A Guide to Home Loans for Bad Credit

Getting a mortgage with bad credit isn’t easy. Banks and credit unions became ultraconservative with mortgage lending following the 2008 housing market crash. However, these days, tighter lending standards don’t have to force you out of the mortgage market. If you have a stable income, you may qualify for a mortgage, even with bad credit. We’ll explain the best home loans for people with bad credit, offer tips for cleaning up your credit histories and point out scams to avoid.

Quick guide to checking your credit score

If you’re just starting to shop for home mortgages, it pays to know if banks think you have bad credit or not. Here’s how FICO, the main credit score provider in the U.S., breaks down credit scores:

  • 800-plus: Exceptional
  • 740-799: Very good
  • 670-739: Good
  • 580-699: Fair
  • 579 and lower: Poor

A credit score above 740 is optimal for finding the best mortgages, but you can often secure a mortgage with a much lower score. You might find an FHA mortgage with a credit score as low as 500 (albeit with a 10 percent down payment rather than 3.5 percent rate for scores above 580), but a credit score of around 650 gives you a decent chance of qualifying for a home mortgage. Getting a mortgage with a truly bad credit score will be difficult, and improving your credit to “fair” status could make it much easier.

Where can you check your credit score? Banks and credit unions use the FICO Scores 2, 4 and 5. These are not the same scores you will find through a free credit scoring site. Unfortunately, we haven’t found a free option for checking your FICO Scores 2, 4 and 5. The best option for checking these is checking them on MyFICO, which costs $59.85.

If you don’t want to pay for a credit score, consider using a free scoring site. But don’t put too much stock in the number it offers. It may overestimate your credit score (for mortgage shopping), especially if you’ve paid off debt in collections recently, and some free scores don’t use the 300-850 scale FICO often uses. Instead, focus on the information about what’s helping and hurting your credit score, if the tool offers those insights, and use that knowledge to make improvements where you can.

You can get a free credit score through our parent company LendingTree.

Home loan programs for people with bad credit

FHA loans

FHA Loan Details

Credit score required

500, but banks have minimum underwriting
standards

Down payment required

Credit score between 500-579: 10 percent
Credit score above 580: 3.5 percent

Upfront financing fee

1.75 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.45 to 1.05 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally, $275,665 for single-family units, but it
varies by location and you should check the limits in your area

Fine print

Mortgage insurance premiums are paid for the life of the loan,
except when putting 10 percent or more down. If your down payment is
less than 20 percent but 10 percent or more, you must have
mortgage insurance for 11 years.

Quick take

If you have bad credit, an FHA loan offers a more accessible mortgage. While credit standards vary by lender, you may qualify for the FHA loan with a credit score as low as 500. With a credit score above the 580 threshold, you may qualify for the 3.5 percent down payment.

Unfortunately, an FHA loan can be expensive because of mortgage insurance fees. In addition to paying ongoing mortgage premiums for the life of the loan, you’ll have to pay a 1.75 percent upfront financing fee.

Pros:

  • 3.5 percent down payments (for those above the 580 credit-score mark)
  • Credit scores as low a 500
  • Can buy up to four units

Cons:

  • 1.75 percent upfront mortgage premium
  • Ongoing mortgage insurance
  • Smaller loan limits

Where to get an FHA loan

You can use the comparison tool on LendingTree or Zillow to find offers from FHA-approved lenders in your area willing to work with people with bad credit. If an online search doesn’t yield the results you want, you may need to work directly with a mortgage broker who specializes in finding mortgages for people with bad credit. You can use a site like Find A Mortgage Broker or Angie’s List to find brokers in your community.

Be sure to check the National Multistate Lending System (NMLS) to see if your broker has had any regulatory action filed against them. Regulatory actions against the broker are red flags that indicate you may want to take your business elsewhere.

Fannie Mae HomeReady Mortgage

HomeReady Mortgage Details

Credit score required

A minimum requirement of 620 generally applies
to Fannie Mae products.

Down payment required

3 percent for credit scores above 680
(for single family homes). 25 percent for credit scores
between 620-680 (for single family homes).

Upfront financing fee

None

Mortgage insurance

0.125 to 3 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100, though it varies by location

Fine print

You must earn less than the median income in
your ZIP code to qualify,
or buy a home in a low-income zip code.
You must take a homeowner’s education class to qualify for the mortgage,
mortgage insurance can be canceled when you reach a
loan-to-value ratio of 80 percent.

Quick take

If you’ve got a fair credit score but a big down payment, the Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgage is the best conventional mortgage for you. With a 620 credit score and a 25 percent down payment, you meet HomeReady eligibility requirements, and you’ll pay no mortgage insurance. Fannie Mae offers a 3 percent down payment option, but you need a credit score of at least 680.

HomeReady mortgages also allow for cosigners who won’t live at the address with you. That means a parent or grandparent with a high credit score could help you purchase the property by co-signing. If you can find a cosigner, you may qualify for the 3 percent down payment even if your credit score falls below 680.

