Capital One Balance Transfer Offer

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Balance transfer offers on credit cards can be an excellent way to reduce the cost of expensive credit card debt, helping you can get out of debt faster. Capital One only offers one card with a balance transfer intro period. Balance transfers are usually offered only to people with excellent credit, however you may qualify if you have good credit. It’s always a good idea to check if you’re prequalified before submitting an application.

In this article, we will:

  • Review the balance transfer offer from Capital One
  • Provide details on who can be approved for the offer
  • Decode the fine print, so that you know how to avoid tricks and traps that could cost you

Note: If you are looking to get out of debt, you should consider downloading our free Debt Free Guide. It will show you how to slash your interest rates, boost your credit score, negotiate hard with creditors and become debt-free fast and forever. Balance transfers can be a great tool in your debt-free strategy, but everyone should have a strategy. And this guide can help you build one.

Offer Review

Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card

Quicksilver from Capital One

APPLY NOW Secured

on Capital One’s secure website

The Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card is best known for having no annual fee, and providing unlimited 1.5% cash back on all of your spend. Unlike many cash back credit cards, there are no rotating categories, no caps, and no minimums for getting your cash back. They really raised the bar on cash back credit cards, until Citibank created the Citi® Double Cash Card which does the same thing, except you earn unlimited 1% cash back when you buy, plus an additional 1% as you pay for those purchases.

Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card offers 0% for 9 months on balance transfers, with a 3% fee. When compared to the rest of the market, this is a mediocre intro period. You can find cards with intro periods of 15, 21 and 24 months. We list all of the balance transfer options here.

Approval Criteria

Capital One markets this card for people with excellent credit. On their website, excellent credit is defined as someone who:

  • Has never declared bankruptcy or defaulted on a loan
  • Hasn’t been more than 60 days late on any credit card, medical bill, or loan in the last year
  • Has had a loan or credit card for 3 years or more with a credit limit above $5,000

If your credit score isn’t excellent, your options are much more limited. In fact, we recommend considering a personal loan to get a lower rate on your debt, where you will have a better chance of getting a higher loan amount.

 Fine Print Alert

Balance transfers can save you a lot of money. However, there are certain traps out there, and if you fall for those traps it could end up costing you a lot of money. Make sure you do the following:

  • If you are approved for your balance transfer credit card, complete the balance transfer right away. The 0% promotional offer begins the day your account is open.
  • Set up automatic payments so that you are never late. Even being late by one day can result in a steep late fee. And, if you are late by 60 days or more, you can see a big spike in your interest rate.
  • Don’t spend on the credit card. Although Capital One does offer 0% on purchases, they do that as a temptation. They want you to spend, so that you don’t use the promotional period to pay down your debt. If you are using a balance transfer, you should be doing it to get out of debt faster.

To learn more about balance transfers, you can visit our learning center.

Balance transfers, when used properly, can take years off your debt repayment. With proper credit behavior, the Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card can save you money and help rid you of debt.

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5 Gig Economy Websites That Help You Make More Money

GirlComputer

In the United States, the way people work is dramatically changing.

The proliferation of the gig economy is shifting the American worker’s view of nine-to-five employment and creating endless possibilities for earning extra cash to help pay the bills and make ends meet.

According to a recent analysis of gig economy and workforce data conducted by Nation 1099, about one-third of all US workers did at least some freelance work last year. What’s more, about 11% of all workers are full-time freelancers and about 22% have embraced side hustling or moonlighting.

Giant gig economy platforms such as Fiverr and Upwork may be well known, but there are quite literally hundreds of similar sites, with more popping up every day. A growing number of these sites specialize in offering niche services—ranging from voiceover work to dog walking, engineering, financial consulting, and website development.

“When it comes to freelancing and the gig economy, all signals show it’s growing even larger,” said trends expert and public speaker Daniel Levine, founding director of Avant-Guide Institute. “What’s so great about these sites is they’re bringing together people from around the world. Borders are disappearing. Before you had to be in the same country for an employee and employer to meet.”

Here are five gig economy sites that can help you earn a few extra dollars or provide a springboard to a full-time freelance career.

1. Rover.com

Phoenix resident Melanie Lewis works at home while she pursues a career in writing. About two years ago, she searched for a way to supplement her writing income and a friend helped her find Rover.com.

Through the site, she makes anywhere from $500 to $1,000 extra each month, by either boarding dogs or offering dog-walking and drop-in services.

“One of my favorite things about Rover is that you set your own rates for the services you offer, so you control what you charge and how much you earn,” said Lewis.

The site, which operates in dozens of cities across the US and Canada, connects dog owners with a variety of services—dog walking, doggy day care, dog boarding, drop-in visits, and house sitting. Note that background checks are required for those seeking to work through the site.

2. Fiverr

Launched in 2010, Fiverr has become one of the gig economy giants. The site has tens of thousands of users who generate steady secondary incomes by offering creative and professional services—everything from graphic design to writing, translation, illustration, and marketing.

Fiverr’s global community of freelancers now includes more than 100 service categories and people doing business in 190 countries.

The site is named Fiverr because the starting price for services is a mere $5, but that’s just a starting point. Advanced sellers can augment their services, charging more money for additional tasks. For example, a copyeditor might charge $5 for editing, but add higher fees for formatting, layout, or rush turnaround.

In addition, the site just introduced FiverrPro, a higher-end initiative that matches curated, talented professionals with those seeking services.

3. Upwork

Previously known as Elance-oDesk, Upwork enables businesses and independent professionals from around the globe to connect and collaborate. It’s another giant in the gig economy. The range of work available through the site is mind boggling—everything from web, mobile, and software development to writing, administrative support, customer service, sales and marketing, and accounting and consulting.

