Looking for Work? Here’s The Wrong Way to Get Your Job Application Noticed

job-application-and-interview-mistakes

In a hyper-competitive job market, some people looking for work will do whatever it takes to stand out. There was the student who designed a Lego set in an attempt to land an ad agency internship. A graphic designer slapped his resume on a four-pack of home-brewed beer. And more than one desperate job seeker has donned a sandwich board in an attempt to find work.

These job hunting stunts might capture the media’s attention, but do they actually lead to job offers? In some cases, yes. Brennan Gleason, the man behind the “résum-ale,” as he dubbed it, quickly landed a job as a creative director for a digital marketing agency with the help of his one-of-a-kind C.V. But quirky job-hunting approaches don’t always yield quick results. It took Dan Conway, aka the Extreme Job Hunter, a year to find work, despite engaging in stunts like auctioning himself off on eBay and sending pizza to potential employers.

Outlandish job search techniques are more common, and may be more effective, when the applicant is in a creative field like marketing and design, perhaps because they’re a way for people to show off their skills to potential employers. Leah Bowman, the student behind the Lego resume, told Careertopia that, “For most companies, this type of application might even cross the line to inappropriate. For advertising agencies, however, I felt that showing my creativity and personality would be an asset.” But even designers and marketing pros should proceed with caution; one quarter of executives in this field surveyed by The Creative Group said gimmicky resumes were unprofessional.

Still, job hunters in all fields are under pressure to get noticed by hiring managers, who are often inundated with resumes for every job posted. The competition can inspire some desperate moves. While the instinct to make yourself stand out isn’t a bad one, some applicants take it too far, engaging in bizarre behavior than can torpedo their chances of getting the job.

“Candidates are realizing that an extraordinary cover letter and resume with strong references aren’t enough, that if you really want the gig, you have to stand out from the competition,” Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer for CareerBuilder, said. “Unfortunately, what many aren’t realizing is that the catch is making sure you do that in a professional, respectful way.”

The Creative Job Application Gone Wrong

Overzealous job seekers don’t always realize there’s a fine line between the charmingly creative job application strategy and the wildly inappropriate. Hiring managers surveyed by CareerBuilder shared stories of candidates who took an out-of-the-box approach to getting noticed, including:

  • The job seeker who bought a first-class upgrade in order to sit next to the hiring manager on a transatlantic flight.
  • A candidate who showed up for an interview wearing a Halloween costume.
  • The person who tried to bribe the hiring manager by sending him money.
  • An applicant who wore a tie emblazoned with the name of the company where he was interviewing.
  • The dressed-to-impress job seeker who wore a three-piece suit and arrived to his interview in a white limousine (the company dress code was casual and the job paid a middle wage).
  • The candidate who had his priest call the hiring manager to ask that the applicant get the job.

What is it about looking for work that inspires people to act in a way that seems designed to turn off hiring managers? Alison Green, an HR expert, blames the “charlatans of the job search advice world, telling people they need to ‘stand out’ and be ‘memorable.’” Candidates who want to rise above the pack might decide it’s a good idea to mail a cake and a framed picture of themselves to a hiring manager (as one candidate did to a reader of Green’s Ask a Manager blog), but such brazen moves can backfire.

“I was so incredibly creeped out by this gesture … I was afraid to eat the cake and couldn’t look at him and didn’t even call him for an interview,” the receiver of this unique “gift” recounted.

Those looking for work would do better to focus on substance rather than sizzle when trying to impress a would-be employer, say most career experts. A strong resume that outlines past accomplishments and clearly shows how your past experience relates to the position you want is a must, according to CareerBuilder. (And remember, only Elle Woods can get away with a scented resume on pink paper.) A robust social media presence that shows you’re an expert in your field can be an advantage when an employers searches for you after receiving your resume.

During the face-to-face portion of the hiring process, steer clear of common interview mistakes and take the time to ask a few questions of your own, since this shows you’re interested in the job. Finally, don’t forget to send a thank you note. Many applicants overlook this basic gesture, even though 59% of hiring managers say a thank you note or email after an interview can boost a person’s chances of being receiving a job offer. And if you’re tempted to send a potential employer a shoe to “get your foot in the door,” remember this: Though gimmicky tactics might get a hiring manager’s attention, it’s ultimately your skills and experience that will land you the job.

[Editor’s note: Employers often check your credit reports before finalizing the hiring process. That’s why it’s a good idea to keep track of what’s happening with your credit. You certainly wouldn’t want errors on your reports to keep you from getting your dream job. You can get your free annual credit reports at AnnualCreditReport.com, and you can check your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, at Credit.com.]

This article originally appeared on The Cheat Sheet.  

 

Image: sturti

The post Looking for Work? Here’s The Wrong Way to Get Your Job Application Noticed appeared first on Credit.com.

Here’s What Kind of Jobs America Is Adding

jobs-america-is-adding

If you’re job seeking, the odds may be in your favor: U.S. employers added a projected 151,000 non-farm jobs from July to August, according to the jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics released Friday. And certain industries are seeing more of a boom than others. 

“It’s more important than ever for job seekers to invest in their personal brands if they want to stand out in this competitive job market,” said Amanda Augustine, a career advice expert at TopResume, a resume critiquing and job search firm. “However, for those seeking employment in the food services, health care and financial services industries, there is a bit of good news: jobs in all three of these sectors continue to see an upward trend.”

Where the Jobs Are 

As Augustine mentioned, food services, health care and financial services industries are seeing increases in jobs, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting an increase of available jobs in each of these areas — the food services and drinking places industry added 34,000 jobs; health care added 14,400 jobs, many of which (12,900) were in ambulatory health care services; and the finance and insurance industry had an increase of 14,400 jobs.

Beyond that, some top categories of hiring included individual and family social services adding 16,600 jobs and retail, which gained 15,100 jobs. Local government hires accounted for most of the government jobs with 24,000 hires (11,700 of them were in education.) 

Preparing for a New Job

If you’re in the market for a new job, whether in one of the industries that saw an increase in positions recently or not, there is a lot to do to prepare. You may want to brush up on your interview skills and update your resume, but something you may not have thought about is checking your credit. Many employers look at a version of your credit report as part of the application process, so it’s a good idea to see where your credit stands ahead of time. You can pull your credit reports for free each year at AnnualCreditReport.com and see a free credit report summary, updated each month, on Credit.com.

Image: Jodi Jacobson

The post Here’s What Kind of Jobs America Is Adding appeared first on Credit.com.