FHA Mortgage Insurance: Explained

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Mortgages with the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) can be especially attractive to credit-challenged first-time homebuyers. Not only can your down payment be as little as 3.5 percent, but FHA loans also have more lenient credit requirements. Indeed, you can qualify for maximum funding and that low percentage rate with a minimum credit score of 580.

On the negative side, the generous qualifying requirements increase the risk to a lender. That’s where mortgage insurance comes into play.

FHA mortgage insurance (MIP) backs up lenders if you default. It’s the price you pay for getting a mortgage with easier underwriting standards. If you put down 10 percent or more, you’ll pay MIP for 11 years. If you put down less than 10 percent, you’ll pay for MIP for the life of the loan. But there are ways you can get MIP removed or canceled, which we’ll also explain in a bit.

MIP can be bit confusing, so we’ll break down exactly how it works and how much it can add to the cost of a mortgage loan in this post.

Upfront and ongoing MIP: Explained

All FHA borrowers have to pay for mortgage insurance.

MIP is paid upfront, when you close your mortgage loan, as well as through an annual payment that is divided into monthly installments. Not all homebuyers have to pay MIP forever, and we’ll get into those specifics, so hang tight.

When you make your upfront MIP payment, the lender will put those funds into an escrow account and keep them there. If you default, those funds will be used to pay off the lender. As for your ongoing MIP payments, they get tacked onto your monthly mortgage loan payment.

How long you have to pay MIP as part of your mortgage payments can vary based on when the loan was closed, your loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, and the size of your down payment. Your LTV is simply how much your loan balance is, versus the value of your home, which our parent company LendingTree explains in this post.

Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP)

UFMIP is required to be paid upon closing. It can be paid entirely with cash or rolled into the total amount of the loan. The lender will send the fee to the FHA. The current upfront premium is 1.75 percent of the base loan amount. So, if you borrow a FHA loan valued at $200,000, your upfront mortgage insurance payment would be $3,500 due at closing.

UFMIP is required to be paid by the FHA lender within 10 days of closing. The payment is included in your closing costs or rolled into the loan. A one-time late charge of 4 percent will be levied on all premiums that aren’t paid by lenders within 10 days beyond closing. The lender (not the borrower) must pay the late fee before FHA will endorse the mortgage for insurance.

With ongoing premiums, your lender will collect your MIP and send it to HUD. The lender, not you, be penalized for any late MIP payments.

Annual MIP payments are calculated by loan amount, LTV, and term. To help estimate your cost, the FHA has a great What’s My Payment tool.

Here’s an example of monthly charges based on a $300,000, 30-year loan at 4 percent interest, with a 3.5 percent down payment and an FHA MIP of 0.85 percent. (This does not include any money escrowed for taxes and insurance):

  • Principal and interest: $1,406.30
  • Down payment: $10,500
  • Upfront MIP at 1.75 percent: $5,066
  • Monthly FHA MIP at 0.85 percent: $203.42
  • Total monthly payment = $1,609.72

Penalties and interest charges for late monthly payments are similar to those levied on the UFMIP.

Base Loan Amount

LTV

Annual MIP

Less than or equal to $625,500

≤ 90.00%

0.80%

> 90.00% but
≤ 95.00%

0.80%

> 95.00%

0.85%

Greater than $625,500

≤ 90.00%

1.00%

> 90.00% but
≤ 95.00%

1.00%

> 95.00%

1.00%

Source: HUD

Base Loan Amount

LTV

Annual MIP

Less than or equal to $625,500

≤ 90.00%

0.45%

> 90.00% but
≤ 95.00%

0.70%

Greater than $625,500

> 90.00% but
≤ 95.00%

0.45%

> 95.00%

0.70%

> 90.00%

0.95%

Source: HUD

How long does MIP last?

The length on MIP requirements also depends on when you closed the loan and the size of your down payment. The rules changed dramatically in July 3, 2013. Until then, you could cancel your MIP after your LTV ratio dropped to 78 percent. Under the new rules, the MIP on loans closed after June 3, 2013, will last either the life of the loan or for 11 years, based on the amount of the down payment.

For loans that were closed before June 3, 2013, you can still request that MIP be dropped after your LTV ratio drops to 78 percent — after five years of payments without delinquencies.