Pros:

  • Can qualify with credit score as low as 620
  • A low 3 percent down payment if you have a 680 credit score
  • Down payment doesn’t have to come from personal funds
  • Mortgage insurance premiums are cancellable
  • Non-occupant cosigners are permitted

Cons:

  • Up to 25 percent down payment required in some instances
  • Not all lenders offer Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgages, so you might struggle to find a bank with this offering.

Where to get a Fannie Mae HomeReady mortgage

Fannie Mae doesn’t publish a list of lenders who offer the HomeReady mortgage, so you will need to work with your lender specifically to see if they offer it. Most major banks and credit unions will be approved to underwrite Fannie Mae mortgages, but the specific product offering will vary by bank.

Consider using an online mortgage comparison engine including LendingTree or Zillow to compare offers in your area. However, once you find lenders that will work with you, you’ll have to ask them about the HomeReady mortgage, especially if you want to use the 3 percent down or co-signing feature.

The Housing and Urban Development office of housing counseling may also help you connect with lenders who offer the HomeReady Mortgage.

VA loans

VA Loan Details

Credit score required

Credit standards set by lender

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1.25 to 3.3 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

None

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100, though it varies by location

Fine print

Must obtain a certificate of eligibility
(for military members and spouses)
before applying for a VA loan

Quick take

For people with a military background, the VA loan is a top mortgage option. The upfront financing fee can be hefty, but it’s a good deal if you plan to live in the house for several years. That said, not all VA lenders work with buyers with bad credit, so you may struggle to find a reputable lender in your area.

Pros:

  • No down payment required
  • No mortgage insurance
  • No firm credit minimums
  • Can buy up to four unit multi-family property.

Cons:

  • Upfront funding fee
  • Not all lenders issue VA loans to borrowers with bad credit
  • Must buy home with the intent to occupy for at least 12 months

Where to get a VA loan

To take out a VA loan, you must get a certificate of eligibility (COE) through the Veterans Administration eBenefits platform. Once you get the COE, you can use the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s interest rate data to learn about interest rates for VA loans.

To find a VA lender who works with bad-credit clients, you’ll probably want to work with a mortgage broker. You can find mortgage brokers online or through your state’s housing finance agency. Be sure that your broker has no regulatory action filed against them before you commit to working with them.

USDA loans

USDA Loan Details

Credit score required

As low as 580, but generally 640

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1 percent (can be financed)

Mortgage insurance

0.35 percent annually

Mortgage limits

No limits, but must meet standards of affordability based on moderate incomes

Fine print

You must meet income eligibility requirements,
and the property must be in a qualified rural area

Quick take

If you’re planning to buy in a rural area (and you may be surprised what qualifies, so check), a USDA loan offers a low cost, low money down loan. Technically, the absolute minimum credit score for this loan is 580, but most lenders won’t issue USDA loans to borrowers with scores below 640. USDA loans tend to be a better deal than FHA loans, but they may have higher costs compared to VA or conventional loans. If you’ve got fair credit, but you don’t have a big down payment, the USDA loan makes sense for you.

Pros:

  • No down payment
  • Only 1 percent upfront mortgage fee

Cons:

  • Ongoing financing fee cannot be canceled
  • Finding lenders who work with bad credit borrowers can be difficult
  • Must meet location and income criteria

Where to find USDA loans

If you meet the USDA eligibility requirements, you can start shopping for USDA loans through LendingTree, but you may not find many offers if you have a credit score below 640. If you can’t easily find a lender, you’ll want to work with an independent mortgage broker who will have insider access to multiple lenders in your city. You can find reputable brokers online through Find A Broker, Angie’s List or the Better Business Bureau (search for mortgage brokers, your city). Before committing to a broker, check that your broker has no regulatory action filed against them.

Manufactured home loans for bad credit

Manufactured homes are houses constructed off-site, transported and anchored to a permanent foundation at a new home site. On average, manufactured homes cost 80 percent less than site-built single family homes, but taking out a mortgage for a manufactured home can be expensive, even if you have good credit. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, almost 68 percent of all loans for manufactured home purchases were considered higher priced mortgages. On top of already high rates, bad credit will drive your interest rate even higher. However, thanks to the lower upfront price, people with bad credit may have an easier time finding home financing for manufactured homes than for site-built homes.

FHA Title I loans (Chattel loans)

FHA Title I Loan Details

Credit score required

No credit score minimums, but
must meet ability to pay criteria

Down payment required

5 percent down for credit scores above 500,
otherwise 10 percent down

Upfront financing fee

Up to 2.25 percent

Mortgage insurance

Up to 1 percent

Mortgage limits

  • Home only: $69,678

  • Lot only: $23,226

  • Home and lot: $92,904

Mortgage term limits

  • 20 years for home only

  • 20 years for single-section home and lot

  • 15 years for lot only

  • 25 years for a multi-section home and lot

Titling requirements

Manufactured homes can be titled as personal property.

Fine print

Manufactured homes must be situated on a lot that meets
FHA property standards (such as hookups for water and electricity,
and foundation anchors) that is owned or leased by the primary
mortgage holder. Manufactured home must be at least 400 square feet.