Hourly and fixed-price jobs are available through Upwork. And the beauty of the site is that Upwork processes all payments and invoicing, eliminating the hassle of chasing down clients to get paid through a third-party platform. For hourly jobs, Upwork even offers payment protection, ensuring you don’t get stiffed for any work completed.

4. Babierge

If you have piles of baby gear and toddler toys sitting unused around the house, Babierge is made for you.

Babierge (a combination of baby and concierge) is a sharing economy platform for baby gear. Think of it as the Airbnb for baby gear. The site’s baby gear entrepreneurs rent, deliver, and set up baby gear, games, and toys at hotels and vacation rentals, and then return to pick it up on departure day.

Though you may not have heard of Babierge, don’t underestimate it. It has workers in 82 markets, with new locations added each week.

“When you look at the money you can make at Babierge based on the hours you put in, the pay is about $40 per hour,” said Trish McDermott, vice president of community and communications for Babierge. “Not bad for gig work.”

Some of the site’s most active workers make as much as $700 per month.

5. Efynch

One last up-and-coming site worth noting is Efynch, a platform designed to connect professional and freelance contractors and maintenance workers with jobs.

Operating in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and northern Virginia, Efynch currently has about 3,000 users and plans to expand to at least ten more cities on the East Coast by spring.

“In addition to skilled workers, anyone with a truck is basically a valuable commodity and can easily make $50 or more per hour on our site,” said cofounder Teris Pantazes. “I’ve had some people make more than $5,000 per month on my site as full-timers. Freelance or side workers probably average between $500 and $1,000 if they work a few evenings or a couple Saturdays.”

Modeled after Upwork but tailored to the contractor and maintenance crowd, the site offers a range of gigs, from simple manual labor tasks such as mowing a lawn to far more complex jobs such as carpentry.

Anyone can join the freelance movement. It just takes a little paperwork and planning. If the lifestyle speaks to you, you should fill out a 1099 and be ready to navigate the financial ins and outs of self-employment. Start by getting your free credit report and gain insights into how you can build your credit while you freelance. Embrace the hustle while maintaining a handle on your finances, and you’ll be set up for success.

Image: istock

The post 5 Gig Economy Websites That Help You Make More Money appeared first on Credit.com.

4 Financial Factors to Keep in Mind When Budgeting for College

States-Grads-Ditch-After-College-2

In the US, the amount of student debt has reached over $1.4 trillion. The bad news for students currently planning on attending college is that tuition isn’t getting any cheaper. Insofar as there’s good news, students are being more financially cautious when planning for college, researching their student loan options, opting to stay in state, or even taking time to earn residency for out-of-state public schools. But college costs aren’t just about paying the university itself. Here are some expected and some less obvious costs students need to budget for when heading to college.

1. Factor in Student Loan Interest

You already know to think about tuition (and perhaps how it compares to the amount of financial aid your top choices offer), but one thing many students don’t really think about until the first bill comes in is how much student loan interest can add to the overall cost.

For the average loan rate of $30,000 at 4% interest, the interest adds over $7,000 for the life of the loan. And that’s if you make all your payments on time—many students end up with loan amounts far higher than that. Some students learn the hard way that they’ll be paying about as much in interest as the amount they took out—or more. You don’t want to be taken by surprise when you get your first bill, so make sure you factor interest in early on.

2. Look into All of a School’s Required Expenses and Fees

Though tuition is the biggest expense, colleges routinely require a large number of other expenses. Textbooks and supplies can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars. Further, many schools expect students to live on campus and purchase a meal plan their first year, and these annual on-campus housing and meal plans can cost about $9,000.

According to the New York Times, mandatory fees are on the rise, and they cost students at four-year public colleges nearly $1,700 during the 2015–2016 school year. These fees range from understandable to seemingly arbitrary—schools charge for everything from dropping a class to “student success fees.” In fact, mandatory fees have risen 30% more than tuition since 1999, so make sure you look into what fees will tack on to your overall college expenses.

3. Consider Transportation

Wherever you go to college, you’ll need to get around. Some schools are located in areas with thriving public transportation or have compact enough campuses that you can bike or walk most of the time. In these cases, you should simply check how much public transportation costs (it could be free or heavily discounted for students), and consider bike maintenance expenses in your budgeting if relevant.

If your school is located somewhere where a car is necessary (or if you want the option of driving home on the weekends), then you have a number of additional expenses to consider—in addition to the car itself, of course:

  • Parking—Many colleges charge hefty parking fees (often to discourage crowding the campus with cars). However, some housing will include parking spaces or garages.
  • Insurance—If you’re staying in state for school, you can stay on a parent’s insurance policy (as long as your primary residence is still your home address). Make sure you consider coverage beyond the state-required liability coverage, and always make sure to compare quotes to find the best coverage at the best rate.
  • Gas—Pro tip: If your friends are bumming rides to the grocery store or elsewhere around campus, ask them to chip in for gas.
  • Maintenance—Take preventative care of your car, get regular check-ups, and keep supplies like jumper cables and an ice scraper in your trunk.

Don’t forget the wonders of modern transportation options. Consider ridesharing or check out car2go or Zipcar for on-demand driving alternatives.

Also, if you’re heading a longer distance from home to go to school, you’ll need to factor flights into your yearly expenses.

4. Don’t Forget the Fun Stuff

Yes, you’re there to learn, but college is full of new experiences, so don’t neglect budgeting for those as well.

Big sports fan? Season student tickets to football, basketball, hockey, etc. can cost a chunk of change. Into theater or music? College campuses draw great talent on small and big stages alike, and ticket prices can run a wide range.

Cold or hot beverage? Pitch in for a tailgate beer or two, and anticipate needing LOTS of caffeine. And ice cream can help get you through exams, so put a little change aside for these treats, too.

