How to Make Moving Back Home Work for You

Moving back home doesn't have to be the end of the world. Here are tips for surviving and getting out.

I’ve moved back home with my parents twice: Once after college to work at a nearby internship and again after breaking up with the person I was living with.

My parents were, at least outwardly, cool about it both times. They never charged rent, which probably made me feel more guilty about mooching off them and spurred me to move out faster.

More than half of post-college millennials moved back in with their parents after college, according to a recent survey by TD Ameritrade. Not all of them have parents as cool as mine, and the mix of emotions involved with shacking up in your childhood bedroom can lead to tension. So if that’s where you find yourself, here are a few tips for making it work.

How to Prepare

Before you plan to move home, you should have a plan to leave, said Susan Newman, a psychologist and author of “Under One Roof Again: All Grown Up and (Re)learning to Live Together Happily.” Know how you will eventually move out and discuss a possible move-out date with your parents.

“It helps you focus a little more on your job hunt,” she said.

If you don’t have a job yet, don’t stress. Here are 50 things you can do to score your first job.

If the date passes, you can always reassess.

You should also talk about your schedule. When you were in high school, your parents might have expected you for dinner every night. Now that you’re an adult, if that’s not the case, you should have a conversation to reset those expectations so Mom doesn’t get offended when she makes your favorite dish and you’re at the bar.

How to Have a Social Life

While you may want to have friends or dates over whenever you want, you still need to respect your parents’ feelings, Newman said. After all, it’s still their house.

Kate Moore, a 26-year-old content creator with Precision Marketing Group, has lived at home for about two months. She said it’s best to establish boundaries on day one.

“You’re used to gallivanting around town at all hours of the night and returning when you felt like it,” Moore said. “Now that you’re back under your parents’ roof, you need to maintain a delicate balance between respecting their space and maintaining your freedom.”

If you expect to be able to come and go as you please, make that clear, but also promise to be considerate.

How to Avoid Clashes

If you had tension with your parents before you moved out, don’t expect that to go away this time around. Make sure to address it head-on once you move back in, Newman said.

For example, if talking about politics always leads to an argument at the dinner table, Newman suggests making clear that is an off-limits topic for both of you. If your parents have disagreed with you on certain issues your whole life, like your style, friends or politics, come to an agreement that you won’t let those issues come to a boil.

Some parents simply won’t listen. It can be hard for the people who taught you how use the toilet to treat you like a fellow adult.

“One thing that might help a lot of the time is to say to your parents, ‘Wait a minute, I’m not the little kid I was before and I really don’t like being treated like a teen who just got my driver’s license,'” Newman said.

However, that also means acting like an adult. Clean up after yourself and don’t expect your parents to do everything for you.

How to Avoid Feeling Like a Mooch

Moore said her parents charge her only as much rent as their utilities increased from her living with them. She said other people moving home should work out how they could contribute to the costs in bills and food they’re accumulating for their parents. Little gestures help, too.

“Sometimes I delight my parents by bringing home a case of paper towels or a gallon of 2% milk,” Moore said. “Small contributions to the greater household will go a long way.”

Don’t act like a guest, Newman said. If you don’t have a job, find other ways to help, like making dinner or mowing the lawn. Yard work for neighbors might also be a good way to earn some extra money.

How to Benefit

You’re not just getting free meals and discounted rent, Newman said, but a chance to spend time with your parents while you’re adult instead of a child they’re raising. Young people should take advantage of the opportunity to get to know their parents, in addition to paying off their student loans or building up their savings. (See how to lower your student loan payments here.)

“As a young adult, and as a parent who’s not racing off to the soccer field for the third game of the weekend, you have more time to talk,” Newman said.

How to Get Out

Whatever your reason for moving back home, whether it’s to chip away at student loan debt or to find a job, pay off credit card debt or simply to save money, it’s important to know what your monetary target is and make a plan for getting there.

Even if you don’t reach your goal by the the time you agree to move out, whether it’s six months or a year, your parents won’t necessarily kick you out if you’ve shown progress, Newman said.

Moore said a mix of rent prices in the area, student loan debt and credit card debt led her back home. Since moving, she’s paid off one of her credit cards. (Paying off a credit card means you’ll lower your credit utilization, and ultimately improve your credit scores. Having good credit scores can help you land better terms and conditions on things like an auto loan or mortgage. Want to see how your credit card debt is affecting you? Check out a free snapshot of your credit report on Credit.com.)

Young adults moving back home shouldn’t feel like they’ve failed, neither should parents whose kids haven’t quite left the nest, Newman said.

“You don’t have to feel guilty,” she said. A lot of young adults lean on their parents to some degree, even if they don’t move back home.

“My son still brings home his laundry,” she said.

Image: monkeybusinessimages

The post How to Make Moving Back Home Work for You appeared first on Credit.com.

