3 Easy Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Faster

These tips are your ticket to mortgage-free living.

As long as you’re alive, you have to live somewhere and, generally speaking, you have two options: Rent an apartment (or a home) and line your landlord’s pocket; or buy a home, and over time, hopefully line your own.

This premise is one of David Bach’s most important messages. The author of the New York Times bestseller “The Automatic Millionaire,” is a firm believer in the idea that real estate is critical to building wealth. In fact, he says buying a home is one of the three most important actions people can take in pursuit of financial security.

“I’ve been a lifelong proponent of home ownership,” says Bach, author of 11 best selling books. “How do you build real wealth on an ordinary income? It’s not very sexy, but it’s a simple, timeless approach: Buy a home.”

It’s not merely the act of purchasing a home that Bach advocates. The secrets to financial success that he offers in “The Automatic Millionaire,” include urging readers to pay their homes off early via an approach he calls “automatic debt-free home ownership.”

It may sound radical to some, but according to Bach, who spent nine years as a financial adviser at Morgan Stanley, the common denominator among all of his clients who were able to retire early was that they had paid off their homes early.

Here’s Bach’s approach to debt-free home ownership.

1. Establish a Biweekly Mortgage Payment Plan

A biweekly payment plan is exactly what the name implies. Instead of only making monthly mortgage payments, split the payment down the middle and pay half every two weeks.

When you make a payment every two weeks, (instead of just one per month,) you end up making one extra month’s worth of payments annually. In other words, over the span of a year, you’re making 26 half payments, which is the equivalent of 13 full payments.

“By doing this, something miraculous will happen. Depending on your interest rate, you can end up paying off your mortgage early — somewhere between five and ten years early” he says in the book.

Additional Benefits of Biweekly Payments

The biweekly payment approach also saves the homeowner thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars, in interest. (Having a good credit score can help you save on interest, too. If you don’t know where your credit stands, you can get your two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

In his book Bach provides the example of a 30-year-mortgage on a $250,000 home. If the interest rate on that mortgage is 5%, then the interest paid over the life of the loan will be about $233,139. When paid biweekly, the same mortgage instead costs about $188,722 — a savings of more than $44,000.

Establishing a biweekly payment plan merely requires calling your lender. If the mortgage is held by a large bank, they may refer you to a third-party that handles payment processing.

But one critical point Bach makes in the book is this: Before signing onto biweekly mortgage payments ask the servicing company what the fee is for the program and what they do with your money when they receive it. The second question is particularly important because some companies hang onto the extra money you’re putting toward the mortgage and send it to your mortgage holder all at once at the end of the month.

You want the extra payments applied to your mortgage as soon as possible, so that you’re paying down the mortgage faster.

You also cannot just split your monthly mortgage payment in half yourself (without talking to your mortgage holder, bank or other servicing company) and mail in payments every two weeks. The bank may send the extra payment back to you, unsure of what to do with it.

This trick can also work for paying down your credit card balance faster. (Here are some other tips for paying off credit card debt.)

2. Pay Extra Each Month

The next approach to debt-free home ownership outlined in Bach’s book is a plan he calls “No-Fee Approach No. 1.” It involves merely adding 10% to whatever your monthly mortgage payment happens to be. If your monthly payment is $1,342, pay an extra $134 dollars each month. (Sending the bank $1,467 per month instead of $1,342.)

This approach leads to paying off a home in 25 years, instead of 30, saving about $44,000. However, Bach urges making the extra 10% automatic, so that you don’t come up with excuses not to do it. In other words, have the $1,467 automatically deducted from your checking account each month.

3. Make One Extra Payment Each Year

Pick one month each year and pay the mortgage twice. Translation: Send the bank one extra payment a year.

Try doing this with some of your tax refund, suggests Bach. But no matter when you choose to do it, don’t simply send the bank a check for double the normal mortgage amount.