Quick take

The FHA Title I loan is an obvious choice for people with bad credit looking to buy a manufactured home, but you need to do your research before you commit to this loan. According to the CFPB, Chattel loans had 1.5 percent higher APRs than standard mortgages. These loans also come with expensive mortgage insurance fees that can be passed on to you.

However the Chattel loan makes sense if you’re buying a used manufactured home or if you plan to rent the lot where your home sits.

Pros:

  • No credit standards
  • Flexible terms for land ownership
  • Can title home as personal property

Cons:

  • Maximum loan is $92,904
  • Some lender restrictions
  • 5-10 percent down payment requirement
  • Must be a fixed term mortgage

Where to find Chattel loans

Chattel loans are a niche product that few banks and credit unions offer. Half of all Chattel loans are issued by five banks: 21st Mortgage, Vanderbilt Mortgage, Triad Financial Services, U.S. Bank, and Credit Human (formerly San Antonio Federal Credit Union), according to a 2014 report from the CFPB. You can also find local lenders through the Manufactured Housing Association’s lender search.

FHA loan

FHA Loans Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

500 (varies by bank)

Down payment required

Credit score between 500-579: 10 percent
Credit score above 580: 3.5 percent

Upfront financing fee

1.75 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.45-1.05 percent

Mortgage limits

Generally $275,665

Titling requirements

Manufactured homes must be titled as real
property and you must own the lot.

Fine print

All manufactured homes must meet standards set by the
FHA including foundation anchors, water and electrical hookups and more.

Quick take

A standard FHA loan makes sense if you’re planning to buy a manufactured home and land. While credit standards vary by lender, you may be able to qualify for the FHA loan with a credit score as low as 500. If you can raise your credit score to 580, you may even qualify for the 3.5 percent down payment.

This loan isn’t as easy to get as the Chattel loan, but some people with bad credit may qualify. If you want to use an FHA loan for a manufactured home, work with your loan officer closely, so your financing is in place before your home is completed.

Pros:

  • 3.5 percent down payments
  • Credit scores as low a 500
  • Up to $275,665 in financing

Cons:

  • 1.75 percent upfront mortgage premium
  • Must pay ongoing mortgage insurance
  • Must buy owner-occupied home

Where to get an FHA loan

The Manufactured Housing Association’s lender search will also provide a list of lenders who may offer FHA loans for manufactured homes in your state. If that list doesn’t provide the results you need, work with a HUD office of housing counseling center to learn about lenders who offer FHA loans for manufactured homes.

USDA

USDA Loan Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

580 and below is considered a no-go;
generally 640 and up

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1 percent, which can be financed

Mortgage insurance

0.35 percent annually

Mortgage limits

No limits, but must meet standards of
affordability based on moderate incomes

Titling requirements

Home must be titled and taxed as real estate

Fine print

You must own the lot where your home is located and meet
income eligibility requirements and the property must be
in a qualified rural area

Quick take

If you’re purchasing a new manufactured home in a rural area, the USDA loan may make sense for you. The manufactured home must be new, and you have to own the site where the home is located. However, with the lowest acceptable credit score being at the 580 threshold, USDA loans aren’t suited for bad-credit borrowers. Improving your credit to “fair” could be the difference between rejection and approval..

Pros:

  • As low as no money down
  • Low financing fees
  • Competitive interest rates

Cons:

  • Higher credit underwriting standards
  • Must own lot
  • Must buy new manufactured home

Where to get a USDA loan

If you meet the USDA eligibility requirements, connect with the HUD office of housing counseling in your state. If the USDA loan is a good fit for you, staffers there will help you find lenders who work with USDA borrowers that want in on manufactured homes.

VA loans

VA Loan Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

Credit score standards set by lender

Down payment required

None

Upfront financing fee

1.25-3.3 percent depending on your military status,
home buying experience and down payment.
This fee can be financed.

Mortgage insurance

None

Mortgage limits

$424,100

Titling requirements

The house must be titled as real property,
and you must own the lot where the house is located.

Fine print

Must obtain a certificate of eligibility
(for military members and spouses) before applying for a VA loan.

Quick take

The VA loan offers a down payment of 0 percent (even for manufactured homes) as long as you own (or will buy) the lot where the home is located. The drawback to the VA loan is that most lenders set their credit score standards in the 600-range, which means that people with bad credit might not qualify. On top of that, not every VA lender offers loans for manufactured homes. Those two factors mean the you may struggle to find a lender in your area who will work with you.

If you find the lender, the VA loan is a great choice, but if you can’t, consider an FHA loan instead.

Pros:

  • No down payment required
  • No mortgage insurance
  • No firm credit minimums

Cons:

  • Upfront funding fee
  • Not all lenders offer VA loans for manufactured housing
  • Must buy home with the intent to occupy for at least 12 months
  • Must own lot

Where to get a VA loan

To take out a VA loan, you must get a certificate of eligibility (COE) through the Veterans Administration eBenefits platform. Once you get this, find an independent mortgage broker who specializes in VA loans for manufactured homes or VA loans for people with bad credit. These brokers work with multiple banks and can help you find better deals than you might find on your own. Before committing to a particular broker, check for regulatory action filed against them. You don’t want to work with a broker who fails to meet the standards set by your state.

