Student Debt Relief Could Be Coming to Thousands of Borrowers

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Tens of thousands of students struggling with insurmountable student loan debt are about to get a little breathing room.

The National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts, a creditor that holds billions in private student loans, reached a settlement Sept. 18 with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in which the trusts were ordered to refund at least $21.6 million toward refunds and penalty fees for affected borrowers.

As MagnifyMoney’s Kelly Clay reported in August, National Collegiate sued dozens of former students who had defaulted on their private student loans. But in court National Collegiate failed to prove they owned the loans. This happens often when loans are sold to another lender or otherwise handed to another account manager and paperwork gets lost. Ultimately, the courts dismissed the lawsuits, citing the fact that National Collegiate had no way of proving they owned the debts in the first place.

In the settlement with the CFPB, the trusts agreed to set aside $3.5 million for reimbursements to borrowers who had already made payments after being sued for loans unlawfully. If a student loan lender can’t prove it owns a debt — for example, if it lacks the proper documentation to prove ownership — it can’t legally collect on it. Likewise, if the statute of limitations has passed, the lender can continue to try to collect on the debt, but it can no longer take legal action against the borrower.

Although there are usually limited circumstances under which student loans are forgiven, this ruling may result in many borrowers eventually having their debts wiped out. The CFPB ordered National Collegiate to have each of its 800,000 loans reviewed by an independent auditor, and the trusts will not be allowed to go forward with collection actions on any loans that they can’t prove they own.

“The National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts and their debt collector sued consumers for student loans they couldn’t prove were owed and filed false and misleading affidavits in courts across the country,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said in a statement.

What does this mean for you?

If you borrowed educational funds from a private lender who sold your debt to the National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts, and you were sued between November 2012 and April 2016, it’s possible you’re due a refund. According to The New York Times, Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase are among the private lenders who sold private student loan debt to the trusts.

StudentDebtCrisis.org, a nonprofit dedicated to higher education funding reform, tweeted: “Thousands of Americans with student debt could see their loans cut under a @CFPB agreement with Wall Street trusts.”

If you’re owed restitution, the company will reach out to you. No action is required on your part. However, if you’d like to make a formal complaint, you can contact the CFPB.

What you can do if you’ve fallen behind on your loan

It can be tough to keep up with your student loan payments. If you’re behind, it doesn’t have to be the end of the world. It takes about nine months (270 days) of nonpayment for a federal student loan to go into default.

But many private student loans default when you are only 120 days late. Sometimes missing one or two payments can send you into default.

So make sure you carefully read your loan contract to better understand what constitutes a default and to know your rights, if you happen to default on your loan.

If you default, don’t panic. While it’s your responsibility to pay what you owe, you have rights, and it is against the law for the debt collector to harass you.

The student loan creditor must provide a written “validation notice” indicating how much you owe, the name of the creditor, what rights you have if you think you don’t owe the debt, and how to obtain information about the original creditor.

You may have options for setting up a repayment plan. Familiarize yourself with the terms of your loan and contact the CFPB if you have concerns about the practices of your lender.

‘I defaulted, and I’ve been sued. Now what?’

If you default on your loan and you’ve been sued, it can be stressful, but don’t give up. You’ve not automatically lost just because the creditor has taken legal action.

Here are four steps to take if you receive a summons.

Stick to the deadlines.

If you ignore the summons or don’t show up in court, this may result in a default judgment against you.

Verify your debt.

Is the amount correct? Is the debt valid? If there’s any discrepancy between what your records show and what the credit agency is alleging, you need to document that.

One way to do that is to send your lender or debt collector a debt verification letter. This is a formal way to ask them to verify the amount, that you are the owner of the debt, and that it’s valid. If they don’t respond to the letter within 30 to 60 days, they must cease attempting to collect the debt.

Know your rights.

Unlike federal student loans, private loans are bound to a statute of limitations. Once that statute of limitations has run out, the lender can no longer take legal action. But that doesn’t mean they’ll stop trying to collect on that debt. And that’s where you should be careful. If you pay even $1 toward an old debt after the statute of limitations is up, it automatically restarts the clock, and the lender can once again take legal action. Find out what the statute of limitations is in your state.

You have a legal right to tell debt collectors to stop contacting you entirely.

If all else fails, hire an attorney.

Hopefully you won’t need one, but every situation is different. If you don’t have the money to pay your student loans, chances are you don’t have the money to pay a lawyer.

But if you find yourself in a situation where you really need someone to simplify the complexity of your case and speak to a creditor on your behalf, you may consider consulting a student loan attorney. Private loans are subject to state law, and a licensed attorney may be the best person to help you navigate those waters. The CFPB has a tool that can help you find an affordable lawyer in your state.

The post Student Debt Relief Could Be Coming to Thousands of Borrowers appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Why You Should Start Paying Interest on Student Loans Immediately

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Whether you’re just starting college or are entering your senior year, chances are you’ve taken out student loans somewhere along the way. With many student loans, you aren’t required to make payments at all until about six months after you’re no longer enrolled in school full-time.

That’s a good thing, right? Well, maybe not.

In fact, making absolutely no payments on your student loans while you’re in school can mean that you graduate with a lot more debt than you expected. That’s because interest accrues on some of these loans while you’re still a student.

Did I lose you? Don’t worry. Here’s a quick primer on what all that means for you.

Understanding How Interest Works on Federal Student Loans

First, know that we’re mainly talking about federal student loans here. If you have private loans, they may work differently. Check your loan paperwork to find out.

When it comes to federal student loans, though, they fall into two main categories: subsidized and unsubsidized.

You have to meet certain income qualifications to get subsidized student loans. If you qualify, the government will pay the interest on these loans while you’re still enrolled in school. We’ll see in a moment why that’s advantageous.

On the flip side, the government does not pay interest on unsubsidized student loans while you’re in school, but you’re still not required to make payments.

On unsubsidized loans, interest is charged from the day the loan is issued. You can figure out this date from your loan paperwork. So if you have a loan with a 5% interest rate, that annual interest is charged starting on the issue date.

Most loan interest is compounded daily, meaning that the total interest rate is divided by the number of days in the year. Each day, the lender charges that amount of interest on the loan’s outstanding balance.

So if you don’t make any loan or interest payments while you’re in the grace period, your interest continues to accrue. The longer you go without making payments, the more interest will accumulate.

This, in and of itself, isn’t the end of the world. You can always catch up on interest payments once your grace period is over. However, capitalization can turn accrued interest into a huge problem.