According to Bach this will confuse the bank. He advises writing two checks. Send one in with your mortgage coupon and the other with a letter explaining that you want the money applied to your principal.

The big takeaway according to Bach is that if you don’t buy a home, you won’t get on the escalator to wealth that home ownership provides. He says this message is particularly important for millennials who have been shying away from home ownership.

“The critical point is that one — you can buy a home. Two — you should buy a home. And three — you will be glad that you did,” says Bach.

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Buying a House When You Have Student Loan Debt

Student loan debt is a reality for many people wishing to buy homes. Fortunately, it does not have to be a deal-breaker. But there’s no getting around the fact that a large amount of student loan debt will certainly influence how much financing a lender will be willing to offer you.

In the past, mortgage lenders were able to give people with student loans a bit of a break by disregarding the monthly payment from a student loan if that loan was to be deferred for at least one year after closing on the home purchase. But that all changed in 2015 when the Federal Housing Authority, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac began requiring lenders to factor student debt payments into the equation, regardless of whether the loans were in forbearance or deferment. Today by law, mortgage lenders across the country must consider a prospective homebuyer’s student loan obligations when calculating their ability to repay their mortgage.

The reason for the regulation change is simple: with a $1.3 million student loan crisis on our hands, there is concern homebuyers with student loans will have trouble making either their mortgage payments, student loan payments, or both once the student loans become due.

So, how are student loans factored into a homebuyer’s mortgage application?

Anytime you apply for a mortgage loan, the lender must calculate your all-important debt-to-income ratio. This is the ratio of your total monthly debt payments versus your total monthly income.

In most cases, mortgage lenders now must include 1% of your total student loan balance reflected on the applicant’s credit report as part of your monthly debt obligation.

Here is an example:

Let’s say you have outstanding student loans totaling $40,000.

The lender will take 1% of that total to calculate your estimated monthly student loan payment. In this case, that number would be $400.

That $400 loan payment has to be included as part of the mortgage applicant’s monthly debt expenses, even if the loan is deferred or in forbearance.

Are Student Loans a Mortgage Deal Breaker? Not Always.

If you are applying for a “conventional” mortgage, you must meet the lending standards published by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. What Fannie and Freddie say goes because these are the two government-backed companies that make it possible for thousands of banks and mortgage lenders to offer home financing.

In order for these banks and mortgage lenders to get their hands on Fannie and Freddie funding for their mortgage loans, they have to adhere to Fannie and Freddie’s rules when it comes to vetting mortgage loan applicants. And that means making sure borrowers have a reasonable ability to repay the loans that they are offered.

To find out how much borrowers can afford, Fannie and Freddie require that a borrower’s monthly housing expenses (that includes the new mortgage, property taxes, and any applicable mortgage insurance) to be no more than 43% of their gross monthly income.

On top of that, they will also look at other debt reported on your credit report, such as credit cards, car loans, and, yes, those student loans. You cannot go over 49% of your gross income once you factor in all of your monthly debt obligations.

For example, if you earn $5,000 per month, your monthly housing expense cannot go above $2,150 per month (that’s 43% of $5,000). And your total monthly expenses can’t go above $2,450/month (that’s 49% of $5,000). Let’s put together a hypothetical scenario:

Monthly gross income = $5,000/month

Estimated housing expenses: $2,150
Monthly student loan payment: $400
Monthly credit card payments: $200
Monthly car payment: $200

Total monthly housing expenses = $2,150

$2,150/$5,000 = 43%

Total monthly housing expenses AND debt payments = $2,950

$2,950/$5,000 = 59%

So what do you think? Does this applicant appear to qualify for that mortgage?

At first glance, yes! The housing expense is at or below the 43% limit, right?

However, once you factor in the rest of this person’s debt obligations, it jumps to 59% of the income — way above the threshold. And these other monthly obligations are not beyond the norm of a typical household.

What Can I Do to Qualify for a Mortgage Loan If I Have Student Debt?