Spring break can also be expensive. Whether it’s a trip to the beach or the ski slopes, if a springtime trip is in your future, set some travel funds aside.

Bonus Build Good Financial Habits Now (and Thank Yourself Later)

In addition to budgeting, you can start building other good financial habits for long-term benefit.

Start earning. Think about work options—but don’t be overly ambitious. Working during your college years can help offset your expenses, but if you try to work too much, you risk letting your studies slip and not getting your money’s worth for tuition. Don’t assume you can pull off a full-time job and still finish in four years when you’re working out your budget. Consider a more realistic goal of 15–20 hours a week, and if you decide to do work-study, apply fast before the jobs get snatched up.

Start building credit.

College is the perfect time to seriously start building your credit so you can more easily navigate post-college life.

Consider getting a student credit card and responsibly using it so you build your credit during your four years. Start with a small credit line and choose a card that rewards you for making your payments on time. When you build your credit during college, you’ll be set up to smoothly maneuver the post-grad life experiences that require good credit, including finding housing, purchasing a car, saving on insurance, or starting your own business. Your credit score is partly affected by your track record of making credit payments over time, so you’ll be glad you started building your credit early.

College is expensive, and even if you do everything right, there’s still a good chance you’ll have loans hanging over your head for a while after graduation. It’s worth making cautious decisions based on financial considerations when choosing your college and budgeting for the next four years, but know that if you keep up with your studies, it will likely all pay off.

Image: baona 

The post 4 Financial Factors to Keep in Mind When Budgeting for College appeared first on Credit.com.

The Equifax Breach and the Cybersecurity Silver Bullet

acer hack

Some time ago, the popular show Mythbusters wanted to find out if the Lone Ranger was right about silver bullets being better than lead ones. Turns out silver bullets are actually slower and less accurate.

When it comes to cybersecurity, quick-fix silver bullets are also less effective than tried-and-true approaches. The most effective cybersecurity strategies begin with two certainties: mistakes will be made, and breaches like the one that hit Equifax will keep happening.

The 143 million consumers exposed in the Equifax breach provide plenty of evidence that there’s still no effective “silver bullet” when it comes to both chronic and acute threats to our collective cybersecurity.

While the Equifax breach is by no means the largest hack to date (that distinction still belongs to Yahoo), it definitely stands out as the breach with the greatest potential to harm its victims.

The Equifax hackers got the most complete data dossiers possible on millions of people. Those dossiers are worth about $30 on the black market and include Social Security numbers, names, addresses, birth dates, and, in some cases, driver’s license numbers. Additionally, the credit card numbers of 209,000 consumers were lifted.

What can be done with this information? Just about every sort of identity theft imaginable.

Credit lines and credit-worthiness can be destroyed overnight, health care records can be polluted with the information of thieves using your benefits illegally, and it can be nearly impossible to get medications filled in a timely manner. Crimes can even be committed in your name, since the thieves have all they need to create a driver’s license with your information and someone else’s photograph.

No Easy Fix

If there were any easy way to solve the data-breach problem, we’d be seeing fewer newsworthy compromises. But as yet, nothing works.

Take, for instance, biometrics. Fingerprints, retina scans, body weight, and shoe size—they offer a great addition to the various ways we authenticate ourselves to the systems storing our data. But they are not a true fix. If a security patch released by a software provider is not installed, as happened in the Equifax breach, it doesn’t matter how many body parts you scan.

Picture the mailboxes in the lobby of a city dwelling—the individual boxes can be opened with one master key so the letter carrier can slot the mail for all the apartments at the same time. It doesn’t matter how well you protect the key for your one apartment’s mailbox if a thief gets access to the master key. The same goes for individual cyber hygiene in the face of a breach.

One of the most promising solutions was once thought to be tokenization—a system of referents that create an impenetrable security trail—but it suffers from the same issue that was behind the Equifax hack: human beings messing up.

Tokenization systems have to be secured and validated using security best practices. That’s where the fallibility part creeps in. Those best practices still need to be implemented by fallible humans with busy lives who have not been told—and consistently reminded—that they are the only solution to the data breach problem.

Data breaches and the identity-related crimes that flow from them are the third certainty in life—right after death and taxes—because there will always be that fallible human element. Education can help mitigate the risks, but even the savviest populace will make mistakes.

Real Solutions

Senator Elizabeth Warren has set her sights on the three credit reporting bureaus, specifically demanding that they offer credit freezes for free. The looming threat of credit hijacking is made possible by the hoarding of information—the credit reporting bureaus’ daily bread. It seems logical, then, that the bureaus should have to pay for the most common crime that data can lead to: credit fraud.

While new laws are good, education is the only real solution.

For many years now I have been advocating a system called the Three Ms, which are the centerpiece of my book, Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers and Identity Thieves.

Practicing the Three Ms continues to be the best way to keep your personally identifiable information from being used in identity-related crimes. 

  1. Minimize your exposure. Don’t click on suspicious or unfamiliar links; don’t authenticate yourself to anyone unless you are in control of the interaction; don’t overshare on social media; be a good steward of your passwords; opt for two-factor authentication whenever it’s offered; safeguard any documents that can be used to hijack your identity; and freeze your credit.
  2. Monitor your accounts. Check your credit reports religiously (you can check your credit report for free on Credit.com); keep track of your credit scores; review major financial accounts daily if possible (better yet, sign up for free transaction alerts from financial services institutions and credit card companies); read the Explanation of Benefits statements you receive from your health insurer; and seriously consider purchasing a sophisticated credit- and identity-monitoring program.
  3. Manage the damage. Make sure you get on top of any incursion into your identity quickly and enroll in a program where professionals help you navigate and resolve identity compromises—oftentimes available for free, or at minimal cost, through insurance companies, financial services institutions, and employers.