Conventional mortgages

Conventional Mortgage Details for Manufactured Homes

Credit score required

620

Down payment required

5 percent (10 percent for people with insufficient
credit for traditional scoring)

Upfront financing fee

None

Mortgage insurance

0.5 percent annually

Mortgage limits

Generally, $424,100

Titling requirements

Must own land, and home must
be titled as real property.

Fine print

You’ll have to pay mortgage insurance until your
home reaches at least an 80 percent loan-to-value ratio.

Quick take

If you’ve got a 20 percent down payment and at least a 620 credit score, and your home meets underwriting standards, the conventional mortgage is the best choice for you. This loan has competitive interest rates and no mortgage insurance for people with a loan-to-value ratio of at least 80 percent. Your home must be at least 600 square feet and meet HUD standards for manufactured homes, and you must own your lot. However, you can use this loan to purchase an existing manufactured home (built after 1976) if it is permanently affixed to an approved foundation.

Another advantage to this loan is that they do accept borrowers with thin credit files, provided they don’t have derogatory marks on their credit file.

Where to find conventional mortgages

Before you start shopping, you can use the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s interest rate data to learn about interest rates in your state. Compare real offers from local lenders using LendingTree, or work with your state’s housing finance agency to find reputable lenders in your area.

Other common financing deals

Aside from those mortgages, manufactured home buyers with bad credit might consider two other options. First, you might consider a retail installment contract. A retail installment contract is issued by the manufacturer (or installer) or your home. If you’re working directly with the manufacturer to take out a loan, you should take the time to understand upfront and ongoing fees, APR and what happens if you miss a payment. The Manufactured Housing Institute provides detailed information on buying and living in manufactured houses and on how to find manufacturers and lenders who can help you finance a manufactured home.

Borrowers with bad credit might also consider owner-held financing option. Owner-held financing is a readily available form of credit, but it is risky. Before signing a lease to own agreement, find a real estate lawyer who can help you uncover title issues and explain the loan. To learn more, you can either find a lawyer through your employer (who may offer legal benefits), the American Bar Association or by contacting HUD office of housing counseling in your state.

Clean up your credit before mortgage shopping

In 2016, the average new home cost $372,500, but that’s before paying interest. According to Informa Market Research, the average interest rate for a person with a credit score between 620 and 639 is 5.115 percent, but a person with a score of at least 760 gets a 3.527 percent rate. Does just a point and a half translate to much cost difference? Absolutely. If both people finance $298,000 on a new home, then the person with great credit will pay $1,343 per month. The person with lesser credit will pay $278 more, $1,621 per month. That translates to more than $100,000 more over the life of the loan.

Tips to improve your credit score

To repair your credit before taking out a mortgage, and qualify for better terms and more options, start with these three simple steps:

  1. Pay all your current debt accounts on time, each month.
  2. Reduce your credit card utilization by paying down your credit card debt.
  3. Stop applying for credit six months before mortgage shopping.

These three factors alone account for 75 percent of your credit score.

As you take care of those items, you’ll want to check your credit report from the three major credit bureaus through AnnualCreditReport.com.

You want to be sure that you recognize all the information on your credit report, and that there are no duplicate entries. Dispute any errors or duplicates. For further guidance, use the Federal Trade Commission’s free guide to disputing errors on your credit report. If you believe you’ve been a victim of identity theft, follow the Federal Trade Commission’s advice on identity theft recovery.

Disputing errors on your credit report may prevent a bank from issuing you a mortgage, so start disputes at least 90 days in advance of applying for a mortgage. While the credit bureaus should clean up the errors within 30 days, the process sometimes takes longer

Getting a mortgage after bankruptcy or foreclosure

Bankruptcy stays on your credit report for up to seven or 10 years, depending on the type, and foreclosures stay on your credit report for up to seven years, but you don’t have to wait that long to take out a mortgage. If you take steps to improve your credit, you can qualify for some mortgages one to four years after your bankruptcy is dismissed, or two to four years following foreclosure.

 

Conventional

FHA

VA

USDA

Chapter 7

Four years from discharge or dismissal (except in extenuating circumstances)

Two years (or one year in extenuating circumstances)

Generally, two years (though it is not a disqualifying standard)

Generally, three years

Chapter 11

Four years from discharge or dismissal (except in extenuating circumstances)

Must meet credit standards

Generally, two years

Must meet credit standards

Chapter 13

Two years after discharge or four years after dismissal

Two years (or one year in extenuating circumstances)

One year of payments

Generally, one year

Foreclosure

Seven years, except if foreclosure was discharged in bankruptcy (then use bankruptcy limits)

Three years except in extenuating circumstances

Generally two years

Generally, three years

Even if you can get a new mortgage just a year or two after bankruptcy or foreclosure, it makes sense to wait longer in most cases. By waiting around three or four years, the damage of the bankruptcy and foreclosure fades, and you’ll have that extra time to revive your credit score.

