5 Health Apps That Can Save You Time & Money

Need to vet a doctor? Schedule an appointment? Monitor your diet? These health apps can help.

For many, healthcare costs are higher today than ever before, leaving many savvy people seeking out resources for saving money and time while addressing their health and wellness. Fortunately, with so many free and cheap health management apps available for download on your smartphone or tablet, the information and resources you need are now more accessible than ever before.

Remember, these apps aren’t meant to take the place of medical care, but they can provide supplemental assistance when it comes to vetting doctors, making appointments and managing your diet and exercise regiment. 

With that in mind, here are five money- and time-saving health management apps you can consider using.

1. ZocDoc

Cost: Free

How much time have you wasted trying to find a medical professional who is within your insurance network and has great reviews? Now, you can make finding a new healthcare specialist easier and faster with ZocDoc. This innovative app allows you to search a desired area for doctors and specialists — and you can filter based on reviews, location, insurance network, and more. Plus, once you find the right specialist for your needs, you can even book your appointment through the app and access any necessary paperwork you’ll need to fill out before your appointment.

2. iTriage

Cost: Free

iTriage was created by two emergency room physicians, and aims to help users get a better idea of what their symptoms may be caused by. Essentially, users can enter the specific symptoms they’ve been experiencing and receive a list of potential ailments or other medical issues that could be the cause. Again, this app is not meant to be used in lieu of seeing a doctor for an official diagnosis or treatment. Instead, the app will help you find a doctor or facility in your area who can treat you. Plus, it can tell you the nearest local urgent care or ER facility if needed.

3. LoseIt!

Cost: Free

LoseIt! is a great app for tracking your daily calorie intake, as well as your energy expenditures through exercise and other activities. It even features a handy scanner that allows you to simply scan a food label barcode with your phone and then automatically enters nutritional facts to your daily log. There are also some fun user challenges and contests to help you stay accountable and continue pursuing your health and fitness goals.

4. Doctor on Demand

Cost: Free, but you’ll pay $49 for any video doctor visits you opt for

Have you ever had a question for your doctor but had to wait until your next physical or other appointment to bring it up? With Doctor on Demand, you’re never more than a few taps away from speaking one-on-one with a licensed doctor, pediatrician, or even a psychologist. These specialists can talk with you about your symptoms and even write prescriptions over the phone without you having to leave your home for an appointment. The app itself is free, but be aware that you will be charged for each “visit” with a licensed specialist.

5. Fooducate

Cost: Free

Want to make smarter choices when it comes to your diet and food intake? If so, and if you’re not sure where to start, Fooducate is a great resource. This app can provide you with everything from the calorie content of a particular food to a breakdown of the macro- and micro-nutrients. It also has a handy feature that assigns each food a “grade” from A to D, so you can get a better idea of the nutrition of the food you eat and make smarter decisions.

Health & Money

These are just a few of the health management apps out there that can save you precious time and money. Remember, of course, to read the fine print of any app you’re considering closely so you know, among other things, whether the app collects any data, how it might be stored and what actions in the app may have charges associated with them.

Keep in mind, apps are just one way to potentially improve your wellness and lower healthcare costs. You can find tips for improving your eating habits, for example, on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

If you already have medical bills, there are some steps you can consider taking to address them more readily. For instance, you could ask the provider for an itemized bill so you can confirm the charges. You can also try negotiating with a doctor’s office for a lower payment (here’s some tips for how to do so.)

Remember, unpaid medical bills can go to collections and do some big damage to your credit. You can see how any medical debts may be affecting you by viewing two of your free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com. 

Image: kali9

The post 5 Health Apps That Can Save You Time & Money appeared first on Credit.com.

How to Pick the Right Healthcare Plan for You

Choosing medical coverage can be daunting. Here's how to select a healthcare plan.

Selecting a health insurance plan that works for your family can be an overwhelming task. However, there are four critical steps you can take to make certain that the plan is right for you and your family.

1. Network

Ever since managed care took over the health insurance industry in the 90s, insurance plan networks have become a critical part of selecting the “right” plan for you and your family. All of the major insurance companies offer online directories for finding medical providers. Those directories, however, can be very confusing. While you may find your physicians are contracted through your insurance company, you might be terribly disappointed when you schedule an appointment only to find that they are not on the sub-network that your plan utilizes.

