advances.

To join Stanford Federal Credit Union, you can become a member at the Museum of American Heritage or join Friends of the Palo Alto Library.

  • Visa Platinum Cash Back Rewards Card by Stanford Federal Credit Union

Digital Credit Union

Digital Credit Union Digital Credit Union offers two cards with no cash advance fees. While interest rates are the same for both cash advances and regular purchases, foreign transaction fees will vary based on the need for currency conversion.

You can join Digital Credit Union by donating to any number of organizations that match your interests. The most common organization new members choose is Reach Out for Schools, which only requires a one-year membership at the cost of $10.

  • Visa Platinum Card by Digital Credit Union
  • Visa Platinum Rewards Card by Digital Credit Union

Alternatives to Cash Advances

While cards that offer no fees on cash advances are cheaper, that does not mean these transactions are cheap. You should only take a cash advance as a last resort in a true emergency. In order to avoid becoming one of the American households that can’t cover $400 financial hardships, start building an emergency fund today. When you withdraw money from your own savings account, you have to pay zero interest and zero fees.

If you don’t have an emergency fund, but you do have a credit card, it is wiser to charge emergency expenses as a purchase rather than taking money out as a cash advance if at all possible. Even when interest rates are identical for these two different types of transactions, cash advances will start charging you those rates immediately, while purchases won’t require you to pay interest until after the first statement is issued.

Payday loans are another alternative. However, they’re not necessarily a good one. They often come with numerous fees and aren’t as hassle-free as some lenders make them out to be. If you don’t pay off your loan at the end of the term (often about two weeks), you risk incurring fees that can add up to more than your loan. This can translate into effective interest rates in the triple digits. If they’re your only option, be extremely careful. Above all, make sure you fully understand the terms and costs.

Foreign travelers will also want to charge purchases whenever possible for this same reason. If you must use cash, a cash advance is a safer alternative to withdrawing money from your bank account abroad, but it is also wise to pay it off using your financial institution’s online services as soon as possible to avoid paying more interest than you have to.

Cash advances aren’t ideal, so if you can avoid them you should. However, they are a much better option than turning to the alternative lending industry where you’ll find predators and payday loans.

The post 20 Credit Cards with No Cash Advance Fees appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

7 Holiday Debt Traps that Can Sabotage Your Finances

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For some consumers, the cheer of the holiday season soon will be replaced with dread over debt.  

Holiday shoppers in 2016 took on an average of $1,003 worth of debt, up from $986 in 2015, and 11 percent said they would only be making the minimum payments, which can extend the payoff date by years.  

“Consumer debt is at the highest of all time,” says Howard Dvorkin, CPA and chairman of Debt.com.

Total household debt rose to a record $12.96 trillion for the third quarter of this year, according to data released in November by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Credit card debt, for example, rose by 3.1 percent, to $808 billion. 

Dvorkin expects that this holiday season will be expensive as consumers make more online purchases with credit cards and because of overall optimism about the economy. 

Retail holiday sales were expected to grow to $1.04 trillion-$1.05 trillion in 2017, according to Deloitte’s annual holiday retail forecast. Deloitte also projects that e-commerce sales during the holiday season will grow to $111 billion-$114 billion, an 18-21 percent increase from the 2016 holiday season, and 55 percent of survey respondents planned to shop online for gifts. 

“When people feel really good about things, they tend to spend more,” Dvorkin says.   

Bruce McClary, vice president of communications at the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, says people have a tendency to overspend during the holidays, relying heavily on credit cards and not paying off the debt until later, sometimes even years later.   

McClary has also noticed that credit card delinquencies have been increasing slightly over the last two quarters. The Federal Reserve Bank notes in its report that “credit card balances increased and flows into delinquency have increased over the past year.”
 

While most Americans are aware and ready to spend a little extra during the holiday season, you can make it a little more merry by avoiding these common debt traps.  

Keeping up with the Joneses

Holiday purchasing pressure ranges from buying the hottest toys to giving (or buying for yourself) the latest tech gadget or the biggest TV on the block. People are tempted to get the latest and greatest, Dvorkin says. 

The average consumer spent roughly $967 on holiday shopping in 2016, up 3.4 percent from 2015, according to the National Retail Federation. Deloitte forecasts that the average consumer in 2017 will spend an average of $1,226, or nearly $2,226 among households earning $100,000 or more.

It all adds up, especially if you’re out to outdo a neighbor: The tree and all the trimmings; hostess gifts for parties; food for your own holiday meals and entertaining; your Clark Griswold-style light shows. Randy Williams, president of A Debt Coach, a counseling service in Kentucky, says the desire for personal reward can contribute to holiday debt. 

“You feel good when you do something for somebody,” he says. 

But then consumers may have the motto “One for you, one for me,” and purchase an item for themselves, which continues the spending cycle. 

Hot holiday toy crazes

Unfurling your child’s Christmas wish list can be at once fun and terrifying. Parents planned to spend, on average, $495 per child, according to 2016 holiday shopping data from the Rubicon Project. 

Lists could include hot holiday toys for 2017 like the $30-$45 Fingerlings (the little plastic monkeys that attach to fingers and move in response to sounds and touch) a $300 Nintendo Switch gaming console or even the $799 Lego Ultimate Collectors Series Millennium Falcon, the company’s biggest set with 7,541 pieces. 

When the toys start to run out, the prices can escalate. The Fingerlings, for example, typically retail at $14.99, but some were listed in November for twice as much on eBay. Since it can be harder for parents to say “no” to the frenzy when it’s a gift that’s going to bring a smile to a little one’s face, Williams says there’s extra incentive to plan well. 

Store credit card pitches

McClary warns not to get into store credit card offers. The instant savings of 10 percent off on the day of your purchase could come with a high cost, such as 29.99 percent APR later. 

“People should resist the temptation,” he says.  

Williams says there’s a reason for the incentives, such as a discount on your purchase, because the company will make back whatever you initially saved. 

“Most people do not pay off their cards within the intro offer time,” he says. 

Instead, set aside cash for holiday spending and use it, instead of credit. If you’re sure you can “affordably borrow,” Williams suggests using an existing line of credit instead of falling for the attractive offers from retailers.  

“Special” offers

Deals seem to abound when shopping online or in stores, but if you aren’t careful, some can land you in more trouble than no deal at all. 

McClary advises to avoid promotions like deferred interest cards and convenience checks. Discounts during the holidays are usually found during other times of the year, too, when the budget is less tight.  

“It’s to the advantage of the consumer to be looking at sales during the year and look for opportunities to get the most out of their money,” he says. 

Trying to keep family traditions alive

Wanting to continue your grandparents’ or parents’ traditions may be sentimental but also pricey in today’s economy. Maybe they held extravagant dinner parties, paid for holiday trips and gave their children  a certain number of gifts every year. You want to follow suit, but can’t afford it. 

“(I’m a) firm believer that what gets us in trouble in the holidays is wanting to do what Mom and Dad did,” Williams says. “Things are more expensive now.” 

Shopping with family members post-Thanksgiving, on Black Friday, although a tradition, also may be a temptation because of impulse buys or if family members don’t hold you accountable to sticking to a budget. 