The odds of President Trump giving his entire fortune to the NAACP are probably better than the chances that we’ll be experiencing fewer big breaches in the future. An individual’s security protocol is only so useful, but an individual’s actions make all the difference.

Image: istock

The post The Equifax Breach and the Cybersecurity Silver Bullet appeared first on Credit.com.

BB&T CD Rates and Review

Trying to find BB&T CD rates
Source: iStock

As you may know if you’ve done a search for BB&T CD rates, their website is not a helpful place to turn for information. Beyond a basic overview of their CDs on their website stating that they have CDs with terms ranging from seven days to five years, they do not give details on their current rates. BB&T did not respond to email and phone inquiries from MagnifyMoney asking why the bank does not publish its CD rates online.

When we called their customer service number, a representative said BB&T’s CD rates change on a daily basis and said the best way to learn about CD rates is to call or visit a local branch.

So that’s what we did.

We called BB&T branches on Sept. 5 and, on the same day, compared their CD rates to other banks and the national averages. After conducting this research, it’s not surprising BB&T makes their CD rates hard to find — they’re terrible.

BB&T CD rates and products

BB&T offers CD terms ranging from as short as seven days to as long as five years. They have eight CD options, each with different investment goals.

7-day to 60-month

For short-term investments, BB&T offers CDs ranging from seven days to 60 months. These personal CDs offer a fixed rate of return along with the flexibility to focus on developing either a short- or long-term investment.

BB&T CD Term

APY

Minimum Deposit Amount

3 Months

0.03%

$2,500

6 Months

0.05%

$2,500

1 Year

0.10%

$1,000

18 Months

0.15%

$1,000

2 years

0.20%

$1,000

3 Years

0.40%

$1,000

4 Years

0.45%

$1,000

5 Years

0.50%

$1,000

Rates as of Sept. 5, 2017

Not only can you find better CD rates at other banks and credit unions for each of the terms BB&T offers, you can get those better rates with smaller minimum deposits. BB&T’s offerings are far from the best in every term length above — you can see some of the top options in our monthly roundup of the best CD rates.

With the seven-day to 60-month BB&T CDs, there are no penalty-free options for withdrawing your funds prior to the CD reaching maturity. The early withdrawal penalty is the lesser of $25 or 12 months of interest for longer-term CDs. So with smaller initial deposits, early withdrawal penalties will negate any interest you may have earned.

Can’t Lose

As the name of this CD implies, whether rates go up or down, you can’t lose. Well, actually, you can: The APY is so low, you’re almost certainly going to lose money to inflation.

At the 12-month mark of the CD’s term, you may make one withdrawal without paying any fees. So if the market rate is higher than what you’re currently getting, simply withdraw the money and reinvest at the higher rate.

If, however, the interest rate you’re receiving is better than what’s currently available, you also have the option of making a second deposit into the Can’t Lose CD, up to $10,000. This locks in the rate for the new investment amount for the remainder of the term. So whether rates go up or down, you’ll lock in the higher rate.

CD Term

APY

Minimum
Deposit Amount

Withdrawal
Penalties

30-month "Can't Lose"

0.25

$1,000

No penalty for one
withdrawal after 12 months

As of Sept. 5, 2017

Still, you can find many CDs with better APYs than BB&T’s Can’t Lose, whether you’re looking for a 12-month investment or longer.

Stepped Rate

Laddering is a way to stagger your CD investments so you’re able to take advantage of increasing rates. With the Stepped Rate option from BB&T, laddering is built into the CD product. The initial CD starts out at a lower rate and increases each year. For example:

Months

APY

12

0.30%

24

0.40%

36

0.55%

48

0.75%

As of Sept. 5, 2017

This product also allows you to make an additional deposit each year (up to $10,000). So if the interest rate you’re receiving is better than the market, you can invest more money into your existing CD to make a higher return. But if the current CD market is offering better rates than your existing CD, you can simply take advantage of that offer and still make a higher return.

In addition, you may make a withdrawal from what you initially deposited into your Stepped Rate CD after two years. So, again, if the market changes dramatically, you may withdraw your money with no penalty and reinvest in a better option.

Or you could create a CD ladder on your own, choosing CDs with better rates than BB&T’s — higher rates are certainly available.

Add-on

The Add-on CD option from BB&T offers a 12-month CD at 0.10% and an opening deposit of $100. You’ll need a BB&T checking account and a $50/month automatic deposit from your checking account into the CD. To get a personal account, you’ll just need to set up direct deposit or maintain a $1,500 balance.

CD Term

APY

Minimum
Deposit Amount

Withdrawal
Penalties

12-month Add-on

0.10%

$100

Greater of $25 or
6 months’ interest

As of Sept. 5, 2017

Home Saver

If you’re in the market for a new home, and you want to earn a little more interest on the money you’re saving, consider the Home Saver CD. Starting with as little as $100, you’ll be able to deposit money earmarked for your new home every month and earn 0.40% APY. With this CD, as long as you’re withdrawing the money for use toward the purchase of your new home, you won’t pay any penalties for the withdrawal. But you will need a BB&T checking account set up for a monthly deposit of $50 into your Home Saver CD.

CD Term

APY

Minimum
Deposit Amount

Withdrawal
Penalties

36-month Home Saver

0.40%

$100

No penalty for
home purchase

As of Sept. 5, 2017

College Saver

Similar to the Home Saver CD, the College Saver CD is meant for parents or students saving for college. It offers the benefit of starting at a higher APY (0.40%) with the flexibility of withdrawing the money up to four times per year to pay for the cost of attending school. As with the Home Saver, you’ll need to have a BB&T checking account with an automatic monthly deposit of $50. The College Saver offers terms of 36, 48, and 60 months.