At certain points in the life of your loan—like when your grace period ends or after you exit a period of deferment—any unpaid interest on the loan capitalizes. This means that the unpaid interest is added to the loan’s principal balance. Then your interest is calculated based on that new, higher balance. So not only do you have a higher balance to pay off, but your interest payments are higher each month, too.

Doing the Math

This is all kind of confusing, so let’s look at how the math breaks down.

Let’s say you take out a $10,000 unsubsidized federal student loan at 5% annual interest. You’ll pay 0.013699% interest daily. Doesn’t sound like much, but it comes out to about $1.37 each day. So over the course of a month, you’ll accrue roughly $42 in interest.

Again, that doesn’t sound like a lot of money, so what’s the big deal?

Well, play this out over the course of your college career. You take out this loan as a freshman, and you let interest accrue for your entire school career, including the six-month grace period after you graduate. Let’s say that totals 54 months.

In 54 months, your total interest accrued on the loan is around $2,268. If that interest capitalizes when your grace period ends, your principal balance is now $12,268. That means your daily interest is about $1.68, making your monthly interest about $51.

Again, it doesn’t seem like a huge amount of money. But multiplied by several years’ worth of student loans, it can really add up.

This is just a general example, though. You can use this calculator to determine just how accrued interest could affect your particular student loans.

Making Interest-Only Payments

Even if you can’t make full interest-only payments, paying what you can to reduce your loans’ capitalized interest is a smart idea. To figure out how to do this, just get in touch with your student loan servicer. Usually you can send in your payments online.

Since you’re not technically on the hook for paying off your loans, you don’t have to make payments every month. But if you come into some extra cash or get a paid internship, consider devoting some of your budget to paying off your student loan interest.

Student loans can be overwhelming, but paying off interest as you go is one way to pay less in the long run. If you have more questions on the best way to tackle your loans, check out these additional student loan resources for expert answers and guidance.

Image: Mixmike

The post Why You Should Start Paying Interest on Student Loans Immediately appeared first on Credit.com.

5 Things to Consider Before Paying Off Your Student Loan Debt

Credit cards are a super convenient financial tool, but they can often be confusing.

Paying off debt is often a top priority. Not only can too much debt hurt your credit score, it can impact your ability to achieve other important milestones in life, such as buying a home.

But when it comes to student loan debt, obsessing over repayment and devoting every spare penny to paying down balances can actually have negative consequences, particularly when you become so focused on repayment that you ignore all other elements of a sound personal financial plan.

“I’ve seen a number of individuals who have devoted unhealthy amounts of time and money towards paying down their student debt, people who are pinching every penny,” says Michael Lux, founder of The Student Loan Sherpa, a website focused on student loan education, strategy, and borrower advocacy. “You can’t just look at your student loan debt in isolation. You need to consider all of the things that paint the complete financial picture.”

As Lux indicated, there’s a variety of reasons why devoting too much of your hard-earned income to repaying student loans can be an unwise approach. Here are the top five.

1. It’s Not Sustainable in the Long Run

Denying yourself all of the day-to-day extras that you enjoy in order to pay off your student loan is not likely to work forever, says Lux.

“The key to success is making it sustainable for years,” he explains. “First, you have to know yourself. When you make a budget, you have to make a realistic budget. If you’re someone who loves the movies, you have to budget money to go to the movies.”

Another tactic that helps create a more balanced and manageable approach is to create milestone repayment goals for yourself and then reward yourself in small ways when attaining those goals, says Lux. For example, when a loan is half paid off, treat yourself to a fancy dinner. Or, when one loan is completely paid off, find another affordable and meaningful way to indulge in some positive reinforcement. 

2. Retirement Savings Should Also Be a Top Priority

Paying off student loan debt should not come at the expense of getting started on a retirement plan. But unfortunately for some, that’s exactly what’s happening.

“Many people put paying off student loans ahead of retirement saving,” says Ryan Farnung of New York–based GPS Financial. “So while they are saving some interest on student loans, and ultimately freeing up some monthly cash flow, they may also be . . . missing out on the potential to tap into the power of compounding interest.”

Carrying some student debt is all right, says Farnung, if it means using your money elsewhere in ways that will provide a greater long-term benefit.

3. Establishing an Emergency Fund Is Also an Important Part of a Healthy Financial Plan

A sound personal financial plan also includes establishing emergency savings accounts, ideally two separate accounts—one with six months of living expenses and a separate liquid emergency fund.

“Student loan rates are so low right now, under 4 or 4.5%,” says Oliver Lee, owner of Michigan-based The Strategic Planning Group. “So I always recommend my clients pay the very bare minimum. Then, create a six-month or one-year living expense shelter so if something goes wrong when you get out of school or you can’t find a job, you have the money you need. And once you have that, you also need a liquid emergency fund—in case the tires go bad on the car or the transmission goes. This account should have $1,000 to $3,000.”

Those who don’t have such emergency funds are likely to rack up costly credit card debt in order to pay for life’s unexpected expenses. And the interest on a credit card is almost always far more than the interest on a student loan.

“You could have your student loans completely paid off and yet have $10,000 to $15,000 in credit card debt because you had no emergency funds,” says Lee. Making savings a priority can help prevent unnecessary credit card debt.

4. Real Estate Is a Better Investment

Devoting too much money to student loan repayment often leads people to put off other investments that come with valuable rewards of their own. Home purchases are a prime example.

Real estate has historically given returns far above the interest rate of student loans, says Lyn Alden, founder of Lyn Alden Investment Strategy. So it’s beneficial to prioritize building these sorts of investment assets, even if it means keeping low-interest student loan debt around for a while. 

5. Missed Life Experiences

There are many variables to consider when deciding how much money to devote to student loan repayment, but according to Farnung, they revolve around one primary question: what are you giving up today in order to improve cash flow tomorrow?

It’s easy to measure how much it costs to carry student loans by determining how much interest you pay annually and what that looks like after taxes. But what’s far more difficult to measure is the experiences you may miss out on or the opportunities for real financial growth you may be overlooking when focusing solely on student loan repayment.

“If you’re postponing funding and maintaining an emergency fund, contributing to your retirement savings, getting married, buying a home, or any number of other life goals and aspirations, you need to take a step back and really think about what the interest on your student loans is costing you,” says Farnung.

To learn more about smart strategies for managing debt, visit our Managing Debt Learning Center.

