Need to Charge Your Phone? ‘Urine’ Luck

phone_battery_urine

“I need to pee.”

“My phone is dying.”

They’re such familiar phrases — everyday mini-crises of modern life, and that makes them a perfect match. It’s one made not in heaven but in a British laboratory. And what a beautiful scientific marriage it is.

Scientists have for the first time recharged a smartphone with urine, according to Engineering and Technology Magazine. Ioannis Ieropoulos and his team at the University of West England developed a small fuel cell that turns urine into electricity, and while microbial fuel cells have already proven capable of charging a basic mobile phone, this is the first time they’ve charged a “modern-day smartphone.” The fuel cells are one square inch, cost between 1 and 2 British pounds (about $1.33 to $2.66) and produce electricity using “natural biological processes,” according to the magazine.

Before you wrinkle your nose in disgust at the idea of pee power, think about this: Multiple surveys have found that the vast majority of people use their phones in the bathroom. That’s really gross, and we don’t even have a good reason for doing it. Scientists are using pee to spread power to people who need it, and you’re sitting on the toilet playing Candy Crush. Get over yourself.

Power to the Pee-ple

Seriously: Using urine to produce electricity could be incredibly impactful. A single fuel cell and 600 mL of urine (about 2.5 cups) produced enough energy for three hours of phone calls on a smartphone. It could help provide affordable electricity to communities in the developing world with little or poor power infrastructure, which is what Ieropoulos and other researchers developing similar systems are trying to do.

While those scientists continue to refine their impressive problem-solving skills, it’s kind of fun to think of some other (less important) things we could do with “Urine-tricity,” as Ieropoulos calls it.

It’s not too much of a stretch to think people would pee as a means to power their smartphones. Plenty of people would rather spend money than wander the world with a dead phone, considering you can buy charger cables pretty much anywhere, as well as device-charging phone cases and portable chargers. There’s also the common tactic of buying a coffee, beer or snack to justify your use of an establishment’s power outlets. At least pee power allows you to charge your phone by taking advantage of something you already need to do, as opposed to whipping out your credit card to solve your battery-life woes. (Side note: If you’re a big credit card user, you should know it has a significant impact on your credit scores. You can see how much by getting two free credit scores each month on Credit.com.)

If you want to get really nerdy about it, you could pitch pee power to the super frugal as an opportunity to save with tag lines like “Bacteria: It’s Good For Your Budget!” or “Waste Not, Watt Not.” After all, we waste energy (and money) by keeping phones plugged in even when they’re charged (though hours of unnecessary phone charging won’t ding your finances by way of a huge utility bill as much as leaving a charged laptop or another more powerful device plugged in).

Then there are the ridiculous first-world problems it could solve, like needing a bathroom and a phone charge in the midst of a night out or a Pokémon Go excursion. (You’d probably need a lot of pee to keep that game going, though.) Sure, this might present a bit of a public urination problem — but then again, maybe it’s a solution: Relief & Recharge is a pretty good port-a-potty name, if you ask me.

More Money-Saving Reads:

Image: Roberto A Sanchez

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Need to Charge Your Phone? ‘Urine’ Luck

phone_battery_urine

“I need to pee.”

“My phone is dying.”

They’re such familiar phrases — everyday mini-crises of modern life, and that makes them a perfect match. It’s one made not in heaven but in a British laboratory. And what a beautiful scientific marriage it is.

Scientists have for the first time recharged a smartphone with urine, according to Engineering and Technology Magazine. Ioannis Ieropoulos and his team at the University of West England developed a small fuel cell that turns urine into electricity, and while microbial fuel cells have already proven capable of charging a basic mobile phone, this is the first time they’ve charged a “modern-day smartphone.” The fuel cells are one square inch, cost between 1 and 2 British pounds (about $1.33 to $2.66) and produce electricity using “natural biological processes,” according to the magazine.

Before you wrinkle your nose in disgust at the idea of pee power, think about this: Multiple surveys have found that the vast majority of people use their phones in the bathroom. That’s really gross, and we don’t even have a good reason for doing it. Scientists are using pee to spread power to people who need it, and you’re sitting on the toilet playing Candy Crush. Get over yourself.