So what can this person do to qualify? If they want to get that $325,000 mortgage, the key will be lowering their monthly debt obligations by at least $500. That would put them under the 49% debt-to-income threshold they would need to qualify. But that’s easier said than done.

Option 1: You can purchase a lower priced home.

This borrower could simply take the loan they can qualify for and find a home in their price range. In some higher priced real estate markets it may be simply impossible to find a home in a lower price range. To see how much mortgage you could qualify for, try out MagnifyMoney’s home affordability calculator.

Option 2: Try to refinance your student loans to get a lower monthly payment.

Let’s say you have a federal student loan in which the balance is $30,000 at a rate of 7.5% assuming a 10-year payback. The total monthly payment would be $356 per month. What if you refinanced the same student loan, dropped the rate to 6%, and extended the term to 20 years? The new monthly payment would drop to $214.93 per month. That’s a $142 dollar per month savings.

You could potentially look at student loan refinance options that would allow you to reduce your loan rate or extend the repayment period. If you have a credit score over 740, the savings can be even higher because you may qualify for a lower rate refi loan. Companies like SoFi, Purefy, and LendKey offer the best rates for student loans, and MagnifyMoney has a full list of great student loan refi companies.

There are, of course, pros and cons when it comes to refinancing student loans. If you have federal loan debt and you refinance with a private lender, you’re losing all the federal repayment protections that come with federal student loans. On the other hand, your options to refinance to a lower rate by consolidating federal loans aren’t that great. Student debt consolidation loan rates are rarely much better, as they are simply an average of your existing loan rates.

Option 3: Move aggressively to eliminate your credit card and auto loan debt.

To pay down credit debt, consider a balance transfer. Many credit card issuers offer 0% introductory balance transfers. This means they will charge you 0% interest for an advertised period of time (up to 18 months) on any balances you transfer from other credit cards. That buys you additional time to pay down your principal debt without interest accumulating the whole time and dragging you down.

Apply for one or two of these credit cards simultaneously. If approved for a balance transfer, transfer the balance of your highest rate card immediately. Then commit to paying it off. Make the minimum payments on the other cards in the meantime. Focus on paying off one credit card at a time. You will pay a fee of 3% in some cases on the total balance of the transfer. But the cost can be well worth it if the strategy is executed properly.

Third, if the car note is a finance and not a lease, there’s a mortgage lending “loophole” you can take advantage of. A mortgage lender is allowed to omit any installment loan that has less than 10 payments remaining. A car is an installment loan. So if your car loan has less than 10 payments left, the mortgage lender will remove these from your monthly obligations. In our hypothetical case above, that will give this applicant an additional $200 per month of purchasing power. Maybe you can reallocate the funds from the down payment and put it toward reducing the car note.

If the car is a lease, you can ask mom or dad to refinance the lease out of your name.

Option 4: Ask your parents to co-sign on your mortgage loan.

Some might not like this idea, but you can ask mom or dad to co-sign for you on the purchase of the house. But there are a few things you want to make sure of before moving forward with this scenario.

For one, do your parents intend to purchase their own home in the near future? If so, make sure you speak with a mortgage lender prior to moving forward with this idea to make sure they would still qualify for both home purchases. Another detail to keep in mind is that the only way to get your parents off the loan would be to refinance that mortgage. There will be costs associated with the refinance of a few thousand dollars, so budget accordingly.

With one or a combination of these theories there is no doubt you will be able to reduce the monthly expenses to be able to qualify for a mortgage and buy a home.

The best piece of advice when planning to buy a home is to start preparing for the process at least a year ahead of time. Fail to plan, plan to fail. Don’t be afraid to allow a mortgage lender to run your credit and do a thorough mortgage analysis.

The only way a mortgage lender can give you factual advice on what you need to do to qualify is to run your credit. Most applicants don’t want their credit run because they fear the inquiry will make their credit score drop. In many cases, the score does not drop at all. In fact, credit inquiries account for only 10% of your overall credit score.

