5 Gig Economy Websites That Help You Make More Money

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In the United States, the way people work is dramatically changing.

The proliferation of the gig economy is shifting the American worker’s view of nine-to-five employment and creating endless possibilities for earning extra cash to help pay the bills and make ends meet.

According to a recent analysis of gig economy and workforce data conducted by Nation 1099, about one-third of all US workers did at least some freelance work last year. What’s more, about 11% of all workers are full-time freelancers and about 22% have embraced side hustling or moonlighting.

Giant gig economy platforms such as Fiverr and Upwork may be well known, but there are quite literally hundreds of similar sites, with more popping up every day. A growing number of these sites specialize in offering niche services—ranging from voiceover work to dog walking, engineering, financial consulting, and website development.

“When it comes to freelancing and the gig economy, all signals show it’s growing even larger,” said trends expert and public speaker Daniel Levine, founding director of Avant-Guide Institute. “What’s so great about these sites is they’re bringing together people from around the world. Borders are disappearing. Before you had to be in the same country for an employee and employer to meet.”

Here are five gig economy sites that can help you earn a few extra dollars or provide a springboard to a full-time freelance career.

1. Rover.com

Phoenix resident Melanie Lewis works at home while she pursues a career in writing. About two years ago, she searched for a way to supplement her writing income and a friend helped her find Rover.com.

Through the site, she makes anywhere from $500 to $1,000 extra each month, by either boarding dogs or offering dog-walking and drop-in services.

“One of my favorite things about Rover is that you set your own rates for the services you offer, so you control what you charge and how much you earn,” said Lewis.

The site, which operates in dozens of cities across the US and Canada, connects dog owners with a variety of services—dog walking, doggy day care, dog boarding, drop-in visits, and house sitting. Note that background checks are required for those seeking to work through the site.

2. Fiverr

Launched in 2010, Fiverr has become one of the gig economy giants. The site has tens of thousands of users who generate steady secondary incomes by offering creative and professional services—everything from graphic design to writing, translation, illustration, and marketing.

Fiverr’s global community of freelancers now includes more than 100 service categories and people doing business in 190 countries.

The site is named Fiverr because the starting price for services is a mere $5, but that’s just a starting point. Advanced sellers can augment their services, charging more money for additional tasks. For example, a copyeditor might charge $5 for editing, but add higher fees for formatting, layout, or rush turnaround.

In addition, the site just introduced FiverrPro, a higher-end initiative that matches curated, talented professionals with those seeking services.

3. Upwork

Previously known as Elance-oDesk, Upwork enables businesses and independent professionals from around the globe to connect and collaborate. It’s another giant in the gig economy. The range of work available through the site is mind boggling—everything from web, mobile, and software development to writing, administrative support, customer service, sales and marketing, and accounting and consulting.

Hourly and fixed-price jobs are available through Upwork. And the beauty of the site is that Upwork processes all payments and invoicing, eliminating the hassle of chasing down clients to get paid through a third-party platform. For hourly jobs, Upwork even offers payment protection, ensuring you don’t get stiffed for any work completed.

4. Babierge

If you have piles of baby gear and toddler toys sitting unused around the house, Babierge is made for you.

Babierge (a combination of baby and concierge) is a sharing economy platform for baby gear. Think of it as the Airbnb for baby gear. The site’s baby gear entrepreneurs rent, deliver, and set up baby gear, games, and toys at hotels and vacation rentals, and then return to pick it up on departure day.

Though you may not have heard of Babierge, don’t underestimate it. It has workers in 82 markets, with new locations added each week.

“When you look at the money you can make at Babierge based on the hours you put in, the pay is about $40 per hour,” said Trish McDermott, vice president of community and communications for Babierge. “Not bad for gig work.”

Some of the site’s most active workers make as much as $700 per month.

5. Efynch

One last up-and-coming site worth noting is Efynch, a platform designed to connect professional and freelance contractors and maintenance workers with jobs.

Operating in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and northern Virginia, Efynch currently has about 3,000 users and plans to expand to at least ten more cities on the East Coast by spring.

“In addition to skilled workers, anyone with a truck is basically a valuable commodity and can easily make $50 or more per hour on our site,” said cofounder Teris Pantazes. “I’ve had some people make more than $5,000 per month on my site as full-timers. Freelance or side workers probably average between $500 and $1,000 if they work a few evenings or a couple Saturdays.”

Modeled after Upwork but tailored to the contractor and maintenance crowd, the site offers a range of gigs, from simple manual labor tasks such as mowing a lawn to far more complex jobs such as carpentry.