CD Term

APY

Minimum
Deposit Amount

Withdrawal
Penalties

36-month College Saver

0.40%

$100

No penalty for
school costs

48-month College Saver

0.45%

$100

No penalty for
school costs

60-month College Saver

0.50%

$100

No penalty for
school costs

As of Sept. 5, 2017

Treasury

This CD offers the ability to make additional deposits of at least $100 into your CD at any time and one monthly withdrawal without penalty. The CD has a six-month term with a variable interest rate tied to the U.S. Treasury Bill — if the rate goes up, you’ll make more money, but if the rate declines, you’ll make less. Right now, rates start at 0.05% and adjust quarterly. Throughout 2016, Treasury Bill rates increased almost every month and have continued to rise in 2017, reaching 1.035% in August. So this is a great option if you have the $5,000 minimum deposit amount and want a short-term investment with the option to add or remove funds from the CD.

CDARS

CDARS stands for Certificate of Deposit Account Registry Service and protects your principal and interest by making sure your money is placed into multiple CDs across a network of banks to keep your CDs insured by the FDIC (maximum limit for each CD is $250,000).

Other things to know about BB&T CDs

Does BB&T allow customers to take advantage of rising rates once they’ve opened a CD?

BB&T has two CD options that allow you to take advantage of rising rates: the 30-month Can’t Lose CD and the 48-month Stepped Rate CD. Both allow you to make a withdrawal before the CD comes to maturity in case rates increase (terms apply). They also allow additional deposits in case rates drop and you want to invest more at the existing rate of your CD. However, the current rates on those products are very low, negating the value of their flexibility.

About BB&T

BB&T (Branch Banking and Trust Co.) is a North Carolina-based bank with locations in 16 states and the District of Columbia, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.

BB&T offers a mobile app for both iOS and Android. While their website is easy enough to use, finding specific information, particularly about rates, is impossible. Their customer service number isn’t much help in that regard either, with most questions answered with a suggestion to visit a branch location. As a result, if you don’t live in an area with a branch, we don’t recommend using BB&T’s CDs. To find the BB&T branch closest to you, use their branch locator.

Pros and cons of CDs

A certificate of deposit (CD) may offer a higher return than you’ll get with your savings accounts, without the risk of loss that accompanies other investment options with higher return rates. The drawbacks associated with CDs are the inability to access your funds during the term of the investment without suffering a penalty and the risk of interest rates increasing while your money is locked into a CD for a specified term.

The bottom line: Are BB&T CDs right for you?

BB&T does offer some flexible deals to its customers, but in general, better CD rates can be found at both banks and credit unions with comparable terms. You can find them on our list of the best CD rates, which we update every month.

The post BB&T CD Rates and Review appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Do You Really Need Pet Insurance?

iStock

More pet owners are buying insurance to cover the cost of accidents, illness and routine checkups, but that hasn’t made it any easier to decide if it’s really worth the extra expense or not.

Nearly 1.8 million pets were insured in the United States and Canada in 2016, which is an 11.5 percent increase from 2015, according to the North American Pet Health Insurance Association (NAPHIA).

Still, that represents a mere fraction of the estimated 400 million pets living in U.S. households today.

One factor holding pet owners back from investing in an insurance plan for their pet could be cost. Annual premiums for coverage can range from $163 (accident-only coverage) to $496 per pet (for a plan that covers both accidents and illnesses), according to the NAPHIA. Those costs can become much higher depending on the age of your pet, type of animal and where you live.

It’s also common for pet insurance plans to come with deductibles, so pet owners could easily still face hefty medical bills even with insurance.

With the increase in how much Americans spend on their pets — from $60.28 billion in 2015 to $66.75 billion in 2016 to an expected $69.36 billion in 2017 — as well as insurers offering coverage, it’s important to determine if insurance is a smart financial option for your furry friends.

What Pet Insurance Covers — and What It Doesn’t

Depending on the insurer and how much you’re willing to pay, you can get several different tiers of coverage for a pet.

The most basic plans offer one or the other: wellness visits or accident-only coverage (similar to a catastrophic health care plan for us humans). At a more comprehensive level, plans can cover illnesses and wellness visits as well as routine checkups. Prices also vary based on what type of pet you have.

For example, Nationwide offers a comprehensive dog insurance plan that covers wellness exams and visits, accidents, hereditary conditions, chronic conditions, and pay back up to 90 percent on some veterinary bills. The price starts at $65 per month or $780 per year. You can pay less and get less coverage.

Their so-called “major medical plan” covers accidents and illnesses but doesn’t offer coverage for wellness exams. The plan starts at $35 per month.

And at the bottom rung of coverage is a wellness plan starting at $18 per month and offering basic coverage for things like flea and heartworm prevention and vaccinations.

It make take time, but it’s important to comparison shop between different pet insurers before you decide on a plan. Sites like petinsurancequotes.com offer ways to compare insurers and plans.

What pet insurance doesn’t cover

While pet insurance can cover many emergencies, the type of plan you purchase will determine if the insurance pays for medical care beyond accidents. Wellness visits and vaccines are not covered by Trupanion, for example, which insures only cats and dogs. Grooming and nail trimming are not included in Nationwide’s wellness package.

While it’s now law that insurers can’t deny humans insurance based on pre-existing conditions, the same perk isn’t enjoyed by pets. Pet insurers such as Trupanion and Nationwide do not cover pre-existing conditions that the pet had before coverage began. Nationwide limits coverage for hereditary disorders by breed — such as cardiac arrhythmia in Boxers — in some plans, but offers full coverage for those conditions in its comprehensive Whole Pet with Wellness plan.