How New Parents Can Budget For Child Care

Plan ahead as much as possible.

[Disclosure: Cards from our partners are mentioned below.]

Having a new baby on the way is an incredibly joyous time for most families, but it can also be stressful. After all, babies require a lot of care — they need to be fed and changed, and then there’s the diapers, clothes, bedding, car seats, toys, healthcare … it can be overwhelming, both emotionally and financially.

Add to that the tremendous childcare expense — the average annual cost for child care in the United States is higher than the average cost of in-state college tuition — and it can feel downright impossible, especially if your finances are already tight.

Fortunately, there are some things you can do to help you budget for child care. We talked to Katie Bugbee, senior managing editor of Care.com, a website dedicated to helping families and caregivers connect in a reliable and easy way. She shared some ideas on how to start saving at every stage.

“Obviously, the earlier people can start saving the better,” Bugbee said. “When you have babies on the brain is a good time to start cutting back. As much as you want to celebrate the last few years without kids and enjoy them, you should also really make sure that you have enough money moving forward to live as comfortably as possible with the additional expenses.”

Before Baby Comes

There are a multitude of things you can do to save money before you have a baby on the way. From cutting back on your daily $3 coffee to skipping that new outfit for work and even buying used items instead of new.

You can also save money by using a cash-back credit card for your everyday purchases. Some of the best cash-back cards can help you earn rewards on pretty much everything you buy. Of course, most of these cards require you have good credit. But, if you don’t, it’s good to keep in mind there are credit cards for bad credit and some — like the Discover it Secured card or the Capital One Secured MasterCard — even offer cash back rewards. Even better, they’ll help you build and improve your credit if managed properly. You can see what your credit situation is by reviewing your free credit report snapshot from Credit.com, which updates monthly.

Of course, you can also save in larger ways. Instead of moving into a bigger, nicer apartment or house, stay where you are for now. That way, you keep your housing budget reigned in while you put more money into savings for your new baby.

If you have the cash flow, set up a savings account especially for baby, and consider skipping that fabulous week long vacation to St. Lucia and opt instead for a long weekend visiting friends. Here are 7 other money moves to make before baby arrives.

When Baby Is On the Way

When you know your baby is on the way, it’s time to really get busy with the saving, especially if you didn’t so earlier. One option is to see if your employer offers flexible spending accounts that cover child care. If so, it could be worth setting up and reaping the tax benefits it will provide. You can also ask if there’s a child care subsidy available, or if there is in-office child care.

Now is also a good time to talk to your accountant or financial adviser about how best to plan for your new family addition. Are there additional tax breaks to consider?

You might also want to begin researching child care options in your neighborhood. There’s a lot to consider, and your financial situation will likely dictate what choices you make. Will you want at-home care? If so, a nanny share can be a great way to cut your costs. Will you opt for a family day care center instead? Are there any in your neighborhood that offer a sliding pay scale that fits your financial situation?

“Going and getting the best care for the most affordable option is what you need to charge yourself with,” Bugbee said. “I strongly recommend using message boards for that, because you probably don’t even know half the daycare or nanny options in your area.”

She suggested trying out sites like Bigtent.com to find child care options near your home. These are closed groups that will want to verify you live in the area, but once that hurdle is out of the way, they can be incredibly helpful, Bugbee said.

You may also want to consider Facebook groups for parents, which can also be very helpful in finding affordable child care services through people who have already used them, she said.

When Baby Arrives & Every Day After

Now is the time to start looking for ways to save money on baby gear itself.

“The only new things you really need are cribs and car seats,” Bugbee said, adding that pretty much everything else can be bought used. Be sure to check for recalls on used products, however, as well as expiration dates where applicable. The money you save can be used toward child care.

Bugbee also suggested using Amazon Mom to help save money on things like diapers, sippy cups, bottles and more.And remember that cash-back rewards credit card we mentioned earlier? Putting it to use on essential purchases can help you save even more. (As far as shopping on Amazon goes, you may find a lot of value in their credit card, which we reviewed here.)

At the end of the day, you want what is best for your child. Saving money wherever you can help you provide a better life for them now and in the future. And teaching them to do the same can help them be financially secure even when you aren’t around to watch after them.

At publishing time, the Discover it Secured and the Capital One Secured MasterCard are offered through Credit.com product pages, and Credit.com is compensated if our users apply and ultimately sign up for this card. However, this relationship does not result in any preferential editorial treatment. This content is not provided by the card issuer(s). Any opinions expressed are those of Credit.com alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer(s).

Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees and terms for credit cards, loans and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees and terms with credit card issuers, banks or other financial institutions directly.

Image: DragonImages

 

The post How New Parents Can Budget For Child Care appeared first on Credit.com.

7 Things You Can Do Now to Solidify Your Child’s Financial Future

There are plenty of things parents can do now to help set their kids down the right path financially.