Anyone can join the freelance movement. It just takes a little paperwork and planning. If the lifestyle speaks to you, you should fill out a 1099 and be ready to navigate the financial ins and outs of self-employment. Start by getting your free credit report and gain insights into how you can build your credit while you freelance. Embrace the hustle while maintaining a handle on your finances, and you’ll be set up for success.

Image: istock

The post 5 Gig Economy Websites That Help You Make More Money appeared first on Credit.com.

15+ Apps That Help You Make Money

Need extra money? Your mobile device could actually unlock a world of additional income for you. There are many ways to earn money online, and they are now conveniently available on smartphones and tablet devices. Add an internet connection, and you’re set. Pursuing a side hustle can be time consuming, but if you’ve got a financial goal like getting out of debt or saving up for a down payment on a home, these apps could be a good start to boosting to your income. All the apps here are free to use via web browser and/or mobile device.

Surveys

Swagbucks

Devices: Android, iOS

The Swagbucks iOS app. Source: iTunes.

Swagbucks is a popular survey website with a couple of app counterparts (discussed below), including Swagbucks Local and SB Answers. By taking surveys, you accumulate points called Swagbucks, not actual money. These surveys usually ask about your demographics, preferences, and behaviors on topics like cereal you eat, places you shop, TV shows you watch, and other lifestyle choices. Plan to spend 15-30 minutes on each survey, though there are occasionally seven- to 10-minute surveys.

In terms of how the conversions work, one Swagbuck is about 1 cent, and you can redeem them for gift cards to places like Amazon, Starbucks, and popular retailers like Walmart and Target. You even have the option to donate your Swagbucks to more than 10 charities featured on the site.

So, how good are the payouts? A three-minute survey could offer you five Swagbucks or approximately 5 cents. A 20-minute survey pays out 80 cents on average. However, many people earn much more with the Swagbucks referral program: 500 Swagbucks (worth $5) per person once the referral is active. Plus, you’ll get 10% of your referrals’ point earnings over the lifetime of their account.

You have a few options to earn Swagbucks on your mobile device:

Surveys On The Go

Devices: Android, iOS

The Surveys On The Go iOS app. Source: iTunes

Surveys On The Go allows users to take various surveys with pretty decent payouts: You’ll get surveys for between 25 cents and $1. However, be prepared to spend time on these surveys. You can spend 15-20 minutes completing them (or more).

There also aren’t always a lot of surveys available. I’ve logged in a few times and found there were no surveys for me. The survey availability will depend on your demographic and even location. Sometimes, there are high-paying surveys ($15-$20), but it’s hard to tell when and where that will happen.

There’s no way to know how often there will be surveys available, but you can choose to receive app notifications when there is a new survey you qualify for.

Unlike Swagbucks, these surveys offer you actual money. You’ll need to earn $10 before you get a payment via PayPal. A nice thing about this app is that you get a consolation compensation of 10 cents if you start a survey and are not qualified to complete it.

InboxDollars

Devices: Android, iOS

InboxDollars iOS app. Source: iTunes

Much like Surveys On The Go, InboxDollars offers cash rewards. The app also offers “sweep” points, which allow you enter sweepstakes for more sweeps, money, or other prizes.

This app usually has plenty of surveys to take, though they are not all optimized for mobile viewing. At times, the interface can be a little wonky and a tad clunky to navigate.

You should also know that you can get deep into a survey (say, 5-15 minutes) only to be disqualified because of your answers. Your hourly “wage” comes out to be pretty low considering you make anywhere from 20-25 cents per 20-30 minutes spent answering questions. You cannot request a payout from the app until you’ve reached the $30 minimum. A $3 processing fee applies to every payment request. Your payment options include a check, gift card from Target or Kohl’s, or a prepaid Visa card (the latter two options available to Gold members only.)

Other survey apps to explore include Panel App, QuickThoughts, and SurveyMini. Overall, if you are looking to make a living wage from taking surveys, you likely won’t come close. With payouts that amount to just a few cents an hour, you’re better off with other ways to produce extra income (unless there’s absolutely nothing else you can do to earn).

Fitness

What’s better than losing unwanted inches? Getting paid for it. There are a few apps that allow you to convert your fitness activity into financial benefits. As always, you’ll want to consult your physician before starting any fitness program.

DietBet

Devices: Android, iOS

DietBet iOS app. Source: iTunes

DietBet allows you to turn your fitness goals into money. In order to enter a bet, you have to put money up front in a game that pools the money of other people with weight-loss goals. Those who make their goals win the bet and split up the pot (minus DietBet’s 10%-25% fee) that is paid out by those who don’t make their goals. WayBetter, the company behind DietBet, also has a StepBet app that offers similar games where you put down money when you set activity goals and win the bet if you meet them.