Power to the Pee-ple

Seriously: Using urine to produce electricity could be incredibly impactful. A single fuel cell and 600 mL of urine (about 2.5 cups) produced enough energy for three hours of phone calls on a smartphone. It could help provide affordable electricity to communities in the developing world with little or poor power infrastructure, which is what Ieropoulos and other researchers developing similar systems are trying to do.

While those scientists continue to refine their impressive problem-solving skills, it’s kind of fun to think of some other (less important) things we could do with “Urine-tricity,” as Ieropoulos calls it.

It’s not too much of a stretch to think people would pee as a means to power their smartphones. Plenty of people would rather spend money than wander the world with a dead phone, considering you can buy charger cables pretty much anywhere, as well as device-charging phone cases and portable chargers. There’s also the common tactic of buying a coffee, beer or snack to justify your use of an establishment’s power outlets. At least pee power allows you to charge your phone by taking advantage of something you already need to do, as opposed to whipping out your credit card to solve your battery-life woes. (Side note: If you’re a big credit card user, you should know it has a significant impact on your credit scores. You can see how much by getting two free credit scores each month on Credit.com.)

If you want to get really nerdy about it, you could pitch pee power to the super frugal as an opportunity to save with tag lines like “Bacteria: It’s Good For Your Budget!” or “Waste Not, Watt Not.” After all, we waste energy (and money) by keeping phones plugged in even when they’re charged (though hours of unnecessary phone charging won’t ding your finances by way of a huge utility bill as much as leaving a charged laptop or another more powerful device plugged in).

Then there are the ridiculous first-world problems it could solve, like needing a bathroom and a phone charge in the midst of a night out or a Pokémon Go excursion. (You’d probably need a lot of pee to keep that game going, though.) Sure, this might present a bit of a public urination problem — but then again, maybe it’s a solution: Relief & Recharge is a pretty good port-a-potty name, if you ask me.

More Money-Saving Reads:

Image: Roberto A Sanchez

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It’s Cheaper to Live on a Cruise Ship Than in These Cities

Cruise lovers, rejoice! It’s actually cheaper to cruise nonstop for an entire year than to pay rent and live in many major U.S. cities. That’s the latest finding of a study by cruise search engine CruiseWatch.com.

According to the study, citizens of Honolulu would save $7,518 per person each year if they went on continuous cruises in 2017. San Francisco residents would save $7,154, Los Angelenos $2,058 and Stamford, Connecticut residents, $3,878. New Yorkers topped the list with a savings of $10,430 for traveling the high seas nonstop.

CruiseWatch calculated how much an average person would spend for things like housing, transportation, utilities and other everyday living expenses. This averaged around $637 per week for an average household size of 2.5 people in New York City. “Currently, the best available prices for the cheapest cruises in our database average around $313.25 per week, which represents a significant savings of $323.75 per week,” the company said in a press release.

The cruise prices used for comparison were accurate as of June 16, 2016 and reflect costs for a two-person interior cabin. Ocean view rooms and suites would cost more.

To conduct the study, the company tapped data, including five years’ worth of cruise price information, to gain a historical perspective on how cruise prices fluctuate throughout the year. CruiseWatch.com also relied on data from the 2012 U.S. Census to calculate the current cost of living in 132 U.S. cities.

The findings aren’t all that surprising, given several housing studies have found rent is becoming increasingly burdensome for many consumers. A recent study from the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, for instance, found the number of renters devoting at least half of their individual income to rent hit a shocking all-time high in 2014 — 11.4 million.

You may be able to save on rent by negotiating with a landlord, signing a longer lease, finding a roommate or opting for a smaller space.

And, in the meantime, if you’re looking to save on a cruise —  whether for a week or a year — it’s a good idea to see if your credit card rewards can help pay for part of your trip. (You can view our roundup of the best travel rewards cards in America here.)

Remember, while rewards cards can be valuable, they are generally available only to applicants with good or excellent credit. (If you’re not sure where you stand, you can get a free credit report snapshot from Credit.com.) In addition, rewards cards are a good deal only for those who pay their balances off in full each month. Otherwise, you’ll likely spend more on interest than you receive in rewards.

More Money-Saving Reads:

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Poor? You’re Going to Pay More for Car Insurance, Research Finds

pay-more-for-car-insurance

Lower-income individuals may be paying more for car insurance, according to recent research by the Consumer Federation of America (CFA).

“Insurance companies are penalizing good drivers by hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars each year based on economic and social status, and the end result is that the poor pay more, much more,” J. Robert Hunter, CFA’s director of insurance, said in a press release.