To get your credit in shape after bankruptcy or foreclosure, you’ll want to continue to make bankruptcy payments as agreed and consider opening a secured credit card to rehabilitate your damaged credit. Use the credit card for daily expenses, and pay it off in full each month.

Improve your shot at approval even if you have bad credit

If you’ve got bad or fair credit, and you don’t have a lot of time to improve it, you can still take out a mortgage in some cases. These are a few things that can help you get approved with a low credit score.

  • Choose a house well within your budget. If you’ve got a strong income and a low monthly payment, the bank may be more likely to approve your loan.
  • Come up with a larger down payment. While the median down payment is just 5 percent, a person with bad credit may need quite a bit more (up to 25 percent) to get a loan.
  • Work with your loan officer: Give them paperwork in a timely manner, and follow their instructions regarding credit repair, collection repayments and debt repayments. If you’re close to gaining approval, the loan officer can help you take the last few steps to meet the bank or government’s underwriting criteria. Loan officers may take advantage of manual underwriting provisions for FHA, VA, USDA and conventional loans, but that requires more information and participation from you.
  • Ask for rapid rescoring if you’re disputing errors on your credit report, or paying down credit card debt.

Rapid rescoring

A rapid rescore is a method for “re-checking” your credit score on an accelerated time scale. Banks usually only check your credit score once when they’re considering your for a loan, but they may pay a fee to see a new score if you’ve paid down debt or removed negative information from your report, according to Experian. The bank will use the new information to recalculate your credit score to see if you qualify for a loan.

Should I keep renting?

A bad credit score by itself shouldn’t stop you from buying a home. You’ll pay more in interest costs over the life of the loan, but you’ll also start building equity sooner. Plus, a few years of paying on a mortgage will help you raise your credit score, so you can refinance later on.

However, a bad credit score can be a symptom of a bad financial situation. If you’re struggling to pay your bills on time, buying a house isn’t usually a good idea. During financial stress, a new mortgage bill is more likely to be a curse than a blessing.

Watch out for these scams targeting people with poor credit

Financial scammers are always on the prowl for desperate people who might become their next victims. These are a few pitfalls that all homebuyers need to avoid as they shop for homes and mortgages.

Mortgage closing scams

Mortgage closing scams are pernicious schemes that involve falsifying wiring instructions, the FTC warns. In a mortgage closing scam, a hacker poses as a title closing agent. He or she may email you fraudulent information about where to wire the money, or claim that there’s been a last-minute change to the details.

Closing for a home is an incredibly busy time, especially if you’ve struggled to qualify for the mortgage in the first place. To prevent mortgage closing scams, ask your title agent to send the wire information in an encrypted email. You can also request a call with the details.

Anyone who has been a victim of a mortgage closing scam should report it to the FBI immediately, and log a complaint in the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

Complex lease-to-own deals

Owner financing isn’t necessarily a scam, but it can be complex. Many owner financing deals don’t put the title into your name until you’ve paid off the entire loan, and some deals require balloon payments after a few years, the FTC warns. If you can’t cover the balloon payment, you lose every cent of equity you’ve paid.

Even worse than difficult loan terms are situations when the owner can’t legally issue a first-lien loan. If the owner has used the house to secure any other loan, then the bank has a first-lien position on the loan.

Don’t sign an owner financing agreement until a lawyer explain the details of the loan to you. You must take steps to protect yourself from owner fraud if you want to own the house in the end.

Hard money loan scams

Hard money loans are real estate loans for investors interested in flipping a property. Hard money loans come with high interest rates, hefty down payments and short payback periods. Most of the time, hard money lenders evaluate project quality rather than investor credit when issuing loans.

If you’re considering a hard money loan at all, you should have plans to flip a property for a profit. If you can’t earn a profit on the house, then a hard money loan doesn’t make sense.

If you are considering a hard money loan because you can’t find traditional financing, be careful. There’s little oversight of hard money loans, so it’s important you know what you’re getting into with these products. You can check out this guide to hard money loans if you want to learn more.

FAQs

If a bank turns you down for a mortgage, you can ask for an explanation. When you ask, the lender has 30 days to prepare an answer in writing, as required by the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Credit Reporting Act. A few common responses include:

  • We don’t think you can afford the payment (for instance, you’ll have to high of a debt-to-income ratio).
  • Your credit score’s too low.
  • You have an insufficient down payment.

Anyone struggling to find a mortgage should consider working with a licensed mortgage broker in his/her county. Mortgage brokers work with multiple local banks and credit unions, and they can often help if a banker cannot.

The best credit score to get a mortgage is any score above a 740, but most people with credit scores above 620 will qualify for some mortgages. And yes, it’s possible to qualify for a mortgage if you have a score of 500-620.