On DietBet, you can participate in a short, four-week challenge called a Kickstarter or a six-month game called a Transformer. You can be in multiple bets at a time to maximize your earnings. The company says Kickstarter winners get back an average of 1.5-two times their bet, while the average Transformer winner takes home $325 for winning all six rounds, or $175 for winning just the final round.

DietBet and StepBet have a No Lose Guarantee, which states that if you win, you will not lose money. They’ll forfeit their cut of the pot to make this happen. Of course, if you don’t win, you don’t get anything, so there’s potential to lose money here. The average Kickstarter bet size is $30, and Transformer costs $25 a month (or $125 up front).

Sweatcoin

Devices: Android, iOS

Sweatcoin iOS app. Source: iTunes

The Sweatcoin app converts your outdoor steps into currency called Sweatcoins (SWCs), which you can redeem for products like watches, fitness apparel, and gift cards. Currently, you’ll earn .95 SWCs for every 1,000 steps you complete. The exact conversion of these coins seems to change depending on the reward: Past promotions include a $12 smoothie gift card for 150 SWCs, a $120 Actofit watch for 1,600 SWCs, and a $88 VICI Life gift card for 250 SWCs.

The items available for purchase with Sweatcoins are limited and change often based on availability and the company’s promotional schedule. This app requires access to your GPS data and location in order to verify that your steps are taken outside.

Shopping

There are many apps that reward you for doing something you’d do anyway — shop. Here’s how most of these apps work: If you purchase a product, the app developer usually gets commissions on purchases you make at their suggestion, which they split with you. In this way, they can provide you with rewards that literally pay you for shopping.

Ibotta

Devices: Android, iOS

Ibotta iOS app. Source: iTunes

Ibotta offers rebates for buying certain products in nearby stores. Once you let it access your geodata, you’ll find deals on items at retailers like Walmart, Whole Foods, Costco, and more.

Sometimes the deals are super product-specific, and other times you can see generic items like milk or eggs offered with a chance to get 25 cents back. In order to get your rewards, you’ll have to scan the item’s barcode with your phone’s camera and snap a picture of the receipt. You’ll then submit these through the app.

This can be somewhat time consuming. For example, the receipt can be long, requiring a few pictures, or you could accidentally throw away the packaging (which I’ve done on a few occasions).

This is another app with a generous referral bonus: You get $5, while your referral gets $10. You accrue referral bonuses and rebates in your Ibotta account and can request payouts via PayPal, Venmo, or a featured gift card once you meet the $20 threshold.

Ebates

Devices: Android, iOS

Ebates iOS app. Source: iTunes

Similar to Ibotta, Ebates gives you rewards for shopping through their portal and purchasing featured items, but Ebates also offers discounts. There are popular stores like Loft, Tom’s, JCPenney, Macy’s, and more. You’ll get your earnings via PayPal every three months (unless you’ve accrued less than $5.01.)

Ebates also has a great referral program. The payouts change from time to time, so you’ll need to check their referral program page for current payouts. At the moment, when you refer one friend who makes a minimum $25 purchase, you’ll get a $5 bonus, while your friend gets $10 added to their account balance after their first purchase.

Shopkick

Devices: Android, iOS

Shopkick iOS app. Source: iTunes

Shopkick pays its users points called Kicks for a variety of shopping activities.

When you open the app, it detects your location and shows you a list of nearby retailers and products that can help you earn Kicks. If you allow the app to access your GPS data, you’ll hear a cha-ching sound when you get close to a participating retailer.

Shopkick is set up to show you the best deals and popular products from retailers like Best Buy, American Eagle, Yankee Candle, and many more.

Kicks can be redeemed for gift cards to places like Best Buy, Starbucks, and Target. The referral program offers 250 Kicks for each friend who signs up and completes their first in-store action.

In terms of the conversion rate, 250 Kicks equals $1 for most rewards. You’ll need to check the rewards section of the app for conversions on specific items.

Gig economy

If you’ve got time and a certain skill set, you can make money helping someone nearby. The apps below are variations of the Uber-like work arrangement we are all getting more familiar with. Given the higher earning potential these opportunities offer, they also require more commitment: Before you can start earning money through these kinds of apps, you may have to submit an application and agree to a background check.