In the unlikely event your credit score drops a few points, it’s a worthy exchange. You have a year to make those points go up. You also have a year to make the adjustments necessary to make your purchase process a smooth one. Do keep in mind that it is best to shop for mortgage lenders and perform credit inquiries within a week of each other.

You should also compare rates on the same day if at all possible. Mortgage rates are driven by the 10-year treasury note traded on Wall Street. It goes up and down with the markets, and we’ve all seen some pretty dramatic swings in the markets from time to time. The only way to make an “apples-to-apples” comparison is to compare rates from each lender on the same day. Always request an itemization of the fees to go along with the rate quote.

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8 Questions to Ask Yourself When Deciding to Rent or Buy a House

Buying a home isn't for everyone. These questions will help you sort out whether it's a good financial move for you.

If you’re at the age when your peers are making major life moves — getting married, having kids and buying homes – you might be feeling it’s time to join them. Or you may simply just be at that stage all on your own.

Either way, plenty of young adults are starting to get the home-buying itch. While there are a lot of appealing benefits to homeownership, taking on that kind of debt is not without risk. The decision to rent vs. buy is one you should make carefully.

If you’re trying to figure out your next move, consider asking yourself these eight questions. The answers should steer you in the right direction.

1. What Is My Top Financial Priority?

Buying a home will slow down your ability to make progress on other financial goals. You’ll need to focus on lowering expenses or increasing your income so you can afford a down payment and monthly mortgage payments. (This guide can help you understand more about how to determine your down payment on a home.)

That extra cash will be funneled toward your mortgage rather than paying off credit cards or student loans if you have them. Other financial goals, such as saving for retirement and building an emergency fund, may also have to take a back seat.

Assess your competing financial goals and decide which ones take priority. Buying a house might come first in your book, or perhaps you’ll decide to work toward other money goals before committing to a mortgage.

2. Do I Have Savings For a Down Payment & Closing Costs?

Renting requires some savings – you’ll need enough cash to cover the first month’s rent and the deposit.

To buy a home, however, the minimum you’ll need to have saved is usually 6% or more of the home’s value. Even FHA loans require a minimum down payment of 3.5%, and closing costs add another 2-3% to the costs.

But that’s the minimum; a 20% down payment is better to give you a decent amount of equity and avoid private mortgage insurance.

If you don’t have sufficient savings, you’ll need to focus on saving for a down payment before you’re in a position to buy. And even if you do have savings, it’s worth it to think through the best use of those savings and whether you’d rather allocate that cash to other goals.

3. How Do Home & Rent Prices Compare?

Housing markets also affect whether it’s a better idea to rent versus buy. If you’re facing sky-high rent prices that climb each year, a mortgage starts making a lot of sense. On the other hand, if you want to live in an expensive area, you could be priced out of buying a home (especially without extensive savings).

4. How Long Do I Plan to Live Here?

The longer you live in a home, the more likely it is that the financial investment of buying a property will pay off.

If you like your city, have a steady job, and are ready to live in the same space for a few years, buying is often more cost effective, but not always. You may want to crunch the numbers to see how long you’d need to live in a home to break even on your initial costs.

5. Will I Qualify for a Good Deal on a Mortgage?

You’ll need a decent income and good credit to qualify for the lowest rates and best terms on mortgage loans. It’s sometimes possible to get a mortgage if you have bad credit, but you’ll pay a lot more over time. (Haven’t checked where your credit stands? Now’s the time. You can get your two free credit scores, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.)

Think of it this way: most mortgages last 30 years. With that in mind, you may see that it’s financially worth it to spend a few months to a year rebuilding your credit if it means qualifying for a lower interest rate for those 30 years. For example, if you boost your credit score by 50 points – from the mid-600s to over 700 – you could qualify for a mortgage rate that’s 80+ basis points lower, according to MyFICO.com.