If you have kids, or are considering having them, you’ve likely started thinking about what that will mean for your finances. But have you thought about how you can help your kids become prepared for their own financial future? There are plenty of things parents can do now to help set their kids down the right path financially. Here are a few.

1. Set up a College Savings Account

One of the most important things you can do is to consider how (and if) you’ll help them obtain a college education. An analysis of Labor Department statistics by the Economic Policy Institute found that in 2016, Americans with four-year college degrees made almost twice the average hourly wage compared to those without a degree. So a college degree is still important. However, you should never save for your child’s college at the expense of saving for your retirement. Instead, consider whether, and how much, you can responsibly save for both. (You can read this to help determine if a 529 college savings plan is the right avenue for you and this one about how much is enough when it comes to college savings.)

2. Have a Life Insurance Policy

Don’t think of a life insurance policy in terms of what would happen to your kid if you die. Consider it a way to ensure your child is taken care of in the future, no matter what happens to you. Talk to a certified financial planner if you aren’t sure where to start, or which option is best for you. (Or you can read this article that outlines seven essential documents to fill out.)

3. Put a Guardian in Your Will

Putting together a solid will so your child will be taken care of if something happens to you should be a top priority when estate planning. Picking the best guardian for your child is equally important. You can name two types of guardians — one to physically look after your child and one to look after their assets. Think seriously before simply naming your mom or best friend as your child’s guardian.

4. Open a Savings Account for Your Child

When it comes to helping kids become financially savvy, teaching them how to save — and why savings are important — is crucial. Your kid doesn’t have to be walking yet for you to open a savings account in their name. Ask your bank about a custodial savings account. Once your child is old enough for an allowance, you can discuss why everyone should have savings and how much to put away. Many experts say saving 20% of your income is a good way to build up a safety net.

5. Give Them an Allowance

Experts differ on whether giving kids an allowance helps them become financially savvy, how much to give and for what purpose (just to help them save, or in conjunction with chores, etc.). Research from T. Rowe Price, an investment management company, showed that children who receive an allowance are more likely to think they have a good understanding of basic financial topics than those who don’t get one. The important thing is to not give your kid an allowance and let him do with it what he will — you need to talk about money with your kid, as well. Discuss the importance of earning money and how to make it last.

6. Talk About Your Finances

Money is often a taboo subject in families, but it shouldn’t be. Consider talking to your kid about money early and often. A 2014 study from North Carolina State University and the University of Texas found that children pay close attention to issues related to money. Make sure you’re filling them in on the important facts. (View your free credit report snapshot on Credit.com to help see where you stand.)

7. Involve Them in (Certain) Financial Decisions

Your young child probably won’t help you save for a down payment on a new house or have detailed conversations about your debt-repayment plans. However, there’s no reason they can’t help put together a grocery list and come shop with you while you discuss how food costs money and the importance of family budgeting. Or perhaps on vacation, your kid can help decide how family money will be best spent on a few outings or can watch you fill up the gas tank to get an understanding of how much your road trip costs. Teach your kid early that it costs money to do fun things and how saving helps you achieve certain financial goals. You might be surprised how much your kid remembers later from your early — and repeated — money conversations in the future.

Image: szeyuen 

The post 7 Things You Can Do Now to Solidify Your Child’s Financial Future appeared first on Credit.com.

7 Things You Can Do Now to Solidify Your Child’s Financial Future

There are plenty of things parents can do now to help set their kids down the right path financially.

If you have kids, or are considering having them, you’ve likely started thinking about what that will mean for your finances. But have you thought about how you can help your kids become prepared for their own financial future? There are plenty of things parents can do now to help set their kids down the right path financially. Here are a few.

1. Set up a College Savings Account

One of the most important things you can do is to consider how (and if) you’ll help them obtain a college education. An analysis of Labor Department statistics by the Economic Policy Institute found that in 2016, Americans with four-year college degrees made almost twice the average hourly wage compared to those without a degree. So a college degree is still important. However, you should never save for your child’s college at the expense of saving for your retirement. Instead, consider whether, and how much, you can responsibly save for both. (You can read this to help determine if a 529 college savings plan is the right avenue for you and this one about how much is enough when it comes to college savings.)

2. Have a Life Insurance Policy

Don’t think of a life insurance policy in terms of what would happen to your kid if you die. Consider it a way to ensure your child is taken care of in the future, no matter what happens to you. Talk to a certified financial planner if you aren’t sure where to start, or which option is best for you. (Or you can read this article that outlines seven essential documents to fill out.)

3. Put a Guardian in Your Will

Putting together a solid will so your child will be taken care of if something happens to you should be a top priority when estate planning. Picking the best guardian for your child is equally important. You can name two types of guardians — one to physically look after your child and one to look after their assets. Think seriously before simply naming your mom or best friend as your child’s guardian.