TaskRabbit

Devices: Android, iOS

TaskRabbit iOS app. Source: iTunes

TaskRabbit allows you to complete small tasks like errands, cleaning, or handyman work for people nearby. As a “tasker” you can choose the types of tasks you’ll complete, your rates, and your own schedule. There’s no minimum to the amount of work you can do; however, the site explains that you cannot invoice for jobs that are under one hour. TaskRabbit takes 30% of your earnings and is available in 39 U.S. metro areas.

The application process is straightforward but stringent. In addition to your general demographics, you’ll need to verify your account with official identification like a driver’s license. You will also need to complete a background check. The TaskRabbit website explains that the company receives a large amount of registrations and cannot give you a timeline on when you’ll be approved.

Fortunately, once you get going, it’s pretty easy to see tasks available, accept them, and even invoice your clients. Although earnings for individual taskers vary due to a number of factors, a report by Priceonomics puts the average monthly earnings are around $380.

GoShare

Devices: Android, iOS

GoShare iOS app. Source: iTunes

GoShare is an app for people who need moving and delivery help. You can earn money with this app if you have a vehicle for large deliveries and can lift heavy items. However, GoShare is only available in nine cities among three states: California, Georgia, and New Jersey.

GoShare users can also work with large retailers to help unload shipments and deliver items to customers. For example, someone who ordered a refrigerator from Home Depot could request a GoShare driver to deliver it.

If you live in one of the areas GoShare serves, you can apply to be a driver. Potential earnings vary by vehicle type: The website says someone who drives a small pickup truck could earn up to $47.52 an hour, while someone with a cargo van can earn up to $61.92 an hour.

Uber/Lyft

Devices: Android, iOS

Left: Uber iOS app. Right: Lyft iOs app. Source: iTunes

Probably the most popular of the bunch, Uber and Lyft offer people the opportunity to use their own car to drive people around and get paid for it. Rates are typically set by the company and depend on your location, time of day, type of car you have, whether or not a passenger will share a ride with other passengers, and a few other factors. Uber is in more than 630 cities around the world, and Lyft is in more than 550 U.S. cities.

Chime

Devices: iOS

Chime iOS app. Source: iTunes

Chime is a division of the popular child care site, Sittercity. Chime is a mobile app designed for people who need quick connections for child care. Again, the premise is: I’m available, you need help, let’s connect with this app. Chime is available in Boston, Chicago, New York City, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C.

According to Chime, all sitters are thoroughly vetted and have completed a background check as well as undergone ID verification. The hourly rate is set according to your local market starting from around $15-$18 per hour.

Rover

Devices: Android, iOS

Rover iOS app. Source: iTunes

The Rover app is like Chime but allows users to look for and offer house-sitting and pet care services. Once you apply to be a sitter, your profile, if accepted, takes about five days to be approve. (Note: You can opt to complete a background check through a third party, but it’s not necessary.) You should also know that you get to set your own rates for services.

Once you agree upon a price with your client and complete a job, your client pays through the Rover app. Those funds are released to you within 48 hours, less the 15% transaction fee Rover deducts. Your payments stay in your Rover account until you withdraw them.

A community forum thread on the Rover website puts part-time earnings at $500-$1,000 per month.

GreenPal

Devices: Android, iOS

GreenPal iOS app. Source: iTunes

There are a few Uber-like apps for lawn care, and GreenPal is just one of them. The only issue is that some of these apps don’t have enough users to make it worthwhile for either service seekers or gig workers (GreenPal currently serves 12 U.S. cities).

As a vendor, you’ll apply through the company’s website. Part of the vetting process is passing a criminal background check, providing client references, and confirming that you have proper lawn care equipment.

Once you are approved as a lawn care provider, you’ll get notifications of nearby jobs. You are able to upload photos of your finished work (kind of like a lawn care portfolio), and then your client will rate you.

Depending on your location and market, expect to bid anywhere from $25-$45 per job. GreenPal takes a 3% transaction fee when your client pays you.

If you have a financial goal in mind and need more earning options, apps like these can certainly help. Just remember to weigh the value of your time against the potential of earning more money before you commit to chasing income this way.

The post 15+ Apps That Help You Make Money appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

How to Get a Mortgage Without a Full-Time, Permanent Job

Here's how to keep your flexible work life from hurting your chances of getting a mortgage.

The growing number of gig economy workers in this country may have the freedom to work whenever they want, and sometimes from wherever they want, but when it comes to buying a home, all of that freedom has its price.

It turns out employees who have many part-time jobs, hop from one short-term contract or project to the next, or rely on freelance work as opposed to permanent jobs, don’t come packaged in the tidy financial box that mortgage lenders typically like.