6. What Other Costs Will I Be Responsible for as a Homeowner?

When comparing costs of renting versus buying, make sure you’re including home-owning costs beyond mortgage principal and interest.

There are escrow costs, homeowner’s insurance, and property taxes. You can expect home maintenance costs to equal 1-3% of your home’s sale price each year. Then there are homeowners’ association fees and new utility costs such as trash collection and water. Meanwhile, renters are usually not responsible for any of these costs.

7. Am I Comfortable with the Risks of Owning a Home?

It’s a popular argument that owning is smarter than renting because you’re investing in a home. But as with any investment, owning a home has its own inherent risks.

There are no guarantees you’ll get a good return on your investment. Just ask the many homeowners who defaulted on their homes after the 2008 mortgage crisis. And even in a strong housing market, there are the everyday risks of unemployment or other financial hardships.

8. How Would Renting vs. Owning Affect my Lifestyle?

Guiding forces in your decision to rent or own are your lifestyle and values. For many, the freedom of choice, privacy, and control that come with owning a home are big selling points. Other people might prefer the convenience, flexibility, and short-term commitment that comes with renting.

Know what you want and choose a housing setup that will help you achieve it. Owning a home can be an admirable accomplishment for some people. Maybe it will be for you, too. Only you know the answer.

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3 Investing Strategies to Save for a New Home

Buying a home is one of the most significant financial decisions you will make in your lifetime. For many Americans, saving for a purchase of that magnitude can feel impossible. The good news is there is no shortage of strategies you can choose from. The number one factor to consider (apart from your income) is how much time you have to save. Depending on when you plan on buying, some options may be better than others.

Here’s a guide to saving for a new home with various timelines in mind.

If you want to buy a home in the next 3 years…

Every investment option comes with a degree of risk, and with only a few short years to save, it’s likely not a wise idea to take big risks with your savings. The last thing you want is for the money to lose value without enough time to recover.

In this case, you should be looking for savings options that offer safety rather than growth, like a high-yield savings account and certificates of deposit (CDs). These are very low risk and, best of all, come with guaranteed returns on investment. If you’re looking for the highest paying savings accounts in your area, you can use our free comparison tool. We also have a list of the best CDs for the month.

If you want to buy a new home in 4 to 7 years…

The longer you have to save for a home, the more creative you can be with your investing strategy. The key is to strike the right mix between safety and growth. You want your money to grow at a comfortable enough pace to beat inflation but maintain enough conservative investments to offset any potential losses you might experience in the market.

You may be able to achieve this with a 25/75 portfolio.

The 25/75 portfolio strategy is pretty simple — no more than 25% of your money is invested in stocks, and the remaining 75% are in bonds. This blend of stocks and bonds should allow your money to grow modestly while keeping safety top of mind. You can start this process by opening a brokerage account and choosing your own mutual funds to reach the right mix. But do your research first. For example, U.S. News & World Report maintains a list of funds that are ranked for their allocation, fees, and performance. 

If you want to buy a home in 8 to 10 years…

Time is certainly on your side if you’ve got nearly a decade to save for your dream home. The key is taking on the right amount of risk. Because you have so much time to save, you can afford to take riskier investment bets, which can potentially reap much higher rewards in the long run.

Consider a 50/50 investment strategy: You’ll invest 50% of your savings in stocks and 50% in bonds. You should have just enough risk to ensure you’ll beat inflation and then some, but still be conservative enough to be able to weather any downturns in the market. To achieve the perfect 50/50 mix, you could split your money evenly between your own selection of stocks and bonds. For those who like a more hands-off approach, U.S. News & World Report has a ranking of mutual funds that are preset to give you the 50/50 allocation. There you can select the fund you feel suits you best. 

Deciding where to invest 

Where you invest your money matters. Save your money in the wrong place and taxes could eat up a portion of your gains each year. You could also be in a situation where taking the money out to buy a home could cause a penalty as well.

