10 States Facing the Most Foreclosures Right Now

foreclosure

This summer there’s some good news. June foreclosure activity has dropped to its lowest level since November 2015. In June 2017, there were a total of 73,828 U.S. properties with a foreclosure filing, down 22% from a year ago and even more from previous years.

This is all according to ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation’s largest multi-sourced property database, which released its Midyear 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, showing a total of 428,400 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings. This includes default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions that occurred in the first six months of 2017. Data has been collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, with those counties accounting for more than 90% of the U.S. population.

Although the study is full of foreclosures, they’ve become fairly rare in the housing market.

“With a few local market exceptions, foreclosures have become the unicorns of the housing market: hard to find but highly sought after,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions.

As homeowners stay on top of their mortgages and housing payments, fewer foreclosures have been occurring. (If you’ve been faced with foreclosure, you’ll likely see the damage to your credit score. Not sure? You can see two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com).

Here are the ten states with the highest foreclosure rates as of June 2017.

10. New Mexico

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 272 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 10.57%

Change from January to June 2015: Up 1.77%

9. Ohio

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 229 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 18.49%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 24.33%

8. South Carolina

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 221 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 15.05%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 14.31%

7. Florida

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 217 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 33.60%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 56%

6. Nevada

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 215 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 30.59%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 40.45%

5. Connecticut

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 200 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Up 3.19%

Change from January to June 2015: Up 44.75%

4. Illinois

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 183 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 10.19%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 25.78%

3. Maryland

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 161 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 30.62%

Change from January to June 2015: Down 31.55%

2. Delaware

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 137 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Down 6.48%

Change from January to June 2015: Up 20.42%

1. New Jersey

June 2017 Foreclosure Rate: 1 in every 101 housing units

Change from January to June 2016: Up 1.8%

Change from January to June 2015: Up 8.53%

Image: fstop123

The post 10 States Facing the Most Foreclosures Right Now appeared first on Credit.com.

7 Reasons Your Mortgage Application Was Denied

There are few things more nerve-racking for homebuyers than waiting to find out if they were approved for a mortgage loan.

Nearly 627,000 mortgage applications were denied in 2015, according to the latest data from the Federal Reserve, down slightly (-1.1%) year over year. If your mortgage application was denied, you may be naturally curious as to why you failed to pass muster with your lender.

There are many reasons you could have been denied, even if you’re extremely wealthy or have a perfect 850 credit score. We spoke with several mortgage experts to find out where prospective homebuyers are tripping up in the mortgage process.

Here are seven reasons your mortgage application could be denied:

You recently opened a new credit card or personal loan

Taking on new debts prior to beginning the mortgage application process is a “big no-no,” says Denver, Colo.-based loan officer Jason Kauffman. That includes every type of debt — from credit cards and personal loans to buying a car or financing furniture for your new digs.

That’s because lenders will have to factor any new debt into your debt-to-income ratio.

Your debt-to-income ratio is fairly simple to calculate: Add up all your monthly debt payments and divide that number by your monthly gross income.

A good rule of thumb is to avoid opening or applying for any new debts during the six months prior to applying for your mortgage loan, according to Larry Bettag, attorney and vice president of Cherry Creek Mortgage in Saint Charles, Ill.

For a conventional mortgage loan, lenders like to see a debt-to-income ratio below 40%. And if you’re toeing the line of 40% already, any new debts can easily nudge you over.

Rick Herrick, a loan officer at Bedford, N.H.-based Loan Originator told MagnifyMoney about a time a client opened up a Best Buy credit card in order to save 10% on his purchase just before closing on a new home. Before they were able to close his loan, they had to get a statement from Best Buy showing what his payments would be, and the store refused to do so until the first billing cycle was complete.

“Just avoid it all by not opening a new line of credit. If you do, your second call needs to be to your loan officer,” says Herrick. “Talk to your loan officer if you’re having your credit pulled for any reason whatsoever.”

Your job status has changed

Most lenders prefer to see two consistent years of employment, according to Kauffman. So if you recently lost your job or started a new job for any reason during the loan process, it could hurt your chances of approval.

Changing employment during the process can be a deal killer, but Herrick says it may not be as big a deal if there is very high demand for your job in the area and you are highly likely to keep your new job or get a new one quickly. For example, if you’re an educator buying a home in an area with a shortage of educators or a brain surgeon buying a home just about anywhere, you should be OK if you’re just starting a new job.

If you have a less-portable profession and get a new job, you may need to have your new employer verify your employment with an offer letter and submit pay stubs to requalify for approval. Even then, some employers may not agree to or be able to verify your employment. Furthermore, if your salary includes bonuses, many employers won’t guarantee them.

Bettag says one of his clients found out he lost his job the day before they were due to close, when Bettag called his employer for one last check of his employment status. “He was in tears. He found out at 10 a.m. Friday, and we were supposed to close on Saturday.”

You’ve been missing debt payments

During the loan process, any recent negative activity on your credit report, which goes back seven years, can raise concerns. The real danger zone is any activity reported within the last two years, says Bettag, which is the time period lenders play closest attention to.

That’s why he encourages loan applicants to make sure their credit reports are accurate and that old items that should have fallen off your report after seven years aren’t still appearing.

“Many things show on credit reports beyond seven years. That’s a huge issue, so we want to get dated items removed at the bureau level,” Bettag says.

For first-time homebuyers, he cautions against making any late payments six months prior to applying for a mortgage. They won’t always be a total deal-breaker, but they can obviously ding your credit, and a lower credit score can lead to a loan denial or a more expensive mortgage rate.

Existing homeowners, Bettag says, shouldn’t have any late mortgage payments in the 12 months prior to applying for a new mortgage or a refinance.