Image: Peopleimages

The post 5 Things to Consider Before Paying Off Your Student Loan Debt appeared first on Credit.com.

The Ultimate Guide to Paying off Medical School Debt

Part I: Is Medical School Worth It?

Getting accepted to medical school is a major accomplishment, but graduating from medical school can be life-changing for your finances. According to The College Payoff, a collaborative study conducted by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, individuals with a doctoral-level degree enjoyed median lifetime earnings of $3,252,000 in 2009 dollars. This figure compares favorably to degrees that require a smaller commitment of time and resources, showing that pursuing a medical degree can pay off.

Now on to the bad news. While earning more money over a lifetime is advantageous, there’s a notable downside to going to medical school. While doctoral-level degrees can pay off with a lifetime of higher wages, the costs of pursuing this degree can be astronomical.

As the Association of American Medical Colleges notes, the average indebted 2016 medical school graduate left college with a median medical school debt of $190,000. No matter how you cut it, that’s a lot of money to borrow and spend.

Medical school debt

Medical school debt in the U.S.

The Association of American Medical Colleges shares statistics on average medical school debt. As of 2016, indebted medical school graduates left school with a median debt loan of $190,000. At public schools, the median debt load worked out to $180,000. Private medical schools, on the other hand, reported a slightly higher level of debt with a median debt load of $200,000.

The high levels of debt many medical school graduates endure are caused by myriad factors, including the rising costs of tuition. While average medical school tuition hasn’t been tracked since 2009, the price tag of a medical education was $29,890 that year.

In addition to the price of tuition, medical students need to pay for countless other expenses, some of which only apply to those in the medical field:

  • Room and board
  • Rent and utilities
  • Food
  • Travel and transportation
  • Health care
  • Instruments and supplies
  • Textbooks
  • Lab fees
  • Test fees
  • Relocation for residency

Lifetime earnings for a doctor

While the costs of medical school are high, doctors’ higher salaries can take the sting out of the long-term costs. In 2016, for example, family and general practitioners earned an annual mean wage of $200,810, while physicians and surgeons earned $210,170, on average. Several medical specialties earned even more.

The following table highlights profitable medical careers alongside careers that require only a bachelor’s degree:

MSD table 1

Is medical school worth the cost?

If you’re trying to decide between degree programs with varying costs and educational outcomes, it’s important to consider the ROI, or return on investment, for your education. While there’s no hard and fast rule to help you decide, figuring out your post-education monthly payment for medical school debt and comparing it to your potential salary can help.

As an example, the average medical school graduate with $190,000 in debt with a 6% interest rate would need to pay $2,109.39 per month toward their loans if they chose standard, 10-year repayment. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the median weekly earnings for someone with a doctoral degree worked out to $1,664 in 2016.

During a month with four weeks of paydays, a doctoral graduate would bring in $6,656 before taxes and $4,659.20 after taxes, considering a 30% tax rate. While a $2,103.39 payment represents nearly half of this person’s income, it’s only for 10 years. Further, the percentage of income will only decrease as their income grows. And if they choose a higher paying medical specialty, the difference could be even greater.

Also keep in mind that doctors don’t have to choose 10-year, standard repayment as there are plenty of other options available, including repayment plans that span up to 25 years. If the graduate with the same level of debt as above chose to repay their loan over 25 years at the same interest rate, for example, they would pay only $1,224.17 per month.

Part II: Paying for Medical School

Federal student loans are usually the first source of funding medical students turn to as they seek to finance their education. Several different types of federal student loans are available, and each has their own benefits, drawbacks and practical limitations. Federal student loans tend to be a good option for medical students since they offer relatively low, fixed interest rates and help students qualify for federal perks like income-driven repayment, student loan forgiveness programs, deferment and forbearance.

Pros of federal student loans:

  • Fixed interest rates that can be competitive
  • Access to federal loan repayment and student loan forgiveness programs
  • Qualifying for subsidized loans means the government may pay the interest on your loans during school
  • Access to student loan forbearance and deferment (if you qualify)
  • No credit check

Cons of federal student loans:

  • Caps on how much you can borrow
  • You may need to take out private loans once you exhaust federal loans

MSD table 2

Private student loan debt for medical school

Private student loans are commonly used once medical students max out the amount of federal money they can borrow for school. These loans are offered through private lenders, which means their rates and repayment terms are not fixed by the government. As a result, they can vary greatly but may be lower than rates offered through government programs.

Pros of private student loans:

  • Interest rates may be lower than federal student loans
  • Loan limits can be high enough to cover the entire cost of medical school
  • Loan disbursement may be faster
  • You can shop around among lenders to find the best deal

Cons of private student loans:

  • You need good or excellent credit to qualify on your own
  • Without good credit, you may need a co-signer
  • Interest rates can be fixed or variable
  • Private loans do not offer federal student loan forgiveness, income-driven repayment, or federally sponsored deferment or forbearance
  • You may need to make payments or pay interest while still in school

When to consider private student loans:

  • You’ve maxed out on federal student loan amounts
  • Private loans offer a better interest rate
  • You don’t plan to take advantage of government programs when it comes to repaying your loans

Private student loan lenders to consider

Grants for medical students

Grants for medical school students are offered through the government, research facilities, corporations and institutions of higher education. Students can seek out information on available grants by asking their school’s financial aid office, searching the internet, or checking government resources that cover the medical field.

Here are some popular grants available to medical students:

This Medical Scientist Training Program grant was created to assist students pursuing degrees in clinical and biomedical research. This program is offered at over 47 universities that help facilitate the grant.

  • Award amount: Amounts vary
  • Qualifications: Available to qualified M.D.-Ph.D. dual-degree students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Depends on the participating institution

The Ford Foundation Fellowship Program seeks to increase diversity and offers grants to medical students pursuing a Ph.D. with the goal of participating in medical research or teaching. Other Ph.D. students are considered as well.

  • Award amount: $20,000 to $45,000, depending on the specific program
  • Qualifications: Medical students in pursuit of a Ph.D. can apply
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Applications open in December 2017

This American Medical Women’s Association grant awards four AWMA student members every year. This two-year fellowship focuses on global health and includes a trip to Uganda.

  • Award amount: $1,000 to fund local project planning and subsidize experiential education in Uganda
  • Qualifications: Must be AWMA member pursuing a medical education
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: The next application cycle is Aug. 1, 2018, to Oct. 30, 2018

This grant, which is offered through the Radiological Society of North America, was created for medical students considering academic radiology.