4. Open a Savings Account for Your Child

When it comes to helping kids become financially savvy, teaching them how to save — and why savings are important — is crucial. Your kid doesn’t have to be walking yet for you to open a savings account in their name. Ask your bank about a custodial savings account. Once your child is old enough for an allowance, you can discuss why everyone should have savings and how much to put away. Many experts say saving 20% of your income is a good way to build up a safety net.

5. Give Them an Allowance

Experts differ on whether giving kids an allowance helps them become financially savvy, how much to give and for what purpose (just to help them save, or in conjunction with chores, etc.). Research from T. Rowe Price, an investment management company, showed that children who receive an allowance are more likely to think they have a good understanding of basic financial topics than those who don’t get one. The important thing is to not give your kid an allowance and let him do with it what he will — you need to talk about money with your kid, as well. Discuss the importance of earning money and how to make it last.

6. Talk About Your Finances

Money is often a taboo subject in families, but it shouldn’t be. Consider talking to your kid about money early and often. A 2014 study from North Carolina State University and the University of Texas found that children pay close attention to issues related to money. Make sure you’re filling them in on the important facts. (View your free credit report snapshot on Credit.com to help see where you stand.)

7. Involve Them in (Certain) Financial Decisions

Your young child probably won’t help you save for a down payment on a new house or have detailed conversations about your debt-repayment plans. However, there’s no reason they can’t help put together a grocery list and come shop with you while you discuss how food costs money and the importance of family budgeting. Or perhaps on vacation, your kid can help decide how family money will be best spent on a few outings or can watch you fill up the gas tank to get an understanding of how much your road trip costs. Teach your kid early that it costs money to do fun things and how saving helps you achieve certain financial goals. You might be surprised how much your kid remembers later from your early — and repeated — money conversations in the future.

Image: szeyuen 

The post 7 Things You Can Do Now to Solidify Your Child’s Financial Future appeared first on Credit.com.

5 Signs You’re Not Ready to Be a Stay-at-Home Parent

It's a big decision to stay home after having a baby — but doing so isn't an option that is right for every mother.

Sometimes new mothers have a hard time deciding if they want to return to work after their baby is born, especially after bonding with their child during maternity leave. Sometimes there is no choice — like if you’re a single parent or your family can’t afford to live solely on your partner’s salary — and there’s not much left to do but head back to the office.

Women who have the option to stay home with a baby may have trouble weighing the pros and cons. As hard as it is to decide, there might be some fairly obvious signs that you’re actually not ready to be a stay-at-home mom. Of course, these tip offs apply to all those prospective stay-at-home dads, too.

Here are a few signs you’re not ready to be a stay-at-home parent.

1. You Have a Budget But Don’t Follow It 

Having a budget is one thing, but following it is something entirely different. Just because it looks like you have your finances under control on paper, if your credit card statements tell a different story, you might need to reconsider staying home, at least until you can get your spending under control. (Curious how your credit card debt is affecting your credit? You can see a free snapshot of your credit report here.)

Having a baby is bound to bring in even more expenses (according to the Department of Agriculture, the current cost of raising a child through age 17 is a whopping $233,610), so if you already have trouble following a budget — or you haven’t updated your budget yet to include everything your baby will need — you may want to consider seeing what following an updated budget would be like for at least a month before deciding if you can afford to live on one salary.

2. You Haven’t Saved for Retirement Yet/You Have No Retirement Savings Plan if You Quit

It’s no secret that Americans are worried about retirement. In fact, one recent survey found that 56% of Americans lose sleep over saving for retirement, while another found that 38% of millennials find retirement to be a significant financial stressor. Even if you have started saving but it’s been a few years since you’ve checked in on your progress, it may be time for a bump in how much you put away … something that will be much more difficult to do if you decide to leave your job.

Of course parents who decide to stay at home do have options when it comes to retirement (spousal IRAs, self-employed retirement funds and rollover accounts, to name a few). But if you don’t qualify for them, don’t care to look into them or can’t afford to put anything else away if you leave your job, it’s probably best to reconsider leaving until you can. You can read this guide to learn more about IRAs.

3. Your Partner’s Health Insurance Options for You & Your Baby Are Subpar at Best

While the future of healthcare is a little shaky right now, there’s one thing you can safely assume no matter what happens — you and your baby will need some. Newborns spend the first six months of their lives visiting a pediatrician at least once a month (often much more frequently in their first few weeks), and new moms, in particular, will have plenty of check-ups with their OB as well. These aren’t things you’ll want to do without health insurance, so if your partner’s options for you and your child don’t stack up, staying on yours until something better comes along is a good idea.