According to the study, those who have a higher economic status pay an average of $1,144 for car insurance each year, while premiums increased about 59% (to $1,825 each year) for those with a lower economic status.

Methodology

The study looked at the five factors most insurance providers use to give an insurance quote that can help determine economic status: education level, occupation, marital status, homeownership status and whether they have owned a car for the past six months.

From there, the CFA used the online portals for the five largest auto insurers in the nation — Allstate, Farmer’s, Geico, Progressive, and State Farm — to get quotes for a typically-mandatory basic liability car insurance policy in 15 major U.S. cities.

The research team established four different hypothetical personas used to apply for these policies: two men and two women who had opposing socio-economic characteristics, but were the same age, drove the same car, lived at the same address and had the same good driving record.

For example, “Female A” is a bank executive with a master’s degree, owns a home, is married, and has had car insurance coverage with the same provider for three years. Her counterpart, “Female B,” is a bank teller with a high school degree, is a renter, hasn’t had a car for the past six months (so no auto insurance), and is single.

According to the CFA study, two drivers with the same driving record and living at the same house paid two different premiums — the one who had a characteristic of a lower economic status paid higher premiums 92% of the time.

Breaking it Down by Provider & Location

The study found that four of the nation’s largest five auto insurers often charged 40% to 92% more (about $600 to $900 annually) to drivers because of their lower economic status, despite having perfect driving records.

Allstate and Farmer’s Insurance were found to charge the largest increases due to lower economic status drivers, CFA said, with increases of $915 and $900 respectively. Neither of these providers immediately responded to Credit.com’s request for comment about the study.

State Farm was found to have the smallest increase in rates for lower economic status drivers at $217 more each year, CFA said.

Geico, Progressive and State Farm also did not immediately respond to request for comment on the study. Neither did the Insurance Information Institute, an industry trade group.

Drivers in Queens, New York; Jersey City, New Jersey; Boston, Atlanta, Minneapolis, Houston and Jacksonville, Florida, saw the highest added expenses, with lower economic status drivers paying an average of more than $700 more each year, the study said.

Los Angeles reported the smallest difference in policy fees between lower-income and higher-income applicants, at $80 per year. This is due to California’s consumer protection laws, which prohibits providers from asking all of the non-driving related questions used in this report, except for marital status.

Applying for Car Insurance

During a tele-press conference on Monday morning, Hunter and Doug Heller, the co-authors of the study, acknowledged that their study did not factor in how a customer’s credit score would alter a premium. When filling out the application for the premium, they did not provide a Social Security number, so the credit scoring was left at a default setting for all policies.

Heller said he felt that if they had factored in credit scores, “it would have made [the discrepancies] a lot worse.”

Before you shop around for car insurance, it’s a good idea to find out where your credit stands. (You can take a look at two of your credit scores for free, updated each month, on Credit.com.) If you discover your scores aren’t up to snuff, you may be able to repair your credit by doing things like paying down high credit card balances and disputing any errors you discover on your reports.

[Offer: Denied from a loan? It may be because of a low credit score due to errors on your report. Lexington Law can help you navigate the credit repair process so you can get back on track. Learn more about them here or call them at (844) 346-3296 for a free consultation.]

More on Auto Loans:

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Time Warner Cable & Charter Overcharged Customers $7.2 Million a Year, Senate Finds

time-warner-cable

A U.S. Senate investigation just gave consumers a reason to cut the cord. According to a report released Friday, TWC overcharged customers nationwide an estimated $639,948 between January and April this year, with the projected yearly total pegged at $1,919,844.

On top of all that, Charter, TWC’s new parent company as of May, told the Senate’s Subcommittee that it “over-billed customers by at least $442,691 per month,” which works out to $5,312,292 per year.

That’s $7.2 million in faulty charges. So what caused it?

Over the course of a six-and-a-half year timeframe analyzed by the subcommittee, “Time Warner Cable and Charter made no effort to trace equipment overcharges to their origin unless customers specifically asked them to and did not provide notice or refunds to customers,” they said in the report. Worse still, “Time Warner Cable and Charter did not automatically refund or credit customers for equipment overcharges they discovered.”