  • Award amount: $3,000 to be matched by a sponsoring department for a total of $6,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a full-time medical student and RSNA member
  • Deadline to apply: Feb. 1, 2008

This program, which is offered through the American Medical Women’s Association, is available to medical students and residents working in clinics around the world.

  • Award amount: Up to $1,000 in transportation assistance costs
  • Qualifications: Students must work in an off-campus clinic where the medically neglected will benefit, be an AMWA member in at least their second year of school, and must spend four weeks to one year serving the medically underserved
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Applications are accepted Jan. 5, April 5, July 5 and Oct. 5

Scholarships for medical students

Scholarships are available to medical students from all walks of life and all backgrounds, although requirements vary based on the program. Medical students can seek out merit-based scholarships, institution-based scholarships and various other scholarships offered through research facilities and corporations.

Here are a handful of popular scholarship options for medical students:

This grant, offered through the American Medical Association, doles out scholarships to medical students who meet certain criteria. The goal of this program is to reduce the debt burden on medical school students across the country.

  • Award amount: $10,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a medical student who is nominated by their school dean and approaching their last year of medical school
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Nomination applications are available every fall

The Herbert W. Nickens Award is available to third-year medical students who have shown proven leadership in the area of medical equality for all.

  • Award amount: $10,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a medical student who is nominated for excellence in leadership; checklist is available here
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Applications due in April each year

This scholarship is open to all students pursuing a service career in health care, including medical students considering any medical field.

  • Award amount: $5,000 to $10,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a medical student with at least one year of medical school remaining
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Application opens at the beginning of May each year and closes at the end of June

This scholarship is available to all medical students with financial need regardless of their gender, race or ethnicity. Applicants are judged on financial need, achievements, essays and community service records.

  • Award amount: $2,000 to $5,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a medical student who can demonstrate financial need and complete the application process
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Applications for 2018 will open at the end of 2017

The Harvey Fellows Program was created for Christian students pursuing higher education in important fields such as medicine.

  • Award amount: $16,000
  • Qualifications: Must be a student who identifies as Christian and attends service regularly
  • Deadline to apply in 2017: Application deadline is Nov. 1 of each year

Part III: Medical School Loan Repayment Programs

Income-driven repayment (for federal student loan debt)

Income-driven repayment programs allow medical students to pay only a percentage of their income toward their federal student loans for 20 to 25 years no matter how much they owe. These programs can be advantageous since they let medical students with large debt loads pay a smaller percentage of their income every month than they would with standard, 10-year repayment. Several different income-driven repayment programs are available, each with their own rules and benefits. The following table highlights each program and how it works:

MSD table 4

Pros of income-driven repayment:

  • Pay a smaller amount of your income for up to 25 years
  • Have your student loan balance forgiven once you complete the program
  • Pay off your debts slowly and at your own pace

Cons of income-driven repayment:

  • You may have to pay income taxes on forgiven loan amounts
  • You may not qualify if you earn too much

Who is eligible?

These programs are available to graduates who have federal student loans and meet income requirements.

How to apply

You can apply for income-driven repayment programs using the U.S. Department of Education website.

Medical school loan forgiveness for doctors

There are numerous loan forgiveness programs available to doctors, each with their own criteria for applicants. Commonly, these programs offer loan forgiveness in exchange for service in a specific field or for a certain type of employer.

Some examples include:

Who is eligible?

Since loan forgiveness programs vary in their details and requirements, you’ll need to read terms and conditions of applicable programs to determine if you qualify.

Is this option right for you?

If you are willing to relocate or know that a loan forgiveness program is already available in your area, then loan forgiveness programs offer a great way to earn a living while having part of your debt forgiven. For this option to be right for you, however, you have to be willing to meet special program requirements such as working in an urban, rural or underserved community.

National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program

This program offers loan repayment assistance for individuals entering qualified health care careers in medical or dental fields. Licensed health care providers may earn up to $50,000 of tax-free loan forgiveness for a two-year commitment to NHSC-approved employment in a high-need area.

Who is eligible?

Medical graduates who agree to work in an NHSC-approved career for at least two years may qualify for this assistance.

How to apply

Contact the National Health Service Corps or visit the NHSC website for tips on the application process.

Is this option right for you?

If you’re willing to work in an area of high need after you graduate, this program may work well at the beginning of your medical career.

U.S. military loan repayment programs

United States Army

Army Student Loan Assistance offers up to $45,000 per year in loan assistance, along with a monthly stipend of up to $2,000. This assistance is available to U.S. residents working to complete an accredited residency.

The U.S. Army also offers up to $120,000 to pay down medical school debt in exchange for three years of service.

Lastly, the U.S. Army offers a Health Care Professionals Loan Repayment Program that provides up to $250,000 for repayment of “education loans for physicians in certain specialties who are serving in an Army Reserve Troop Program Units, AMEDD Professional Management Command, or the Individual Mobilization Program.”

How to apply

For additional information, contact your local Army recruiter, call 1-800-USA-Army, or visit Healthcare.GoArmy.com.

United States Navy

The Navy Student Loan Repayment Program offers up to $65,000 in repayment assistance, depending on your loan amount and year in school. Eligible applicants serve in the U.S. Navy and have federal student loans.

You may also qualify for the U.S. Navy’s loan forgiveness and repayment program, which offers up to $40,000 per year in loan assistance before taxes. You must be a final year medical student ready to join the U.S. Navy.

Lastly, the Navy Financial Assistance Program offers up to $275,000 in loan repayment assistance plus a monthly stipend to medical residents who agree to serve in the U.S. Navy. Physician sign-up bonuses may also be available.

How to apply

Contact your local Navy recruiter or visit the Navy Recruiting Command website.

United States Air Force

The Air Force Health Professions Scholarship Program offers up to $45,000 per year plus a monthly stipend up to $2,000 for medical students who join the U.S. Air Force and serve their country as a medical professional. Once you complete your residency, you’ll have a one-year obligation for each year you participate in the program plus one extra year.

How to apply

Contact a U.S. Air Force recruiter for more information, or visit the U.S. Air Force application page to apply.

State-level loan repayment programs for doctors

Part IV: Paying Down Your Medical School Debt

While the very idea of medical school debt could have you feeling overwhelmed, it’s important to understand the many options available when it comes to paying off your loans sooner rather than later. In addition to paying off your loans faster, some strategies can help you save money on interest or secure a more manageable monthly payment.