If you plan on buying a home in five years or more, strategically using a Roth IRA could be your best option. With a Roth IRA you can withdraw all of your contributions without penalty; additionally, you can withdraw $10,000 of the earnings without tax or penalty for a first-time home purchase. 

Lastly, a plain brokerage account may suit you. There are no tax advantages to investing here, but if you’re using the account to buy a home in the future, there may be more benefits in other areas. You can only contribute $5,500 ($6,500 after age 50) in a Traditional IRA or Roth IRA, and withdrawals are subject to strict rules. A regular brokerage account, on the other hand, has no limits to what you can put in or take out for home purchases or any other purchases. Take a look at your situation and see which options fit you best.

What about my 401(k)?

A common question most people ask is whether they should use their 401(k) to grow the money and then use it to buy a home. This is usually a bad idea. If you withdraw the money before age 59½, you would be subject to a 10% penalty, plus income taxes on top of that amount. In addition, the amount that you withdraw could severely alter your retirement goals. This is called an opportunity cost.

A better idea, though still not one we recommend, is taking a loan from your 401(k). You are allowed to take a loan of up to $50,000 or half the value of the account balance, whichever amount is less. This is still a loan, however, meaning it could affect your ability to qualify for a mortgage. You also have to pay this loan back. Depending on your company’s 401(k) rules, if you leave the company, the entire balance of the loan might come due within 60 to 90 days after you leave. If you stay with the company, you could be required to pay the loan back within five years.

Thankfully, your 401(k) isn’t your only option. Taking money from a Traditional IRA is a bit better. You are allowed to withdraw $10,000 without penalty for a first-time home purchase. This may change your tax situation as any withdrawal would have to be counted as part of your regular income. For most people this still isn’t the best option but certainly better than dipping into your 401(k).

Making a clear goal

Do some research to see what home prices are like in your desired area. Then make a clear savings goal. An easy way to do this is to take 10 to 20% of the average home value in your area to estimate your downpayment. Use this calculator to see how long it will take you to reach your goal.

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17 Things Homeowners Forget to Do Once a Year

homeowners-forget

Image: Xavier Arnau

The post 17 Things Homeowners Forget to Do Once a Year appeared first on Credit.com.

Your HOA Payments May Now Affect Your Credit Score

barbecue

Homeowner associations can be great for neighborhood maintenance, settling disputes and enforcing community guidelines, but all of those benefits come with a cost: the association dues.

A good chunk of American homeowners agree to pay them — nearly 25%, according to RealtorMag.org — but unlike the mortgage, insurance and tax costs those homeowners also must pay, HOA fees aren’t reported to credit bureaus. Until now.

Credit data aggregator Sperlonga has agreed to become the first company to furnish HOA payment and account status data to Equifax Inc., one of the three major credit reporting agencies. Details on when that reporting will begin was not immediately available. According to the Community Association Institute, homeowner associations and property management companies collect approximately $70 billion in HOA payments each year through at least 333,000 community associations.

For years, experts in the credit scoring industry have talked about the value of adding things like rent payments and utility bills to credit scores as a way of giving more people access to credit. It’s something they refer to as alternative data.

“Until now, HOA payments have gone largely unreported to the national credit reporting agencies. Our service will help elevate association payments to the same level of importance as the consumer’s other financial obligations like residential mortgages, auto loans and credit card payments,” said Matt Martin, chairman and founder of Sperlonga, in a prepared statement. “Property owners that pay HOA fees on time should begin to see the similar impact to their credit reports as they would with other payment obligations traditionally found in a credit report.”

Of course, now property owners who are late or delinquent with HOA payments could likewise see a negative impact on their credit scores, just as they would with a late mortgage payment.

“Introducing new sources of data beyond what has traditionally been found on credit files can provide additional insight into a consumer’s financial behavior and help deliver expanded credit access,” Mike Gardner, senior vice president at Equifax, said in a press release.