“It’s tradition but it’s also a day people can’t afford,” Williams says.  

Hosting hordes of holiday visitors

While milk and cookies are left out for Santa, entertaining guests, from neighbors and co-workers to out-of-town family and friends, can increase your food and utilities spending in December. 

According to a holiday retail survey by Deloitte, 24 percent of people plan to attend and/or host more parties and events during the holidays.  

“You spend money in all sorts of ways,” Dvorkin says. 

Indulgent spending

“Where the problem is, we don’t plan for Christmas, we just do Christmas,” says Williams. He says that means sometimes consumers plan, mentally, to go into debt.  

He advises to plan ahead for the next season, adding that he knows people who start checking items off their list in February during sales, or in June or July when fewer people are buying and prices are lower.  

The NRF predicts holiday sales, including gifts and food and beverage items, to reach nearly $682 billion, up from $655.8 billion in 2016. Without careful spending, a large amount of that could be a debt burden on consumers until the next season comes around.

“You don’t want this to be a compounding problem that continues to grow each year,” McClary says. 

The post 7 Holiday Debt Traps that Can Sabotage Your Finances appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

The Ultimate Holiday Debt Survival Guide for 2017

Here are six personality types that can keep you from financial success and how to spot them.

Millions of Americans have an overwhelming amount of debt, and during the holidays, many consumers spend more than they have. Don’t fall victim to overspending and accruing debt this holiday season. You can still love and celebrate the holiday season without overspending on holiday gifts, food, decorations, lights, and entertaining. After all, the holidays are a time to gather with friends and family and to be grateful for what you have!

We compiled the ultimate holiday survival guide to get you through this season of giving without going into debt. Here are five tips to help you spend wisely and protect your finances.

1. Create a Holiday Budget

You might be tired of hearing about budgeting, but if you’re serious about not overspending this holiday season, you should make a holiday budget. It’s important to be realistic—don’t make guesses if you can avoid it. Look back on how much you spent last year to guide you as you create your budget, and see where you could cut back.

The key to staying on budget is proper organization so you can have a holiday season that’s free of financial stress. When it comes to gift giving, be sure to make a list and check it twice. Don’t feel pressured to give to friends or extended family if your budget doesn’t allow it.

2. Use Cash

It can be discouraging to start off the New Year already behind on the eight ball in money matters. To avoid a financial hangover in January, you may want to consider using cash or a debit card for your holiday purchases—instead of a credit card. By having cash on hand when holiday shopping, you will be less likely to go over budget. You’ll be forced to spend only what you have available as opposed to a large credit line.

If you do plan to use a credit card, remember that you’ll have to pay interest on your purchases if you don’t pay the entire balance in full. Be sure to add due dates to your calendar for each of your credit cards and schedule a reminder on your phone. Overdue payments can hurt your credit score and push you further into debt with late fees.

Additionally, learn to prioritize your bills. Pay off the card with the highest interest rate first—otherwise you’ll pay more over time. You should also consider dropping any retail credit cards after you’ve paid them off. These tend to have the highest interest rates and limited benefits.

3. Plan Ahead

Last-minute shopping is stressful, and it can also be costly. If you’re in a rush, you’re more likely to forget about your budget and instead grab what is most convenient. Taking the time to research the best deals, sales, and prices can save you time and money. Try spreading your holiday gift purchases throughout the year, in place of doing it all in December.

4. Get Creative

If your budget doesn’t allow you to buy for everyone you would like to this year, a great alternative is a holiday grab bag. With a grab bag, everyone buys a few small gifts to wrap and throw into a bag or a box, then each participant randomly picks one gift at a time until all the gifts are gone. Anyone who would like to participate should agree to a price that fits into everyone’s budget and how many gifts each person should buy. This is not only frugal but also fun!

If you’d rather stick to traditional gift giving, get creative with it. Try making do-it-yourself projects or crafts—a homemade gift is much more sentimental than a store-bought one anyway. For your children’s teachers or coaches you would like to include in your holiday list, consider gift cards, home-baked goodies, or both combined. Gifts don’t need to be lavish to show someone you appreciate them.

5. Implement Damage Control 

If it’s too late and you’ve already overspent this holiday season or are already in deep credit card debt, don’t panic. There are ways to recover and do damage control after the holiday season is over.

The most important thing of all is committing to paying off your debt. It might be easier to simply continue your regular spending habits and pay the minimum balance when you remember. But giving debt priority, even when it’s an insignificant amount, will do wonders in helping you maintain good financial health.

With all the new items you’ve received during the holiday season, you might have some older things you can sell. Clothes, electronics, and even books could earn you a little extra cash to help pay off your debt. Amazon, eBay, and your local consignment shops or thrift stores are fantastic venues for selling your unwanted stuff.

Take a look at your budget and make sure you set aside enough money each paycheck to make at least double the minimum payment. But if you can manage it, you should aim to pay much more than that. Fine-tune your budget to see where you can cut back so you can make more substantial payments to your credit cards. The sooner you’re out of debt, the sooner you can start putting that money where it really matters.

Don’t let your finances take a major hit this season. Follow these tips to avoid overspending, and keep an eye out for other common holiday pitfalls. By building more frugal shopping habits, you can also improve your credit score. If you’re curious about how your credit’s faring now, take a free look at your credit score through Credit.com.

Image: gilaxia 

The post The Ultimate Holiday Debt Survival Guide for 2017 appeared first on Credit.com.

Can I Get a Holiday Loan?

can i get a holiday loan
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If you’re stressed over the possibility of racking up holiday debt this year, you may be right to worry. In our 2016 holiday debt survey, 65.2 percent of respondents who added debt during the holidays said they did so unexpectedly and didn’t budget for the extra expenses.

This just goes to show what can happen if you take on debt without a plan. If you charge holiday purchases and don’t have a plan to pay them off, you can wind up making monthly payments for longer than you think — and fork over lots of interest payments along the way.

While most people said credit cards were the main source of their debt, nearly 9 percent said they used personal loans to finance their holiday spending, making it the third most popular borrowing option overall.

If you’re considering using a personal loan to fund your holiday shopping this year, it’s important to know the pros and cons first.

First up … what’s a holiday loan?

A holiday loan is simply a personal loan issued by a financial institution, like an online lender, bank or credit union. While these loans are intended to cover holiday expenses, they are not the same as other short-term loans such as payday or cash advance loans.

Since holiday loans are unsecured, you can borrow money without putting up anything as collateral. But because the lender is assuming more risk this way, these loans can carry very high interest rates. That being said, if you have good credit, relatively low levels of debt and sufficient income, you might qualify for lower rates.

Generally speaking, you can get a holiday loan (or other unsecured personal loan) in amounts up to $35,000 with several lenders. However, some may let you borrow quite a bit more. Your interest rate can vary depending on your creditworthiness, and the amount of time you have to repay your loan depends on how much you borrow and the loan terms you select. Personal loans are issued with a fixed repayment period, which can last up to 84 months.

Why get a loan for the holidays?

While some people budget throughout the year, setting aside money for the holiday season, there are plenty of ways to get off track. It’s possible that other expenses will pop up and cause your savings plan to go awry, or that you’ll need to pay for holiday travel or to get your home ready for guests.