Here are some tips that can help as you pay down medical school debt:

#1: Refinance your student loans to a lower rate.

Refinancing your student loans to a new loan product with a lower interest rate and better terms can help you save money and possibly even lower your monthly payment. With a lower interest rate, you’ll save money on interest each month, which could help you save money and pay off your loans faster, provided you keep making the same monthly payment.

Keep in mind, however, that there are notable disadvantages that come with refinancing federal loans with a private lender. When you refinance federal loans with a private lender, you lose out on special protections afforded to federal loan borrowers like deferment and forbearance. You also disqualify yourself from federally sponsored income-driven repayment and loan forgiveness programs.

Recommended lenders for refinancing your medical school loans

LenderTransparency ScoreMax TermFixed APRVariable APRMax Loan Amount 
SoFiA+

20


Years

3.35% - 7.125%


Fixed Rate*

2.815% - 6.740%


Variable Rate*

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
earnestA+

20


Years

3.35% - 6.39%


Fixed Rate

2.81% - 6.19%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
commonbondA+

20


Years

3.35% - 6.74%


Fixed Rate

2.80% - 6.73%


Variable Rate

No Max


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now
lendkeyA+

20


Years

3.25% - 7.26%


Fixed Rate

2.67% - 6.06%


Variable Rate

$125k / $175k


Undergrad/Grad
Max Loan
apply-now

#2: Find ways to save on monthly expenses.

While graduating from medical school can be a momentous occasion, you can put yourself in a better financial position by living a modest “student” lifestyle as long as you can. Ways to save money include, but aren’t limited to, finding a roommate to share living expenses, skipping pricey dinners out, living without cable television, driving your older car as long as you can, and preventing lifestyle inflation as you start earning more.

#3: Pay all of your monthly payments on time.

Federal Direct Loans and some private lenders offer interest rate discounts after you complete a specific number of on-time monthly payments. Check with your lender to see if they offer this option. If not, you should still make on-time monthly payments to avoid late fees and keep your loans in good standing.

#4: Pay extra toward the principal of your loans.

If you don’t want to go through the trouble of refinancing, you can still pay off your loans faster by paying more than the minimum payment on your student loans each month. Throwing extra money at the principal of your loans reduces the amount of interest you owe with each passing month, helping you save money while paying off your loans faster.

#5: Pay interest while in school.

Some medical student loans let interest accrue while you’re still in school. If you have the financial means to make interest-only payments while you’re still in school, doing so can help you prevent your student loan balance from ballooning before you graduate.

Frequently Asked Questions

Tuition at medical schools is not fixed, meaning it can pay to shop around before you choose an institution. Private schools tend to be more expensive than public schools as well, meaning you can usually save money if you decide on a public education for your medical degree.

The amount you can save depends on your current interest rate and your new loan rate and its terms. To find out how much you could potentially save by refinancing, enter your old loan and new loan information in a student loan calculator.

You can lower the payment on your student loans in a few different ways. First, you can refinance your student loans into a new loan product with a lower interest rate or longer repayment timeline. Second, you can choose an extended repayment plan or even income-driven repayment.

Federal student loans come with important federal benefits and protections such as deferment and forbearance. They also leave you eligible for income-driven repayment plans and federal loan forgiveness.

As you shop for student loans for medical school, remember that the terms of your loan can make a big difference in how much you’ll pay over time. Compare loans based on the interest rate, any applicable fees, and the monthly payment amount you’ll need to make. You can also check student loan providers’ profiles with the Better Business Bureau and read student loan reviews for even more insight.

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, some of most popular pre-med majors include biological sciences, physical sciences, social sciences and humanities.

According to Swarthmore College, medical schools are interested in students with excellent academic ability, strong interpersonal skills, leadership skills, and demonstrated compassion and care for others.

The post The Ultimate Guide to Paying off Medical School Debt appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Earn Frequent Flyer Miles for Refinancing Your Student Loans? You Bet

Get a lower rate plus miles and get flying.

It used to be that rewards points and frequent flyer miles were primarily associated with credit cards. But those days went the way of the dinosaur long ago, and one of the most recent examples of that fact comes in the form of the new partnership between JetBlue and SoFi, a direct lender best known for student loan refinancing.

Members of JetBlue’s TrueBlue program can now earn one TrueBlue point for every $2 of student loan debt refinanced with SoFi. The offer, which caps at 50,000 points and is only available to new SoFi customers, was described by JetBlue as a first of its kind in the airline industry.

While airlines have long been creatively partnering with mortgage lenders, online retailers and others, the student loan market has remained largely untapped.

But with record levels of student loan debt, (the average 2016 graduate has about $37,172 in debt) and millennials putting off travel in some cases because of that debt, this partnership addresses a growing market opportunity.

“Members of the global legacy programs like United and American have been able to earn points for mortgages and other loans for decades, but their rosters of partners do not specifically include an education loan specialist like SoFi,” said Kate Hogenson, who designed loyalty programs for United Airlines and now works as a strategic loyalty consultant at Kobie Marketing. “Airlines have flirted with college and young adult programs in years past, but they’ve been shuttered; United closed down their College Plus program in 2010.”

For its part, JetBlue has been dipping its toe in the financial product space more and more over the past year, beginning with offering points for personal loans through Best Egg. And when looking at the demographics of their customers, moving into the student loan arena made sense, said JetBlue’s Director of Loyalty, Scott Resnick.

“We see this as a great opportunity for customers who have student loans to refinance them while doing something that benefits them in another part of their life,” said Resnick. “Any time there’s an opportunity for customers to earn points doing something they would be doing otherwise in life, there’s natural tendency to look for partnerships there.”

The other part of your life that benefits of course, is your travel habit. Here’s what you need to know about the offer.

The Fine Print

The program doesn’t have a lot of hidden details. There are no blackout dates for using the miles earned through the refinancing offer, and no expiration date either.

In addition, there’s no application or origination fee for refinancing through SoFi, officials said.

“You can apply for free in fewer than 20 minutes,” said SoFi’s Catesby Perrin, vice-president of business development. “Our borrowers save an average of $22,000 over the life of their loan.”

SoFi offers various refinancing options, including both fixed and variable rate interest and loan terms of five, seven, 10, 15 and 20 years.

The Drawbacks

There seem to be few downsides to the JetBlue offer. But there are some basic considerations to keep in mind.

“JetBlue’s route system is limited to the U.S., the Caribbean, and select destinations in Latin America,” said Hogenson. “You have to be in a major JetBlue city for this to make sense.”

