12 Cars That Depreciate Quickly (& Are Good to Buy Used)

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If you’re in the market for a new car, you may be tempted to drive a brand-new one off the lot. After all, many manufacturers are already releasing their feature-packed 2017 models, and the weather hasn’t even turned cold yet.

But, before you do, consider this: A new study by iSeeCars.com, an automotive data and research company, found that buying a new car is not always going to get you the best bang for your buck. In fact, the company discovered that purchasing some cars that are just a year old can provide consumers with substantial savings.

“Most people know new cars depreciate the most in the first year and that different cars have different depreciation rates, but we wanted to determine which used cars experienced the largest price drops compared to their new models,” Phong Ly, the CEO of iSeeCars.com, said in a press release.

To establish the savings, iSeeCars.com analyzed the more than 14 million cars sold from August 1, 2015 and July 31, 2016, excluding models with fewer than 250 new and 250 used cars sold. The average asking prices of year-old cars were compared to those of new cars from the same model, according to the release, with the difference in price expressed as a percentage of the new model average price. This percentage was then compared to the overall percentage difference across all models.

Using this data, iSeeCars.com researchers found that the average price difference between a new car and a lightly used car was 21.2%, ranging from $6,099 to $19,966 in savings. (Note: For this study, a lightly used car is defined as a vehicle from the 2014-2015 model years with mileage within 20% of 13,476, the average annual miles traveled in the U.S., according to the Department of Transportation.)

But it isn’t all cars — iSeeCars.com established a dozen cars that offer the best value when purchased lightly used instead of brand new, with price differences between 31.2% and 34.6% — at least 1.5 times more than the overall average. Below are those 12 cars.

1. FIAT 500L

Price Difference: $8,096 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.6%

2. Lincoln MKS

Price Difference: $16,039 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.5%

3. Volvo S60

Price Difference: $14,204 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.4%

4. Kia Cadenza

Price Difference: $12,940 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.3%

5. Mercedes C250

Price Difference: $15,247 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.3%

6. Nissan Maxima

Price Difference: $12,469 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.0%

7. Lincoln MKS + MKZ Hybrid

Price Difference: $14,177 less
Percentage Price Difference: -33.8%

8. Jaguar XF

Price Difference: $19,966 less
Percentage Price Difference: -32.3%

9. FIAT 500

Price Difference: $11,106 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.9%

10. Cadillac ATS

Price Difference: $6,099 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.8%

11. Chrysler 300

Price Difference: $13,351 less
Percentage Price: -31.7%

12. Buick Regal

Price Difference: $11,525 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.2%

If you’re considering purchasing a new car — whether it’s straight from the manufacturer or simply new to you — it’s a good idea to make checking your credit part of your shopping process. Knowing where your credit stands can help you get an idea of what terms and conditions you may qualify for with your auto loan. You can see two of your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.

Image: AdrianHancu

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The ‘Leftover’ Cars You Can Buy for Less This Year

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Labor Day weekend has long been a big week for car sales, but according to Edmunds.com, you may be able to save really big if you look into leftovers — that is, outgoing 2016 models scheduled to be phased out or redesigned for 2017.

Per the car shopping site, dealers will be looking to get rid of these vehicles at steep discounts (think thousands of dollars) as they try to clear out their lots to make room for shiny, new 2017 models. And you don’t need to feel too behind the times for buying a car that’s last year’s news.

“Even though these vehicles are being redesigned or going away altogether, they still have the same great technology and performance that you’d find in most new cars, but at a much better value,” Ron Montoya, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com, said in a press release. “Bargain hunters are strongly encouraged to consider these vehicles.”

Edmunds identified nine vehicles in particular that are going at a good price relative to their MSRP, based off of the Price Promise deals listed on its site. Note: Some of the discounts are regional, so it’s still a good idea to comparison shop for car deals in your area. And it’s best to avoid buying a car outside of your budget just because you can get a good discount.

With that in mind, here are the five most lucrative leftover vehicles.

1. 2016 Mercedes-Benz E-Class Sedan

Edmunds spotted a number of deals for $7,000 to $10,000 off the soon-to-redesigned luxury sedan’s $71,175 MSRP.

2. 2016 Hyundai Genesis Sedan

Up for rebranding as the Genesis G80, this sedan is going for $3,000 to $5,500 less than its $49,800 MSRP in certain areas.

3. 2016 Buick LaCrosse

Edmunds is seeing deals for as much as $6,200 off the $38,982 MSRP on the entry-level full-size sedan getting a redesign in 2017.

4. 2016 Cadillac SRX

The luxury SUV is going for $8,000 off its $56,380 MSRP, once the incentives are factored in. It’s being replaced by the 2017 Cadillac XT5.

5. 2016 Subaru Impreza Sedan

Scheduled for a 2017 redesign, the 2016 Impreza is going for $900 to $1,100 less than its $22,052 MSRP. But, according to Edmunds, San Franciscans can get the real deal — saving as much as $2,300.

Looking to Buy This Labor Day?

Of course, it can pay to do your research and comparison shop before hitting a dealership, no matter what area you’re in or what car you’re looking to buy. It’s a good idea to think about your monthly payments versus price, so you know exactly what the car is going to cost you over the life of the loan — and you don’t overextend yourself.

Also, it can help to check your credit, since a good score will help you qualify for the best financing opportunities and save you on interest. You can do so by pulling your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com and viewing your credit scores for free each month at Credit.com.

Image: Ridofranz

The post The ‘Leftover’ Cars You Can Buy for Less This Year appeared first on Credit.com.