Insurance companies normally have several different networks and your doctors may not belong to all of them. I have found that the simplest way to find out if your providers are on the network is to call their offices directly and provide the name of the insurance company and the name of the network you will be using. The other piece of information you will be able to glean is if your doctors will be participating in that network in the upcoming year. This will not usually be indicated on the insurance company’s website. Contracts between insurance companies and medical providers change constantly, and a network that includes your physicians this year may not include them next year.

2. Benefits

Many benefits that used to be optional are required to be included by the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. the ACA, or Obamacare). For example, mental health benefits, maternity coverage and guaranteed coverage without pre-existing condition limitations are currently all mandated by law. These standardized benefits may not last if the ACA is partially or fully repealed.

While many benefits are standardized, benefit levels are not. There are typically three types of policy benefits you will need to consider when selecting a plan. It is very important to read the Summary of Benefits and Coverage for your selected plan before you make this important decision.

  • A deductible is the amount of money you must pay before any expenses will be covered by your insurance company. The deductible typically resets on January 1st of each year. So, if you have a $1,000 deductible, you will have to pay the first $1,000 of eligible expenses, and the insurance company will start paying a portion of the next expenses incurred in that calendar year (see co-insurance, below). Generally, the higher the deductible, the lower the premium. So if you want to save money on your monthly premiums, you can select a higher deductible. There may also be a separate per-stay deductible if you need hospitalization or go to the emergency room. Sometimes, the deductible will be waived and a smaller copay will be required upon each visit to the doctor. The amount of the co-pay will vary by plan. Typical co-pays range from $25 to $100 per visit.
  • Co-insurance is the split between what the insurance company pays and the expenses for which you are responsible after the deductible has been paid. You might select a plan that pays 80% of approved medical expenses after your deductible has been satisfied. You would then be responsible for the other 20% of expenses. A plan that only pays 50% of expenses (with you paying the other 50%) would generally cost less than the aforementioned 80%/20% plan. This sharing stops and the insurance company pays 100% of the remaining charges when you have reached the out-of-pocket maximum. This limit is expressed in a dollar amount and includes all of your deductible and co-insurance payments. A typical out-of-pocket maximum might be $4,000 per person, with an $8,000 family limit. So if you have a family of four and each had expenses of $2,000, the family limit would be reached even though no one person reached their individual limit.
  • The final benefit selection you will need to make is for prescription drug coverage. Some plans cover prescription drugs just like any other medical expense, subject to the deductible and co-insurance described above. Other plans might waive the deductible and co-insurance but require a separate co-pay each time you refill a prescription. Since name-brand drugs are more expensive, the co-pay is usually higher. Generic drugs, however, cost less so they enjoy a lower co-pay. Finally, there may be a separate prescription drug deductible, which must be satisfied before any co-pay applies.

3. Insurance Company

The strength of the insurance company backing the policy you choose is just as important as the network or benefits selected. There is a misconception that Obamacare is an insurance policy backed by the government. Each policy is still underwritten by an insurance company, not the federal government. Since claims are paid by the insurance companies, you should check out the financial strength of the company. Several rating agencies evaluate the financial strength of insurers, including Moody’s, A. M. Best and Fitch Ratings. Look for companies with an “A” or better rating from all three rating agencies. (You can check your own credit rating for free by viewing your free credit report snapshot, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

4. Premiums

The premium is the monthly amount paid to the insurance company in return for the policy benefits purchased. All of the factors discussed above will work together to determine the premium required for your insurance coverage. And while your health, medical history or gender can’t affect your premium, a few other factors can. Premiums increase with age and as family members are added to the plan. Premiums can also vary widely based upon where you live in the country or even within your own state. Rates are determined, in part, by the medical expenses in your particular zip code. The insurance company can also charge more if you use tobacco.

While deciding on the correct medical insurance plan can be tedious, balancing these four critical details can help you make an informed and appropriate selection.

Image: asiseeit

The post How to Pick the Right Healthcare Plan for You appeared first on Credit.com.

Open Enrollment Season: How to Choose the Right Health Plan

Smiling senior man having measured blood pressure

It’s that time of the year again — health care open enrollment. Open enrollment season is the time of the year when you enroll, re-enroll, or change your 2017 health insurance plan. These fall months are pretty crucial. Unless you have a qualifying life event (getting married, starting a new job, etc.), you won’t get another chance to change your benefits for another year.

