The Common Scams People Still Fall for All the Time

The scams are dumb, but the victims are not. Here's why we keep falling for these fraudulent tricks and how to stop doing so.

The top site for classified ads in the U.K. conducted a study recently that should send a wave or two to this side of the Atlantic. When it comes to scams, it’s all about the bait. Gumtree found that even with the forethought that a listing was a scam, more than a third of their users would still go ahead with a transaction. As my mother would say … Actually, she’d probably just shake her head.

It doesn’t matter where they happen. Scams are as international and ubiquitous as the human capacity to be tricked. And while some scams are super-nova dumb, that does not always mean that most people who fall for them are.

Scams rely on a simple fact of life: People are busy. Most of us aren’t Zen masters of meditation. It’s hard to fully occupy each and every moment because we lead distraction-filled lives. We’re not constantly up on the fire tower scanning the horizon for smoke, and that’s a good thing.

Unfortunately, there are some real slime balls out there who rely on this problem of ours.

Here are some recent scams that are making the rounds:

Amazon Phishing Scam

In this scam, you get an email from Amazon. It informs you that there’s been a problem of some sort. Don’t focus on what sort, because it’s these nuances that will get you got. If you get an email from Amazon telling you that there’s been a problem with an order, or that a recent order was canceled, it’s time to focus. It could be a scam.

How it works: There’s a link in the email that leads to a site that looks identical to Amazon, but you’re not anywhere near the site. The scammers are looking to get your personal information to use in the commission of identity theft, and your financial information to drain your credit card or bank account.

What to do: Visit your Amazon account by logging in directly. Do not use the link in the scam phishing email.

[Editor’s note: Keeping track of your credit scores can help you spot signs of fraud early on. A significant decrease in your scores could be a sign that someone has gotten hold of your information and using it without your permission. You can check your credit scores regularly using Credit.com’s absolutely free Credit Report Summary.]

Smishing Scams

Smishing isn’t terribly different from phishing, but if you’re not expecting at least the possibility of a smishing text, you might fall for it. The text arrives and appears to be from your bank. It could be from your internet provider. Generally, it’s from somewhere that can negatively impact your life, and that would also be in possession of your mobile digits.

How It Works: The smishing text informs you that someone has tried to access your account or it’s been frozen (again don’t get caught up on the details, the account or anything else), and your password or some other data needs to be updated. There’s a link to use where you can authenticate yourself by entering your personal information (for example, your Social Security number), and secure your account.

What to Do: If you regularly use your smartphone to access the internet, bear in mind that there are hidden dangers everywhere, and pause before you pounce on text warnings.

Sweepstakes Scam

You get a phone call from someone very cheerful, and maybe even a little breathless in the delivery of their blue-sky greetings. You’ve just won the Publishers Clearinghouse Sweepstakes. You’re a millionaire or a $500,000-aire. The prize patrol is 20 minutes away, so get dressed and be ready for your photo op with a beach towel-sized check.

How It Works: This scam preys on the wonderful human trait that, no matter how our day or month or year is going, hope springs eternal. Part of your prep for the prize patrol, however, requires that you pay the processing fee upfront. There could be many explanations for it, but the bottom line is you’re going to have to spend money to collect the prize.

What to Do: Hang up, and don’t bother changing your clothes. If you really have money coming to you from the sweepstakes or lottery, they are legally obligated to get it to you.

IRS Phone Scam

You get a phone call from the IRS, which is not entirely far-fetched anymore because Congress directed the IRS to collect back taxes with help from collection agencies. So, you could get a legitimate call from one of these four collection agencies: CBE Group of Cedar Falls, Iowa; Conserve of Fairport, New York; Performant of Livermore, California; or Pioneer of Horseheads, New York.

How It Works: The caller says you owe taxes (never mind the particulars as this is the nuance stuff that fuels any good scam), and if you don’t pay you’re going to be arrested (or some other bad thing will happen). Payment can only be made through a prepaid debit card or gift card, because of the particular kind of hell you created with your fictional bad behavior. You are informed that the purchase of whatever card you are told to buy is linked to the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System.

What to Do: Hang up and wait for a letter from the IRS notifying you of the situation, or call the IRS directly to inquire about any taxes you may owe.

The Grandparent Scam

Here’s one that doesn’t prey on the attention deficit disorder called daily life, but rather, it plays on the heartstrings. This scam relies on the sharing of information on social media, and the universal inability among some people to recognize a relative’s voice.

How It Works: A targeted grandparent gets a call asking for emergency funds, either directly from the grandchild who is actually a scammer armed with family names gleaned from your social media account — or someone representing them (a lawyer, bail bondsman, police officer). The story is good. All scammers are good storytellers. The ask is doable. They need money wired now.