For this reason, the best time to purchase pet insurance is when the pet is young because there is little chance of pre-existing conditions. The average age of insured cats and dogs was 4.86 years in 2016, according to NAPHIA.

When Pet Insurance Makes Sense

In 2016, Americans spent $66.75 billion on pets, according to data from the American Pet Products Association. Of that, Americans spent $14.71 billion on pet supplies and over-the-counter medicine and $15.95 billion on vet care alone.

“Now people are demanding more for their pets,” says Dr. Simon Platt, a veterinary neurologist and professor at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine.

Insurance appeals to pet owners who prefer to pay a monthly cost for future health expenses instead of doling out hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars when care is needed.

When Destin Miller’s mixed border collie, ?zil, had gastric problems, her pet insurance from Trupanion covered $320 of the $350 bill for medication, fluids, blood work, and 24 cans of special dog food. The $30 that Trupanion did not cover were the dog’s two exams.

“They were all approved … extremely quickly,” says Miller, 23, a graduate student at the University of Georgia in Athens, Ga.

Miller says it is easier for her and her fiancé to pay about $80 per month in pet insurance because she knows it could help cover greater expenses when her dogs are sick.

“It’s a nice safety net,” she says.

In 2016, the average claim amount paid for accident and illness plans was $263 in the United States, according to the NAPHIA 2017 report.

When deciding whether or not to purchase pet insurance for your animal, there are several factors to consider other than cost:

  • Breed: Know the risks and medical conditions associated with your breed, such as if your dog is likely to have diabetes, to determine if it will be covered or if the level of coverage will be enough for your pet’s care now or in the future. Also, if you have a purebred or pedigree dog or cat, it may have inherited medical conditions that could be considered high risk and too expensive to treat.
  • Age: Typically, your pet needs to be at least eight weeks old to be covered, according to NAPHIA. But you also don’t want to wait too long to get coverage because your pet may be too old for a company to insure because of the potential for high costs of care with age.
  • Waiting period: For most policies, you will need to wait 10 to 30 days for the insurance to kick in, according to NAPHIA.
  • Number of pets: Some insurers may limit the number of pets you can insure, particularly if they are considered “high risk,” according to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). But others may give you a discount if you are insuring more than one pet.

How much should I pay for pet insurance?

Insurance companies provide a variety of plans. Pet insurance can vary due to different factors such as species, geographic location, age and gender.

Don’t simply purchase the plan with the cheapest premium. Look at the deductible as well, because that’s how much you’ll have to pay out of pocket before your insurance kicks in. You should also consider how much you are paying for your pet’s care today and how much care you anticipate your pet will need in the future. Paying for a more expensive plan may be worth the money if you make several visits to the vet each year.

Trupanion allows its customers to choose their own deductible from $0 to $1,000, which allows pet owners to choose a premium that works with their budget, says Emily Coté, director of customer marketing for Trupanion, a Seattle-based pet insurer.

For example, Nationwide offers these examples: Coverage for a small mixed-breed puppy, under the age of one and located in San Diego, Calif., could cost $17.75 a month for a Wellness Basic plan from Nationwide or $49.94 per month with Nationwide’s Whole Pet with Wellness plan. Nationwide, after an annual $250 deductible, will pay up to 90 percent of all accidents.

For a kitten under the age of one, the Wellness Basic plan would cost $12 a month, and Nationwide’s Whole Pet with Wellness plan would be $35.25.

“People want that peace of mind,” Coté says. “It’s easier to budget that monthly amount and not have to make medical decisions due to finances.”

Where to shop for pet insurance

While pet insurance has been in the United States for about 35 years, the awareness and interest is much smaller than their European — most specifically British — counterparts, say insurers and veterinarians.

Platt says when he worked in the United Kingdom, he would fill out three to four insurance claim forms a day. Platt says he has filled out only three to four claims while living and working in the United States the past 11 years.

“I now see some major household insurance names offering it,” he says.

Shop around and compare rates. More than a dozen companies offer pet insurance, with some under brands and entities with names like Pet Protect and Nuzzle, based on a list of NAPHIA members and a list of companies compiled by the AVMA. Providers include major home, auto and life insurers, such as Nationwide and Geico, while some companies, such as Trupanion, PetFirst, and Healthy Paws, specialize in insuring animals. It’s important to get quotes from insurers and compare coverage yourself to make sure you’re getting the best rate.

Free trials from pet shelters. Pet shelters also sign up owners for insurance, typically by offering a free trial for the first 30 days. However, after the trial, you could be charged unless you cancel the policy. Discount membership clubs, such as Sam’s Club with PetFirst Pet Insurance, also offer pet insurance.

Your employer. Some companies, such as Deloitte, Microsoft, and Chipotle Mexican Grill offer pet insurance as an employee benefit. See if your employer offers a policy.

 

The post Do You Really Need Pet Insurance? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Can You Use a Personal Loan for a Home Down Payment?

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Scraping together the down payment on their mortgage is the biggest challenge facing many would-be homebuyers. And lots of those would probably like to use a personal loan to top up their savings so they reach their lender’s threshold. But can they do that?

The short answer is that few lenders would give their consent to a borrower looking to use a personal loan for their down payment. You would be taking on new debt and then taking on even more debt on top of that…not exactly the greatest solution.

The good news is that there are lots of different options out there for low down payment mortgages and even assistance programs that can help you get together funds for a down payment.

How Much Do I Really Need For A Down Payment?

Let’s make sure you know how big your down payment needs to be. Because, if you are a bit fuzzy on that, you are not alone. And you could be in for some good news.