Most Americans get their health care through three main options — Medicare, their employer, or the federal health care exchange.

  1. Medicare

Open enrollment for Medicare is between Oct. 15 and Dec. 7 each year. You can get a jump start on the enrollment period by reading up on the plans and options ahead of time in Medicare & You, which is updated each year.

  1. Your job

Enrollment for employer-provided health care plans varies since these plans are set by the employer. Enrollment is typically in the fall, and any changes will go into effect on Jan. 1 of the following year. Ask your employer’s human resources department when your deadline is to enroll.

  1. Obamacare

Open enrollment through the state and federal Health Insurance Marketplace begins Nov. 1, and closes Jan. 31. Keep up on important deadlines here. If you need help signing up on the exchange, seek advice from a designated health care navigator.

Here are some tips to keep in mind as you review your health coverage this year:

Don’t get complacent

You might love the benefits you have at the moment, but that doesn’t mean you should blindly sign up for the same plan next year. Insurers are constantly tweaking existing coverage areas and creating new plans. Check to see if your existing plan has changed and see if there are new plans. With the rapid increase in pharmaceutical and health care prices, it’s important to look beyond the premium alone. Lower-cost plans may have higher out-of-pocket costs like deductibles, co-pays, and co-insurance. Certain covered drugs and treatments or the qualifying doctors or hospitals in your network could have changed as well.

Lower your out-of-pocket expenses with a Flexible Spending Account

Americans are paying the highest out-of-pocket health care expenses in history, due to a shift toward high-deductible plans. You can lower your out-of-pocket expenses by setting aside pretax dollars in a Flexible Spending Account. FSAs are only available to workers whose employer provides them.

FSAs can be used only for certain medical expenses, such as co-pays, prescriptions, and some over-the-counter medications. The maximum contribution is $2,550 for 2016. You can only sign up for one during the open enrollment period. When you do, you’ll decide how much of your pretax salary you want to contribute to cover qualified health care expenses throughout the year. Be careful not to contribute too much, however. The downside of an FSA is that you have to use the money in the account by December 31, or it is returned to your employer. However, some employers offer grace periods.

Take advantage of a Health Savings Account if you have a high-deductible health plan

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) go with high-deductible plans like salmon and white wine. Like an FSA, you contribute pretax dollars to an HSA to cover your medical expenses. However, since HSAs are not tied to any one employer, they are portable. Your money will come with you from one job to the next, and you won’t be limited on where you can use it. You also don’t have a certain time period to make or change your contribution amount, so you can make changes anytime throughout the year. In order to qualify for an HSA in 2017, your health plan deductible must be higher than $1,300 for an individual and $2,600 for a family.

Learn from last year’s mistakes

This is your chance to find a plan that fits your budget and your needs. Insurance companies change coverage rates and options frequently, so take the opportunity to do your research and flesh out all of your options this enrollment season. If you went for a low-premium, high-deductible plan this year, you might have realized you don’t really like paying higher out-of-pocket expenses all that much. Similarly, if you’ve paid for a high-premium, low-deductible plan but don’t use your health insurance that much, you may join the ranks of the growing number of Americans who have switched over to high-deductible health care plans over the past few years.

Check to see if you qualify for a tax credit

Like 80% of Obamacare applicants, you might be eligible for a tax credit that would lower your monthly premium. The average subsidy granted in 2016 was $3480 ($290/month), according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. If your estimated household income is up to four times the federal poverty level, then you’d qualify for the credit. You can check here to see if you qualify for a subsidy.

If you decide to forego insurance, know what to expect

Under the Affordable Care Act, every American has to have qualifying health insurance coverage, or pay a tax penalty. For 2016, the penalty is $695 for each uninsured adult in the household. However, there are a few exceptions. You might qualify for an exemption from the penalties under certain circumstances. For example, you won’t face a penalty if you suddenly lose a job or you are in between jobs for 1 or 2 months and have a gap in coverage. You should check to see if any exemptions apply to you before skipping out on signing up this enrollment season.