“Historically the mortgage industry wants everything — residency, credit score and a two-year history of employment. And we’re also trying to predict the likelihood of that continuing for the next three years,” said Whitney Fite, senior vice president, strategic accounts for Atlanta-based Angel Oak Home Loans. “With the gig economy, we’re seeing less and less people fitting in that box.”

Gig economy workers don’t often have the requisite stack of W-2s to document wages. And predictions for future income can be murky. All of which can make obtaining a mortgage an uphill climb unless you, as the gig economy worker, do your homework and start preparing your finances and paperwork well in advance.

Here are six tips to help prepare you for the home loan application process.

1. Get Organized

The No. 1 piece of advice Fite has for gig economy workers who want to own a home is to spend time organizing all of your documentation, including proof of employment and income, the names and phone numbers of references, previous employers, landlords and more. You’ll also want to pull your credit scores so you know exactly where you stand. You can get your two free credit scores on Credit.com.

“Have all of your records, have all the dates of where you worked, who you worked for. It’s going to be onerous from a documentation standpoint, but you need to be prepared,” said Fite.

Gathering this information is more important for gig economy workers than typical borrowers, because you will have to work harder to convince a mortgage lender to approve a home loan.

2. Go the Extra Mile to Educate Your Mortgage Lender

You need to be able to explain to your mortgage lender what you do for a living.

Take the time to educate him or her about your job. Perhaps print out a news article or other information that will help a lender understand what you do.

“You need to prove that your past two years are normal. And that the likelihood of continuance is there,” said Fite. “Be prepared to supply a lot of documentation for that, such as articles about your industry. Things of that nature go a long way. The mortgage lender is not going to make a decision based on it, but it will help create a level of comfort.”

In addition, showing consistency in terms of the type of work you do will improve your chances of obtaining a mortgage, said John Moran, a mortgage professional who runs The Home Mortgage Pro.

A mortgage underwriter is looking for a stable history. Even if the gigs themselves start and stop frequently, gigs within the same industry or utilizing the same skill set will be considered more favorably.

3. Ease Up on the Deductions…

Self-employed individuals, as gig economy workers typically are, often use a Schedule C when filing taxes to report income and write off numerous expenses tied to working the way they do.

The downside of deducting a long list of expenses from your income is that it reduces your profits on paper. You may bring in $73,000 in a given year. But after deducting the cost of everything from internet and cell phone bills, to travel, business meals and professional memberships, your net income on paper may be far less.

“Use caution in how you’re deducting expenses as it’s the net income that’s used to qualify for a mortgage, not the gross pay,” said Kevin Hardin, a senior loan officer with HomeStreet Bank. “It’s tempting to use the full breadth of the IRS tax laws to reduce taxable income, but every dollar that is reduced from that taxable income reduces the income that can be used for qualifying for a mortgage.”

So, if you know you want to buy a home in the near future, consider forgoing some or all of the deductions for a year or two to increase the income you’re reporting.

4. …But First, Talk With a Mortgage Officer About Your Goals

Before completely doing away with claiming any or all expenses on your tax return, however, talk to a mortgage officer about your home buying goals. Here are some tips for finding a good mortgage lender.

“Go to a mortgage officer and say, ‘This is the amount of home I want to buy, how much income will I need to show?’” said Hardin. “Don’t just arbitrarily stop writing things off.”

In other words, get educated about the income you’ll need to show on paper first, before throwing write-offs out the window. Once you’ve identified how much mortgage you’d like, it will be easier to determine what the monthly mortgage payment would be and thus, how much income you’ll need to be able to document.

“The first step is to talk to a mortgage loan officer and then take that information to your tax preparer and say, ‘This is the number I need to hit in terms of income,’” Hardin said.

5. Get Your Debt Down

Let’s stress this one more time — because you are a gig economy worker, mortgage lenders will require more assurance that you’re qualified for a loan and that you’re a good risk.

To that end, work to get your debt down to zero, or as low as possible before applying for a mortgage, and keep your credit score in excellent standing, said Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser since 1995 and author of The Loan Guide: How to Get the Best Possible Mortgage.

“Self-employed borrowers are going to be held to a higher standard because there is an added layer of risk with them,” said Fleming.

6. Try a ‘Bank Statement’ Mortgage

Newly emerging “bank statement” mortgage programs may be a good option for self-employed or gig economy workers to consider, said Fite, of Angel Oak Home Loans.

Such mortgages rely upon reviewing 12 to 24 months worth of deposits to one bank account  and a profit and loss statement for your business, in lieu of the traditional two years of tax returns, W-2s, and payroll checks.

“These are geared toward the gig economy. It’s a rapidly growing segment of mortgages across our industry,” said Fite.