Yes. If you took out a loan when you had bad credit, you may qualify for a much better rate by improving your credit after just one to two years of on-time payments on all your lines of credit, according to research from VantageScore Solutions. However, if your bad credit score is the result of foreclosure or bankruptcy, your credit score may not fully recover for seven to ten years, so don’t count on a massive rate drop right away if those are the reasons for your bad credit score.

Given how much easier it is to qualify for a mortgage and how much you can save when you have good credit, waiting to buy often makes sense.

VA loans don’t require a down payment, and they have no firm credit minimums, but you’ll still need to meet a bank’s underwriting standards (which could be as high as a 640 credit score). If you have a credit score of 580-640 and you meet other qualifying standards, you may qualify for a no-money-down USDA home loan..

Outside these options, the only no-money-down mortgages for people with bad credit include owner-held mortgages or rent-to-own deals. Do your homework.

Not all mortgages allow cosigners, but a cosigner could help you qualify. Asking someone to cosign essentially means asking that person to pay your mortgage if you’re ever unwilling or unable to pay the bill. We generally don’t recommend becoming a cosigner unless you plan to live in the house.

An adjustable-rate mortgage makes a lot of sense if you have bad credit and you are confident you can improve your credit score within seven years before your interest rate adjusts (in the case of a 7/1 ARM). If your credit improves, you may be able refinance at a lower, fixed rate before the interest rate adjustment takes place. However, this option is risky. You may be stuck with higher interest rates if your credit doesn’t improve or if interest rates rise by the time you need to refinance.

The post A Guide to Home Loans for Bad Credit appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Millennial Homebuyers Still Value a Personal Touch

Many millennials surprisingly opt for local, face-to-face interaction over online tools when buying homes.

All the hullabaloo about millennials coveting their social media accounts over face-to-face interactions holds untrue — at least when it comes to real estate, according to a recent survey conducted by the financial wellness community, CentSai. (Full Disclosure: I am the co-founder and president of CentSai.)

In fact, the 2,050 millennials surveyed are more traditional than previously believed when faced with buying a home. Three-quarters of respondents – age 18 to 34 – prefer to use a local real estate agent instead of an online one.

And 71% said they would choose a local lender instead of applying online.

This is in stark contrast to a 2015 Fannie Mae survey, which found 70% of homebuyers would like to obtain a mortgage online and 69% would like to complete a mortgage application online. (Your credit plays a key role in the terms and conditions of your mortgage. You can view two of your credit scores free on Credit.com to see where yours currently stands.)

Millennials Want Someone They Can Trust

Online mortgage lending and brokerage services are expected to transform home buying, but millennials surveyed said that – contrary to popular belief – they prefer local providers due to existing relationships and local knowledge.

“While sites like Zillow are perfect for looking online to size up the market, when it came to using a lender or actually buying a home, personal touch was essential,” said Keenan Spiegel, who bought his first home with his fiancée in Norwalk, Connecticut, last year.

Spiegel, a wealth management associate at Morgan Stanley and director of data visualization for CentSai, said he used a local real estate agent recommended by his family because he wanted to be sure he worked with someone he trusted.

And while getting approved for a mortgage online could have taken minutes, the couple preferred the experience of using a local, brick-and-mortar who was more hands-on and available when they called with an “endless” list of questions.

“We felt local lenders also know much more about the area they service and can provide a lot of information about the community where you’re about to buy a home,” Spiegel said. “We wanted to know about the quality of schools and the crime rates.”

Online Isn’t Everything Yet

Despite the purported savings and the ease of use, online providers may not yet be as big of a disruptor in the sector as one would expect.

That said, the vast majority of millennials surveyed (91%) said they would use an online site or mobile app to research neighborhoods and home prices and help identify the home that they may buy. But they cited various reasons for “going local” when it came to choosing their agent or lender – including personal touch and handholding, longstanding relationships and local knowledge.

A little more than half (56%) of the millennials surveyed plan to buy a home in the next two years, and for this group, online lenders likely need to provide an even more personalized experience to garner business.

The fear of missing out on valuable information that comes out of an in-person conversation still weighs on the millennial mind.

After all, buying a home is a major purchase, and despite all the bots and burgeoning artificial intelligence, the internet still has a way to go before it can mimic sitting across the table from a real estate agent.

Image: Steve Debenport

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10 States Where Foreclosure Woes Linger

Foreclosure rates across the country continue to improve, but these 10 states are still struggling with above-average residential foreclosures.

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This Simple Trick Can Keep Mortgage Paperwork From Becoming a Huge Hassle

Securing a mortgage requires a laundry list of paperwork. But there’s a way to simplify it.

Every year for your tax returns, you gather together paperwork such as receipts, explanations, paystubs and W-2s. Seventy percent of this information contains the same things you’ll need for getting a mortgage loan. If you do your taxes on time in April and save your documents in a secure, easily accessible location, you can use it to to support your application for a home loan later in the year.