The post Open Enrollment Season: How to Choose the Right Health Plan appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Report: 600,000 Veterans Could Go Without Health Insurance Next Year

changes-to-Medicaid

A new Urban Institute report predicts that more than 600,000 veterans will go without health insurance in 2017 unless there are policy changes to the Medicaid program. They point out that more than half of those veterans live in the 19 states that have not expanded Medicaid.

“If Medicaid expansion decisions do not change between now and 2017, we project that approximately 604,000 veterans will be uninsured in 2017 and that 54% will be living in states that have yet to expand Medicaid,” according to the report.

In May 2011, the Urban Institute, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, began studying the effects the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 had on citizens. The findings in the September 2016 report are based off analysis of data from the 2011 – 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), 2013 – 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) and U.S. Census Bureau.

The report notes that, even with Medicaid expansion, thousands of veterans are going to be left without a way to pay for medical care, as they all aren’t eligible for care provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. It estimates that 38% of veterans would become part of the “assistance gap,” meaning they are not in the low-income category that qualifies them for Medicaid, but are making too much money to qualify for federal Obamacare health insurance subsidies. (It’s important to note that Medicaid expansion doesn’t come without costs — states have to figure out a way to pay for it.)

The researchers predict that, while fewer than 1 in 10 uninsured veterans in certain states would qualify for Medicaid in 2017 based on current expansion plans, “a projected 47% would qualify if all 19 states chose to expand.”

How Medical Debt Can Affect You

Medical debt can become a major burden and may even damage your credit, no matter if you’re a veteran, on active duty or a civilian. This can complicate things when it comes time to get a mortgage, take out a loan for a car or even apply for a job (many employers look at a version of your credit report as part of the application process).

If you’re currently laden with medical debt, it’s a good idea to review your bills for any errors, like double charges or other incorrect entries, that may help that number come down. And, while it may be challenging, it’s important to remember that you need to make your bill payments on time to maintain good credit. (You can see how your medical debts are affecting your credit by taking a look at two of your free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com and by getting copies of your free annual credit reports through AnnualCreditReport.com.) If you need assistance with paying these bills, consider talking with a professional to see what your options are.

Image: agentry

The post Report: 600,000 Veterans Could Go Without Health Insurance Next Year appeared first on Credit.com.

The Average 65-Year-Old Retired Couple Needs $260,000 to Cover Health Care

health-care-costs-in-retirement

Paying for health care is hard on many Americans, but costs are especially high in retirement.

That’s according to recent analysis by Fidelity Investments, released this week, which found a 65-year-old couple retiring this year will need about $260,000 to cover their health care.

“The estimate applies to retirees with traditional Medicare insurance coverage,” Fidelity said in a press release, “and provides a general idea of monthly expenses associated with Medicare premiums, Medicare co-payments and deductibles, and prescription drug out-of-pocket expenses.”

It assumes the average life expectancies of 85 for a man and 87 for a woman.

The cost of covering healthcare in retirement is up 6% over last year’s estimate of $245,000, Fidelity said. It’s also their highest estimate since they began running the numbers in 2012.

“In recent years, the health care industry has experienced a period of historically low spending levels, due to a range of factors including a period of slow economic growth,” said Adam Stavisky, senior vice president of Fidelity Benefits Consulting.

However, long-term care expenses, which are based on a number of factors, could also throw a monkey wrench in retirees’ finances. As Fidelity noted, these costs are only covered by Medicare in certain circumstances, and a 65-year-old couple would need $130,000, plus savings for medical expenses, to insure against long-term care costs. (Keep in mind, this is assuming the couple is in good health and purchased a policy with an $8,000 monthly maximum benefit, with three years of benefits, and an inflation adjuster of 3% per year.)

Saving on Medicare 

According to one report by the Kaiser Foundation, Medicare beneficiaries spent $4,734 out-of-pocket on average in 2010; when hospitalized two or more times, those costs soared to $6,216. So how is a retiree to save on Medicare? Fortunately, there are ways to get around the problem. Credit.com asked Nate Purpura, vice president of Consumer Affairs with eHealth, a health insurance provider in San Francisco, how it’s done.