Hogenson suggested visiting JetBlue’s website and researching the number of points needed to travel to a city you’re interested in visiting, to help determine whether this offer makes sense for you. And while perusing the site, spend some time reviewing the route you may have to travel on JetBlue to get to where you want to go.

“To get from New York to Las Vegas, you might find yourself routed through Fort Lauderdale,” she said.

Should You Refinance Student Loan Debt in Pursuit of Frequent Flyer Miles?

Obviously, you should never make student loan refinancing decisions based solely on earning frequent flyer miles. A serious financial decision like this should still be approached with the same amount of research, caution and common sense you would use otherwise.

“You should make your refinancing decision based on saving the most money, meaning finding the lowest interest rate,” said Brandon Yahn, founder of the website Student Loans Guy. “Additional perks like miles are great, but shouldn’t be the driving factor in which lender you ultimately choose, unless all else is equal.”

Put another way, student borrowers should look beyond the sparkle of free flights and focus on the student loan consolidation product itself, said Hogenson.

Qualifying for Refinancing

One last important point to keep in mind, in order to qualify for any refinancing program, it’s critical that you have a good credit score, have a history of paying your bills on time and have a solid, steady income. If you don’t know where your credit stands, you can get your two free credit scores on Credit.com.

Image: RobertoDavid

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Meet the Man Who Makes $600 a Month Selling Crickets

When Jeff Neal’s wife told him she wanted to quit her job to stay at home with their kids, he had to think about how to make one income work.

When Jeff Neal’s wife told him she wanted to quit her job to stay at home with their kids, he had to think about how to make one income work. With over $21,000 in student loans, there wasn’t much extra money lying around. Losing another income stream would be difficult.

But rather than give up hope, Neal did something no one expected. He launched a side business that helped bring in extra money: selling crickets online.

Yes, you heard that right. Crickets.

Now, Neal makes $600 a month selling bugs online at The Critter Depot, which helps him pay off his debt. Read on to learn more about this odd side hustle and how Neal has turned it into a steady income stream.

Searching for a Side Hustle

Neal graduated from Temple University and got a job as a project manager. While he made a good salary, he had student loan debt and a growing family. When his wife decided she wanted to stay home with the kids, Neal knew he had to make changes.

“My wife wanted to stay home, so I had to take full responsibility as the sole provider,” he says.

Since his full-time job involves e-commerce, he focused his side-hustle search on online jobs. After doing extensive research, he decided to put all of his efforts on one specific niche.

The area that he identified was in the pet industry; reptile and exotic animal owners need live crickets to feed their pets, but getting them can be difficult — and expensive. So, Neal’s site caters to pet owners, selling crickets of various sizes in bulk.

But before you rush out and buy tanks and crickets to replicate Neal’s success, you should know his approach is even more interesting. He actually doesn’t deal with the crickets at all. Instead, his business is a drop shipping company.

What Is Drop Shipping?

Drop shipping is a business model where the store doesn’t stock any of the items it sells. Instead, when a customer purchases a product, the drop shipper works with a manufacturer — or in this case, a cricket supplier — to fulfill the order. The drop shipper never comes into contact with the product, so wrangling crickets isn’t part of Neal’s day.

“I don’t know anything about raising crickets,” he admits. “They have short life spans and unique nutritional and environmental needs. It’s a lot of work that takes a lot of knowledge. When I set up my business, I found someone who breeds crickets. He takes care of them and ships them; I just handle the orders.”

For customers, drop shipping is a seamless process, whether it’s through Amazon or a private site. Most of the time, you don’t know when you’re buying from a drop shipper. Once your order is placed, the drop shipper works with the supplier to place the order, and you receive the item like you normally would.

Drop shipping can be a mutually beneficial relationship between the seller and supplier. In Neal’s case, he has the marketing expertise and skills to build a successful website and business. That gets the cricket farmer more exposure and more orders than he would get on his own. Neal estimates that he generates about $3,000 in sales each month from The Critter Depot and his cut is $600.

Previously, Neal primarily sold crickets on Amazon. But meeting Amazon’s strict standards is hard when you’re shipping live insects. He ended up taking his sales to just his website, which requires more work for him each day to build traffic.

His new income stream allows him to take advantage of other opportunities, too. He recently purchased the site Jason Coupon King, which generates another $700 a month in revenue.

Balancing a Side Gig With Life & Work

While Neal’s side hustle is successful, he has to balance his work with his full-time job and his family. But that’s why he says drop shipping is a great option. It gives him the flexibility he needs while still allowing him to earn extra money.

“I don’t have a television, so when I come home from work, I just spend time playing with the kids and catching up with my wife,” says Neal. “Once they’re in bed, I work on optimizing my websites, contributing to forums and building links to my sites.”

Neal says he spends an hour or two a day after work on his side hustle and that his business is still growing. The extra income is substantial enough to help him pay off his student loans early and give his family more wiggle room in their monthly budget. (You can keep tabs on your own finances by viewing two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com.)

Making Extra Money

While selling crickets might not be for you, Neal’s story is just another example of the many ways you can make money on the side. If you’re struggling to make ends meet, or need more income to pay down debt or boost your emergency fund, launching a side hustle can be the right approach.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Neal 

The post Meet the Man Who Makes $600 a Month Selling Crickets appeared first on Credit.com.

How to Take a Vacation When You’re Juggling Student Loan Debt

With a little discipline and money management, you can travel responsibly.

Are your student loans keeping you from taking a much-needed vacation? While many put off planning a trip to pay down their loans, others find ways to do both. Student loans don’t need to feel like handcuffs restricting you from the excitement of traveling to a new or favorite destination. With a little discipline and money management, you can travel responsibly. Here’s how.

1. Live Within Your Means

While it’s always advisable to live within your means, taking on an extra-frugal mentality will not only help you save money for your vacation but also help you put more money toward your student loan debt. Living within your means starts with creating a budget.

Many dislike the word budget, or think it’s an impossible task. However, you may be surprised how much cash you free up when you limit your expenses to a set amount and cut unnecessary spending. When you have an idea of where your money is going, you see where you can make cutbacks. (Here are 50 things to stop wasting your money on.) Even a few cutbacks can free up enough cash for your vacation.

2. Start a Vacation Fund

If you don’t plan on traveling anytime soon, you may want to open a vacation fund where you put money aside each month. If you’re in a position to set money aside, even a small contribution a month will add up in no time. You may want to consider making automatic transfers so you’re not tempted to spend the money elsewhere. Just remember, saving money in an emergency fund (and for retirement) should take precedent.