4. Your Emergency Savings Account Is Minimal

You might think having three months worth of bills covered in an emergency account is great — and it is — but it might not be enough if you’re considering leaving your job. Experts recommend having at least three to six months’ worth of bills covered in an emergency savings account, and that doesn’t really take into account all the extras that come along with having a baby. If you’ll be moving into a house from an apartment for more space, assume that you’ll have random projects pop up that will start draining that emergency fund quickly. If your partner can afford to keep funding the account to cover for any withdrawals you take or to provide you with more of a cushion that’s one thing, but if the account has been stagnant for a while and your family can’t afford to put anything else away right now, maybe a better idea is to stay at your job and slowly build up the emergency account a bit more so that when/if the time comes that you leave your job, you’ll feel more secure knowing your emergency funds are all there.

(And, if you don’t have a savings account at all, you’ll want to start socking away dollars ASAP. No need to panic, though: This piece will help you create an emergency fund in 30 days or less.)

5. You Struggle Spending All Day Alone with the Baby During Work Leave

Let’s be honest — babies are tough to take care of. So if you find it difficult to stay positive while on maternity or paternity leave, that might be a sign that you’re not quite ready stay home full time with a baby. Working is about a lot more than just a paycheck — it’s about having some time to yourself (funny how commutes suddenly become a wonderful thing) and with other adults, and it’s about having a job to do that both stimulates and fulfills you. If you don’t think staying at home with a baby will do all of those things for you, it’s probably best for you, and your family, if you head back to work.

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

Image: g-stockstudio

The post 5 Signs You’re Not Ready to Be a Stay-at-Home Parent appeared first on Credit.com.

13 Ways to Save at Babies R Us

Taking care of baby is expensive. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to save at the nearby Babies 'R' Us.

Whether you’re a first-time parent or a pro at parenting your multiple kids, the truth is taking care of little ones comes with a hefty price tag. If you’re on a first-name basis with the customer service rep at Babies R Us, you could probably benefit from our list of ways to save at this kids’ goods superstore.

1. Start at the Source

Don’t miss the Babies R Us savings center, chock full of daily deals in the ‘today’s deals’ section.

2. Shop the Sales

It goes without saying that shopping the clearance section will save you some cash, and the Babies R Us clearance section online is a great way to get started.

3. Become a Rewards ‘R’ Us Member

Rewards R Us members earn one point for every $1 spent at Babies R Us and Toys R Us stores, and 125 points earns you $5 in R Us Rewards. You can bank your points up to $200 in R Us rewards for future purchases.

4. Put Together a Registry

If you’re expecting, putting together a registry with Babies R Us will get you up to 10% back on purchases made from that registry if you’re a Rewards R Us member — even if you made the purchases yourself. You’ll also receive a 10% completion discount certificate to finish purchasing the rest of the items from your registry.

5. Search for Coupons in Your Local Paper

Your local Babies R Us may be having its own sales, which you can learn about through your local paper. You can also select your local Babies R Us location online and look for weekly ads containing coupons there.

6. Double Up on Coupon Savings

Check out coupons available directly from Babies ‘R’ Us and on sites like RetailMeNot, then try searching for manufacturer coupons for products you’re interested in. Babies R Us will let you stack your coupons, which could greatly add to your savings.

7. Use Social Media to Your Advantage

Sign up for the Babies R Us newsletter for sales notifications and coupons, and follow the brand on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a sale.

8. Trade in Your Old Baby Goods

At least once a year the company has a trade-in event that could earn you savings. For example, from now through Feb. 20th, Toys R Us and Babies R Us are hosting a Great Trade-In Gear & Furniture Event, where trading in your old gear will score you a 25% off coupon on a new item, or 30% off when you use your R Us Credit card.

9. Provide Your Contact Information at the Store

While it’s frustrating to be constantly confronted with fliers from stores where you’ve given out your email or home address, if you’re hoping to score deals on baby goods, it doesn’t hurt to share that information with Babies R Us. At least once a month a flier comes to my home, and while I’m not always looking for baby gear, the attached coupon that comes with the flier is always appreciated.

10. Open an R Us Credit Card

If you know this store will be on your monthly hit list, it might be worth signing up for an R Us credit card. When you open the card, you’ll start with either 15% off your purchase that day or a special financing option, plus you’ll earn two points per every $1 spent at either Toys or Babies R Us (125 points = $5 in rewards), and you’ll get 10% off on in-store purchases every Thursday when you use the credit card.

Want more details? Check out our Babies R Us credit card breakdown or visit our full credit card review center.

11. Use the Price Match Guarantee Program

Babies R Us will price match your in-store purchase on identical items from any of its competitors, including Amazon, Baby Depot, diapers.com and Target, among others (in-store and online prices are eligible). Find the full list here.

12. Buy in Bulk to Save on Shipping

A purchase of $19 or more will earn you free shipping at babiesrus.com. If you can’t wait the four to six days for delivery you could always opt for the free in-store pick-up option (when available). This way, if your items are in stock, you can pick them up all together in the same day, usually in under an hour. Using this method allows you to pay for your items online before picking them up, meaning if anything is on sale or cheaper online (which occasionally happens), you’ll be able to score that deal.