Applying for a personal loan may be a good way to bridge the gap between the money you have and the money you need, says Jeff Rose, a certified financial planner and Discover Personal Loans partner. “Borrowing a set amount of money with a fixed repayment term and fixed rate can help you meet your financial obligations over the holidays while having a set budget with a clear payoff schedule, resisting the temptation to rely on revolving debt.”

Rose says he has seen situations where a holiday loan made sense. In one situation, an acquaintance of his was desperate to return home for the holidays to see his dying father on what could be his last Christmas. In that case, taking out a personal loan to travel home was “one of the best investments they’ve ever made,” Rose tells MagnifyMoney.

But, holiday travel isn’t the only reason to take out a holiday loan.

For example, the holidays are a popular time to propose, and “engagement rings can get expensive,” says Rose. You might even find the perfect ring that costs more than you have saved, but the time is ripe for asking.

“That’s where a personal loan can be a financially responsible tool to help you make this purchase,” he adds.

Or, perhaps you want to borrow money to cover the costs of holiday gifts, replace the appliances in your home or make a special purchase for your family.

What it takes to qualify

Getting a personal loan to cover expenses during the holidays is no different than getting a personal loan any other time of year, notes Rose. “Different lenders have different qualifications for loan approval and offer different rates, so my advice would be to research and find what fits your financial situation,” he says.

Generally speaking, however, some typical minimum requirements for a personal loan include being a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, being at least 18 years of age, and having a low debt-to-income ratio.

Your credit score may also impact your ability to get a personal loan. While it’s possible to get a personal loan with a FICO score of 500 or above, the best loan rates and terms go to those with good or excellent credit.

In addition to your credit score, another important requirement for getting a personal or holiday loan is that DTI — debt-to-income ratio — says San Diego financial adviser Taylor Schulte. To calculate your debt-to-income ratio, add up your monthly debt obligations (i.e. mortgage, auto loan) and divide that by your monthly gross income.

“Some experts say a debt-to-income ratio higher than 36 percent can dramatically reduce your chances of getting a loan or increase the interest rate to an unreasonable number,” he says. To improve your debt-to-income ratio, try paying down your existing debts,, picking up extra work to bring in additional income or putting on your game face and asking for a raise.

Schulte also notes that, if all else fails, you could ask a family friend or family member to cosign for your loan. While this can help you get a lower interest rate and better terms, this also means your cosigner is jointly responsible for repayment.

Holiday loans versus credit cards

While a holiday loan can be a good option for consumers who need cash to cover end-of-year or holiday expenses, some consumers also turn to credit cards to meet their needs. This strategy can be advantageous since some credit cards may offer a 0 percent intro APR on purchases for 12 months or longer. But, before you decide between a holiday loan and a 0 percent intro APR credit card, it’s important to note how each one works — and the reasons one option might work better for you than the other.

If you’re considering a personal loan, know that these financial products typically have a fixed interest rate and are structured with equal payments made over a specified time period. In that respect, a personal loan may be easier to pay off in a timely manner since you know exactly when your last payment will come due.

With a credit card, on the other hand, you’ll get access to a line of credit you can use to charge purchases. Because the amount you borrow may vary, you may not know your exact monthly payment. Plus, your monthly payment will increase as you use your card to charge more purchases.

While many cards offer 0 percent intro APR on purchases for more than 12 months, your APR, or interest rate, also resets after the introductory offer is over. If you don’t pay off your balance before that happens, you could wind up paying a hefty interest rate on your balance that is higher than what you would pay on a personal loan.

Things to watch out for

While borrowing money for the holidays can make sense, that doesn’t mean this option is foolproof. There are plenty of risks that come with borrowing.

Risk #1: Borrowing without a plan

Whether you decide to take out a holiday loan or charge your holiday purchases on a credit card, Rose recommends making sure you have a clear plan for the funds you borrow and a true need, along with the ability to repay the loan.

“Also, consider the repayment timeline and total cost of the loan, including any fees, from the start to ensure you can afford the monthly payments,” he adds

Any time you borrow money, you should also make sure you’re not borrowing to buy things you can’t truly afford — or just being wasteful in general. “Around the holiday season, it can be easy to spend more than you planned,” says Rose.

If you rack up too much debt and don’t have a clear plan to pay it back, you could wind up spiraling into more and more debt or taking years to pay it all off. And obviously, more debt inevitably leads to more interest charges layered on top.

Risk #2: Too many fees

Look for personal loans that do not charge additional fees — examples of these would be origination fees and prepayment penalties.

And understand other potential traps, such as with personal loan companies that precompute interest or ask you to pay for unnecessary insurance. In a precomputed loan, the total amount of interest that you would pay during the entire term of the loan is calculated and added to the balance up front.

Risk #3: Not shopping around

Another major risk of personal loans is that you won’t take the time to shop around, Schulte says. Through his personal experience, Schulte has seen how many people wrongly assume their primary bank is the best place to get a loan — even when that’s not even close to being accurate.

“It doesn’t hurt to start with your primary bank to see what they can offer,” says Schulte. “But, failing to shop around could literally cost you thousands.”

Schulte suggests shopping around with at least three to five lenders before making a decision. Fortunately, it’s fairly easy to get multiple loan quotes online.

We recommend you shop online to find lenders without those tricks and traps. A good place to start the search is with LendingTree, MagnifyMoney’s parent company. With a short online form LendingTree will perform a soft credit pull (with no impact to your score) and match you with multiple loan offers.

Because dozens of lenders participate in LendingTree’s program, you may also find lenders willing to accept borrowers with less-than-perfect credit.

LEARN MORE Secured

on LendingTree’s secure website

Tips for financial success during the holidays

There are a number of things you can do throughout the year to help yourself financially when the holidays roll around, Rose says. If you’re eager to make the most of this holiday season, or at least escape the holidays with minimal financial damage, consider these suggestions:

  • Save for the holidays all year long.“If each month you put a portion of your income in a separate account designated for holiday spending, you should have a nice amount of money set aside when the season arrives,” says Rose. While it may be too late to start saving for this year’s holiday season, it’s never too early to start saving for next year.
  • Set appropriate expectations for your family.Whether you’re worried you’ll have a skimpier array of gifts under the tree or not, Rose says it’s important to have an upfront conversation with your family (spouse and children) about how many gifts they are going to receive and how much you’re going to spend. “It’s easy to get caught up in the season and start adding more and more to the pile and buying stuff you don’t need,” he says.
  • Stock up on gifts all year long.“You can also take advantage of buying gifts when retailers are having big sales,” says Rose. On Cyber Monday, you can typically get huge savings on everything from clothes to electronics. Buying in advance on these type of sales is huge, and right after this year’s holiday season can be a great time to stock up on next year’s gifts.
  • Opt out of gift exchanges.If you’re involved in multiple gift exchanges or “Secret Santa” arrangements, opting out for the year can help you save some cash. By not participating in these holiday “extras,” you can save money for the gifts that are most important.