3. Spread Out Purchases

For those looking to book flight and hotel accommodations with their credit cards, you may want to consider spreading out these purchases. Typically, flights and hotels will be the costlier part of your vacation. When you book these together, you’re making it difficult to pay back in full — add in your student loans and monthly bills, and this may break your budget. By planning ahead and spreading out these large vacation expenses, you’ll make your monthly credit card and loan payments a bit easier.

4. ‘There’s an App for That!’

If your travel and hotel accommodations eat up too much of your vacation budget, you may want to consider other options. Sites such as Airbnb let you rent out homes, apartments or even rooms, often for a lower price than a hotel. When traveling by air, consider downloading helpful apps like Hopper. The Hopper app predicts when flights to a specific location will be cheapest and notifies travelers when they should consider purchasing tickets.

5. Pick Up a Side Gig

A side hustle can be a great way to help supplement your current income. This extra cash can help pay for your vacation while helping you keep up with student loan payments. Between babysitting, tutoring, freelance writing or shifts at your local gym, there are endless possibilities. Consider finding something that interests you so it doesn’t feel too much like extra work.

6. Opt for a Staycation

While a staycation may not sound as appealing as an actual vacation, sometimes a trip around your own region can end up being surprisingly relaxing or adventurous. Consider researching what your own area has to offer. Between beaches, hiking trails and museums, you may find a staycation is just what you need to forget about those student loans.

Image: Rawpixel 

The post How to Take a Vacation When You’re Juggling Student Loan Debt appeared first on Credit.com.

Moving to One of These 9 States Could Save You Thousands

Should you move to one of the nine states with no income tax? Here's how to decide.

Each year, taxpayers pay trillions in income taxes. In fact, the government collected approximately $3 trillion last year. If you’re like most taxpayers, you owe both federal and state taxes, which means an even bigger chunk of your paycheck goes to the government.

When you’re carrying debt — whether it’s student loans or a credit card balance — it can be frustrating to see so much of your hard-earned money leave your hands. That’s why many people consider moving somewhere with no state income tax.

According to a new study by Student Loan Hero, taxpayers could save an average of $1,977 a year by moving to a state with no income tax. But before you pack your bags, find out what factors you should keep in mind.

States Without Income Taxes

States that collect income taxes use them to fund essential programs and services for residents. More than 50% of state tax revenues go toward education and healthcare initiatives, such as Medicaid. State agencies also use collected income taxes to pay for services, including transportation and law enforcement.

Residents in most of the country must pay federal and state income taxes. However, nine states don’t levy any state income tax: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. Because you don’t have to pay state taxes, you can get a significant yearly savings.

How Much Could You Save?

How much you could save by moving to a state with no income tax depends on your income bracket and where you live now. For example, Oregon workers have a state income tax of 7.75%, the highest rate of any state in the country. Someone earning the median salary in the state — $49,710 — would pay $3,851 in addition to their federal taxes.

Moving to another state to save that kind of cash can be tempting. So tempting, in fact, that 30% of survey respondents would move to a state with no income tax to save money. Moreover, 38% of respondents said they’d use their tax savings to accelerate their student loan debt repayment. (To see how student loans are impacting your credit, check out your free credit report snapshot on Credit.com..)

Using Your Savings for Debt Repayment

The savings you get from not paying state taxes can save you even more money in the long run. Using that money to repay your loan helps you pay off the loans faster, cutting down on interest charges. It can also save you thousands over the life of your loan.

For example, say you had $35,000 in student loans with an interest rate of 6.31% (the current rate for Grad PLUS loans) and a minimum monthly payment of $400 a month. Now, take the average $1,977 you would save by moving to a state without income tax and divide it up over 12 months. That would give you an extra $165 in your pocket each month. If you put that additional amount toward your student loans, you could pay off your debt about three and a half years early and save more than $4,500 in interest.

Other Costs

Before packing up and moving to a new state, consider other costs that may eat into your savings. Between putting down a deposit on a new apartment, moving your belongings and registering your vehicle in a new state, you can spend thousands.

In addition, some states with no income tax make up their revenue through other means, such as sales tax. Florida has a 6% sales tax on goods and services, including essentials such as clothing or food. If you’re not used to paying taxes on groceries, the added sales tax can put a dent in your budget. That’s why it’s important to compare the cost of living when deciding if it’s worth it to move to a new state.

Moving to Save Money

Depending on your circumstances, moving to a state with no income tax can give you a substantial savings. You can use that money to pay off your student loans faster, boost your emergency fund or catch up on retirement savings. But before you make the leap, be sure you understand the added expenses of moving so your decision is financially sound.

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How to Build Wealth After Graduation

You've just graduated college and you'd like to be wealthy someday. Get started now.

You’ve just graduated college and you’d like to be wealthy someday. Problem is, you have no clue how to make it happen. First, you’re broke and may be drowning in student loans. Second, no matter what the experts might say, it feels like there are tons of fellow grads fighting over a handful of jobs. Third, though you don’t mind hard work, you don’t want wealth to come at the expense of a social life, a family and the chance to do some good in the world. Should you give up the dream and content yourself with an average life?

Not at all. It’s completely possible to become a multimillionaire before you retire. Right now you have an advantage you never will again: youth.

Many young people have no concept of how simple it is to build wealth. Not easy, because hard work and self-discipline are required, but simple. Any intelligent person with an ordinary career trajectory can do it. But now is the time to get started. With every year that passes, your window of opportunity closes a little more. Sounds good, right?

Understanding the Astonishing Power of Compound Interest

If you take a penny and double it every day for a month, how much would you end up with? A hundred dollars? A thousand dollars? How about a million dollars? Not even close. Starting with a single penny, if you double it every day for 31 days, you end up with $21,474,836.48. That’s compound interest. That’s how you get rich. And that’s why, when it comes to wealth building, your age gives you a major advantage.

Starting with your first job out of college, you can try investing 15% off the top. By the time you retire, you’ll be a multimillionaire. Yes, you’ve heard the “pay yourself first” principle before. But you probably don’t realize just how wealthy it can make you. Let’s say you start making an average graduate’s starting income (which, according to The National Association of Colleges and Employers, is $52,569 a year, as of 2016). Assuming you are good at your job and get consistent annual raises of 4%, you’d be making $77,815 a year 10 years from now, and $252,385 in 40 years. Not only will you be making more money, but you will also be able to save more money. If you consistently (and that means every year) deposit 15% of your income into investments, compound interest will begin to accumulate like you wouldn’t believe. Assuming a return of 10% a year, you’d be worth more than $5.4 million when you are ready to retire. (Assuming, of course, that you put this money aside and aren’t spending it on things you shouldn’t be.)