“There are workarounds, but it can be as laborious as brain surgery,” says Bettag.

You accepted a monetary gift

Your lender will be on the lookout for any out-of-place deposits to your bank accounts during the approval process. Bettag advises homebuyers not to accept any large monetary gifts at least two months or longer before you apply, and to keep a paper trail if the lender has any questions.

Any cash that can’t be traced back to a verifiable source, such as an annual bonus, or a gift from a family friend, could raise red flags.

This can be tricky for homebuyers who are relying on help from family to purchase their home. If you receive a gift of money for a down payment, it has to be deemed “acceptable” by your lender. The definition of acceptable depends on the type of mortgage loan that you are applying for and the laws that govern the process in your state.

For example, Bettag says, the Federal Housing Authority doesn’t care if a borrower’s entire down payment comes as a gift when they are applying for an FHA loan. However, the gifted funds may not be eligible to use as a down payment for a conventional loan through a bank.

You moved a large amount of money around

Ideally, avoid moving large sums of money about two months before applying.

Herrick says many borrowers make the mistake of shuffling too much cash around just before co-signing, making themselves look suspicious to bank regulators. Herrick says not to move anything more than $1,000 at a time, and none if you can help yourself.

For example, If you’re considering moving money from all of your savings accounts into one account to deliver the cashier’s check for the down payment, don’t do it. You don’t need to have everything in one account for the cashier’s check for your closing. You can submit multiple cashier’s checks. All the lender cares about is that all of the money adds up. You may be able to simply avoid some of this hassle by arranging to pay using a wire transfer. Just be sure to schedule it in time.

You overdrafted your checking account

If you have a credit issue already, says Bettag, overdrafting your checking account can be a deal-breaker, but it won’t cause as much of an issue if you have great credit and offer a good down payment. Still avoid overdrafting for at least two months prior to applying for the mortgage loan.

You may be the type to keep a low checking account balance in favor of saving more money. But if an unexpected bill could risk overdrafting your account, try keeping a few extra dollars in the account for padding, just in case.

You forgot to include debts or other information on your loan application

Your loan officer should carefully review your application to make sure it’s filled out completely and accurately. Missing a zero on your income, or accidentally skipping a section, for example, could mean rejection. A small mistake could mean losing your dream home.

There’s also the chance you accidentally omitted information the underwriter caught in the more extensive screening process, like money owed to the IRS. Disclose all of your debt to your loan officer up front. Otherwise, they may not be able to help you if the debt comes up and disqualifies you for your dream home later on.

If you owe the IRS money and are in a payment plan, Bettag says your loan officer can still work with you. However, they want to see that you’ve been in a plan for at least three months and made on-time payments to move forward.

“Can you imagine not paying your IRS debt, getting into a payment plan, and then not paying on the agreed plan? Not cool for lenders to see, but we do,” says Bettag.

The Bottom Line

There is no hard and fast rule on how long before you begin the mortgage process that you should heed these warnings. It all varies, according to Bettag. If you have excellent credit and a strong income, you might be able to get away with a recently opened credit card or other discrepancies — minor faults that might totally derail the application of a person who has bad credit and inconsistent income.

Whatever the case may be, Bettag encourages prospective homebuyers to stick to one general rule: “Don’t do anything until you’ve consulted with your loan officer.”

The post 7 Reasons Your Mortgage Application Was Denied appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

25 Places to Buy a Vacation Home on a Budget

A summer vacation home might just fit into your budget if you choose the right location.

If you’re dreaming of a vacation home but also have a budget to manage, there’s some great news for you. Throughout the U.S., there are plenty of places where a vacation home can be accessible and budget friendly. If you can afford it, these locations are definitely worth looking into for a summer vacation home. Remember, when buying any house your credit plays a huge role. Check your credit score for free on Credit.com.

Daren Blomquist, senior vice president of ATTOM Data Solutions, leading provider for real estate data, calculated the best places to buy a vacation home for 2017. Variables include median sales prices, crime, five-year home appreciation, average summer temperature and the percentage of good air quality days. Here are some of the best and most affordable areas to buy summer vacation homes.

Best Places to Buy a Summer Vacation Home

25. Venice, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $225,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 67%

24. Sun City Center, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $154,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 86%

23. Santa Rosa Beach, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $450,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 76%

22. Kissimmee, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $174,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 87%

21. North Fort Myers, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $180,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 93%

20. Sun City, Arizona

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $151,425

5-Year Home Appreciation: 81%

19. Palm Coast, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $178,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 59%

18. Lake Placid, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $125,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 56%

17. Jackson, Georgia

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $120,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 56%

16. Green Valley, Arizona

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $149,900

5-Year Home Appreciation: 20%

15. Medford, Oregon

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $238,450

5-Year Home Appreciation: 62%

14. Berlin, Maryland

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $206,600

5-Year Home Appreciation: 9%

13. North Port, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $175,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 90%

12. Fort Pierce, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $144,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 100%

11. Satellite Beach, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $253,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 49%

10. Cape Coral, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $205,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 82%

9. Beverly Hills, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $80,900

5-Year Home Appreciation: 50%

8. Ocean City, Maryland

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $230,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 0%

7. Delray Beach, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $175,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 123%

6. Deerfield Beach, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $140,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 109%

5. Weaverville, North Carolina

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $265,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 33%

4. Asheville, North Carolina

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $259,500

5-Year Home Appreciation: 40%

3. Port Charlotte, Florida

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $150,500

5-Year Home Appreciation: 115%

2. Waynesville, North Carolina

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $195,000

5-Year Home Appreciation: 30%

1. Crossville, Tennessee

YTD 2017 Median Sale Prices: $87,500

5-Year Home Appreciation: 34%

Image: stellalevi

The post 25 Places to Buy a Vacation Home on a Budget appeared first on Credit.com.