The post Can I Get a Holiday Loan? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

What Happens to Debt When You Divorce? 

what happens to debt when you divorce
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For every two to three new marriages in 2014 there was at least one divorce, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data — a grim statistic that could easily kill deflate your inner romantic.  

Breaking up a marriage is hard to do and it’s made all the more difficult by the financial implications. 

The average price of a divorce, from start to finish, lands at around $15,500 (including $12,800 in attorney’s fees), according to a 2014 survey put out by Nolo, a publisher specializing in legal issues. If the legal expenses are one side of the coin, figuring out what to do with your joint financial assets and debts is the other.  

We’ve talked about what happens to debt after you’ve married. Now it’s time to ask what happens to debt when you divorce. 

Here’s everything you need to know, plus some tips for protecting your finances when a marriage ends. 

Where you get divorced 

When it comes to splitting up debts, the state you live in can sway the outcome in a big way. A majority are considered equitable distribution states, where the judge uses his or her discretion to divide up debt in a way that’s deemed fair and evenhanded. 

Each state has its own set of laws and procedures, but Vikki S. Ziegler, a longtime matrimonial law attorney licensed in multiple states, says the court generally has more leeway in an equitable distribution state.  

Simply put, the judge has the freedom to take multiple factors into consideration. This might include everything from one spouse’s income to another’s employment status.  

The situation could play out much differently if you live in a community property state. These states are listed below, and in them, debt is viewed a bit differently. 

  • Alaska* 
  • Arizona 
  • California 
  • Idaho 
  • Louisiana 
  • Nevada 
  • New Mexico 
  • Texas 
  • Washington 
  • Wisconsin 

*Alaska has an optional community property system. 

Community property states typically split all marital debt right down the middle, regardless of who actually accrued the debt. This means that if your spouse racked up hidden balances during the marriage, you’ll likely be on the hook for half. In community property states, the divorce process is typically more cut and dried than subjective. 

“The most important thing for someone leaving a marriage to understand is how the law applies in each state that they are getting divorced in,” Ziegler told MagnifyMoney. “How are you going to allocate debt, and who’s going to be responsible for what?” 

An experienced divorce attorney can help fill in the blanks. 

The type of debt 

The type of debt you have is another biggie. Let’s first zero in on secured debt, like a mortgage or car loan.  

According to John S. Slowiaczek, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, whichever spouse decides to keep certain assets — such as the house or a car — will also assume whatever debt is left over.  

“Debt associated with an asset will ordinarily be allocated to the person acquiring the property,” Slowiaczek tells MagnifyMoney. 

Your mortgage: The loan will likely be the responsibility of both parties equally, unless it’s only in one party’s name. If you both co-borrowed the mortgage, you’ll have to decide who will keep the loan and who will exit if one partner wants the house. One way to get one name off a mortgage loan is to refinance the debt and put the loan under just one person’s name.  

The equity built up in the home usually belongs to each party 50/50 as long as the title is held as joint tenants with right of survivorship or tenants by the entirety; don’t be intimidated by the legal jargon. All this means, essentially, is that you legally own the home together.  

If you decide to sell the house, either the couple or the court will likely compel that process, after which you can divide the proceeds equally after paying off the debt.  

If you’re planning on staying in your home, refinancing your mortgage before you divorce can help ease the financial blow. With divorce being as costly as it is, finding ways to trim your budget can better prepare you for a single-income lifestyle. Refinancing could do just that, lowering your monthly payment and potentially your interest rate, assuming you have good credit.  

A lower bill may also make it financially possible for you to stay in the house, if that’s what you want. Plus, if you apply before splitting, you’re more likely to get approved since a combined income will likely make you more attractive to lenders.  

Your car loan: The same usually goes for car loans — if one spouse wants to keep the vehicle, he or she could refinance the loan under his/her own name. Or you can sell altogether and divvy up the cash. As Slowiaczek mentioned above, remaining debt follows the asset, so whoever keeps the car will assume the debt. 

Credit debt. The way nonsecured debts, like credit cards, are handled goes back to individual state laws.  

In a community property state, Ziegler says the courts usually take a 50/50 view of marital debt. But equitable distribution states typically look at who contributed to the debt, how much money each party makes, and other statutory requirements that allow them to potentially allocate the debt differently. In other words, things aren’t as black and white, and the courts have more interpretive wiggle room.   

Barbara, a 36-year-old sales professional in Tampa, Fla. is eight months into the divorce process. Florida is an equitable distribution state, meaning the debt she and her husband accrued could end up being split any number of ways. One of the toughest parts of her experience has been the $35,000 of credit card debt she says she shares with her ex. 

“It was mostly accrued by [my husband], but mostly in my name,” she told MagnifyMoney. The couple also have a $202,000 mortgage, and deciding who will assume the mortgage (and the equity in the home that comes with it) has been a point of contention.  

Ziegler says Barbara probably has more leverage than if she lived in a community property state.  

When you acquired the debt 

One bit of good news: no matter where you live, Ziegler says premarital debts are off limits. Where divorce is concerned, the court is only interested in debts that were accrued during the marriage. The same generally goes for debt acquired post-separation.  

How the debt was used 

Every case is different, but the reason behind the debt can sometimes be argued. If, for example, debt was taken on for one spouse’s personal use, the other spouse might argue against being on the hook for it, depending on the property laws in the relevant state. 

“Credit card purchases to buy groceries or make a car payment are obviously marital, but what about debt that was racked up for personal use, like [cosmetic surgery] or gifts for someone your spouse was having an affair with?” asked Ziegler. “It can be argued that those expenses are not marital debt and should be assumed by the individual.”  

This underscores the importance of parsing out individual versus marital debts. To help make it easier, Ziegler recommends that couples maintain two different types of accounts: joint for marital expenses, and individual for personal spending. It’s also wise to keep your statements handy.
 

How to financially protect yourself during a divorce 

Divorces don’t usually come cheap, but there are steps you can take to soften the blow. 

Sign a prenup

Prenuptial agreements aren’t as taboo as they once were. According to a survey released by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) in 2013, “prenups” are on the rise; a whopping 63 percent of divorce attorneys cited an increase in recent years. This is because they serve as a loophole against state rules, dramatically simplifying the fight over debts and assets. 

“Most prenuptial agreements say that if the debt is in either party’s name, it’s separate debt that cannot be allocated or redistributed for payment,” said Ziegler.  

If you’re already married, it isn’t too late to protect yourself. As of 2015, 50 percent of AAML members reported an uptick in postnuptial agreement requests. 

Safeguard your credit

Take steps to safeguard your credit before you divorce. As soon as you begin the separation process, do yourself a favor and make a list of all your individual and joint debts to get an idea of what you’re dealing with. Are you or your spouse listed as authorized users on any accounts? If so, cancel those straight away to avoid accruing any new joint debt. To make sure you don’t miss anything, pull your credit report and take a thorough look at your open accounts. 

Ziegler also suggests making it clear in the divorce agreement who’s responsible for which debts — but that doesn’t always protect you. 

“The reality is, if your name is still attached to the account, and your ex-spouse defaults on payments, it’s going to negatively impact your credit,” she warned.  

If your ex agrees to pay off any debts, you can protect yourself by transferring the balances fully into the former partner’s name. 