Where Should My Money Go?

First, pay the government because things can get troubling if you don’t. Second, pay yourself. Put the aforementioned 15% of your income in some sort of investment. Third, pay the interest on your debts, such as credit cards, student loans, car loan, etc. Keeping debt low is critical. (Your credit utilization level — the amount of debt you carry in relation to your overall credit — is a major influence on your credit scores. You can find out where yours stand by viewing two of your scores for free on Credit.com.) Fourth, pay for non-critical parts of your life like entertainment, travel and toys.

Don’t succumb to the temptation to pay for prestige. A big part of being able to save the requisite 15% involves not blowing your paycheck on expensive cars, high-dollar meals and trendy couture. But that needn’t mean depriving yourself. Beautiful, comfortable clothes are not cheap, but they don’t have to cost a fortune. You can buy a great pair of slacks for $150 or you can spend 10 times that amount. The difference will be the label on the waistband. The point is this: The best material things in life are affordable. They are not cheap (quality never is), but if you buy them selectively and use them with care, you can enjoy a life as materially rich as Mark Zuckerberg on an income that wouldn’t get him through lunch.

Landing That First Job

Of course, this advice hinges on your finding a decent-paying first job. (To start, you can read these 50 things recent grads can do to score their first job.) Depending on where you’re applying and your prospective industry, you may also want to consider the following ideas during the application process.

  • Forget the standard resume-cover letter program. Instead, write a direct marketing letter that lets your prospective employer know you understand what their problems are and that you have the solutions.
  • Call the office of your prospective future boss and ask for a short, informational interview. This is a great way to get in that locked door and find out a lot of personal and professional information about your prospect.
  • If you feel you might not get the job you are seeking, suggest that you can do a project for the company on a freelance basis, perhaps for free.

Right now, you may think becoming a millionaire is not a laudable goal. You might say money doesn’t matter. Well, it may not matter now, but it will when your kids are applying to colleges or when you’re approaching retirement. Financial independence frees you to live a rich, fulfilling, authentic life. And that’s the true definition of wealth.

This article originally appeared on The Dollar Stretcher.

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MagnifyMoney 2017 Survey of Recent College Graduates

An estimated 1.8 million college students will make up the U.S. class of 2017. The first few years — even the first few months — after college can feel like a financial land mine as graduates figure out how to manage their finances independently.

To give this graduating class a leg up, MagnifyMoney asked 1,000 recent college graduates to tell us what they wish they had done differently in those crucial years after graduation.

Among the most popular regrets were not being careful about debt/missing debt payments (48%) and not building their credit score up sooner (40%). One in five graduates also said they wished they had been better about saving money.

Missing a credit card or student loan payment even once can result in lasting credit score damage, and a lower credit score can make it difficult to get approved for new credit down the road.

Looking closely at the results of our survey, we can understand why so many college graduates may be struggling to stay on top of their bills — especially those who graduated with student loan debt.

Student Debt: A gateway to credit card debt

The vast majority of our survey respondents (61%) said they left school with student loan debt. On average, graduates with student loan debt said they carried $35,073.

We found some troubling trends among those with student loan debt. Not only are they more likely to say that they did not feel like they were better off their parents at their age, but they are also more likely to carry large loads of credit card debt.

More than half (58%) of graduates without student loan debt say they believe they are better off now than their parents were at their age. Graduates with student loans were less likely to agree with that statement. Half (52%) of college graduates with student loans say they are better off than their parents were at their age.

According to our survey, college graduates who left school with student loan debt were more likely to wind up in credit card debt down the road, as well.

  • 59% of all college graduates reported having credit card debt.
  • But 67% of recent grads with student loan debt report having credit card debt, versus 44% of those without student loans.
  • 20% of recent grads with student loans report credit card debt of $10,000 or more, almost twice the rate of those without student loans (11%).
  • And 24% of recent grads with $50,000 or more in student loans report having $10,000 or more of credit card debt.

2 in 5 will need longer than 10 years to pay off their student loans

A significant percentage of student loan borrowers expect to take longer than the standard 10 year repayment timeframe to pay off their loans.

  • 40% of recent grads with student loans anticipate that they’ll need more than 10 years to repay their student loans. For context, the standard repayment period for federal student loans is 10 years.
  • Among the grads who report more than $50,000 in debt, just 26% say they will pay off loans within 10 years. And 41% believe they will take more than 20 years, or never pay off their student loan debt.
  • Among all student loan borrowers, 7% said they will ‘never’ be able to pay off all the debt.

Optimism for the future

One thing graduates seem to have in common — whether they carried student debt or not — is a shared sense of optimism for their futures.

  • 65% of grads without student loans feel they will be better off than their parents in the future.
  • 64% of those with student loan debt also feel they will be better off than their parents.

Even among recent graduates with the burden of $50,000 or more in debt, 60% believe they will be better off financially than their parents in the future.

Those with Master’s degrees are most confident, with 68% saying they will be better off than their parents, versus 64% of Associate’s and Bachelor’s degree recipients.

Top 3 tips to manage debt after college

Know your options. If you are struggling to pay down your student loan debt, find out if you qualify for flexible repayment options like income-driven repayment plans. Students with high-interest student loan debt can consider refinancing to lock in a lower interest rate.  Here are the top 19 places to refinance student debt in 2017.

Stay on top of your payments. Student loans will be reported on your credit report after you graduate. By making on-time student loan payments, you are already taking one of the most powerful steps toward building a solid credit score. If you fear you will miss a payment, contact your loan servicer right away. Even one missed payment can derail your credit score.

Build your credit score strategically. A 2014 study by MagnifyMoney found that the average college student will face credit card APRs of 21.4%. Carrying a balance with an APR that high can quickly lead down a long road of unmanageable credit debt. A simple way to build credit is to take out a credit card, charge small amounts each month and pay it off in full. To avoid relying on credit card debt, set money aside from your paycheck for emergencies.

Methodology

MagnifyMoney conducted a national online survey of 1,000 U.S. residents with college degrees who reported completing their most recent degree within the last 5 years via Pollfish from April 26 – 30, 2017.

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