More Rich People Are Choosing to Rent Than Ever Before — Here’s Why

Renting a home or condo has become a status symbol for some wealthy Americans.

Karen Rodriguez, an Atlanta, Ga., real estate agent, says people frequently contact her who are interested in condos renting for $10,000 to $15,000 a month in properties such as the Ritz-Carlton Residences, which have floors of condos above upscale hotel rooms.

“I do see a lot of high-net-worth renters,” says Rodriguez, with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Georgia Properties. “They have the disposable income to pay top dollar.”

Renter households increased by 9 million during 2005-2015, reaching nearly 43 million in 2015, according to the State of the Nation’s Housing report, an annual study by Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies that analyzes U.S. Census Bureau data. Of those, 1.6 million renter households earn $100,000 or more, representing 11% of all renters.

“Indeed, renter households earning $100,000 or more have been the fastest-growing segment over the past three years,” the report stated.

Here are four reasons why high earners are choosing to rent.

They’re frustrated with market trends.

stock market numbers and graph

Rob Austin, a biotech account manager in the Los Angeles area with a household income of over $350,000, rents a 1,700-square-foot townhome with his wife and two children.

In the last 10 years, 1.2 million households that earn $150,000 became renters, up from 551,000 in 2005. Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, RentCafe.com reported in late 2016 that “wealthy households” that earn more than $150,000 annually increased by 217%, compared to an 82% rise in homeowners in the same income bracket.

The $150,000-and-up dollar amount served as the benchmark for “wealthy” renters because that’s the top of the bracket used in the American Community Survey to identify renters and homeowners.

Even when they had their second child in 2016, Austin says they were more steadfast to keep renting the two-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath townhome instead of buying. Prices are increasing so much that they’re “priced beyond perfection,” he says.

“It’s gotten worse,” he says. “Everything is mispriced at this point.”z

They want the next best thing.

Some buyers’ mindset is, “I don’t love it, so I’m just going to go rent a house,” says Atlanta, Ga., real estate agent Ben Hirsh.

Some may be bored with what’s on the market and are holding out for a home or condo with even more extravagant features or amenities. “They’re not happy with what’s out there,” says Rodriguez, also founder of Group Kora Real Estate Group, which sells new and luxury condos.

If they’re in a location or price range that’s hot, they could get more for their home if they sell now. Some wealthy homeowners take advantage of the resale market by going ahead and selling a home or condo and biding their time while renting. For example, if they’re sold on news about ultraluxe condos that have been announced, but are not under construction, they don’t mind renting in the interim.

“People think there’s more coming,” Rodriguez says.

Some clients have so much wealth that they’re willing to pay for the entire year up front for an unfurnished condo, she adds. Investors also have noticed the market trends and are buying condos for $1 million to $2 million with the intention to rent them out.

They don’t want a long-term commitment.

retirement retire millionaire happy couple on the beach

Some wealthy homeowners are ready to sell their million-dollar estates for a lock-it-and-leave-it lifestyle, but aren’t sold on townhome or condo living.

Instead, they’re willing to spend what can amount to the down payment on a starter home for monthly rent to experience the luxury condo lifestyle with privacy and ritzy amenities, like 24/7 room service and spa access.

“They want to test out a high-rise,” Rodriguez says. “They are people who definitely can afford to buy.”

A 2016 report by the National Association of Realtors identified the top 10 markets in the U.S. with the highest share of renters qualified to buy. The study analyzed household income, areas with job growth above the national average, and qualifying income levels (a 3% down payment in each metro area’s median home price in 2015) in about 100 of the largest U.S. metro areas. The markets that are above the national level (28%) were:

  • Toledo, Ohio (46%)
  • Little Rock, Ark. (46%)
  • Dayton, Ohio (44%)
  • Lakeland, Fla. (41%)
  • St. Louis, Mo. (41%)
  • Columbia, S.C. (41%)
  • Atlanta, Ga. (40%)
  • Columbus, Ohio (38%)
  • Tampa, Fla. (38%)
  • Ogden, Utah (38%)

The short-term mentality also may be the nature of the industry that brings people to a city. Some prospective renters whom Rodriguez meets are planning to live in Georgia for a couple of years because of work, such as jobs in the growing entertainment sector. Films such as the “Avengers” and TV shows such as “The Walking Dead” shoot in metro Atlanta.

They don’t want to live out of a suitcase in a hotel and have the income to afford high-priced rentals, joining political figures and international executives who also are among those making the same choice, Rodriguez says.

They want cash in the bank.

Townhomes sell for about $800,000 in Austin’s neighborhood in California. To make a 20% down payment, he’d have to shell out $160,000 up front.

“Why would I want to tie up $160,000 in cash in an asset that most likely is not going to go up a lot more — and more than likely has topped and has nowhere to go but down in the next cycle?” Austin asks.

Austin says he’s not wavering from his decision, although he’s “taking heat” from friends since he has the income to purchase a home.

“We’re bucking the trend by saying, ‘No thanks, we don’t want to play (the real estate market),’” he says. “We’ll just wait.”

The post More Rich People Are Choosing to Rent Than Ever Before — Here’s Why appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

This Family Spent $6,000 to Save Their Home and Still Wound Up Facing Foreclosure

Lageshia Moore of Far Rockaway, N.Y. says her family spent $6,000 in hopes it would save them from foreclosure. “Some people might say, ‘OK, just get a new house.’ But it wasn’t that simple,” says Moore.

When Lageshia Moore and her husband found their home in 2006, they thought it would be a perfect place to raise their family. The $549,000 Far Rockaway, N.Y., duplex even had future income potential if they could find a reliable tenant and rent out one half of the house.