In an encrypted thumb drive, round up all your “mortgage documentation.” (Just remember the password for the thumb drive and, of course, where you ultimately choose to store it.) Within the drive, make subfolders that have the following titles:

  • Tax returns: You can include all pages and schedules of personal returns and corporate returns. Mortgage tip: Make a PDF of this information for future use and store safely.
  • W-2s: same concept, but you’ll need the most recent two years.
  • Pay stubs: every time you get paid, download the pay-stub in PDF format onto the thumb drive and drag and drop it into the folder. It shouldn’t take too long and can save you a ton of time in the future.
  • Bank statements: every month when you pay bills simply download your bank statements in PDF format and similarly add them into the appropriately titled folder.

Be sure to delete any sensitive information that is not properly protected on your computer to minimize your risk should you accidentally download malware onto your computer or otherwise get hacked.

Doing the above things does create a bit more work on an ongoing basis, but it insures you are prepared. These documents can also help your applications for other types of credit in the future, including:

  • car loans
  • student loans
  • personal loans
  • home equity lines of credit
  • credit cards
  • any credit offers

Documentation planning will make the process of obtaining credit less of a scramble, keeping supporting documentation literally at your thumb tips. Save yourself from the need to go “digging.” If applicable, also have this information handy:

  • Your divorce decree: have the divorce decree including all pages, all schedules and the schedule of creditors in a saved folder.
  • Prior foreclosure documents: have the trustee’s sale date deed.
  • Short sale documents: have the final settlement statement from that transaction.
  • Alimony or child support paperwork: have the agreement paperwork.
  • Information on tax debt: have state and/or federal payment plan on file.

Requests for the documentation referenced in this article are consistent with today’s mortgage lending world. Be smart, be prepared and make sure you have the documentation ready before the lender asks for it to minimize hitting any snags.

Remember, too, your credit score will also play into your ability to qualify for an affordable mortgage. You can keep track of how your credit by viewing your free credit report summary, along with two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.

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10 States Plagued By Foreclosure

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Have Mortgage Rules Made It Tougher to Buy a House?

mortgage rules

The “Know Before You Owe” mortgage rules that went into effect last October have slowed the homebuying process a bit, but overall it hasn’t made it more difficult — for buyers and sellers, anyway — according to mortgage adviser Casey Fleming.

“I have seen homeowners frustrated because the process took longer than they thought,” Fleming, author of loanguide.com, said. But buyers and sellers have extended their contracts “in every single deal that I’ve ever been involved in.”

Those delays stem from the new rules, which require additional paperwork and disclosures for lenders. The new, standardized forms spell out exactly how much a borrower must pay for closing costs and how much each monthly payment will be as the loan ages and potentially adjusts, right up until its term ends.

They’re great changes for buyers because they make the total cost of the mortgage very clear before they finalize the purchase. Lenders, however, have been “in a tizzy” over the changes, Fleming said.

“The problem is that there are very severe penalties (for lenders) for not getting it right,” Fleming said, offering an example of a lender who, because of a math error in determining the lifetime costs of an adjustable-rate mortgage — part of the new paperwork and disclosure rules — had to eat about $15,000 because of the error, even though it would have had no financial impact on the borrower.

In a nutshell, borrowers must now get the new standardized forms at least three days before closing on their loan. Before, changes could be made right up to and even during the closing.

Before the change, homebuyers received the “HUD-1 Settlement Statement” — short for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development — at closing, when they were already busy signing dozens of forms. (Note: It was always possible to ask for a preliminary HUD-1 several days before closing and some mortgage lenders did provide advance copies.) The HUD-1 looks a bit like an accountant’s ledger or an IRS tax form. Borrowers were also presented with a separate Truth in Lending Act (TILA) disclosure.

Both the HUD-1 and the TILA disclosure have now been replaced by a single “Closing Disclosure” form. This form is still several pages long, but designed to be easier to read. The cover page includes clear representations of monthly payments, total payments, closing costs, prepayment penalties, balloon payments and potential interest rate changes during the life of the loan. Everything on page one of the document is a direct response to complaints about many practices that tripped up consumers during the housing bubble.

The rest of the document bears similarity to the old HUD-1, with borrowers’ details on one side and sellers’ details on the other. Late fees and other terms follow. There’s an easy-to-use interactive guide to the paperwork on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau website.

While lenders are still adjusting to the changes, Fleming said the processes should be smoothed out over the next several months. Overall, Fleming thinks the clarity of the new rules combined with the easing of mortgage underwriting through lower down-payment requirements and mortgages becoming available for people with lower credit scores make it a very good time for buying a new home. (You can check your own credit scores for free on Credit.com to see where you stand.)

“I see homebuying becoming far easier and far more possible than it was before,” Fleming said. “And from a consumer perspective, these new rules — they’re not perfect, but I see them giving the consumers more confidence in terms of their decision-making process because they’re going to see what they’re really spending and not just looking into some murky pond.”

If you want to get an idea of how much home you can buy, you can check out this home affordability calculator.

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4 Credit Tips for Buying a Home

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This may come as a surprise, but you don’t need a perfect credit score to buy a home or get a mortgage.

In some cases, your credit just needs to be sufficient. Good, bad, ugly or indifferent, as long as your credit score matches the criteria of the mortgage size and property type you are looking for, you may be able to get financing.