Fortunately, TWC and Charter have agreed to amend their policies. However, for its part, TWC said it “will not investigate when it began overcharging those customers unless customers bring specific concerns to the company’s attention.” The new policies will alert customers to overcharges and help them decide whether to take a credit or refund.

In response to a request for comment, a Charter spokesperson provided the following statement via email:

“An audit of our set-top box charges over the last nine months found them to be over 99% accurate. To move us closer to 100% accuracy and permanently resolve this issue, we have installed new controls to ensure discrepancies are caught and eliminated on a daily basis. Charter customers who were incorrectly charged for set-top boxes are being notified and given a 12-month credit for these fees. … We will put controls into place to catch such instances daily [at TWC], as we now have installed at Charter, but that will take approximately 60 to 90 days. Until then, we will proactively issue a one-month credit to any TWC customer that the current monthly process reveals was overcharged.”

If you’re thinking of switching cable providers, be sure you know where your credit stands. It isn’t uncommon for utility and cable companies to run a credit check when you apply, and you could potentially pay a larger deposit if you have bad credit. You can view your free credit scores, updated each month, on Credit.com. Not making sense of it all? You can read our tips for understanding your credit score.

More Money-Saving Reads:

Image: Craig McCausland

The post Time Warner Cable & Charter Overcharged Customers $7.2 Million a Year, Senate Finds appeared first on Credit.com.

Time Warner Cable & Charter Overcharged Customers $7.2 Million a Year, Senate Finds

time-warner-cable

A U.S. Senate investigation just gave consumers a reason to cut the cord. According to a report released Friday, TWC overcharged customers nationwide an estimated $639,948 between January and April this year, with the projected yearly total pegged at $1,919,844.

On top of all that, Charter, TWC’s new parent company as of May, told the Senate’s Subcommittee that it “over-billed customers by at least $442,691 per month,” which works out to $5,312,292 per year.

That’s $7.2 million in faulty charges. So what caused it?

Over the course of a six-and-a-half year timeframe analyzed by the subcommittee, “Time Warner Cable and Charter made no effort to trace equipment overcharges to their origin unless customers specifically asked them to and did not provide notice or refunds to customers,” they said in the report. Worse still, “Time Warner Cable and Charter did not automatically refund or credit customers for equipment overcharges they discovered.”

Fortunately, TWC and Charter have agreed to amend their policies. However, for its part, TWC said it “will not investigate when it began overcharging those customers unless customers bring specific concerns to the company’s attention.” The new policies will alert customers to overcharges and help them decide whether to take a credit or refund.

In response to a request for comment, a Charter spokesperson provided the following statement via email:

“An audit of our set-top box charges over the last nine months found them to be over 99% accurate. To move us closer to 100% accuracy and permanently resolve this issue, we have installed new controls to ensure discrepancies are caught and eliminated on a daily basis. Charter customers who were incorrectly charged for set-top boxes are being notified and given a 12-month credit for these fees. … We will put controls into place to catch such instances daily [at TWC], as we now have installed at Charter, but that will take approximately 60 to 90 days. Until then, we will proactively issue a one-month credit to any TWC customer that the current monthly process reveals was overcharged.”

If you’re thinking of switching cable providers, be sure you know where your credit stands. It isn’t uncommon for utility and cable companies to run a credit check when you apply, and you could potentially pay a larger deposit if you have bad credit. You can view your free credit scores, updated each month, on Credit.com. Not making sense of it all? You can read our tips for understanding your credit score.

More Money-Saving Reads:

Image: Craig McCausland

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6 Ways to Save on Your Cable Bill

Ivanko_Brnjakovic

It’s a great time to be a pay TV (aka cable) consumer. Really. After decades of helplessly paying skyrocketing TV bills (helpless because many consumers were stuck within monopoly situations) the worm is finally turning. New entrants like Verizon’s FiOS and SlingTV have created genuine competition, while the “cord cutting” phenomenon has helped many consumers ditch traditional pay TV altogether.

The pay TV industry is losing hundreds of thousands of customers every quarter, but roughly 100 million people still pay for TV in the U.S., so reports of the $100 cable bill’s demise are premature (the average cable bill really is $99). In fact, a recent survey by Consumer Reports found that 68% of Americans still pay for cable or a similar service, leading the magazine to conclude that only a “trickle” of people are really leaving pay TV.