In order to purchase the property and avoid primary mortgage insurance, the couple took out two mortgages to cover the costs.

Like millions of Americans who purchased homes at the peak of the housing bubble, their timing could not have been worse. Moore, a teacher, left her job in 2007. It soon became impossible to meet their $4,000 total monthly mortgage payments. By the summer of 2008, they were deep in default, and the recession sent their home value plummeting.

They were officially underwater on their house, and the family was living solely on Moore’s husband’s income as a driver. Eventually, they were notified that their lenders had begun the foreclosure process.

“Some people might say, ‘OK, just get a new house.’ But it wasn’t that simple,” Moore said. “This was the house where we were raising our family. My husband is very proud and homeownership means a lot to him — so we weren’t going to just let it go.”

Instead, Moore and her husband did what many families facing foreclosure do: They began looking desperately for “foreclosure relief” companies, law firms, and groups who promised help. A nonprofit connected them to a court-appointed attorney, but it didn’t stop the foreclosure process. So they turned to companies that advertised foreclosure relief on radio stations and online.

Over the course of six years, the family handed over thousands to a handful of relief groups they thought could stop the foreclosure. “We were desperate, and we thought, ‘OK, we’ll hand over this money to someone and they’ll just fix it,’” Moore said.

One of those foreclosure relief companies was Florida-based Homeowners Helpline, LLC. In 2015 the family gave the company a total of $6,000: an initial $2,000 down payment, and then $1,000 in four monthly installments. By that time Moore had found a new job, but the family hadn’t paid the full mortgage amount in years.

Moore shared the contract with MagnifyMoney, in which Homeowners Helpline says it will “perform a mortgage loan review and audit,” including actions like sending a cease-and-desist letter and a “Qualified Written Request” for information about the account to the family’s lenders.

Here’s what Moore says happened: Homeowners Helpline connected her family with a New York City lawyer who “kept asking for endless paperwork, month after month after month,” and who eventually stopped answering their calls, she claims. They finally got in touch with him just before the house was set to go up for auction, she said, and he told them the efforts to stop the auction had failed.

“We were horrified,” Moore said.

Homeowners Helpline told MagnifyMoney a different story. Sharon Valentine, a processor at Homeowners Helpline who worked on Moore’s husband’s case, said the family was slow to hand over needed paperwork and “unrealistic about their expectations.”

Crucially, Valentine said, the family didn’t tell Homeowners Helpline the house was actively in foreclosure until they mentioned the auction. “And then it was like, ‘Wait, what?’” Valentine said. The company would have taken different actions had they known about the foreclosure proceedings, she added.

“We can’t help you effectively if you don’t give us all of the information and the paperwork,” Valentine said. “In general, some clients come in and they hear their friend was able to get a 2% [mortgage] rate or cut their payments in half, and it’s like, ‘Well, that’s a very different situation.’ We try to help educate, but sometimes you can’t change that expectation.”

The Best Help is Free

But there is a free resource to educate panicked homeowners about expectations and provide foreclosure assistance — as well as help them avoid scam companies that will steal their money. NeighborWorks America runs LoanScamAlert.org, which aims to be a one-stop shop for people with questions about or problems with their mortgages.

The Loan Modification Scam Alert Campaign launched in 2009, when Congress asked NeighborWorks America to educate and help homeowners. LoanScamAlert.org offers resources including information about how to spot and report scams, and lists of trusted authorities who can help. Its main goal: Drive people to call the Homeowner’s HOPE Hotline, at 888-995-HOPE (4673), which is staffed 24 hours a day by counselors who work at agencies approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

“We provide them with a single, trusted resource,” said Barbara Floyd Jones, senior manager of national homeownership programs at NeighborWorks America. “It gets confusing when you see companies with all of these similar names advertising on the radio or TV, and then you have to research them. We want to let people know they don’t have to pay a penny for assistance.”

Anyone — regardless of income or other factors — can contact the counselor network to receive free advice and help. Homeowners aren’t always aware of the myriad government-affiliated groups that can provide assistance, or of the federal and state programs created to speed loan refinances and modifications, Floyd Jones said.

“We can never promise that everyone will be able to save their home; there are a variety of circumstances,” Floyd Jones said. “But we can promise a trusted counselor will listen, take a look at your paperwork if you want, and tell you all of your options.”

In fact, if a homeowner grants permission, the counselor can contact the mortgage lender directly to discuss options to stop the foreclosure, modify the terms of the loan, or otherwise make a deal. If need be, homeowners will also be connected with vetted legal assistance — although Floyd Jones noted not every situation requires a lawyer.

True to LoanScamAlert.org’s name, the hotline counselors also take complaints about mortgage-related scams: third-party companies that take the money and run, or slip in paperwork that unwittingly gets homeowners to sign over the deed to the house.

The Federal Trade Commission received nearly 7,700 complaints about “Mortgage Foreclosure Relief and Debt Management” services in 2016 — down from almost 13,000 in 2014, but still a significant figure.

“Stopping phony mortgage relief operations continues to be a priority” for the FTC, said spokesman Frank Dorman.

Both the FTC and LoanScamAlert.org offer tips to avoid scams — and to make sure you’re taking advantage of all federal and state programs that could help.

Red Flags:

  • They ask you to pay before any services are rendered.
  • Pressure to pay a fee before action is taken, sign confusing paperwork, or hire a lawyer off the bat. As with any scam, fraudulent mortgage relief services rely on high pressure to push vulnerable homeowners into taking action. Companies shouldn’t ask for “processing fees” or “service fees” early in the process, Floyd Jones said, as early foreclosure-stoppage efforts don’t cost anything. Be wary of signing any document, as you could unwittingly surrender the home’s title or deed to a scammer.
  • They make promises they can’t keep.