The post What Happens to Debt When You Divorce?  appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Getting Loans from Someone Other than a Bank

Getting Loans from Other Bank

Updated November 06, 2017

Personal loans allow borrowers to have access to a fixed amount of money at a fixed interest rate, with a fixed monthly payment and you know when you’ll have completely paid off the loan. They are a great resource for someone looking to refinance debt and can’t use a balance transfer. If you need cash, personal loans are usually the best way to borrow. Personal loans tend to be much cheaper and simpler than a credit card.

How to get a personal loan?

Step 1: Check and see if you can get a loan with an Internet-only lender.

Ideally, you should start your shopping with a site like [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL], which lets you shop at dozens of lenders with just one simple online form (described below). [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL] is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.

Step 2: Go to your local credit union and see if they can match or beat your P2P loan

Step 3: Take the loan with the lower interest rate

If you aren’t eligible for a P2P loan from an Internet-only lender then try your local credit union.

Internet-only lenders

The rise of technology allowed a new wave of lenders to offer an alternative to traditional bank loans. Peer-to-Peer lending (or P2P for short) allows borrowers to receive loans from “peers” often in the form of individual investors or hedge funds, endowments and pension funds.

Peer-to-peer loans are interesting because they were developed specifically for the digital environment. This makes them accessible with a few clicks on a computer and a relatively simple application process. Companies like [ProsperPL]Prosper[/ProsperPL], [LendingClubPL]LendingClub[/LendingClubPL] and [UpstartPL]Upstart[/UpstartPL] facilitate matching borrowers with investors. There is no need to visit a bank branch. The aim of P2P lending is to give a borrower lower interest rates while giving investors higher returns.

Interestingly, some big banks have acquired or built their own online lenders which are offering consumers even better rates. SunTrust has done that with the acquisition of [LightStreamPL]LightStream[/LightStreamPL], and Goldman Sachs has recently invested in building Marcus.

Step 1: Shop Online for a Personal Loan (without hurting your score)

[Disclosure: [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL] is the parent company of MagnifyMoney.] At [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL]e, you can shop for a loan at dozens of lenders with just one online form (that takes less than 5 minutes to complete). [LendingTreePL]LendingTree[/LendingTreePL] will perform a soft credit pull (with no impact to your score), and you can get real offers – including how much you can borrow and the interest rate. We think this is one of the best places to start your personal loan shopping journey.

LEARN MORE

LightStream*

Pro:

  • If you have excellent credit, LightStream offers some of the lowest interest rates in the market. [LightStreamAPR]Rates start as low as 2.49% (to finance an auto) and 5.49% (to refinance credit card debt)[/LightStreamAPR].
  • You can get the money by the next business day. This is a remarkably fast process.
  • [LightStreamPL]LightStream[/LightStreamPL] has a rate match promise: if you find a lower interest rate somewhere else, they will match it.
  • There is [LightStreamPrepayFee]no pre-payment penalty[/LightStreamPrepayFee] and [LightStreamOrgFee]no origination fee[/LightStreamOrgFee].

Con:

  • You must have excellent credit to qualify.
  • [LightStreamPL]LightStream[/LightStreamPL] does [LightStreamInq]not have “soft pull” functionality[/LightStreamInq]. If you apply for a loan, [LightStreamInq]there will be a hard inquiry on your credit report[/LightStreamInq].

LendingClub*

Pro

  • Their interest rates are most likely lower than other loans with an [LendingClubAPR]APR range of 5.99% to 35.89%[/LendingClubAPR].
  • You can find out your [LendingClubInq]interest rate without a hard inquiry on your credit score[/LendingClubInq]. Prosper [LendingClubInq]uses a “soft pull” so there will be no point reductions on your credit score[/LendingClubInq], nor an inquiry left on your report for finding out the interest rate.
  • There is [LendingClubPrepayFee]no pre-payment penalty(fine if you pay off the loan early), but they won’t refund your loan fee[/LendingClubPrepayFee].

Con:

  • You must have a [LendingClubCreditScore]high credit score (600 or higher) to be eligible[/LendingClubCreditScore] to get a personal loan from [LendingClubPL]LendingClub[/LendingClubPL].
  • You probably won’t be accepted if you have a history of missed payments.
  • There is an upfront fee, but your APR will include the fee. Be sure to compare the APR and not just the interest rate when you’re shopping around.

Upstart*

People with minimal credit history can turn to [UpstartPL]Upstart[/UpstartPL] for an opportunity to be eligible for a personal loan.

[UpstartPL]Upstart[/UpstartPL] evaluates where you went to school, your area of study, your grades and employment history to determine your eligibility for a loan and your interest rate.

Step 2: Credit Unions

Credit unions are not-for-profit organizations that offer alternatives to traditional banks. They have more of an emphasis on serving their community than worrying about a corporation’s bottom line. Unlike banks, credit union members own the credit unions.

Credit unions do offer loans, but first you must become a member of the credit union. Some credit unions are closed. But others (like PenFed) will let you join if you make a $15 donation to a charity.

Pros

  • Loans from a credit union usually have lower interest rates than a bank, and possibly the lowest you can find.

Cons

  • You will need to join a credit union, and may not qualify for a loan so you could be out the cost to join.

PenFed offers a 9.99%-14.99% interest rate with no upfront fee for a term of five years. However, you will need to have a 700+ credit score to be competitive for this personal loan.

Non-bank lenders

[OneMainFinancialPL]OneMain[/OneMainFinancialPL] is a non-bank lender owned by Citigroup. You will have to physically visit a branch to get approved. But, the process usually takes less than 30 minutes. Borrowers with high credit scores should first explore the P2P space and credit unions before turning to OneMain, because it will be a more expensive form of borrowing.

Pros:

  • If having face-to-face contact is important to you, then you can visit physical branches.
  • OneMain will approve people with credit scores as low as 550, so it is possible to get a loan when other reject you. Although expensive, OneMain will be much less expensive than payday loans or title loans.

Cons:

  • You have to visit a branch, even if you’re preapproved online. If you don’t have a branch near you, this could be a serious hassle.
  • There will be a hard inquiry on your credit report
  • Likely higher interests rates (APRs) than a loan from P2P lenders like Prosper or [LendingClubPL]LendingClub[/LendingClubPL]
  • A few complex terms and conditions

Warning:

  • Don’t bother with the insurance products they’ll try to sell you.

Step 3: Take the Lowest Interest Rate

Personal loans can be valuable tools to help pay down debt, reduce interest rates and save you hundreds to thousands of dollars. But remember; don’t rush into a personal loan just because it seems like a good deal. Take the time to do your research, shop around and ensure your getting the absolute best interest rate you can. Even the difference of .01 can make a difference in the long run.

Read where to find the best personal loan rates online here.

The post Getting Loans from Someone Other than a Bank appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Back to Our Pre-Recession Ways, Americans Are Spending More and Saving Less

iStock

Americans appear to be back to their pre-recession savings habits. The personal savings rate in the U.S. dropped to 3.1 percent in September 2017, according to the Commerce Department — the lowest level since the Great Recession took hold.