In other words, pay TV bills are probably here to stay for a long time. So you might as well avoid the minefield of gotchas that pay TV creates, and save yourself a bundle. If your monthly bill reaches into the triple digits, you might be doing TV wrong. Here are six things to consider.

1. Skinny TV

If you aren’t part of the trickle of cord cutters, perhaps there’s a middle ground you should consider— cutting back, but not completely cutting the cord. This group has been dubbed “cord shavers.”

About 11% of TV fans in the Consumer Reports survey said they had trimmed subscriptions as a way of saving money. Many took advantage of the latest trend in pay TV offerings — so-called “Skinny TV.” Pay TV firms have finally heard the message that consumers don’t watch 150 channels, and don’t want to pay for them. So providers, led by Verizon and Comcast, have come up with new bare-bones bundles that cost around $50. If you have an average cable bill and switch to a skinny package, you’ll save $600 annually. That could pay for a nice new TV … or a subscription to streaming services like Hulu or SlingTV, and still leave you with money left over.

2. ‘Promotion Pricing’

By now, the game is well-known — threaten to cancel, and get a special deal from the cable or satellite “customer retention department.” Everyone seems to know about this, but consumers still get distracted or can’t be bothered and overpay. Paying full price for TV is like paying MSRP for a new car. It’s only for suckers. Make sure to call periodically and ask about your rate. Notice when competitors like FioS arrive in your neighborhood, because competition always makes providers more amendable to cutting deals.

Again, I know you know this. That’s why the real game isn’t about getting promotion pricing, but keeping it.

3. Have a Calendar

We’ve all been there, happily paying our discounted $55 cable bill, when one day, we notice the bill is now $132. Yikes! What happened? The promotion period ended, that’s what happened. If you are lucky, you notice it during the first month and negotiate a new deal— and perhaps even score a refund of that month’s overpay. But many consumers are busy, and don’t notice the increase, and pay for months until they realize just how much the bill has soared.

Whenever you score a special deal from pay TV, it always ends. And it ends rudely. One of the most critical tips to avoiding the dreaded bill doubling is to mark a calendar every time you negotiate such a deal with a reminder to call again before your deal expires.

Sounds simple, right? Not so fast. Here’s a fresh tip I learned recently. Reminiscent of the old days of cellphone contracts, it can be very hard to learn exactly when your discount period ends. It’s often not on a monthly bill, or even on your website profile anywhere. You’ll probably have to call and beg to find out. That’s why it’s so important to write it down when you strike the deal.

But there’s still something else about promotion pricing that might trip you up.

4. Make a Well-Timed Call

When I called my pay TV provider recently to bargain for a continuation of my promotion pricing, I was hit by a new wrinkle: There was nothing the agent could do for me. I called too early!

I had to call within seven days of my promotional price ending, I was told. Until then, the rep couldn’t sign me up for a new “save the customer” deal.

This is starting to feel like the old rebate game, now. The more rules, the more likely consumers trip up. So make sure your calendar note is very precise. And please remind me in about two weeks that I have to call the cable company again.

5. Cut Down on Box Rentals

The old advice to save money on cable was to buy your equipment, rather than rent it. A cable box might cost $50 to buy, but $4 per month to rent, meaning the purchase paid for itself within a year. Recently, that equation has become far more complex, as cable boxes have become more complex. They now support HD, DVR, high-speed Internet, and even wireless networks. So it’s not as easy to buy your box, and in some cases, it’s not realistic.

However, a big mistake consumers make now is paying for boxes they don’t really need. Now that it’s relatively easy to stream channels to smartphones and tablets, it’s quite possible your family only needs one box. Maybe you can add a Roku device or Chromecast to your bedroom TV and skip the box rental for that unit. Maybe you can watch movies on your tablet and skip the box/TV altogether.

Even more promising: The Federal Communications Commission is trying to open up the “box” market to even more competition, which should bring prices down for everyone and spur creativity. To some extent, that’s already happening. Comcast, for example, recently announced it would experiment with boxless delivery of its channels, and let consumers use an Xfinity app instead. Progress!

6. Do You Really Watch That?

All these changes really add up to one big question every consumers should ask themselves: Do you really watch that? Do you really need the all-in 300-channel package from your TV? Is it possible that a $50 skinny TV package would be good enough? Would Sling TV’s 20 or so channels at $20 a month, plus a decent antenna for free over-the-air TV, do it for you? Or is Netflix binge watching, which can cost even less than $20 a month, enough to satisfy your screen needs?