A variety of mortgage lenders are beginning to offer this loan option.

Image: Jacob Ammentorp Lund

The post How to Get a Mortgage Without a Full-Time, Permanent Job appeared first on Credit.com.

These 4 Small Business Credit Cards Are Perfect for Freelancers

A business credit card can make it easier to track costs and reward office expenses. Here are a few solid choices for freelancers.

[Disclosure: Cards from our partners are mentioned below.]

Americans are joining the gig economy in droves. In 2016, the Freelancers Union found that 35% of the U.S. workforce engaged in freelance work, an increase of more than 1 million people from the prior year. With freelancing on the rise, many workers may be managing business finance for the first time.

A separate credit card for business expenses offers several advantages. Most importantly, it makes tracking business costs easier and can help avoid headaches during tax season. Small business credit cards also reward freelancers for their business spending.

Here are four small business credit cards that can help freelancers fund their business.

1. Blue Business Plus Card

Perks: Two points per dollar on up to $50,000 in purchases each year, one point per dollar thereafter
Signup Bonus: None
Annual Fee: None
Annual Percentage Rate (APR): 0% intro APR for 15 months, then variable 11.99%, 15.99% or 19.99%
Why We Picked It: Cardholders earn points that can be redeemed for business and travel, and additional features make it easy to track business expenses.
Benefits: All purchases earn double points, which can be redeemed for travel, office supplies and other business expenses. There are several additional travel protections and insurance policies. You can upload receipts from your mobile phone and connect your transaction records with QuickBooks.
Drawbacks: Fewer merchants accept American Express compared to Visa or MasterCard.

2. Chase Ink Business Cash

Perks: 5% cash back on up to $25,000 at office supply stores and utility providers (phone, internet and cable TV), 2% cash back on up to $25,000 at gas stations and restaurants, 1% cash back on all other purchases
Signup Bonus: $300 bonus cash back when you spend $3,000 in the first three months
Annual Fee: None
APR: 0% intro APR for 12 months, then variable 13.99% to 19.99%
Why We Picked It: The card earns extra cash back on a variety of business expenses.
Benefits: You’ll earn cash back on every business expense, with an extra incentive for office supplies, utility bills, gas and dining purchases. That covers many of the purchase types that help a small business run.
Drawbacks: The 5% and 2% cash back rates are capped at $25,000 in purchases each, and you’ll only get 1% back on purchases exceeding those limits.

3. Spark Cash for Business

Perks: 2% cash back on every purchase
Signup Bonus: $500 bonus cash back when you spend $4,500 in the first three months
Annual Fee: $59, waived in first year
APR: Variable 17.74%
Why We Picked It: With unlimited 2% cash back on all purchases, this card earns solid cash back no matter your business need.
Benefits: With 2% cash back on everything, every purchase puts money back in your wallet. Additional employee cards are free, and you’ll get a number of travel and purchase protection policies standard.
Drawbacks: You’ll start paying an annual fee in year two.

4. CitiBusiness AAdvantage Platinum Select

Perks: Double miles on every dollar spent with American Airlines, select telecommunications merchants, car rental agencies and gas stations, one mile per dollar spent on everything else. (Full Disclosure: Citibank advertises on Credit.com, but that results in no preferential editorial treatment.)
Signup Bonus: 60,000 miles when you spend $3,000 in the first three months
Annual Fee: $95, waived in first year
APR: 16.49%
Why We Picked It: Cardholders earn miles for flights and get a host of other travel perks to boot.
Benefits: Eligible purchases earn double miles and all other purchases earn one mile. Miles can be redeemed for American Airlines flights and upgrades. You’ll get preferred boarding, a free checked bag, 25% off in-flight purchases and many other American Airlines perks.
Drawbacks: The card is really only valuable for loyal American Airlines flyers.

How to Choose a Credit Card for Your Freelance Business

Getting a separate credit card for your business expenses is a smart move, but you’ll want to choose carefully.

The right credit card for you depends on your goals. If you’re frequently traveling to meet clients, a travel rewards business card might make the most sense. If you’re working out of a home office and need to save every penny, a card with no annual fee might be suitable. If you’re just launching your business, a card with a long 0% APR intro period could help you pay down your up-front expenses.

You don’t have to use a business card for your freelancing business. It’s a good idea to have a separate card, but small business credit cards can have higher fees and penalties, as they aren’t regulated by the federal Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, which regulates consumer cards. Small business credit cards are typically better for businesses that spend tens of thousands of dollars per year to operate. If you’re a sole proprietor with a low overhead, you may want to consider getting a personal credit card to use only for business expenses.