Meanwhile, Americans are spending more (household debt is at a 10-year high) and consumer confidence has risen to its highest level in almost 17 years, according to data released Tuesday through The Conference Board, a global, independent business membership and research association.

3 reasons we’re saving less:

Household debt is on the rise again. Total household debt increased to $12.84 trillion in the second quarter of 2017, up $114 billion, or 0.9 percent, from the same quarter last year, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported in August. This was a new high since the third quarter of 2008, the peak of the mortgage crisis. People may feel they can get access to funds by borrowing when it is needed, rather than holding money in savings, said Andrew Opdyke, economist at the First Trust Advisors.

But incomes are up and we’re spending more. While personal income rose 0.4 percent in September, consumer spending surged 1 percent, the fastest pace since 2009, Commerce reported.

Hurricanes don’t come cheap. The Commerce Department Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) said August and September estimates of personal income and spending reflected the effects of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Millions were displaced by the hurricanes, and experts say the spending jump was driven by a hurricane-induced uptick in auto sales and increases in gas and household utility prices.

Year

Personal Savings Rate

Total Household Debt

Consumer Confidence

2007

3.0%

$11.85 trillion

99.6

2008

4.9%

$12.60 trillion

97.3

2009

6.1%

$12.41 trillion

98.1

2010

5.6%

$11.94 trillion

97.9

2011

6.0%

$11.73 trillion

96.8

2012

7.6%

$11.38 trillion

99.0

2013

5.0%

$11.15 trillion

99.0

2014

5.7%

$11.63 trillion

99.8

2015

6.1%

$11.85 trillion

100.4

2016

4.9%

$12.29 trillion

100.4

2017

3.7%*

$12.84 trillion

101.1

Sources:

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis


*as of Q3

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development

It’s not exactly news that Americans aren’t the greatest savers. The Federal Reserve reported that in 2016, 44 percent of Americans could not come up with $400 in cash to cover emergencies.

But should we worried that we’re saving less and spending more than we have in a decade?

Economists say that as the economy is humming along, consumers are feeling more confident that they can spend and borrow more without putting themselves in financial distress. It’s no coincidence that Americans saved the most in the same year (2012) that consumer confidence was comparatively low.

Brian Wesbury, chief economist at First Trust Advisors, writes that rising debt levels aren’t so alarming when you factor in overall income growth. Household incomes grew by 3.2 percent between 2015 and 2016, according to the Census Bureau.

“Yes, consumer debts are at a record high in raw dollar terms, but so are consumer assets,” wrote Brian Wesbury, chief economist at First Trust Advisors. “Comparing the two, debts are the lowest relative to assets since 2000 (and that’s back during the internet bubble when asset values were artificially high.”

How to calculate your personal savings rate

Take your total monthly income from all sources (salary, retirement account, etc.), less taxes and money spent on everyday expenses, including debt payments.

Next, divide your monthly savings amount by your total income. Then multiply by 100 to get your personal saving rate.

There’s no magic savings rate to aim for. A good rule of thumb is to save 10 percent of each paycheck for retirement, and establish an emergency fund covering at least three to six months’ worth of basic living expenses.

Evidence suggests that many Americans are just getting by, shouldering record levels of student loan debt while grappling with rising fixed costs. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in September reported that 43 percent of American adults struggled to make ends meet in 2016.

But savings is key to achieving financial security. The CFPB study found that adults with savings and financial cushions had a higher level of financial well-being than those who didn’t have a safety net to fall back on.

7 strategies to boost your savings:

  1. Automate. Many employers can set up automatic deposits of your income into multiple checking or savings accounts. You can have a portion of your paycheck automatically transferred into a savings account so that you will be less inclined to touch that money. It makes easier for you to resist the temptations to spend.
  2. Make retirement a priority. If you are not able to set aside 10 percent of your income, you should try to contribute enough to capture the full company match for your 401(k), if your employer offers one.
  3. Track your spending. You will be surprised by the amount of money you spend on groceries or Starbucks once you actually track the money coming in and out. The more you know about your finances, the better off you’ll be. A simple app to track spending patterns is a good place to start engaging in day-to-day money management and establish a habit of saving and budgeting.
  4. Get rid of high-interest debts. Debts are anti-assets. It makes more sense to pay off high-interest debt, such as credit card debt, than to save. Here are four tips to help you pay down debts.
  5. Avoid lifestyle inflation. Lifestyle inflation means people spend more as their incomes increase. It is one of the ultimate budget-killers.
  6. Don’t keep up with the Joneses. Forget them. The key to being satisfied with the state of your finances and your life is focusing on your needs and goals rather than comparing with your friends and co-workers
  7. Find ways to help break your negative spending habits. Here is a simple $20 rule that can help break your credit card addiction. We’ve also written about other strategies to break bad money habits here.

The post Back to Our Pre-Recession Ways, Americans Are Spending More and Saving Less appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Trapped in Payday Loan Debt? Here’s How You Can Escape.

Trapped in Payday Loan

Nobody likes being in debt, but it’s even worse when it seems like there’s no way out. That’s how the 12 million Americans who take out payday loans each year usually feel. That’s understandable, considering they pay out around nine billion dollars in loan fees. But there is hope—you don’t have to be stuck in the payday loan debt cycle forever.

Why It’s So Easy to Get Buried in Payday Loans

Payday loans are unsecured personal loans targeted at people who need money fast but don’t possess the type of credit or collateral required for a more traditional loan. Usually the only requirements to qualify for a payday loan are an active bank account and a job. Companies like MaxLend, RISE Credit, and CashMax have made an art out of providing high-interest loans to people who feel desperate and out of options.

The very structure of payday loans is set up to keep people on the hook. Here’s a breakdown of what payday loan debt looks like, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts:

  • It’s not short-term. Although payday loans are advertised as quick, short-term loans, the average payday loan borrower is in debt for a full five months each year.
  • Loan fees are huge. Average loan fees are $55 every other week, and the average borrower pays $520 per year for multiple loans of $375.
  • People borrow for the wrong reasons. Most payday loan borrowers—70%—spend the money on everyday expenses, like groceries, gas, and rent, rather than on emergencies.
  • It’s a vicious cycle. To totally pay off a loan, the average borrower would need to fork over $430 the next payday following the loan. Because that’s a big chunk of change, most people end up renewing and extending the loan. In fact, 80% of all payday loans are taken out two weeks after another one was paid in full.

What Happens If I Don’t Pay My Payday Loan?

As with any other loan, if you default on a payday loan, it can result in growing fees, penalties, and possible legal action. Because many payday loans use automatic debit payments to take funds directly out of a bank or prepaid account, you can also end up with overdraft fees on top of everything else. This can leave you without the funds you need to pay for necessities like food, childcare, and utilities. To top it all off, you may also experience a barrage of calls and threats from debt collectors.

This all sounds extremely unpleasant, but there are ways you can get help with payday loans.

How to Get Out of Payday Loan Debt

As we’ve established, it’s crucial to stop the vicious cycle of payday loan debt. There is payday loan help, but it can be hard to know where to start.