What to Do: Never wire money unless you are absolutely certain where and to whom it’s going. If possible, double check a request with another relative. If you’re told secrecy is necessary (because a parent or sibling will be mad), just say no. Bigger picture advice: Don’t overshare. Set your privacy as tight as it will go, and don’t let people tag you in photos. And while it’s hard to sift through these days, get rid of any friends on social media who aren’t actually friends. Perhaps you should use this as an opportunity to prune a few friends too. You know, the ones that are always asking you for money.

The One-Ring Scam

This one is simple. Your phone rings once. That’s it. The scam relies on a couple things, though. First, there’s a curiosity factor. Second, there’s the very real possibility that most people have not memorized every area code used in the United States. But forget that, because caller ID can be be gamed with a spoofed phone number. Here’s what you need to know: Your phone rang once.

How It Works: You call back the number, and you’re automatically charged for a service that you didn’t want, or money is otherwise sucked out of your phone account to appear at the end of the billing cycle.

What to Do: If your phone rings once, assume the conversation that didn’t happen wasn’t worth happening. Wait for whomever called to leave a message, and never (ever) return fire.

There are more scams happening all the time, and no way to chronicle every one of them. But the baseline behavior of pausing and thinking for a moment, “Could this be a scam?” is your best protection to keep fraudsters at bay.

Image: Kerkez

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Phone Scams Reach Record 10.2 Billion. Here’s How to Protect Yourself

Phone scammers hit record breaking numbers this year, which is another reason to be aware of how to protect yourself from phone scams.

Does it feel like you’ve had more than your fair share of robocalls this year? If so, you’re not alone. Phone scammers were extra busy in 2016, making a record 10.2 billion robocalls to Americans, offering them everything from fake cruises and gift cards to opportunities to support bogus charities, according to a new report from Hiya, a company providing caller ID and call-blocker apps.

The same holds true for holiday scams, which saw an increase of more than 113% over last year, according to Hiya’s data.

“By taking advantage of the holiday ‘giving’ season, scam calls aimed at defrauding consumers are on the rise,” Jan Volzke, vice president of reputation data at Hiya, said in a prepared statement. “Whether preying on the spirit of gifting or the desire to get away after a rocky 2016, scammers are continuing to inundate the phone lines with fraud. We hope our data can educate consumers about these malicious and annoying calls so they can get back to enjoying their holiday season.”

These are the top phone scams for 2016, according to Hiya.

1. Telemarketer

Scammers are using telemarketing techniques to lure victims into giving out Social Security and credit card numbers, as well as bank account information.

2. Other Robocalls

Robocallers have been dodging regulations against their illegal activity by frequently changing or “spoofing” their caller ID so they appear to be calling from a local number.

3. Extortion/Kidnapping Scam

These scammers call random phone numbers and demand payment for the return of a “kidnapped” loved one.

4. IRS Scam

The caller pretends to be with the IRS and demands money for unpaid taxes or will trick the recipient into sharing private information. Remember, the IRS will never, ever call you about any taxes you owe.

5. Debt Collector

These scammers offer “solutions” to help victims pay off credit card and loan debt. Victims will give personal and financial information, enabling scammers to steal their identity and money.

6. Surveys

Scammers call victims offering prizes if they take a survey. However, before redeeming the prize, credit card information must be provided to cover “shipping and handling.”

7. Vacation Scams

Victims are notified that they have won a free vacation, but discover they have to pay a number of fees, provide a credit card number and are pressured to sign up for travel clubs to “earn” more trips.

8. Lucky Winner Scam

Scammers alert victims that they are the lucky winner of a contest or lottery. To redeem the prize, victims must provide personal and/or financial information.

9. Tech Support

Scammers pretend they are calling from a reputable tech agency (i.e. Microsoft or Dell) and claim that they have been notified of a virus on the victim’s computer. Scammers demand payment for services and third-party access to the computer to obtain private information.

10. Political Scams

During election season, scammers call victims requesting candidate donations, verifying voter registration, claiming they need to re-register to vote, or requesting that they take an election survey.

How to Help Avoid Being Scammed

To keep yourself safe from these and other scammers, the FBI recommends you exercise caution in how you respond to any call from someone you aren’t familiar with in order to help protect yourself from the damage of identity theft and fraud.

They urge you to:

Always be suspicious of unsolicited phone calls.

Never give money or personal information to someone with whom you don’t have ties and did not initiate contact.

Trust your instincts: If an unknown caller makes you uncomfortable or says things that don’t sound right, hang up.

If you think you or a loved one may have been a victim of a phone scam, it’s a good idea to check your financial accounts, credit reports and credit scores frequently for signs of fraud, like unauthorized transactions or unfamiliar entries. Be sure to immediately address these issues by notifying the authorities and even considering a credit freeze. Checking your bank activity for any problems is something you can do daily, but you can also get two free credit scores on Credit.com, updated every 14 days, to help you quickly spot some signs of identity theft, like that aforementioned sudden drop in scores. You can also get your free annual credit reports from AnnualCreditReport.com.

Image: ti-ja

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