A survey of professionals at a 2017 conference hosted by the Mortgage Bankers Association revealed a persistent myth: Twenty-eight percent of respondents thought “consumers still mistakenly believe that a 20 percent down payment is a requirement for purchasing a home.” And another four in 10 respondents thought that even those who knew 20 percent isn’t necessary still believed they’d find it difficult to buy a home with less.

Those consumers couldn’t be more wrong. Creditworthy buyers can usually get approved for a mortgage with a down payment as small as 3 or 3.5 percent. And some (more than you may think) who qualify for specialist mortgage programs need put down nothing. Discover more about all those options below.

Here are the minimum down payments required for a selection of mortgages.

Remember: You may get a better mortgage rate if you increase the amount you put down.

The Best Mortgages for a Low Down Payment

Type of Loan

Down Payment Requirement


Mortgage Insurance

Credit Score Requirement

FHA

FHA

3.5% for most

10% if your FICO credit score is between 500 and 579

Requires both upfront and annual mortgage insurance for all borrowers, regardless of down payment

500 and up

SoFi

SoFi

10%

No mortgage insurance required

Typically 700 or higher

VA Loan

VA Loan

No down payment required for eligible borrowers (military service members, veterans, or eligible surviving spouses)

No mortgage insurance required; however, there may be a funding fee, which can run from 1.25% to 2.4% of the loan amount

No minimum score
required

homeready

HomeReady

3% and up

Mortgage insurance required when homebuyers put down
< 20%; no longer required once the loan-to-value ratio reaches 78% or less

620 minimum

homeready

USDA

No down payment required

Ongoing mortgage insurance not required, but borrowers pay an upfront fee of 2% of the purchase price

620-640 minimum

Conventional loans (one not backed by a government program)
A conventional loan is simply a type of mortgage loan that isn’t backed by a government program. Usually these loans require a 5 to 20 percent down payment, though that can be as low as 3 percent using offerings such as Fannie Mae’s HomeReady or Freddie Mac’s Home Possible mortgages. You will need to be reasonably creditworthy.

SoFi

SoFI offers mortgage loans for minimum down payments of 10 percent. You can borrow between $100,000 and $3 million. And you will not have to pay for private mortgage insurance (we’ll talk more about PMI below), even though you have not reached the usual 20 percent down payment threshold. But you will need to have good-to-great credit and sound finances.

Federal Housing Administration mortgage (FHA loan)

FHA mortgages require a 3.5 percent down payment if your credit score is 580 or higher. This can be good if your credit score is less than stellar, but it may be more costly than other options. That is because you will be liable for mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs), which will be added to your monthly mortgage payments.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture mortgage (USDA loan)

USDA loans require no down payment, unless you have significant assets. There are various eligibility criteria, including your having a low to moderate income. And you must purchase in an eligible area, although those areas make up 97 percent of the nation’s land mass. You can check if you and your area qualify using a tool on the USDA website.

Veterans Affairs mortgage (VA loan)

VA loans also require no down payment. These are for veterans, those still serving in the military and related groups. You can check your eligibility on the VA website. If you qualify, it is highly likely this will be the best mortgage you can get.

Learn more by checking out our guide to The Best Mortgages That Require No or Low Down Payment.

3 Ways To Get Help With Your Mortgage Down Payment

Down payment assistance programs

Before exploring ways of borrowing to top up your down payment funds, you should definitely check out your eligibility under various assistance programs. These are typically targeted at middle- and low-income buyers, and you may have to use a lender that participates in the program.

Some programs provide outright grants or gifts that do not have to be repaid. And they are often available to both first-time buyers and existing homeowners.

Many of these down payment assistance (DPA) programs are state-based. You can click through to your local offering, if any, from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) website, which has a link for each state. You should also call your city or county to see if it operates a similar, parallel program.

Others are run across multiple states by nonprofits, such as the National Homebuyers Fund. Freddie Mac recommends a look-up tool on the private Down Payment Resource website as a way of tracking down DPA programs for which you might be eligible.

Finally, do not forget to check with your human resources department. Some employers offer help.

Using a gift from family or friends

Suppose you cannot get help from a mainstream DPA or your employer. Perhaps your parents or another close relative, fiancé, fiancée or domestic partner may be willing to give you a gift toward your down payment. Your lender should normally have no problems with this arrangement. But it is very likely to apply a couple of industry-standard rules:

  1. You must meticulously document the gift process and provide copies of the donor’s withdrawal slip or check, and the recipient’s deposit slip. If appropriate, a copy of the donor’s check to the closing agent is fine.
  2. You must provide a letter or form signed by the donor declaring that the payment is a gift and not a loan. This must include certain information and statements, and you can download a sample gift letter from the NOLO legal website.

Many lenders will allow this gift to cover 100 percent of the down payment. However, some may prefer you to provide some of the funds yourself.

Expect your loan officer to be mildly suspicious of large gifts. Some applicants try to sneak through money that is actually a loan in disguise, risking jail time or fines for mortgage fraud. If you raise any red flags, your loan officer can investigate the funds in great detail, including their ultimate source.

It is generally fine to borrow money from friends or relations for part of your down payment, providing you declare the loan(s) to your lender. It can then include your repayments when it assesses your ability to afford your mortgage.

Central to that assessment is your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio. As the name suggests, that is the proportion of your monthly income that goes out in debt payments, including minimum payments on credit cards and standard payments on instalment loans, such as auto, student and personal loans, as well as your new mortgage. You should also include any regular commitments for alimony or child support.

LendingTree has a DTI calculator that can help you determine yours. If you plan on borrowing for your down payment, include the payments on the loan(s) from your family or friends when you use it. It is unlikely a lender will allow your DTI to be higher than 50 percent. Some types of mortgage require 43 percent, and many lenders prefer it to be in the 30s.