Do a TV-watching audit during the next month or two. I’ll bet you’ll find that you can replace about 95% of your TV/screen habit with less than 50% of the cost. That’s an equation you can’t resist, and could really help you cut your monthly bills. Live, local sports is still the holdout, but with all the money you’ll save, you can probably afford to eat out at your local sports bar with the savings. And you might make some friends, too.

And remember, if you’re applying for new cable service, chances are the company is going to run a credit check. It’s a good idea to do your own credit check before applying for cable so you can be sure there aren’t any surprises on your credit report. You can start by checking your two free credit scores, updated every month, on Credit.com.

More on Credit Reports and Credit Scores:

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9 Home Improvements for Your Best Summer Ever

eating_healthy_meal

Summer is just around the corner, so the time is ripe for thinking about some home improvements that can help you enjoy the longer, warmer days to their fullest.

Here are nine things you can do now that won’t break your bank account (or housing budget) and will ensure you get your summer off to a great start.

1. Buy Some Plants You Won’t Kill

Plants can add a ton of beauty to your yard, patio or porch, but they can also be expensive, especially if they die because you don’t have the right soil or you put them in too much or too little sun. If you don’t know a lot about what kinds of plants do well in your region or those that are easiest to care for, reach out to your local county Cooperative Extension Agent, a part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They offer free services and seminars, soil sample testing, advice on plants that do well in your area and even Master Gardener certification.

2. Get Your Grill in Tip-Top Shape

Nothing ruins a good barbecue faster than a dirty or broken grill, so before you head to the grocery store for provisions, do a thorough clean and check of your grill. If it’s a gas grill, it’s a good idea to check the burners to ensure they haven’t corroded. They should light quickly and burn evenly. If they don’t, it might be time to buy some replacement burners. Same goes for your ignition switch.

If your grill looks a bit worse for wear, you might also want to consider sprucing it up with a fresh coat of high-temperature grill paint.

3. Make Any Needed Repairs to Patio or Lawn Furniture

If you store your furniture, now’s the time to dig it out and give it a good scrub. You’ll also want to make sure it’s still sturdy enough for a full summer of use. Are the frames rusting or broken? Are the joints fast? Are there any rips in the fabric and can it be replaced? How about your seat cushions? Check it all out so you’re not having to apologize to guests later.

4. Lighten Up

How’s the lighting in your outdoor living space? Replace any old melted candles with some fresh new ones and check strings of lights for any broken or burned-out bulbs. If you don’t have any outdoor lighting except for your porch light, consider adding some. Uplighting under trees can be a lovely accent.

5. Don’t Bug Out

Along with the longer, warmer days come mosquitos, flies and other critters that can make being outdoors less than enjoyable. And who wants to coat themselves in stinky bug spray every 10 minutes? Consider some citronella candles, bug zappers or, if you have the budget, a mosquito trap.

6. Get Your A/C Serviced

To avoid your air conditioning going out on the hottest day of the year, consider spending some money now on a service call to have a technician come out and check your unit, especially if it’s older and out of warranty. Spending some money now on preventative maintenance can save you the hassle and possibly bigger expense later on. (High credit card balances related to home repairs or otherwise could hurt your credit. You can see where you currently stand by viewing your two free credit scores, updated each month, on Credit.com.)

7. Check Your Insulation

How old is the insulation in your house? It’s just as important in the summer months as it is in winter when it comes to keeping your monthly utility bills in check, so if you didn’t take a look last fall, you might want to do so now.

If you know what you’re doing, take a crawl through the attic and check the depth of your insulation. Energy.gov has some tips for how much you need when it comes to different types of insulation. If you don’t know what you’re doing, or if crawling around in the attic sounds like your own personal horror movie, hire someone to come check it out for you.

8. Check Watering Hoses & Sprinkler Systems

If you store your watering hoses for winter, it’s a good time to check them for leaks and to see if any of the fittings or washers need replacing. It’s also a great time to have your sprinkler system inspected for leaks, broken heads and other issues.

9. Service Yard Tools

If you mow your own yard, now’s a great time to get a tune-up on the lawn mower and have the blade sharpened. While you’re at it, you can also have the weed whacker, chainsaw and leaf blower tuned up as well so they’re running smoothly all season long.

More Money-Saving Reads:

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