Remember, these cards generally require good to excellent credit to qualify. If you don’t know where your credit stands, you should check your credit before applying, which you can do for free on Credit.com.

Image: Izabela Habur

At publishing time, the Capital One Spark Cash for Business and CitiBusiness AAdvantage Platinum Select World Mastercard credit cards are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

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Confessions of a Side Hustler: How Full-Time Workers Keep Their Side Gigs a Secret

Many Americans are juggling extra gigs on top of their regular nine-to-five. According the Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 7.5 million Americans held more than one job in 2016. The figure rose by more than 300,0000 workers from the previous year, due in part to years of stagnant wages, a competitive labor market and the growth of the gig-economy. Of the multiple job holders, more than half, or 4.1 million, split their time between a full-time and part-time gig.

Having a side gig waiting tables after work is one thing. It’s when workers decide to turn their side hustle into a full-time business that things can get complicated.

For budding entrepreneurs, it can make sense to continue working full time until their new venture business is up and running. A full-time job provides a certain level of stability — like a consistent salary, health care, and other benefits.

Knowing when and if to disclose your new business with your employer is the hard part. For that reason, some entrepreneurs choose to keep their secret side hustle just that — a secret.

Some experts say an employer should know if you have any business interests outside of your daily work responsibilities. Others argue what you do on your free time is none of your employer’s business so long as you aren’t using company time or resources.

“Some employers really encourage their employees to work on side businesses because it stimulates creativity,” says Jill Jacinto, a millennial career expert at Manhattan-based career consultancy firm WORKS. On the other hand, she adds, some employers “might feel you are neglecting your current job or getting ready to make a move elsewhere.”

Beyond feeling ostracized by fellow workers or their employers, there are also potential legal conflicts or consequences to worry about, says Bruce Eckfeldt, founder of Eckfeldt & Associates, a business coaching and management training firm based in New York City and a master coach for career-assistance company, The Muse.

“Before you invest a bunch of time in your startup, make sure that your current employment agreement isn’t going to be a problem,” he says. If you happen to be launching a business in the same field as your current employer, there may be restrictions outlined in your contract that could come back to bite you.

In addition, you should do your very best to separate your new business from your day job as best you can. Separating your time and focus is a little more obvious — don’t work on your startup at your job — but you may also need to create some physical boundaries too.

“Build a solid wall between the work you do for you employer and for your startup. Separate email address, file repositories, maybe even computers and profiles if you’re really careful,” says Eckfeldt. He says this adds a physical level of separation between your day job and your startup. It also protects you against any claims you have used work time or resources on your startup. Doing so is common for many starting out, but generally considered unprofessional, and could breach the terms of your employment contract.

We interviewed several full-time workers who are secretly juggling side businesses along with their 9-to-5. We asked about their motivations, how they keep their other job under wraps, and the toll it has taken on their professional lives. To protect their identities (and their livelihoods), we have changed several of their names.

Here’s what it’s really like to live a double work life.

“I sell live crickets on the side.”

By day, Jason*, 32, is a project manager for a paint and flooring company in York, Pa.

After work, he puts on a much different hat as a pet food distributor. But he doesn’t sell Kibble ‘n Bits. His website, The Critter Depot, sells live crickets, which pet owners purchase in bulk to feed pets like snakes and large reptiles. Jason also operates a couponing blog under a pseudonym “Jason” and picks up Craigslist gigs in his free time.

“I like to get income from many sources, so I side-hustle,” Jason tells MagnifyMoney.

The husband and soon-to-be father of three says his ultimate goal is to retire as soon as possible. He plans to keep taking on extra work as long as he can manage it. He calls his full-time job “the bedrock” of his retirement plan.

“The full-time job, that’s the bedrock. That’s the foundation. If I had to sacrifice the other three [businesses], I would make sure I kept my full-time job,” says Jason. “Even if my side hustles got to the point where they were pulling in six figures alone, I wouldn’t get rid of my full-time job.”

On why he doesn’t tell his employer about his other income streams, Jason says he doesn’t want to blur the lines between his different businesses.

He’s careful to focus only on office work during office hours, and on his businesses when he’s at home. He doesn’t want to risk losing any trust at work.

“I don’t want [my boss] to think maybe I’m too zoned in on my side projects and not zoned in enough on my at-office projects,” he says.

For him, keeping his job in addition to the side income streams is all about keeping his family afloat.

“If I were a bachelor, I’d say you’ve got to put every ounce of your time into it. But the father in me says you’ve got to be level-headed because it’s not just you that’s relying on [your income], your whole family is relying on it.”