The best way out can depend on where you took out the loan. Laws governing payday loans vary from state to state. Some states, like Colorado, are currently working to change the way payday loans are administered in order to make it easier for customers to pay loans back and avoid the snowball effect of constant loan renewal. Other states require payday lenders to offer borrowers an  Extended Payment Plan (EPP), which stops the accrual of fees and interest.

Here’s a closer look at some of the options available to get rid of payday loan debt.

Extended Payment Plans (EPPs): If you borrowed from a lender who is a member of the Community Financial Services Association of America (CFSA), then you may be in luck. CFSA’s Best Practices allow a payday loan customer the option of entering into an EPP.  This means you’ll have more time to repay the loan (usually four extra pay periods) without any additional fees or interest added for that service. Best of all, you won’t be turned over to collections as long as you don’t default on the EPP. Here are the steps to follow if you want to apply for an EPP:

  • Apply on time. You must apply for the EPP no later than the last business day before the loan is due.
  • Sign a new agreement. If you took out your loan through a storefront location, you’ll have to go back to that location to turn in your application. If you took out a loan online, you’ll need to contact your lender for instructions about how to sign your new agreement.

Credit Counseling: If an EPP isn’t an option, you may want to talk with a credit counseling agency. While credit counseling agencies spend their time helping consumers get out of debt, these kinds of loans can present unique challenges. “It’s not a traditional loan with set guidelines in terms of how they work with us,” explains Fox. In spite of those challenges, there are things a credit counseling agency can do to help you get out of payday loan debt:

  • Restructure the payback. Fox says that payday lenders who are members of the CFSA “seem to be more lenient” and are “more apt to try to work with people.” Those lenders will often “restructure to pay back (the balance) over six to twelve months when coming through our program.” But he also adds that this applies in  only about 40–50% of the payday debt situations clients are dealing with.
  • Negotiate a settlement. If restructuring the payback terms isn’t an option, the credit counseling agency will try to work with the lender to determine a settlement amount that will resolve the debt altogether. If you can pay off the loan with a lump-sum payment (this is the time to ask Mom or Dad for help), the agency may be able to settle the debt for a percentage of the outstanding amount.
  • Adjust your budget. If no other options are viable, the agency can work with you to come up with a budget that will help you find the money to get the loan paid off. Sometimes that means reducing payments on other debts, consolidating debts, or reprioritizing other expenses.

Bankruptcy: Nobody wants to resort to this option, but sometimes it’s the only way to get out from under this kind of debt. There is a myth out there that you can’t include payday loans in a bankruptcy. However, that is not the case: “For the most part, payday loans aren’t treated any differently in bankruptcy than any other unsecured loan,” writes attorney Dana Wilkinson on the Bankruptcy Law Network blog.

Another unsubstantiated claim is that you may be charged with fraud or arrested if you can’t pay a payday loan back or if you try to discharge the loan. One of the reasons this fear is so widespread is that payday loan debt collection scammers often make these kinds of threats, despite the fact that these threats are illegal.

What to Do After You Get Rid of Payday Loans

After you get out of payday loan debt, you want to make sure you never go to a payday lender again. Some of the smartest things you can do to start cleaning up your credit include signing up for a free credit report. Regularly checking your credit is the best way to make sure you clear up any mistakes. Plus it’s rewarding to see your credit score improve.

You can also sign up for credit repair or search for a consolidation loan to help you pay off all of your debt. This allows you to start moving in the right direction financially.

Getting out of payday loan debt can seem daunting, but it’s worth the effort and hard work. Taking control of your finances—and actually being able to plan for the future—is a reward worth striving for.

Are you trapped in payday loan debt? Or have you found your way out? Share your story in the comments below.

Image: Ingram Publishing

The post Trapped in Payday Loan Debt? Here’s How You Can Escape. appeared first on Credit.com.

1099-Cs and Your Taxes: What You Should Know

Photo of a young couple going through financial problems

Not many know what a 1099-C is or why they receive it. But these forms can be a little scary because they’re tax documents—and no one wants to mess up their taxes. When you get one, it’s because you had a portion or all of a debt canceled.

It’s important to understand what a 1099-C is and what to do about it to ensure you are filing your taxes correctly. Here’s what you need to know.

What’s a 1099-C?

A 1099-C falls under the 1099 tax form series of information returns for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). These forms let the IRS know you’ve received income outside of your W-2 income. Any company that pays an individual $600 or more in a year is required to send the recipient a 1099. You often receive a 1099-C when $600 or more of your debt is forgiven or discharged.

When you use credit or take out a loan, that borrowed money is still currency you can use—even if you don’t pay it back. So when debt is canceled, that money is considered ordinary income and is therefore taxable (if over $600), which means you have to report it on your tax return. Yep, Uncle Sam gets a cut of the portion of your debt that was forgiven or discharged.

When you get a 1099-C, you can find the reason you received it in the sixth box of the form. Some common reasons you may get a 1099-C are included below:

  1. You negotiated a settlement to pay a debt for less than the amount you owed and the creditor forgave the rest.
  2. You owned a home that went into foreclosure and there was a forgiven deficiency (a difference between the home’s value and what you owe on it).
  3. You sold a home in a short sale where the lender agreed to accept less than the full amount you owe.
  4. You didn’t pay anything on a debt for at least three years and there has been no collection activity in the past year.

Are My Debts Erased with a 1099-C?

If you know you received a 1099-C because of a settlement agreement, where you paid off debt for less than the full amount due, then you don’t owe anything. If the form was filed because you haven’t made payments for three years and they haven’t tried to collect recently, then you may still owe the debt. Your state’s statute of limitations may determine what debt you are and are not responsible for.

Anytime you receive a 1099-C, check the form for errors. If you find any, first work with your creditor to get the information corrected. If that doesn’t resolve the issue, then you can include an explanation with your tax return. To find out if a 1099-C has been filed, you can request a wage and income transcript from the IRS for the tax year or years in question. The transcript should list any 1099-Cs that were filed under your Social Security number.

Do I Have to Pay Taxes on the 1099-C Amount?

The IRS will automatically assume that the amount listed on the 1099-C is accurate and will expect you to include that amount in your ordinary income when you file your tax return. Depending on the other income you earn and your tax bracket, you could receive a larger tax bill or a smaller refund. However, if you can demonstrate that you qualify for an exclusion or exception, you may be able to avoid paying taxes on part or all of that phantom income.

One of the most commonly used exclusions is the insolvency exclusion. It works like this: you are insolvent to the extent that your liabilities (what you owe) exceed your assets (what you own). If the total amount by which you are insolvent is larger than the amount listed on the 1099-C, you can exclude the entire amount listed on the 1099-C from your income. You’ll have to file Form 982 with your tax return to claim this exclusion.

If the amount by which you are insolvent is less than the amount on the 1099-C, then you may be able to avoid including part of that amount in your income. However, the insolvency exclusion may not be the perfect fit for everyone—there may be another exclusion that fits your situation better.

What if I Don’t Receive a 1099-C for Canceled Debt?

Even if you don’t receive a 1099-C, you are still responsible for reporting canceled debt as taxable income. Make sure you do not leave any forgiven or discharged debt off of your tax return. If you do, you will more than likely hear from the IRS in the future for failure to pay, which will cost you more money in the long run. Look at your credit report to ensure you don’t have any unpaid debt from the last three years.