13. Use Outside Sources

Search discount sites like Gift Card Granny and Groupon, which often offer vouchers or gifts cards for stores at discounted prices. Keep in mind that sometimes these transactions aren’t immediate so they’re best for items you don’t need right away.

Want more brand hacks? Check out our roundup of 7 ways to save at Macy’s.

Image: FatCamera

The post 13 Ways to Save at Babies R Us appeared first on Credit.com.

5 Things Having a Baby Taught Me About Money

A new mom and personal finance expert shares the new money lessons she learned from baby.

While I’ve always been pretty financially conscious (you don’t become a personal finance writer by not caring about these kinds of things), it wasn’t really until I had a kid that I started putting some of the financial advice I’ve always heard into practice. Plus, I picked up plenty of new tips.

Here are five of the biggest things I learned about my finances after I had a baby. They don’t only apply to people with kids, though. In fact, I wish I’d taken some of them into consideration a little bit sooner.

1. Sometimes it’s OK to Spend Money to Save Time … or Your Sanity

While I’d never advocate for frivolous spending, I’ve learned that sometimes it’s OK to spend a little bit extra on something that will either help save time or make your life just a little bit easier. In my Mom Life, that has taken on all kinds of forms: From big-ticket items like forking over the cash for a nanny (as a freelancer I could just as easily be stingy and try to fit all my work into nap times, nights when my husband gets home or the weekends, but why make it so hard?) to deciding to finish our basement (a large chunk of cash upfront, yes, but with all the visitors we have coming to see the baby, and all the toys that are steadily taking over the house, this is a sanity saver for sure) to the small — and sometimes silly — but necessary, like investing in travel covers for our stroller and car seat so they don’t get ruined when they’re chucked carelessly under planes.

2. Time Really Does Fly, so Start Saving for Retirement Today

It’s pretty easy to get caught up in the day-to-day minutia when you have a tiny baby that depends on you for her every want and need. But every now and then, when I get five seconds to myself, I’m able to look back through the photos on my phone and see how much my daughter has grown. Can she honestly be six months already? You’re probably saying, “I already know time goes quickly. It’s been [insert amount of time here] since I graduated from college,” but really, there’s nothing that sets up a ticking clock quite like a quickly growing child. My point is, although I have always kept the mantra “the earlier you can start saving for retirement, the better,” tucked somewhere in the back of my mind, I now fully grasp the truth behind it.

For example, my daughter was born in July 2016. Had I invested just $100 on that day into a retirement account, by the time I’m potentially ready to retire in 30+ years, that measly $100 could grow to more than $900. Now imagine I invested more than $100, and did so every single month instead of once? Behold, the power of compound interest.

3. Things Change, so it’s Important to Revisit Budgets & Goals

Having a child would be an obvious change to anyone’s budget, but for me, becoming a parent just reinforced how important it is to not only have a budget and savings goals, but that it’s equally as important to revisit those things on a fairly routine basis. Before I was married, for example, my savings goals consisted of essentially two buckets: Emergency and travel. (Ah, the good ol’ days.) When I got married they became: Emergency, travel, move/house. When we started thinking about kids, a fourth “baby” bucket was added. You get the picture. Since buying a house, we’ve added “home repairs” to that list, too, and believe me when I say we’ve already tapped into that one mightily.

The beginning of the year is a great time to check in on your current budget and savings goals and update as needed, but don’t be afraid to shift things around as often as you need to remain comfortable.

4. Finding What Makes You Most Productive Will Be to Your Advantage

I’ve always considered myself an organized person, but I really kicked it into high gear when my daughter was born, and that’s helped my career as well. As I planned to re-enter the workforce after taking a couple months off when my daughter was born, we didn’t yet have a nanny, but I wasn’t willing to wait to get started. Enter the key to my success: organization. As a working mom without a nanny — and then even when we did find one — I realized quickly that if I was going to get anything (let alone everything) done that I wanted to in a day, I better have a plan. For some people (ahem, me) that might mean making daily to-do lists where items can be crossed off. Others might find reminders set for specific times of day helpful, or setting calendar appointments.

The point is, most of us need a little help keeping on task throughout any given day, whether it’s with personal or professional goals. Learning the things that will get you moving more quickly and efficiently will help you power through your to-do list and streamline your day. Remember: Time is money, so make the most of yours.

5. It’s OK to Use Your Savings for What You’ve Saved For

I’ve always felt more secure when I had savings in the bank, which at times has meant going without things I could have really used, even if they were the exact things I was actually saving for in the first place. Silly, I know, but once I was able to start putting money into savings I loved to watch it grow — and I equally hated to watch it dwindle.

