You May Not Have to Remember Your Passwords Anymore If This Google Plan Takes Off

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You may soon be able to log into your Android devices without entering a password, thanks to the new “trust scores” Google announced at its annual I/O conference last week.

The trust scores, also referred to as the Trust API (application program interface) or Project Abacus, started development last year and The Verge reports the security updates are expected to be rolled out to a test group of “several very large” financial institutions next month. If all goes according to plan, Google expects Android users to have access to the scores at the end of the year and then potentially other operating systems after that.

How it Works

The API runs in the background and utilizes user-specific factors to develop a user’s trust score each time they log on, which could help prevent unauthorized users from accessing your personal information. According to TechCrunch, the API will factor in personal indicators, like face shape and voice recognition, as well as behavioral data, like how you move and type to compute the score.

Eventually, The Verge reports, trust scores could play a factor in logging into any apps or programs on mobile devices. Qualifications would vary based on what you’re trying to do, like banking apps requiring a higher trust score than a social media app.

Replacing Passwords

Until this security measure is implemented on devices, all users will continue logging in with standard passwords. If you think you have a weak password on any of your accounts, or use the same one for multiple logins, you may want to consider changing them. In fact, it’s a good idea to change your passwords often for better internet safety.

If you believe one of your accounts or passwords has been compromised, especially if it’s something that can be tied back to your finances, checking your credit report can help you see if anything damaging has occurred. (You can get your free annual credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com and view two of your credit scores for free, updated monthly, on Credit.com.) If you see any signs that your identity has been stolen, like new accounts you didn’t open or addresses that aren’t yours, you should dispute the information with the credit bureaus and report the fraud to the proper authorities.

[Offer: If you need help fixing errors on your credit report, Lexington Law could help you meet your goals. Learn more about them here or call them at (844) 346-3296 for a free consultation.]

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Image: Petar Chernaev

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