“I’m a travel agent when I’m not working on Wall Street.”

While Fred*, 45, was working at an investment firm in New York City, he developed an idea for a travel business. In 2009, he launched YLime, a concierge service that helps organize group trips for Americans looking to book travel to various countries for annual Carnival celebrations. Recently, he expanded his offerings to include travel packages to some African countries and wine tours on Long Island, N.Y.

His reasons for keeping his side business under wraps are simple: his workplace frowns upon employees having outside income.

“I’ve been on Wall Street for about 20 years now, and there is a certain culture in here. If they see you doing something else, it limits your growth,” he says. “They are not going to consider you for those positions because they assume you’ve already checked out to a certain extent.”

Although he says his company isn’t a conflict of interest for his position, he would be concerned if his higher-ups knew about YLime.

“Depending on your relationship with some people in the firm, some people may try to use that information against you,” Fred says.

“My bosses found out about my secret trucking business from a local news reporter.”

After a management shake-up at the Las Vegas gaming company where she had worked for a decade, 41-year-old project manager Marcella Williams thought her days were numbered.

Fearing she might lose her job, she decided to use her project management skills to open her own business on the side as a backup.

She launched CDL Focus, a truck rental and shipping company, in mid-2015. She rents two semi-trucks, primarily to people looking to obtain a commercial driver’s license. They can use her trucks to practice driving or to take the licensing test without going through an employer to gain access to a truck. Williams employs a driver for the other part of her business, which focuses on shipping.

She spent nearly $130,000 of her own savings and salary to bootstrap the business. In its early days, she admits it was hard to focus 100% on her day job while trying to get CDL Focus off the ground.

“The truth is, I probably spent a lot more time especially in the beginning working on the business than on my job,” says Williams. She gave her full-time job assignments priority and would shift her focus once her regular duties were completed, she says.

Williams recalls a time a potential truck client called her in the middle of a meeting with her supervisor.

“I’ve been in a meeting with my boss and my phone is ringing off the hook and he’s like, ‘do you need to get that?’” she says. In those cases, Williams says she tries to take the call after hours or send an prewritten reply so that she can respond later.

“You want to run your business and stay on top of it, but when you have a one- to two-hour conference call or meeting, you have to decide: are you going to screw over the person who is paying you?” she says.

After almost two years in operation, Williams caught the attention of a local reporter who wrote about her new venture. It wasn’t long before her employers found out.

The same day, her supervisor asked her into his office to be sure she wasn’t going to quit.

Now, she says, “[my co-workers] ask me ‘how is your trucking company going?’ in the middle of cubicle land.”

“I flip houses and sell bounce castles, and my employers have no idea.”

Austin, Texas-based Dennis* says he hasn’t quite mastered the ability to focus on his full-time job and ignore his side business until after work hours. The 31-year-old works as a logistics manager for a large technology company. About a year and a half ago, he and his wife took their savings and launched a real estate investing business.

Dennis and his wife buy, renovate, and resell homes. They learned the basics of house-flipping from a well-known investor in Austin. “Our first year we did 13 transactions,” says Dennis.

Excluding education and other startup costs, Dennis and his wife got into the market with $1,000 in direct mail advertising and about $15,000 spent fixing up their first property. They now earn between $20,000 and $50,000 on each home they flip. The couple says they brought in about $65,000 in 2016.

In 2016, Dennis also launched a pair of e-commerce stores, which sell bounce houses for children and clothing and accessories.

“I work on all three [projects] while I’m at my day job so it is hard, especially trying to keep everything a secret and not having co-workers see what I am truly working on,” Dennis says. “I know that I am not fulfilling my primary duties at my full-time job to the fullest extent of my abilities.”

To make things easier, the couple has hired a call center to take and record all calls from the real estate business, which are then addressed after Dennis comes home from work. He says he will do the same for the e-commerce stores as business grows.

His ultimate goal is to build up enough passive income to replace his corporate income. For now, he keeps his job for financial security, while he grows his e-commerce portfolio and his and his wife’s real estate business.

“The salary and stock incentives that we have right now are kind of hard to walk away from unless I had sufficient passive income that would replace what I have now,” he reasons. He has given himself two years to grow his businesses into self-sustaining operations. At that point, his stock in the company will be fully vested, and he can consider leaving for good.

“I’ve been blessed. I have a good education, and I’ve always had a good job, but ultimately my main goal in life is to be independent and not have to do the corporate grind,” he says.

The post Confessions of a Side Hustler: How Full-Time Workers Keep Their Side Gigs a Secret appeared first on MagnifyMoney.