    Promises or guarantees they’ll save your home from foreclosure — or even claims like “97% success rate!” No one can guarantee results.

  • They say they’re affiliated with the U.S. government.

    Companies that claim to have an affiliation with a government agency. Some scammers may claim to be associated with the government, charging fees to get you “qualified” for government mortgage modification programs like Hardest Hit Fund. You don’t have to pay for these government programs — and lenders, particularly big banks like Wells Fargo and Bank of America, may be able to offer you their own modification options directly.

  • They want you to send your mortgage payments to them.

    Companies that tell you to start paying your mortgage directly to them, rather than your lender. They may promise to pass the money along, but they could pocket it and disappear.

    Companies that ask you to pay them through unconventional methods: Western Union/wire transfers, prepaid Visa cards, etc., instead of a check. They’re trying to get your money in a way that’s hard to trace.

As for Lageshia Moore and her husband, the family ultimately filed for bankruptcy — a move that can stop the foreclosure process, but only temporarily — and are now working with a law firm on a loan modification she hopes will reduce their payments to a manageable monthly sum. In giving advice to others, she reiterates the simplest but most important tip: “Just do your research.”

“You’re panicked, but you have to do your due diligence,” she added. “Really sit down and weigh the pros and cons: foreclosure, short sale, etc. What does this process or contract really mean? It’s an emotional time, but you have to try to keep the emotion out of it. That’s what I would tell myself.”

What to Do if You’re Facing Foreclosure:

  • Call a HUD-certified counselor at 1-888-995-HOPE. You’ll get advice and help for free, and while counselors can’t ever promise to save a home, they’ll be happy to take a look at any paperwork or information about your case, contact your lender about options if you grant permission, and connect you with vetted legal assistance if need be.
  • If you’re not facing foreclosure yet, but you’re worried that you’re about to run into trouble, contact your mortgage lender’s loss litigation department. They may be willing to work with you. Your lender can also tell you whether you’ll qualify for government programs.
  • Overall, don’t let desperation stop you from taking the time to research any potential actions, including signing on with a relief company. Explore the company’s background and track record. Check online for reviews from other homeowners — and be sure to look up phone numbers too. Many scam companies simply shut down, reopen under a new name, and retain the same phone number.

The post This Family Spent $6,000 to Save Their Home and Still Wound Up Facing Foreclosure appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

15 ZIP Codes With the Most Underwater Properties

Mortgage debt is a desperate struggle in many areas of the country. See where underwater homes are most prevalent.

Nearly a tenth of homes with a mortgage in the United States were considered “seriously underwater” at the end of the first quarter of 2017, according to statistics from ATTOM Data Solutions.

These homes — all 5.5 million of them — are not physically flooded, though the situation is nearly as alarming: A property is seriously underwater if the amount owed on the loan secured against it is at least 25% higher than the value of the property.

The good news is that the number of seriously underwater homes is down from the same time in 2016, but up slightly from the fourth quarter.

Where Are the Trouble Spots?

“While negative equity continued to trend steadily downward in the first quarter, it remains stubbornly high in often-overlooked pockets of the housing market,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions.

These pockets exist in several Rust Belt cities, Las Vegas and central Florida, Blomquist said. And nearly a third of all homes nationwide valued at less than $100,000 are seriously underwater.

Using ATTOM data, we’ve compiled the ZIP codes where at least 65% of the properties are seriously underwater. They represent the worst areas in the country.

Remember, if you’re in the market for a new home, a good credit score can help prospective homeowners secure lower interest rates on their mortgages. You can check two of your scores free on Credit.com.

15. Chicago ZIP Code 60636
Properties with loans: 7,875
Properties seriously underwater: 65.6%

14. Detroit ZIP Code 48227
Properties with loans: 7,825
Properties seriously underwater: 65.8%

13. North Chicago ZIP Code 60064
Properties with loans: 2,856
Properties seriously underwater: 65.9%

12. Milwaukee ZIP Code 53206
Properties with loans: 3,189
Properties seriously underwater: 66.2%

11. Detroit ZIP Code 48234
Properties with loans: 6,096
Properties seriously underwater: 66.6%

10. Maple Heights, Ohio ZIP Code 44137
Properties with loans: 7,694
Properties seriously underwater: 66.8%

9. Detroit ZIP Code 48205
Properties with loans: 7,574
Properties seriously underwater: 67%

8. Riverdale, Illinois ZIP Code 60827
Properties with loans: 5,391
Properties seriously underwater: 67.4%

7. Dolton, Illinois ZIP Code 60419
Properties with loans: 6,673
Properties seriously underwater: 68.2%

6. Detroit ZIP Code 48228
Properties with loans: 9,993
Properties seriously underwater: 68.2%

5. Detroit ZIP Code 48224
Properties with loans: 8,974
Properties seriously underwater: 69.4%

4. Las Vegas ZIP Code 89109
Properties with loans: 6,327
Properties seriously underwater: 69.9%

3. Detroit ZIP Code 48235
Properties with loans: 9,629
Properties seriously underwater: 70%

2. St. Louis ZIP Code 63137
Properties with loans: 5,954
Properties seriously underwater: 70.6%

1. Trenton, New Jersey ZIP Code 08611
Properties with loans: 4,426
Properties seriously underwater: 74.6%

Image: eclipse_images 

The post 15 ZIP Codes With the Most Underwater Properties appeared first on Credit.com.

Millennial Homebuyers Still Value a Personal Touch

Many millennials surprisingly opt for local, face-to-face interaction over online tools when buying homes.