Fast forward a couple years and some of those savings buckets have to be spent — hello mortgage down payments, health insurance deductibles to give birth and any number of house repairs. These days it seems like I don’t have the option of whether to spend money in my savings … for the good of my family, money must be spent. And that’s OK. The whole point of saving up for something in the first place is so that when the time comes to actually purchase the item — whether it’s a house, a vacation or that really extravagant computer bag you’ve had your eye on — you’ve done your due diligence and can buy it outright, rather than go into credit card debt over it (and, if you already have, you can find tips for getting rid of those balances here). Coming to grips with this earlier could have saved me a lot of unwarranted angst.

Of course everyone is different when it comes to money management, but hopefully at least a few of the revelations I’ve had about finances over the past six months might be able to help you out, as well.

For more money lessons, visit Credit.com’s personal finance learning center.

This story is an Op/Ed contribution to Credit.com and does not necessarily represent the views of the company or its partners.

Image: SolStock

The post 5 Things Having a Baby Taught Me About Money appeared first on Credit.com.

9 Items New Parents Might Not Actually Need

items-new-parents-might-not-actually-need

Expecting a child is an exciting time in a couple’s life. It is fun to plan and get everything ready in anticipation of the little one’s arrival.

Of course, if you are on a tight budget, that can make planning more difficult or even sometimes stressful. While you will register and hopefully receive some of what you need from friends and family, there will be many items you need to buy.

I recall when I was expecting my first. I registered for all sorts of things which were on the list I was provided by the store. Many I received and some of them, I honestly never really used. I felt horrible that people spent money on things that we didn’t really need.

After having had three kids, I know the items I consider non-essential, but still see a lot of new moms asking for them. That is not to say that you can’t purchase them. However, if your budget is tight, these might be some things you can ask for on your registry, but, if you don’t get them, you don’t rush out and spend your own money to buy them, especially if doing so will land you in debt.

1. Wipes Warmer

Not only is this really not needed, many warmers tend to dry out the wipes, which can result in waste. Who wants to spend money on wipes just to have them dry up and get thrown out? (I sure didn’t.) If you want to, you can use your own hands to warm the wipe for a minute.

2. Changing Table

This is convenient, but you really don’t “need” one. If you want a designated area to change your baby, you can purchase an inexpensive changing pad and secure it to a low dresser instead. That way, you are not stuck with an expensive piece of furniture that you will never use again.

3. Diaper Disposal System

These may seem convenient, but they are not a must. Not only do they not always keep the smell out of the room, but you also have to pay for expensive refills. Instead, have a trash can in the room you will most frequently have diaper changes. Take the trash out at the end of each day (and you can flush the solid waste by shaking the diaper into the toilet as your baby gets older).

4. Specialty Detergent

This is one I fell for myself. I was told I had to get the special detergent for my baby’s clothes. Instead, opt for a free and clear brand of detergent. It will be free of dyes and perfumes, which are the products that can irritate sensitive skin. Best of all, you will save time, as you can wash baby’s clothes in with everyone else’s and not have to do extra loads of laundry.

5. Bassinet

These are so pretty to look at, but there is not any guarantee you will use it. Even if you do, it is for a relatively short period of time. Instead, consider getting a pack ‘n play with the removable bassinet on the top to use instead.

We actually had a couple of pack ‘n plays (received both as gifts). One was smaller and was kept upstairs and then we had another in our family room. Both had the bassinet and were used for naps when our kids were very small. As they got older, we then had the playpen to use to set them in when needed.

6. Baby Food Processor

There is no need for a special appliance to create your own baby food. You can use your own food processor, blender or magic bullet to make the food. It works exactly the same and saves you the cost (and space) of having an additional item in the kitchen.

7. Baby Shoes

Adorable? Yes. Necessary? No. Babies do not need shoes until they get closer to learning to walk. So save your money and purchase them when they are bit older.

8. Bottle Cleaning System & Sterilizer

Your dishwasher works perfectly fine when it comes to cleaning bottles and nipples. Many even have a sterilizing option built in (which is just a very high heat setting that can kill germs). Skip the fancy system and use your dishwasher to clean bottles and they will be perfectly fine for baby to use.

9. Baby Towels

The everyday towels you use on yourself are perfectly fine for drying your little one. Just wrap them up tightly in it and cover that little wet head if you are concerned about your little one catching cold.

Your baby needs just a few things when they are first born and the most important thing is your love and attention. The other things — they are just things.

Anything else you would like to add to our list?

[Editor’s Note: Don’t let yourself overspend on your new little bundle of joy. You can use this free tool to track your financial goals, like building good credit, each month on Credit.com.]

Image: kupicoo

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3 Big Money Mistakes Your Freshman is Likely to Make

College is a time for adventure, growth and learning, but it can also be a time for silly financial mistakes if your freshman isn’t careful. This will likely be the first time your kid is out in the world on her own, so it makes sense that she’ll want to try new things. But her actions might come with some serious and long-lasting financial consequences unless you can help point her in the right direction first.

