My New Car Is a Piece of Junk. Can I Return It to the Dealer?

My Car Is a Piece of Junk. Can I Return It to the Dealer?

Once upon a time, you loved your car. You loved it so much that you agreed to the payment terms and drove it home from the dealer or, dare we say, a private seller. But now, that love has grown cold and you wish you’d never laid eyes on it. And to make matters worse, you’re bound to its existence and monetary depreciation—thanks to that sweet-little-pain-in-the-butt payment book. Or at least, that’s what you’re afraid of.

If you’re wondering if you can return your unwanted car without any more financial obligation, read on. We’ll discuss whether it’s possible and what you can expect.

Can I Return My Car?

Readers have asked us if they can just “give the keys back” and get a car that is reliable and without unanticipated problems—specifically, a vehicle they can confidently drive with their family, friends, or pets in tow. The short answer is yes, but there’s a variety of potential repercussions and unseen problems.

Before you do anything, find out the following:

  1. If you purchased your car through a private seller, does your state have a “lemon law”?
  2. If you purchased your car through a dealership, does the dealer have a return policy?

If you can answer “yes” to either of these questions, look into these options further to see if your circumstances apply and what you’re entitled to.

However, if you have no recourse under your state’s lemon law and your situation doesn’t qualify for a dealership’s return policy, returning the car is going to be a little tricky and could have credit implications—which you’ll want to consider, especially if you plan to lease or purchase another car once you give the other one back.

Returning the Car to the Dealer

Despite how liberating and freeing a car return may feel, giving the vehicle back to the dealer won’t erase your debt. In fact, the consequences could be just as frustrating as the junk car itself.

“Technically, if you give the car back, it is the same as a repossession,” Matt Briggs, co-founder and CEO of RentTrack, explains. “Keep in mind you have a legal obligation to pay the terms of the loan and the car dealer is typically not the finance company who holds the loan (unless they are ‘buy here pay here’). Either way you cannot simply ‘give back’ the vehicle to a dealer and walk away.”

So look at it this way: to simply give the car back is to consent to automobile repossession—meaning the car would be sold at auction, and you would be responsible for the difference in what the car brought at auction and the amount you still owe on the car.

Plus, you’d be on the hook for expenses involved in this process, such as repossession, towing, title and sale, and storage. So if you leave the car at the dealership, you still owe the debt—which could total to more than the dang clunker is worth—and you’re out a working vehicle.

Concerned about what could happen to your credit score? According to Experian, a car repossession stays on your credit report for seven years—even after the original account goes delinquent. You can see how your debt has affected you by getting a free credit report summary on Credit.com, which will explain what factors influence your credit score.

Car Debt and Bankruptcy

There is a way, however, to force a dealer to “eat steel,” says Eugene Melchionnne, a Connecticut bankruptcy attorney. To do so, you can surrender the car and discharge the debt in bankruptcy—but then you’d have to apply for bankruptcy. “There is also a process for ‘cramming down’ the debt to the value of the car in bankruptcy, and in a Chapter 13 case, you can spread the balance owed over an extended period of time,” he says.

“For example, if the car loan is for $20,000, but the car is worth $10,000, the loan can be reduced to $10,000, and if there are, say, four years left to pay at $500 per month, the payments can be spread out to a maximum of five years on the lowered balance, resulting in $330 or more a month savings,” Melchionne explains.

Selling or Trading the Car Instead

With all that said, it might be simpler and cheaper to sell the vehicle yourself or trade it in for something else, which is what Matt Briggs suggests you do.

“[At] most repossession auctions, the cars sell for a much lower price than the retail value, so you may end up owing more than you would if you sold it [as a] private party (using a website like AutoTrader, eBay, or Cars.com) or if you traded it in on a different vehicle.”

The Bottom Line

For most of us, simply driving the car back to the dealership and handing over the keys, however tempting, is not a workable strategy. So after you dig yourself out of this mess, do as much due diligence as possible before you buy next time.

“Bottom line,” Briggs said, “you have a legal obligation to pay the car loan in full, so make sure you are getting a good deal before you sign on the dotted line.”

 

Image: hemera

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12 Cars That Depreciate Quickly (& Are Good to Buy Used)

cars-that-depreciate-quickly

If you’re in the market for a new car, you may be tempted to drive a brand-new one off the lot. After all, many manufacturers are already releasing their feature-packed 2017 models, and the weather hasn’t even turned cold yet.

But, before you do, consider this: A new study by iSeeCars.com, an automotive data and research company, found that buying a new car is not always going to get you the best bang for your buck. In fact, the company discovered that purchasing some cars that are just a year old can provide consumers with substantial savings.

“Most people know new cars depreciate the most in the first year and that different cars have different depreciation rates, but we wanted to determine which used cars experienced the largest price drops compared to their new models,” Phong Ly, the CEO of iSeeCars.com, said in a press release.

To establish the savings, iSeeCars.com analyzed the more than 14 million cars sold from August 1, 2015 and July 31, 2016, excluding models with fewer than 250 new and 250 used cars sold. The average asking prices of year-old cars were compared to those of new cars from the same model, according to the release, with the difference in price expressed as a percentage of the new model average price. This percentage was then compared to the overall percentage difference across all models.

Using this data, iSeeCars.com researchers found that the average price difference between a new car and a lightly used car was 21.2%, ranging from $6,099 to $19,966 in savings. (Note: For this study, a lightly used car is defined as a vehicle from the 2014-2015 model years with mileage within 20% of 13,476, the average annual miles traveled in the U.S., according to the Department of Transportation.)

But it isn’t all cars — iSeeCars.com established a dozen cars that offer the best value when purchased lightly used instead of brand new, with price differences between 31.2% and 34.6% — at least 1.5 times more than the overall average. Below are those 12 cars.

1. FIAT 500L

Price Difference: $8,096 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.6%

2. Lincoln MKS

Price Difference: $16,039 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.5%

3. Volvo S60

Price Difference: $14,204 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.4%

4. Kia Cadenza

Price Difference: $12,940 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.3%

5. Mercedes C250

Price Difference: $15,247 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.3%

6. Nissan Maxima

Price Difference: $12,469 less
Percentage Price Difference: -34.0%

7. Lincoln MKS + MKZ Hybrid

Price Difference: $14,177 less
Percentage Price Difference: -33.8%

8. Jaguar XF

Price Difference: $19,966 less
Percentage Price Difference: -32.3%

9. FIAT 500

Price Difference: $11,106 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.9%

10. Cadillac ATS

Price Difference: $6,099 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.8%

11. Chrysler 300

Price Difference: $13,351 less
Percentage Price: -31.7%

12. Buick Regal

Price Difference: $11,525 less
Percentage Price Difference: -31.2%

If you’re considering purchasing a new car — whether it’s straight from the manufacturer or simply new to you — it’s a good idea to make checking your credit part of your shopping process. Knowing where your credit stands can help you get an idea of what terms and conditions you may qualify for with your auto loan. You can see two of your credit scores for free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.

Image: AdrianHancu

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