You have a legal right to access the information consumer reporting agencies collect about you and dispute any inaccuracies. So, if you’re wondering which of your account payments might be reflected on your credit report, it’s a good idea to track your credit by pulling your free annual credit reports each year. You can also see how the data being reported is affecting your credit standing on a more frequent basis by checking your two free credit scores, updated every month on Credit.com.

More on Credit & Credit Cards:

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5 Unexpected Homeownership Costs to Consider Before Buying

Purchase agreement for house

If you’ve saved up enough money to put down a substantial down payment on a home (keep in mind that experts recommend at least 20% to avoid paying the infamous Private Mortgage Insurance, or PMI), you should be very proud of yourself.

Unfortunately, that’s just the beginning.

For many people, home ownership is still a dream that’s well worth attaining. If you’re in this group, then it’s important to consider some of the extra costs that come with owning a home that aren’t exactly broadcasted with the price tag of the house. The following are some of the big ones to consider.

Fee No. 1: Closing costs

I’ll never forget the day my sister and her husband bought their first home. They got home from their realtors office and she called me and said, “Did you know there’s this thing called ‘closing costs’? It’s so much extra money!” Now you may have heard the term ‘closing costs’ before, or you might at least be aware that there are some additional fees that go along with closing on a home, not just your down payment amount, but it’s worth doing a little extra research to determine just how much your closing costs are estimated to be based on where you live. Different states have different laws about these things, and when it’s a couple extra thousand we’re talking about potentially having to spend, it’s worth budgeting that in with your down payment costs from the beginning.

Fee No. 2: Property taxes

When you own a home, you’re much more a part of a community than you are when you live in, say, an apartment — at least you will be expected to pay to be a part of a community more so than you are when you live in an apartment. Property taxes are an unfortunate downside of living somewhere and being expected to help maintain the upkeep of the surrounding area. Depending on where you live, property taxes could even total somewhere between $500 and $1,000 or more a month on top of your mortgage payment, so again, it’s worth checking into this added fee before signing on the dotted line of your new place.

Fee No. 3: Homeowner’s insurance

If you already live in your own apartment then you should already be somewhat familiar with the concept of renter’s insurance. When you buy a house, though, the cost that you’re paying each month for the security of your home should you need to make repairs may go way up. For starters, an entire home will most likely be larger, and you’ll need more stuff to fill it, so right there the amount of money it’ll take to insure your things will go up. You can get a handle on how much of an additional cost this might be to your monthly budget by calling your current renter’s insurance company and getting quotes based on the size and price home you’re in the market for.

Fee No. 4: HOA fees

Not all houses will come with this fee, but if you’re looking for a condo, townhouse or to purchase an apartment, especially, expect to probably have to dish out for homeowners’ association fees. These fees can start in the low hundreds and go up to the thousands, based on how fancy of a place you’re looking at, but it’s definitely worth factoring into your monthly budget, as well. The good thing about HOA fees is that they’re used to help take care of common areas and in some cases may even cover areas around your own specific home, like the yard, roof, driveway, etc. (This is good in the sense that any repairs needed in those areas will already be covered in your HOA fees, but it’s somewhat bad in the fact that if you’re HOA covers an area, you’ll probably get little to no say with what can be done to them.)

Fee No. 5: Maintenance

Remember when you had mold in your apartment and you called up your maintenance man and he fixed it? Or when the dishwasher broke and suddenly a new one appeared? Whether or not it took a while for your maintenance people to actually fix problems in your apartment, the truth was it was kind of nice that at the very least, you didn’t have to worry about paying for the repairs. When you own your own home, guess what? That’s all on you. Leaky roof? Grumbly dryer? Termite infestation? While the good news is now you and you alone have a say on how quickly these problems get fixed (well you and your repairman, at least), the bad is that you also have to pay out of your own pocket for them.

If you’ve taken all these additional costs into consideration and you still feel ready to take the leap into homeownership, check out this story for nine additional tips for first-time homebuyers to make the experience a little easier.

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