Here’s the breakdown:

Loan Term

Original Down Payment

MIP Duration

20, 25, 30 years

Less than 10%

Life of loan

20, 25, 30 years

More than 10%

11 years

15 years or less

Less than 10%

Life of loan

15 years or less

More than 10%

11 years

Source: FHA

 

Loan Term

Original Down Payment

MIP Duration

20, 25, 30 years

Less than 10%

78% LTV based on original purchase price
(5 years minimum)

20, 25, 30 years

10-22%

78% LTV based on original purchase price
(5 years minimum)

20, 25, 30 years

More than 22%

5 years

15 years

Less than 10%

78% LTV

15 years

10-22%

78% LTV

15 years

More than 22%

No MIP

Source: FHA

How to Eliminate MIP

NOTE: About endorsements

According to the MIP Refund Center, the HUD endorsement on FHA loan is the date your MIP is approved. When you pay your upfront MIP with the lender, the loan is closed.The clock starts ticking on your MIP on the endorsement date.

More on MIP cancellation:

Most of today’s FHA borrowers will have but a few options to end their insurance payments. If you’re hoping to get out of paying FHA mortgage insurance, you’re going to either have to pay off the loan or do some refinancing. The FHA policy allowing borrowers to cancel annual MIP after paying for five years and reaching 78 percent LTV was rescinded with the new regulations in 2013 requiring payments for the life of the loan.

The good news about the FHA policy is that you can retire your loan earlier by making additional payments. If you closed your loan after June 2013, you can cancel MIP by refinancing into a conventional loan once you have an LTV of at least 80 percent.

Here are two strategies to get your MIP canceled:

Replace/refinance with a Streamline FHA Mortgage

If you have a current FHA mortgage and have no late payments, you may qualify for a Streamline FHA mortgage to refinance your existing loan with a better rate. You’ll still need to pay MIP but the savings generated by the lower interest rate can offset your insurance costs.

Replace/refinance, with conventional PMI

Want to switch to conventional refinancing? Credit requirements are tougher and interest rates may be higher on conventional PMI. The minimum qualifying credit score for conventional fixed-rate loans is 620.

PMI is similar to MIP in that both protect the lender’s investment. The MIP is determined by the LTV and term. The PMI is calculated on the size of your down payment.

A minimum of 5 percent down is required and the PMI can be paid in a lump sum or monthly installments — not both. If you put down 20 percent or more, the requirement for PMI on conventional financing can be waived. In conventional refinancing, you may be required to have an appraisal to determine property value. This is essential since the PMI insurance requirement on conventional loans ends once the borrower’s LTV drops to 78 percent. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says that the lender is required to cancel PMI once your payments reach the “midpoint of your loan’s amortization schedule” — no matter the LTV. That’s if you’re current on your payments.

A good way to determine the value of refinancing is to complete an analysis through LendingTree’s Refinance Calculator.

LEARN MORE:

FHA announcements and changes

HUD announces changes in MIP requirements from time to time in reaction to risks such as foreclosures, deficits in the Mortgage Insurance Fund or downturns in FHA lending.

For example, in January 2015, HUD reduced the annual MIP insurance rate by 50 basis points. Another announcement was released this year after President Trump took office when HUD canceled a plan to lower MIP premiums proposed by the Obama administration. According to the National Association of Realtors, the cancellation of lower rates means “roughly 750,000 to 850,000 homebuyers will face higher costs, and 30,000 to 40,000 new homebuyers will be left on the sidelines in 2017 without the cut.”

Consumers should check with lenders or with HUD to stay up to speed on changes that could affect their mortgage.

Am I eligible for a HUD refund?

If you acquired your loan prior to Sept. 1, 1983, you may be eligible for a refund on a portion of your UFMIP. Or, if you refinance your home with another FHA loan, the insurance refund is applied to your new loan.

HUD rules specify how long you have to refinance before you lose your refund:

  • For any FHA-insured loans with a closing date prior to Jan. 1, 2001, and endorsed before Dec. 8, 2004, no refund is due the homeowner after the end of the seventh year of insurance.
  • For any FHA-insured loans closed on or after Jan. 1, 2001 and endorsed before Dec. 8, 2004, no refund is due the homeowner after the fifth year of insurance.
  • For FHA-insured loans endorsed on or after Dec. 8, 2004, no refund is due the homeowner unless he or she refinanced to a new FHA-insured loan, and no refund is due these homeowners after the third year of insurance.

The refund process goes into motion when the mortgage company reports the termination of your insurance on the loan to HUD. You may receive additional paperwork from HUD or receive a refund directly in the mail. You can find out if you’re owed a refund by entering your information at the HUD refund site. If you’re on the list, call HUD to get the ball rolling at: 1-800-697-6967?.???

Final thoughts

If you’re trying to get into a home with less-than-optimal credit, an FHA-backed loan could be your best option. You’ll pay for the benefit of landing the mortgage through MIP over much of the loan’s lifetime, if not all of it. You may save money after you’ve built some equity (or improved your credit) by refinancing to a conventional mortgage that drops the mortgage insurance requirement after you reach the 78 percent LTV milestone.

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