4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Leasing or Buying a Car

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When you’re looking for a new car, it can be difficult to decide whether buying one outright or leasing one for a period of time makes more sense. It’s true that cars only go down in value the longer you own them, but there are still some solid arguments for owning one outright rather than essentially renting one.

Car-related decisions can be stressful, and there’s a lot you need to know before buying or renting, but don’t worry. If you’re in the market for a new car and aren’t sure which way to go, you can use the following questions to help you make the best decision for your situation.

Question 1: How Much Will I Be Driving This Car?

If you only need a car for weekend adventures and plan to use public transportation or to carpool during the week, then leasing might be the better option for you, if you can get a good deal. Most lease contracts come with stipulations on how many miles you can put on the car while you’re using it, but if you’re only using it for a few quick trips each week, you likely won’t come close to hitting that mileage mark. Still, you’ll want to pay close attention to that number if you do end up going for a lease. Always ask what happens if you go over the mileage count, since the penalties can be steep. On the other hand, if you have a lengthy commute to get to work and you need a reliable car to get you there—or you just aren’t interested in tracking miles—buying might be better for you.

Question 2: What Do I Plan to Use It For? 

You probably wouldn’t go into a car purchase intending to rough up the car, but stuff happens, so you’ll need to decide what you plan to use your car for to know if leasing is right for you. If you lease a car, the dealer generally allows normal wear and tear upon return at the end of your lease, but you’ll be charged extra if they think the car has been more weathered. Be sure to get the specifics from the dealership on what exactly they consider “normal” wear and tear, and if that doesn’t match your plans for the car—if you plan to off-road in the Colorado Rockies on most weekends, for example—it might be better to buy.

Question 3: How Long Do I Plan to Keep It?

One appealing thing about leasing a car is that most car leases end after three years—so you have the opportunity to upgrade to a new model every three years if you’d like. Of course you could buy a car and upgrade that way, but it can be harder to deal with the sale of a car than it is to just turn your lease back over to the dealer.

Question 4: How Much Can I Afford to Put Down?

Most lease agreements will come with lower down payments than buyer agreements have. In some cases, if you lease a car, you may even be able to negotiate with the dealer to skip a down payment altogether. (Keep in mind, though, that this will likely result in higher monthly payments.) Either way, if you really need a car now, and you don’t have the cash for a decent down payment, then going with a lease may put you in the driver’s seat faster than if you waited to buy a car.

Buying a car is a very personal decision, and whether you lease or buy will be determined by a number of factors. At the end of the day, buying a car is almost always the cheaper option if you need a car for the long term, but signing up for a short-term lease can be a solid option depending on your needs. Putting in a little bit of extra thought before searching for your next ride can ensure you make the right decision.

Whatever move you decide to make, be smart in how you approach car buying or leasing. Don’t forget that having good credit will improve your car-buying experience, so before you make car-related decisions, check your credit and see where you’re at. You can always check your credit for free at Credit.com.

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Can I Get a Car Lease With Bad Credit?

Auto Loan Balances at an All-Time High

Your heart is set on a shiny, new set of wheels but your credit is tanked. Don’t despair; you’re not the first driver to face this dilemma. Car leases do exist for those with bad credit and may even help you beef up your score.

Here’s why: Monthly payments can be much lower for leased cars, they often fall under the manufacturer’s warranty and tend to require less money down upfront. Not missing a payment on your lease may also help you amp up your credit, making you that more attractive to lenders down the road.

If all that sounds good to you, here’s how to get started.

1. Check Your Credit

Before you apply for any auto lease, you need to know where your credit stands. That way you’ll have an idea of what type of lease you may qualify for. It may also prevent you from overpaying, lest you think your credit is worse than it actually is. (You can view two of your credit scores for free, updated each month, on Credit.com to see where you stand.)

2. Shop Around

Now that you’ve got your number, it’s time to go shopping. But first, some dating advice: Don’t fling yourself at every slick dealer who feeds you a line — take your time to find the right one. Don’t be afraid to ask questions if something sounds off. Your credit may stink, but you shouldn’t settle for an unfair agreement.

Something to keep in mind: every time a lender pulls your credit report, that’ll create a hard inquiry on your file, which could ding your credit score. But the vast majority of credit scoring models are smart enough to know you’re shopping around and will group your hard inquiries from different dealers into just one inquiry if you complete your shopping in a specific timeframe, ideally two weeks.

3. Be Realistic

If your score is less than 720, you may encounter some difficulties. This could mean a higher monthly payment, a hard time getting approved or being asked for a security deposit or percentage of the car’s cost upfront. (Some dealerships require the latter, but you can always volunteer to put more money down if you want a smaller monthly payment.)

It’s also helpful to go into the process with realistic expectations. You don’t have a perfect credit score, so you don’t want to overextend yourself and get a super expensive car lease you’re unable to actually pay. Make sure you opt for something that you really can afford like a compact or mid-sized car instead of a luxury sedan, for example. The monthly payments will likely be lower, and there’s no reason to push your budget to the limit if you’re already dealing with financial issues.

4. Explore Other Options

Still coming up short? There are options. You can ask a trusted friend or family member to co-sign your lease. If you choose to go this route, you should both be aware that if you fall behind on payments and the account becomes delinquent, that will appear on your co-signer’s credit report. Only do this if you feel you can manage the lease responsibly.

Another option would be a lease takeover, which is still subject to approval from the original lender. This allows you to take over a lease contract from someone who can no longer make the required payments, and is often easier to qualify for.

More on Auto Loans:

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Lease or Buy: The Definitive Guide for Car Buyers

6 Credit Cards That Can Get You Into a New Car

Americans love a good rivalry: Yankees versus Red Sox, Coke versus Pepsi, and most of all, leasing versus buying.