  1. Do your research. “The important thing to know is that Medicare you get from the government only covers about 80% of medical costs on average, and that doesn’t include prescription drugs,” Purpura said. “The other thing is that the government doesn’t cap your out-of-pocket expenses.” So if you get sick and visit the hospital twice in a year, you’ll incur out-of-pocket costs despite holding insurance. “If you just kind of glide into retirement and stick with the original government Medicare, you miss a lot of opportunities to save money,” Purpura added. Spend some time doing research to figure out your Medicare coverage options.
  2. Comparison shop for plans. “There’s a bunch of different insurance you can buy to supplement Medicare,” Purpura said. “Our research shows that, on average, a person can save 20% when they compare monthly premiums for Medicare Supplement Plan F — the most popular supplement plan.”
  3. Review your prescription drug coverage annually. Yes, the plans are “massively complicated,” Purpura said. However, different types of drugs (think generic versus brand name) are covered at different levels, so it pays to comparison shop for drug coverage. “And the good news is the rules change ever year,” Purpura added. “You have a time once a year to compare and update and make sure you’re getting the best price.” Using online portals offered by private insurers or the government, type in your prescription and dosage amount to see which plan works best for you.
  4. Consider Medicare Advantage for dental and vision. “On average, seniors spend 6% of that $4,700 on out-of-pocket dental care,” Purpura said. Medicare Advantage plans typically roll dental, vision and prescription drug coverage all into one, plus, they’ll cap your out-of-pocket spending on deductibles, co-pays, co-insurance and more.

Remember, combining the tips above with a rock-solid financial plan will keep you ahead of the game when it’s time to retire. To see how any debt is affecting your finances, you can view two of your free credit scores, updated monthly, on Credit.com. Carrying debt? See how long it will take to pay it off with our lifetime cost of debt calculator.

Image: Susan Chiang

The post The Average 65-Year-Old Retired Couple Needs $260,000 to Cover Health Care appeared first on Credit.com.

What Is the 1095-B & Why Did I Get It?

tax_forms

This year, you may have received a tax form you haven’t seen before: the 1095-B. It’s a form sent by your health insurer or employer that shows you had the minimum health insurance needed to avoid a tax penalty during the tax year. (In short, it’s an Obamacare thing.) You could also receive a similar form, the 1095-C, if you work for a company with more than 50 employees. You might actually receive both or multiple forms, depending on your insurance setup and employment situation throughout the tax year.

If that seems confusing, relax. You don’t even need these forms to file your taxes.

“You just need to check a box that says you had health coverage,” said Debra Hammer, a senior communications manager with TurboTax. “You most likely will receive a form, but it’s not required.”

If you didn’t have health coverage for the full year and don’t qualify for an exemption, like financial hardship or gaps in coverage for less than 3 months, you may need to pay a penalty. Tax software should help you calculate that penalty, and if you’re going the pen-and-paper route for tax preparation, you can find information about the penalties on HealthCare.gov.

“The only real problem with the 1095-B is that people are afraid that if they don’t have one that they cannot file their tax returns until that get the form when in reality, most of the time the information about health insurance is on their W-2 coded DD in box 12,” wrote Bill Farmer, an Enrolled Agent with HTI Tax Service, in an email. “Another dead giveaway that a person has had health insurance is that they have a code W in box 12 which indicates that they have a Health Savings Account.”

Even if you get a 1095-B or 1095-C, it’s quite likely you won’t need to do anything with them other than file them away with the rest of your tax paperwork. The extent of your Obamacare-related tax activities may be limited to checking that single box indicating you had health insurance for the year.

But not everyone has it so easy. There’s the 1095-A, which has been around for two years and goes to people who had coverage through the health insurance marketplace. It’s required to reconcile the insurance premium credits you may have received and what you really qualify for, based on the difference in your actual income and the estimated income you used when applying for health coverage — it determines if you received too little or too much of a health care subsidy and will affect your tax refund or tax bill.

“Where the whole thing starts getting hairy is when you have an A-B or an A-C combination — the person got a credit part of the year and had company-provided insurance part of the year,” Farmer said. It’s common for such taxpayers to have to repay the credits they received, he added.

It can be understandably stressful to end up owing taxes you didn’t expect to have to pay, but figuring out a way to cover that bill is important. You could pay your taxes with a credit card, though there are fees associated with that option, or you could take out a personal loan if you need help. You could also work out a payment plan with the IRS. Not paying isn’t a great option, because it can eventually get more expensive with fees and interest, not to mention the potential impact on your credit score.