All the hullabaloo about millennials coveting their social media accounts over face-to-face interactions holds untrue — at least when it comes to real estate, according to a recent survey conducted by the financial wellness community, CentSai. (Full Disclosure: I am the co-founder and president of CentSai.)

In fact, the 2,050 millennials surveyed are more traditional than previously believed when faced with buying a home. Three-quarters of respondents – age 18 to 34 – prefer to use a local real estate agent instead of an online one.

And 71% said they would choose a local lender instead of applying online.

This is in stark contrast to a 2015 Fannie Mae survey, which found 70% of homebuyers would like to obtain a mortgage online and 69% would like to complete a mortgage application online. (Your credit plays a key role in the terms and conditions of your mortgage. You can view two of your credit scores free on Credit.com to see where yours currently stands.)

Millennials Want Someone They Can Trust

Online mortgage lending and brokerage services are expected to transform home buying, but millennials surveyed said that – contrary to popular belief – they prefer local providers due to existing relationships and local knowledge.

“While sites like Zillow are perfect for looking online to size up the market, when it came to using a lender or actually buying a home, personal touch was essential,” said Keenan Spiegel, who bought his first home with his fiancée in Norwalk, Connecticut, last year.

Spiegel, a wealth management associate at Morgan Stanley and director of data visualization for CentSai, said he used a local real estate agent recommended by his family because he wanted to be sure he worked with someone he trusted.

And while getting approved for a mortgage online could have taken minutes, the couple preferred the experience of using a local, brick-and-mortar who was more hands-on and available when they called with an “endless” list of questions.

“We felt local lenders also know much more about the area they service and can provide a lot of information about the community where you’re about to buy a home,” Spiegel said. “We wanted to know about the quality of schools and the crime rates.”

Online Isn’t Everything Yet

Despite the purported savings and the ease of use, online providers may not yet be as big of a disruptor in the sector as one would expect.

That said, the vast majority of millennials surveyed (91%) said they would use an online site or mobile app to research neighborhoods and home prices and help identify the home that they may buy. But they cited various reasons for “going local” when it came to choosing their agent or lender – including personal touch and handholding, longstanding relationships and local knowledge.

A little more than half (56%) of the millennials surveyed plan to buy a home in the next two years, and for this group, online lenders likely need to provide an even more personalized experience to garner business.

The fear of missing out on valuable information that comes out of an in-person conversation still weighs on the millennial mind.

After all, buying a home is a major purchase, and despite all the bots and burgeoning artificial intelligence, the internet still has a way to go before it can mimic sitting across the table from a real estate agent.

Image: Steve Debenport

The post Millennial Homebuyers Still Value a Personal Touch appeared first on Credit.com.

2 Times an Adjustable-Rate Mortgage Makes Perfect Sense

The interest rate on your loans determines how expensive it is to borrow money. The higher the interest rate, the more expensive the loan.

With a conventional, 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, borrowers with the best credit can expect to receive a 4.23% interest rate on that loan. The average homebuyer borrows about $222,000 when they take out a mortgage, which means paying a staggering $168,690 in interest over the term of the loan.

When you need to repay balances in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, even half a point of interest can make a huge difference in how expensive your mortgage is. If you borrowed the same amount but had a rate of 4.73% rate, you’d pay $192,190 in interest — or almost $24,000 more for the same loan.

Given that interest rates make such a big impact on how much your mortgage costs, it makes sense to do what you can to get the lowest rate possible. And this is where adjustable-rate mortgages can start to look appealing. In two cases especially, it makes perfect sense to go with an ARM: when you plan to pay off your mortgage quickly, or you plan to move out of the home within a few years.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages Can Allow You to Borrow at Lower Rates

An adjustable-rate mortgage, also known as an ARM, is a home loan with a variable interest rate. That means the rate will change over the life of the loan.

ARMs are usually set up as 3/1, 5/1, 7/1, or 10/1. The first number indicates the length of the fixed rate period. If you look at a 3/1 ARM, the initial fixed rate period lasts 3 years. The second shows how often the interest rate will adjust after the initial period.

Some ARMs come with interest rate caps, meaning there’s a limit to how high the rate can adjust. And their initial rate is often much lower than traditional fixed-rate loans.

This can help you buy a home and start paying your mortgage at a lower monthly cost than you could manage with a fixed-rate mortgage. Borrowers with the best credit scores can access a 5/1 ARM with an interest rate of 3.24% right now.

The Risks ARMs Pose to Average Homebuyers

“The main advantage of an ARM is the low, initial interest rate,” explains Meg Bartelt, CFP, MSFP, and founder of Flow Financial Planning. “But the primary risk is that the interest rate can rise to an unknown amount after the initial, fixed period of just a few years expires.”

Homebuyers can enjoy extremely low interest rates for a month, a quarter, or 1, 5, 7, or 10 years, depending on the term of their adjustable-rate mortgage. But borrowers have no control over the interest rate after that.

The rate can rise to levels that make your mortgage unaffordable. Remember our earlier example, where just half a point of interest could mean making the entire mortgage $24,000 more expensive?

ARMs adjust their rates periodically, and the new rate is partly determined by a broad measure of interest rates known as an index. When the index rises, so does your own interest rate — and your monthly mortgage payment goes up with it.

The variable nature of the interest rate makes it difficult to plan ahead as your mortgage payment won’t be static or stable.

“Imagine at the end of year 5, rates start going up and your mortgage payment is suddenly much higher than it used to be,” says Mark Struthers, a CFA and CFP who runs Sona Financial. “What if your partner loses their job and you need both incomes to pay the mortgage?” he asks. In this situation, you could be stuck if you don’t have the credit score to refinance and get away from the higher rate, or the cash flow to handle the extra cost.