Here are five mistakes college freshmen often make when it comes to their finances — and how you can help your child avoid them.

1. They choose a college without considering the price tag

While it’s true that going to a good college is important these days, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your kid needs to go to the most expensive college to score his dream job after school. If your kid has always dreamed of going to a specific, but expensive, school, sit down with him at least a year or two out of applying to talk about how he’ll pay for it. The U.S. government recently launched the College Scorecard, where you can easily search for a school and see how its students fare financially after graduation. It might change his mind if he sees most students graduate from his dream school with tons of student loan debt. If your kid is willing to be a little flexible, you might want to point him towards one of these 20 most rewarding colleges for student loan borrowers, which ranks the best schools for generating the highest income after accounting for loan expenses.

2. They apply for credit cards before they learn how to use them

Luckily it’s gotten much harder for banks and credit card companies to market credit cards to students on college campuses. But the temptation to apply for credit will still be there. The second your kid applies for a credit card, she starts building a credit history that will follow her for at least the next seven years. A smart way to give her experience with some supervision is to add her as an authorized user on your credit card account. You can keep track of her spending habits and she can start building credit while she’s still in school. But don’t just pay the bill off each month without question. Talk to her about her credit score, what a credit report is for and how interest works. If you think it’s a good idea for your kid to dip her toe into the credit card world independently, consider starting her out with one of these best credit card options for college students. 

3. They never learn how to budget

The road to financial security starts with one simple building block: a budget. Unfortunately, budgeting isn’t something that comes naturally to everyone — especially for college freshman who may be trying to balance a job, classes, parties, and outings with friends. While your college kid probably won’t have a ton of disposable income to work with, it’s still a good idea to talk to him ahead of time about how to set up a budget, even when it’s just a limited amount of money he’ll be dealing with. If they can stick to a budget, they can also avoid costly mistakes like overdrawing their bank account, which can lead to all kinds of painful fees. During that conversation you can discuss the importance of an emergency savings account (because even college kids need an emergency savings account), how to divvy up income into necessary expenses and fun money, as well as how, once he graduates, he’ll likely need to put some extra money aside for retirement savings, as well.

The post 3 Big Money Mistakes Your Freshman is Likely to Make appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

3 Big Money Mistakes Your Freshman is Likely to Make

College is a time for adventure, growth and learning, but it can also be a time for silly financial mistakes if your freshman isn’t careful. This will likely be the first time your kid is out in the world on her own, so it makes sense that she’ll want to try new things. But her actions might come with some serious and long-lasting financial consequences unless you can help point her in the right direction first.

Here are five mistakes college freshmen often make when it comes to their finances — and how you can help your child avoid them.

1. They choose a college without considering the price tag

While it’s true that going to a good college is important these days, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your kid needs to go to the most expensive college to score his dream job after school. If your kid has always dreamed of going to a specific, but expensive, school, sit down with him at least a year or two out of applying to talk about how he’ll pay for it. The U.S. government recently launched the College Scorecard, where you can easily search for a school and see how its students fare financially after graduation. It might change his mind if he sees most students graduate from his dream school with tons of student loan debt. If your kid is willing to be a little flexible, you might want to point him towards one of these 20 most rewarding colleges for student loan borrowers, which ranks the best schools for generating the highest income after accounting for loan expenses.

2. They apply for credit cards before they learn how to use them

Luckily it’s gotten much harder for banks and credit card companies to market credit cards to students on college campuses. But the temptation to apply for credit will still be there. The second your kid applies for a credit card, she starts building a credit history that will follow her for at least the next seven years. A smart way to give her experience with some supervision is to add her as an authorized user on your credit card account. You can keep track of her spending habits and she can start building credit while she’s still in school. But don’t just pay the bill off each month without question. Talk to her about her credit score, what a credit report is for and how interest works. If you think it’s a good idea for your kid to dip her toe into the credit card world independently, consider starting her out with one of these best credit card options for college students. 

3. They never learn how to budget

The road to financial security starts with one simple building block: a budget. Unfortunately, budgeting isn’t something that comes naturally to everyone — especially for college freshman who may be trying to balance a job, classes, parties, and outings with friends. While your college kid probably won’t have a ton of disposable income to work with, it’s still a good idea to talk to him ahead of time about how to set up a budget, even when it’s just a limited amount of money he’ll be dealing with. If they can stick to a budget, they can also avoid costly mistakes like overdrawing their bank account, which can lead to all kinds of painful fees. During that conversation you can discuss the importance of an emergency savings account (because even college kids need an emergency savings account), how to divvy up income into necessary expenses and fun money, as well as how, once he graduates, he’ll likely need to put some extra money aside for retirement savings, as well.

The post 3 Big Money Mistakes Your Freshman is Likely to Make appeared first on MagnifyMoney.