Whether or not you’re fretting over 1095s, it’s probably a good idea to started filing those tax returns, if you haven’t already. Either you’ll get your refund sooner or have more time to ask questions and figure out how to tackle the tax bill you need to pay by April 15.

More on Income Tax:

Image: dolgachov

The post What Is the 1095-B & Why Did I Get It? appeared first on Credit.com.

FSA vs. HSA: Which Is Right for You?

Couple Reading Letter In Respect Of Husband's Neck Injury

If you’re in the position of having both a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) and a Health Savings Account (HSA) available to you, you might be wondering which way you should go.

Most consumers don’t totally understand account-based health plans, including HSAs and FSAs, according to a survey by health care and benefit payment firm Alegeus Technologies. Case in point: Only half of FSA holders passed an FSA proficiency quiz, and just 30% of HSA holders passed an HSA proficiency quiz.

If you aren’t sure which account is the best pick — or even what they can do for you — here’s a breakdown of your options.

What’s a Health FSA?

A health Flexible Spending Account is an employer-sponsored medical savings account into which you can contribute pre-tax dollars that you can use toward qualified health care expenses. This generally includes deductibles, copayments and qualified medical expenses that your insurance doesn’t cover, such as prescription medication, contraceptives and orthodontia.

In 2016, you can contribute as much as $2,550 to an FSA.

FSA Pros:

If your employer offers an FSA — and a majority do — signing up during open enrollment (usually in the fall) is easy, and setting aside funds pre-tax lowers your taxable income, which means you pay less in taxes overall.

FSA Cons:

The money you contribute to an FSA must be used by December 31 of the contribution year, unless your employer offers either a grace period (in which case you must use all funds by March 15 of the following year) or a $500 carryover option, in which you can roll over up to $500 in unused funds to the next FSA year. Otherwise, the unused funds are forfeited to your employer.

This means you must be fairly accurate at guessing what your healthcare expenses will be in the future, which isn’t always so easy. And you can only change how much you contribute to your FSA during open enrollment, or after a life change (such as a marriage or birth of a baby) or change in employment.

FSAs are employer-specific. If you change jobs, you’ll generally lose your FSA.

What’s an HSA?

A Health Savings Account is a medical savings account into which you can deposit pre-tax money, available to consumers enrolled in an HSA-qualified high-deductible health plan. Like an FSA, the funds can be put toward out-of-pocket health care expenses.

In 2016, the contribution limits for HSAs are $3,350 for individuals and $6,750 for families.

HSA Pros:

The money you put into an HSA can stay there until you use it — no end-of-year deadline. You can save now and pay for medical costs in 20 years if you wish. To make high-deductible health plans (and accompanying HSAs) more enticing to employees, many employers sweeten the deal by contributing some amount to the HSA annually — an average of $515 per employee in 2014, according to United Benefit Advisors.

You also have the ability to invest the funds in your HSA, ostensibly giving you another way to grow your savings. You won’t be taxed on any earnings or distributions from the account.

You can change your HSA contribution amount at any point during the calendar year. Had an unexpected medical expense? Put pre-tax money into your HSA to cover it.

HSAs are not employer-specific, so you can take your HSA with you even if you change jobs.

HSA Cons:

Not everyone is eligible for an HSA. You must be enrolled in a qualified high-deductible health plan (HDHP), so if you aren’t, an HSA isn’t an option for you.

For 2016, an HDHP would be self-only health insurance with a deductible of $1,300 or more or family health insurance with a deductible of $2,600 or more. To have an HSA, your HDHP would have to be your only plan, you shouldn’t be Medicare-eligible, and you can’t be claimed as a dependent on anyone else’s taxes.

The Bottom Line

So which should you choose? That depends on your circumstances. If you’re eligible for both, an HSA has more advantages in terms of flexibility, the ability to roll it over year after year, and the chance to invest the funds.

If you’re not eligible for an HSA, and your employer offers an FSA, the choice is easy: Sign up for the FSA.

You can’t have both accounts at once unless your employer offers a limited purpose FSA that could be used to pay for out-of-pocket dental and vision expenses. Your benefits department should be able to tell you whether that’s the case.

The post FSA vs. HSA: Which Is Right for You? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.