Leasing a car is sizzling hot right now. New data show one out of every three new cars is leased. And leasing may very well rule the future, as it shot up 46% over the last five years among millennial new car buyers. To those who think leasing is always a terrible deal, this is a travesty. To leasing fans, it’s vindication.

The topic of car leasing brings out a lot of emotion in drivers. Many people think leasing is non-sensical because after making payments for three years, consumers own nothing. But, in reality, that’s an inaccurate assessment and whether or not you should lease depends — not only on the driver’s needs but on those of the auto industry. Sometimes car makers offer incentives that make leasing attractive. So those who dismiss leasing outright could be missing out.

The truth is, leasing is more expensive than buying most of the time. The average American keeps a new car for six-and-a-half years, but a 2012 survey found Americans intend to keep their cars for up to 10 years. In either case, buying will probably be cheaper than leasing because when you buy a car, the monthly payments will eventually stop. Pay off a car loan, you keep the car; pay off the lease, you just get another. So the longer you intend to keep a car, in general, the better it seems to buy.

Yet even this equation comes with a hitch. My four-year-old Toyota Rav4 needed a new transmission recently. But as a high-mileage driver, I was out of warranty, and worst of all, out of luck. My repair bill was $5,000 (although Toyota kicked in $1,000 when I complained).

The advantage renters have is like the advantage renters have over mortgage holders — no surprise repair bills. As long as drivers stay within mileage limits, whatever happens to the car will generally be covered under warranty. As one reader on my website put it, “I’ve been leasing for about 10 years now. No unpredictable repair shocks to my wallet because I’m always driving a new car.”

Of course, mileage caps are another factor in the lease vs. buy dilemma. Those with long commutes or who like to travel generally shouldn’t lease because leases tend to limit drivers to about 1,000 miles per month. Exceeding the limit is expensive and can cost from 10 to 30 cents per mile. Also, watching your miles every week is a drag. Imagine turning down a road trip because of your mileage cap. This is especially critical, as dealers have been sweetening lease deals lately with even more complex, i.e., lower, mileage caps.

One factor often cited as a reason to buy is equity. It’s usually stated like this: “With buying, you own something of value after you pay off the loan. With leasing, you have nothing at the end.” But that’s just part of the story. Cars are terrible assets; they lose value quickly and in unpredictable ways. In the end, I find most five- or six-year-old cars are worth a few thousand dollars as trade-ins.

Online auto valuation sites may say your car is worth more, but what matters is what you walk away with. Used car sales are so clunky, it’s silly to use those lease vs. buy calculators and feel vindicated you saved $982 on a vehicle you owned for five years. You may have given that value back to the dealer when you received wholesale value instead of street value.

In the end, people want — and need — reliable transportation, so you can see why leasing’s attractive.

When Leasing Can Beat Buying

Less sales tax: You don’t pay sales tax on the full price of the car but on the value of the car used during the lease. (If you buy the car at the end of the lease for its established ‘residual value,’ you’ll pay the rest of the sales tax.)

Tax perks: For some folks, leasing is a much easier tax write-off.

Luxury: You’ll probably be driving around in a nice new car every three years.

It feels cheaper: Monthly and down payments will probably be lower.

No repair surprises: Fear of big repair costs will definitely be lower.

Buy ‘used’ for less: Particularly low-mile drivers may get a bargain at the end of the lease by buying the car at residual value. (Sometimes, but rarely, is this cheaper than buying the car in the first place.)

When Buying Can Beat Leasing 

End-of-lease risks: What happens when the lease ends? “Wear and tear” damages can turn a good deal bad quickly. And the dealer pretty much has the upper hand. You generally have no bargaining power, unless you’re about to buy or lease another car.

Inflexibility: Young people seem attracted to leases because they feel flexible. But leasing is often less so because it’s much harder to get out of a lease than sell a car (even a car with a loan balance). What happens if you take a job where you can’t have a car? Leaseholders can get really burned.

Miles: A thousand miles per month may sound like a lot to you today, but what if your company moves 35 miles away months from now? Mileage limits can be pretty oppressive, especially in a world of unknowns. The average 20-something holds 7.2 jobs before age 29.

Overall cost: Leasing is more expensive than buying, even with a loan. But here’s a simple way to look at it: Both are methods of financing a car. With leasing, since you’re paying less upfront, you’re borrowing more longer. So, of course, it costs more. Another way to look at it: With leasing, rather than making a down payment upfront, you can make a down payment three years into having the car (buying for its ‘residual value’). That essentially means you’re borrowing more longer.

As with all generalizations, these concepts may be more or less true based on your unique car deal. Remember, everything is negotiable at a dealership: upfront costs; monthly payment; residual value; ‘money factor’ (leasing speak for interest rate). Even mileage is negotiable since you can buy extra miles upfront for less than you’d pay after three years. It’s possible to lower leasing risks through negotiation or car-maker incentives. If so, leasing may be right for you. (A good credit score can give you more bargaining power on auto financing. You can see where your credit currently stands by viewing your two free credit scores, updated each month, on Credit.com.)

The Bottom Line

Leasing is a bit too much like the Eagles’ song “Hotel California” for my taste. Once you check in, it’s pretty hard to check out. Renters turn in cars and get new leases, and they tend to do so at the same dealerships, for the reasons mentioned above. You’ll never escape the monthly car payment. And worse, perhaps you’ll get a good lease deal today, but three years from now, leases could fall out of favor and you’d be stuck.

In the end, leasing is a seductive but generally a bad plan for saving money. But for folks who care less about money and more about having a new car every three years, don’t drive often and lose sleep over repair bill risks, it can make sense.

More on Auto Loans:

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