“Once you get in this spiral, it is tough to get out,” says Struthers. “The spiral just gets tighter.”

And yes, adjustable-rate mortgages can go down. While that’s possible, it’s more likely that the rate will rise. And some ARMs will limit how high and how low your rate can go.

Struthers puts it plainly: “ARMs are higher-risk loans. If you can handle the risk, you can benefit. If you can’t, it can crush you. Most people do not put themselves in a position to handle the risk.”

Who Can Make an ARM Work in Their Favor?

That doesn’t mean no one can benefit from adjustable-rate mortgages. They do come with the benefit of the lower initial interest rate. “If you plan to pay off the mortgage during that initial fixed period, you eliminate the risk [of getting stuck with a rising interest rate],” says Bartelt.

That’s exactly what she and her husband did when they bought their own home.

“In my situation, we had enough savings to buy our house with cash. But the cash was largely in investments, and selling all the investments would push our income into significantly higher tax brackets due to the gains, with all the cascading unpleasant tax effects,” Bartelt explains.

“By taking an ARM, we can spread the sale of those investments out over 5 years, minimizing the income increase in each year. That keeps our tax bracket lower,” she says. “We avoided increasing our marginal tax rate by double digits in the year of the purchase of our home.”

She notes that another benefit of taking the ARM in her situation was the fact that she and her husband could continue to pay the mortgage past that initial 5 years if they chose to do so. “The interest rate won’t be as favorable as if we’d initially locked in a fixed rate,” she admits. “But that option still exists, and having options is power.”

Planning for a Quick Sale? An ARM Might Work for You

Another way ARMs can provide benefits to homeowners? If you won’t live in the home for long. Buying the home and also selling it before the initial rate period expires could provide you with a way to access the lowest possible rate without having to deal with the eventual rise in mortgage payment when the rate increases.

“ARMs are typically best for those who are fairly certain they won’t be in the house for a long period of time,” says Cary Cates, CFP and founder of Cates Tax Advisory. “An example would be a person who has to move every two to four years for their job.”

He says you could view taking out an ARM as a way to pay “tax-deductible rent” if you already know you don’t want to stay in the house for more than a few years. “This is an aggressive strategy,” he explains, “but as long as the house appreciates enough in value to cover the initial costs of buying, then you could walk away only paying tax-deductible interest, which I am comparing to rent in this situation.”

Cates says you’re obviously not actually paying rent, but you can mentally frame your mortgage payment that way. But you need to know the risk is owing on your mortgage if you go to sell and the home hasn’t realized enough appreciation to cover what you spent to buy.
He also reminds potential homebuyers that you take on the risk of staying in the home longer than you expected to. You could end up dealing with the rising interest rate if you can’t sell or refinance.

What You Need to Know Before Taking an ARM

Before applying for an adjustable-rate mortgage, make sure you ask questions like:

  • What is the initial fixed-interest rate? How does that compare to another mortgage option, and is it worth taking on a riskier mortgage to get the initial fixed rate?
  • How long is the initial fixed rate period?
  • How often will the ARM adjust after the initial rate period?
  • Are there limits to how much your ARM’s rate can drop?
  • How high can the ARM’s rate go? How high can your monthly mortgage payment go?
  • If the mortgage’s interest hit the maximum rate, could you afford the monthly payment?
  • Do you have a plan for selling the home within the initial rate period if you want to sell before paying the adjusted rate?
  • Could you pay off the mortgage without selling if you did not want to pay the adjusted rate?

Do your due diligence and understand the risks and potential pitfalls before making a final decision. But depending on your specific situation, your finances, and your plans for the next 5 years, you could make an ARM work for you.

The post 2 Times an Adjustable-Rate Mortgage Makes Perfect Sense appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

When You Can’t Pay All Cash: Secrets for Winning a Bidding War in 2017

The housing market is competitive. These tips will help give you an edge.

Let’s face it. The 2017 housing market hasn’t been easy for the typical homebuyer. The number of homes for sale has fallen year-over-year for 17 months straight, and with historically low mortgage rates beginning an upward ascent, there’s more demand from homebuyers than we’ve seen in at least four years. The results are bidding wars and escalating home prices. In February, one in five homes that sold went for more than their list prices. That’s close to levels we saw in 2013 but the difference is that four years later buyers are savvier and understand the competitive conditions better. And the stakes are much higher now. Home prices have increased 30% since then.

If you’ve done any research on how to win a bidding war or if you’ve already been through one or more yourself, you know cash is king, and that waiving one or all of the several contingencies meant to protect the buyer is often what it takes to win, especially in hot markets like San Francisco, Seattle and Denver.

But that leaves typical, financed homebuyers who don’t have that kind of cash or aren’t up for the risk of waiving contingencies wondering if they even have a shot at winning a home in this market. It can be done, and and there are several strategies that can help you do it. Here are some tips from Redfin real estate agents who’ve helped homebuyers win bidding wars this year in competitive neighborhoods across the country.

1. Choose the Right Agent

Your agent’s toughest job in a competitive situation is to win the attention of the listing agent and sell you and your offer to them, so the relationships they have with other agents in the neighborhood can go a long way. When you’re evaluating agents, consider how they present themselves and if they’re the right person to represent you, build a case for you and fight on your behalf. Choose someone who is confident and aggressive, but who listens to you and can help you stay grounded in the heat of the moment. Most importantly, choose an agent who has a good track record. Find out how many bidding wars they’ve competed in this year and how many they’ve won. Remember that the market has been changing quickly, so what it takes to win a bidding war today could be drastically different from what it took even three or four months ago in the same hot neighborhood.