What if I Receive a 1099-C for Old Debt?

Be careful when it comes to old debt and 1099-Cs. Creditors who follow IRS guidelines should send out 1099-Cs when a debt lies dormant for three years and there has been no significant collection activity for the past year.

Specifically, the IRS 1099 instructions state that debt is canceled “when the creditor has not received a payment on the debt during the testing period. The testing period is a 36-month period ending on December 31.”

However, the creditor can rebut this cancelation if “the creditor (or a third party collection agency on behalf of the creditor) has engaged in significant bona fide collection activity during the 12-month period ending on December 31.”

If a creditor sends out 1099-Cs years (or decades) after the 1099 deadlines, the responsibility falls upon the taxpayer to explain to the IRS why they believe it should not have been filed that year. Again, there is no specific form for reporting this kind of dispute. You’ll have to include an explanation, and you may wind up arguing with the IRS to get it resolved.

What if I Receive a 1099-C for Debts Canceled in Bankruptcy?

You don’t have to pay taxes on personal debts discharged in bankruptcy. And creditors aren’t required to file 1099-Cs for those debts. If they do, however, you can file Form 982 and claim an exclusion because the debt was included in bankruptcy.

Don’t panic if your bankruptcy occurred long ago and you don’t know where to find a copy of your bankruptcy papers to prove the debt was discharged. Although it’s anyone’s guess why a creditor would send an unrequired 1099-C years after the fact, you likely won’t have to jump through hoops to prove the debt was discharged.

Getting a 1099-C can be confusing, especially if you don’t have a handle on your credit. Avoid future credit surprises by using Credit.com’s free credit report tool.

Image: David Sacks

The post 1099-Cs and Your Taxes: What You Should Know appeared first on Credit.com.

1099-Cs and Your Taxes: What You Should Know

Photo of a young couple going through financial problems

Not many know what a 1099-C is or why they receive it. But these forms can be a little scary because they’re tax documents—and no one wants to mess up their taxes. When you get one, it’s because you had a portion or all of a debt canceled.

It’s important to understand what a 1099-C is and what to do about it to ensure you are filing your taxes correctly. Here’s what you need to know.

What’s a 1099-C?

A 1099-C falls under the 1099 tax form series of information returns for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). These forms let the IRS know you’ve received income outside of your W-2 income. Any company that pays an individual $600 or more in a year is required to send the recipient a 1099. You often receive a 1099-C when $600 or more of your debt is forgiven or discharged.

When you use credit or take out a loan, that borrowed money is still currency you can use—even if you don’t pay it back. So when debt is canceled, that money is considered ordinary income and is therefore taxable (if over $600), which means you have to report it on your tax return. Yep, Uncle Sam gets a cut of the portion of your debt that was forgiven or discharged.

When you get a 1099-C, you can find the reason you received it in the sixth box of the form. Some common reasons you may get a 1099-C are included below:

  1. You negotiated a settlement to pay a debt for less than the amount you owed and the creditor forgave the rest.
  2. You owned a home that went into foreclosure and there was a forgiven deficiency (a difference between the home’s value and what you owe on it).
  3. You sold a home in a short sale where the lender agreed to accept less than the full amount you owe.
  4. You didn’t pay anything on a debt for at least three years and there has been no collection activity in the past year.

Are My Debts Erased with a 1099-C?

If you know you received a 1099-C because of a settlement agreement, where you paid off debt for less than the full amount due, then you don’t owe anything. If the form was filed because you haven’t made payments for three years and they haven’t tried to collect recently, then you may still owe the debt. Your state’s statute of limitations may determine what debt you are and are not responsible for.

Anytime you receive a 1099-C, check the form for errors. If you find any, first work with your creditor to get the information corrected. If that doesn’t resolve the issue, then you can include an explanation with your tax return. To find out if a 1099-C has been filed, you can request a wage and income transcript from the IRS for the tax year or years in question. The transcript should list any 1099-Cs that were filed under your Social Security number.

Do I Have to Pay Taxes on the 1099-C Amount?

The IRS will automatically assume that the amount listed on the 1099-C is accurate and will expect you to include that amount in your ordinary income when you file your tax return. Depending on the other income you earn and your tax bracket, you could receive a larger tax bill or a smaller refund. However, if you can demonstrate that you qualify for an exclusion or exception, you may be able to avoid paying taxes on part or all of that phantom income.

One of the most commonly used exclusions is the insolvency exclusion. It works like this: you are insolvent to the extent that your liabilities (what you owe) exceed your assets (what you own). If the total amount by which you are insolvent is larger than the amount listed on the 1099-C, you can exclude the entire amount listed on the 1099-C from your income. You’ll have to file Form 982 with your tax return to claim this exclusion.

If the amount by which you are insolvent is less than the amount on the 1099-C, then you may be able to avoid including part of that amount in your income. However, the insolvency exclusion may not be the perfect fit for everyone—there may be another exclusion that fits your situation better.

What if I Don’t Receive a 1099-C for Canceled Debt?

Even if you don’t receive a 1099-C, you are still responsible for reporting canceled debt as taxable income. Make sure you do not leave any forgiven or discharged debt off of your tax return. If you do, you will more than likely hear from the IRS in the future for failure to pay, which will cost you more money in the long run. Look at your credit report to ensure you don’t have any unpaid debt from the last three years.

What if I Receive a 1099-C for Old Debt?

Be careful when it comes to old debt and 1099-Cs. Creditors who follow IRS guidelines should send out 1099-Cs when a debt lies dormant for three years and there has been no significant collection activity for the past year.

Specifically, the IRS 1099 instructions state that debt is canceled “when the creditor has not received a payment on the debt during the testing period. The testing period is a 36-month period ending on December 31.”

However, the creditor can rebut this cancelation if “the creditor (or a third party collection agency on behalf of the creditor) has engaged in significant bona fide collection activity during the 12-month period ending on December 31.”

If a creditor sends out 1099-Cs years (or decades) after the 1099 deadlines, the responsibility falls upon the taxpayer to explain to the IRS why they believe it should not have been filed that year. Again, there is no specific form for reporting this kind of dispute. You’ll have to include an explanation, and you may wind up arguing with the IRS to get it resolved.

What if I Receive a 1099-C for Debts Canceled in Bankruptcy?

You don’t have to pay taxes on personal debts discharged in bankruptcy. And creditors aren’t required to file 1099-Cs for those debts. If they do, however, you can file Form 982 and claim an exclusion because the debt was included in bankruptcy.

Don’t panic if your bankruptcy occurred long ago and you don’t know where to find a copy of your bankruptcy papers to prove the debt was discharged. Although it’s anyone’s guess why a creditor would send an unrequired 1099-C years after the fact, you likely won’t have to jump through hoops to prove the debt was discharged.

Getting a 1099-C can be confusing, especially if you don’t have a handle on your credit. Avoid future credit surprises by using Credit.com’s free credit report tool.

Image: David Sacks

The post 1099-Cs and Your Taxes: What You Should Know appeared first on Credit.com.