Here’s a quick cheat sheet of the top three most commons mortgages and their basic credit score requirements.

  • Conventional loans. You generally need a credit score of 620. However, anyone with a 620-679 credit score should expect to pay higher interest rates and fees.
  • FHA loans. You’ll generally need a credit score of at least 600. There are lenders that do FHA Loans with credit scores as low as 580, but it’s going to come at a cost. Expect the lender to go through your file with a much finer-toothed comb if your score is at 620 or below. Conversely, if your credit score is 620 or higher, not only will you get better rates and fees, but you’ll also have an easier loan process.
  • Jumbo Loans. You’ll generally need a credit score of at least 680. You will also generally need at least 30% equity when buying or refinancing a home. A 700 or better score yields better rates and terms and requires less down (possibly as little as 20%).

Of course, a good credit score generally helps you net better terms and conditions. You can check two of your credit scores for free each month on Credit.com to see where you stand. If you have some credit challenges preventing you from getting a mortgage with competitive rates and fees, here are some strategies straight from a mortgage pro that could improve your situation.

1. Pay Down Debt/Rapid Re-Scoring

Some mortgage lenders have a credit doctor service, known as rapid re-scoring, available through their credit reporting company. This service allows them to run statistical credit modeling: the lender plugs in a certain credit score needed, an algorithm analyzes your complete credit portfolio and outlines what can be done to get you to that aforementioned threshold.

Oftentimes, high credit utilization (the amount of debt you are carrying versus your total available credit) is the culprit for a low score. In those instances, paying down certain credit accounts could make you more creditworthy — and mortgage eligible — within short period of time.

2. Time

If buying a house is a longer-term goal, time can be your friend. Credit history is a large component of a healthy credit score. Make your payments on time, keep the amount of debt you are carrying low and avoid late payments of any kind. These smart spending habits show that you are responsible with your obligations and will bolster your credit score eventually.

3. Quit or Resolve Disputes

In order to get a mortgage, you generally cannot have any accounts in dispute on your credit reports. At the same time, simply removing a dispute from your credit report can make your credit score drop. The reason? Credit scoring models generally ignore information being disputed, like an account with a late payment, which would otherwise hurt your credit score.

In order to circumvent these problems, work to resolve any disputes. (You can find more about getting errors off of your credit reports here.) You can also consider handling any issue you may have with a lender directly in lieu of filing a formal dispute with the credit bureaus. Here are some tips for negotiating with creditors.

4. Put More Money Down

Putting more money down to buy a home could put you in an entirely different mortgage category and help you bypass certain credit scoring problems.

Remember, if you have been told “no” by a bank or lender, you owe it to yourself to get a second or third opinion. What’s more, your credit score could improve from month to month, depending on what’s holding you back, so keep an eye on it in the meantime.

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Do You Understand Your Mortgage’s Fine Print?

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When shopping for a mortgage, it’s critical to have a general understanding of how points affect your mortgage rate and payments, and ultimately connect to your bottom line. Below are some guides to help you identify your net tangible benefit on a home loan.

Points

When you pay points, you are paying a premium to buy the interest-rate down, thus lowering your monthly mortgage payment. In most mortgage scenarios, you have the choice to pay this point based on the interest rate, and other times you might not due to factors like loan-to-value, loan size, loan program, loan purpose, property occupancy or credit score.

A point is essentially1% of the loan amount. Also referred to as mortgage pricing, points can change daily until you lock in your loan rate. Some lenders allow you to lock your rate up front while others require your loan to be underwritten or have the home appraisal ordered prior.

No Points

This is the most common scenario for buyers, but your financial goals should dictate your decision. If lower interest rates over the life of the loan are better for your situation, paying points might be worth considering.

Basis Point Credits

When a particular interest rate generates an overage, a premium is paid back to you and applied toward closing costs. Here’s how it works:

Let’s say you’re looking at that 30 year fixed rate at 3.75%, but you want no points. The next day mortgage pricing deteriorates by 25 basis points making the rate 3.75%  at .25% charge. If the 3.75% rate improves by .25% then that would be a credit as a function of your loan amount to pay the closing costs .

Mortgage Tip: Anytime you’re seeing a mortgage rate with any form of credit, it is based on the rate chosen for specific day in real time. Always review APR as the benchmark cost measure.

Determine Rates and Fees Consistent With Your Financial Goals

Ask yourself:

  • How long will you keep the loan or property for?
  • Do you plan to buy another property?
  • Is retirement around the corner?
  • Do you intend to pay the mortgage off in full?
  • Do you want to pay dollars today to line up the future?
  • Are the figures available based on your financial pictures consistent with any other goals you may have?

If you are uncertain about your short- and long-term financials goals, taking a conservative, low-cost, low-payment loan is usually a sound bet. An experienced mortgage professional can help you weigh costs versus benefits to determine which rate and pricing scenario best suits you.

Looking to get a sound mortgage loan? Get a free rate and cost offer online now!

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

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