2. Get to Know the Seller & Offer Them Exactly What They Want 

When a seller has several above-asking offers to choose from, they’re often looking for one that stands out from the rest. Most buyers make their offer distinct with a written, personal letter to the seller describing themselves and what they love about the home. This is an important opportunity to connect with the seller on an emotional level and humanize the transaction. To find a way to tug at the seller’s heart strings, pay attention to cues when you’re walking through the house to find something you can relate to them about, like sports team memorabilia, artwork or kids’ activities. Don’t be afraid to dig for information on social media too. Find something you have in common or something specific they care about and build your letter around it. For tips and examples of how to write a great cover letter, read more here.

Personalize the offer terms to cater to the particular seller. An easy way to do this is for your agent to simply ask the listing agent what the seller’s preferred close date is and whether they prefer that the buyer use a certain lender or title company and write those terms into the contract. Most sellers are buyers too, and they might need extra time to find their next home, so consider offering them a rentback or leaseback agreement, in which they can stay in the home and rent from the buyer after closing. To sweeten the deal, let them stay on for free for a period of time. Beyond typical offer terms, find out if there’s anything else the seller wants or needs — and we mean ANYTHING. Agents said they’ve seen buyers win competitive bidding wars by offering to adopt the sellers’ dog, by agreeing to keep the chickens in the backyard and by offering them a free vacation.

3. Make Your Offer as Close to Cash & as Close to Non-Contingent as Possible

Even if you can’t offer cash and you don’t want to give up your standard protections, there are ways to make your offer nearly as appealing to the seller. Here are some tools to consider:

  • Pre-inspection: Conduct the inspection before submitting the offer so that you know exactly what you’re buying and can waive the inspection contingency without waiving your right to an inspection.
  • Large earnest money deposit: The earnest money deposit is typically 1% to 3% of the offer price, but consider making yours significantly larger if you can. This shows the seller that you’re serious about this home and have the funds needed to close.
  • Non-refundable deposit: Redfin agents have seen buyers offer an additional deposit with the guarantee that if the deal doesn’t close, the sellers can keep the cash.
  • Fully underwritten pre-approval: Have your lender go beyond the standard pre-approval letter and fully underwrite the loan in advance. This ensures the seller that the financing will be approved by the lender and helps many buyers feel comfortable waiving the financing contingency. Not all lenders can or will do this, so it’s an important question to ask when choosing a lender.
  • Shortened contingency periods: If you aren’t able to waive contingencies, consider shortening the timelines associated with them. A three-day inspection contingency is much more appealing to a seller than a standard one that can last a full week or more.
  • Agree to make up for an appraisal deficiency: If you can’t waive the appraisal contingency, agree to cover part of the difference, up to a certain amount you can afford and are comfortable with, in the event the appraisal comes in low. Make sure your finances are in order before taking these steps. You can get a snapshot of your credit report, including two free credit scores, on Credit.com.

4. Have Your Agent Do an In-Person Escalation Clause

In many parts of the country, buyer’s agents write an escalation clause into the contract saying how far above the highest-priced offer the buyer is willing to go, up to a defined limit. In this in-person version, the agent uses the same technique but prints out several different versions of the first page of the offer with the different purchase prices on it depending on how high they need to go to beat the other offers in the room. Once a price is agreed to in real time, the agent can hand over a final and complete offer package. (Confused about any mortgage lingo? Here’s our handy glossary.)

5. Be Fast… or Last

In some markets and situations, being the first to submit an offer (especially if it’s at or above the asking price) can win you the deal. In others, especially if there’s an offer deadline, it pays to wait and find out what the seller is looking for and how many other bids you’re up against to help inform your strategy before submitting an offer. Either way, getting in to see a home right away gives you and your agent time to prepare the best offer possible.

6. If at First You Don’t Succeed, Get in the Backup Offer Position

About 17% of homes that go under contract end up coming back on the market. This presents an opportunity for buyers whose offers don’t get accepted in the first go round. Backup offers can be formally or informally accepted, which is usually up to the listing agent and the seller, but it’s worth it to ask for a formal backup offer contract. If the listing agent won’t accept a backup offer, make sure you’ll be alerted right away if it comes back on the market and can be first with a new offer. When it does, find out what killed the original deal and guarantee you’ll be easier to work with. For example, agree to use the original buyer’s inspection and if it was negotiations over a certain repair that caused the deal to fall apart, agree to cover the cost of that repair yourself.

If You Still Find Yourself Sitting on the Sidelines

With most homes in competitive markets igniting bidding wars, many times with dozens of bids, the odds may still mean that it could take several tries before getting an offer accepted. Here’s some advice agents offered for buyers frustrated after one or more failed attempts:

  • Find out exactly why your offer wasn’t chosen. If your agent didn’t tell you why you lost, ask her to be blunt about it. If she doesn’t know, it can’t hurt for her to follow up with the listing agent and find out.
  • Consider a fixer-upper or a home that has been on the market for a long time.
  • Consider a new construction home. While there may be campouts and lotteries for highly sought-after new construction homes, there typically aren’t full-on bidding wars because the price the builder is charging is set, and there’s rarely negotiating in a competitive market. So you just have to be first in the door and willing to pay full price.
  • Try house hunting and making offers during an off time like school vacation week or during a storm to avoid competition.

Want more homebuying tips? Here are 50 ways to help yourself get your dream house.

Image: marrio31

The post When You Can’t Pay All Cash: Secrets for Winning a Bidding War in 2017 appeared first on Credit.com.

The 13 Least Affordable Places to Buy a Home

If you're buying a house in these 13 counties, don't expect your paycheck to go very far.

Image: Portra 

The post The 13 Least Affordable Places to Buy a Home appeared first on Credit.com.