Borrowing from yourself

One way to keep your DTI low is to borrow from yourself because not all lenders count repayments of such loans in your DTI, even if you have to make them. But you need to check your lender’s policy before you proceed, and either rule out this option or find a more sympathetic source for your mortgage.

How do you borrow from yourself? By raiding your retirement pot. You may be able to make a withdrawal or take a loan from your 401(k), IRA or Roth IRA to fund your down payment.

But, unless you are a tax accountant, you should take professional advice before doing so. No, really. This is a big step with lots of potential implications.

Potential implications of raiding your retirement funds

  1. Unless you use money in a Roth IRA, you could find yourself with significant tax liabilities if the loan isn’t repaid.
  2. If you withdraw money from your 401(k), your employer could demand immediate repayment in full if you switch jobs or otherwise leave.
  3. Some 401(k) funds have rules against this sort of borrowing.
  4. Whatever you do, there is a high chance your retirement fund will take a big hit.

As previously suggested, take advice from a trusted, reputable professional.

Advantages of making a 20 percent down payment

There’s a reason that 20 percent down payment myth survives. It may well be that, decades ago, your parents or grandparents had to find that much as a minimum.

And 20 percent remains an important threshold for borrowers. Put down that much or more, and you won’t have to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI).

You have to pay the premiums for PMI (they are mostly wrapped up in your monthly mortgage payment, but you may have to make an upfront payment too), but the only benefit you get from them is an ability to borrow with a smaller down payment. If any claim is made on the policy, probably because you have defaulted on your loan, the payout will go directly to the lender.

The biggest downside to a low down payment: PMI

Like we mentioned, most mortgage loans that come with a low down payment requirement have a big caveat — the added cost of private mortgage insurance.

The amount you pay for PMI will depend on the type of mortgage you choose and maybe your personal circumstances:

  • Conventional loan — You will get a quote from your lender. Monthly payments are typically lower than on some other types of mortgage and will depend on your credit score and the size of your down payment. Your upfront payment is likely to be small or sometimes zero.
  • SoFi loan — There is no PMI and so no MIPs on these loans with a down payment equal to or higher than 10 percent.
  • FHA loan — This is often the most expensive type of PMI. But its costs are not affected by your credit score, and the size of your down payment tends to have less impact. So this is a good bet if your credit is iffy and you don’t have substantial savings. At the time of writing, in 2017, you can expect to pay 1.75 percent of the loan value as an upfront charge, and then anything between 0.45 percent and 1.05 percent annually, depending on how much you borrowed and the sizes of your original loan and down payment. Although calculated on an annual basis, ongoing premiums are spread evenly through the year and collected through your monthly payments. If you cannot afford the upfront payment, it may be possible to wrap it up in your overall loan.
  • USDA loan — This is similar to the FHA loan’s PMI model, but typically has lower upfront and monthly payments. As with FHA loans, if you cannot afford the upfront payment, it may be possible to wrap it up in your overall loan.
  • VA loan — You do not pay ongoing monthly premiums with one of these. However, you do pay an upfront cost, called a “funding fee.” For first-time buyers in 2017, these range from 1.25 percent to 2.4 percent, depending on your type of service and the size of your down payment. For regular military with a zero down payment, it is 2.15 percent. If you cannot afford that funding fee, you may be able to wrap it up in your overall loan.

Most sorts of PMI terminate (either automatically or on request) when your mortgage balance reaches 80 percent of the contract price or the property’s appraised value when you bought your home. However, that does not apply to FHA loans. You will likely be on the hook for PMI premiums for those until you move or refinance.

Should you wait to get a mortgage until you can avoid PMI?

By now you may be pondering a dilemma: Should you jump into the market now and swallow those PMI costs? Or might you be better off holding back until you have the whole 20 percent down payment, thus avoiding PMI altogether?

Your smart choice largely depends on the real estate market where you want to buy. It might also depend on the market where you are selling, if you are not a first-time buyer. And it is mostly down to math.

A matter of math

Research home-price trends in your target neighborhood to see whether they are rising (they are in most places) and, if so, how quickly. Bear in mind that some forecasting companies expect growth to continue, but more slowly. For example, CoreLogic calculated home prices grew 6.7 percent nationwide in the year ending July 2017, but expects that to slow to 5 percent by July 2018.

It makes sense to go ahead and jump into the housing market if you anticipate that the value of your home will increase sufficiently year after year to offset the added cost of PMI.

Once you have a feel for those price trends, use a calculator like MagnifyMoney parent company LendingTree’s mortgage calculator to model your options. It will itemize your PMI as part of your total monthly payment. Work out how much you could save by avoiding PMI, and compare that with how much you stand to lose in home-price inflation if you wait to save that 20 percent.

You are now in a position to make an informed decision over whether to buy now or carry on saving. Of course, if in the meantime you find the home of your dreams, you can always choose to go with your heart rather than your head.

For more information, read What Is PMI and Is It Really That Bad?

One last thing about personal loans…

There are lots of things to like about personal loans. They are easy, quick and relatively cheap (or often free) to set up. They almost always have lower interest rates than credit cards for equivalent borrowers. And they make budgeting simple, because you know how much you will pay each month, subject to rate hikes.

However, typically their rates are noticeably higher than secured loans, such as mortgages and home equity products. And you need good credit to get a low interest rate.

Some lenders advertise personal loans for as much as $100,000. Others have more modest caps. How much you will be able to borrow will depend on many factors, including how easily you can afford to repay it and your credit score.

Find out more at Shopping for Personal Loans.

The post Can You Use a Personal Loan for a Home Down Payment? appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

America’s Super Saving Cities: The regional forces shaping America’s saving landscape

Where do America’s biggest savers live? Using IRS and U.S. Census data, MagnifyMoney created a City Saving Score for over 2,000 U.S. cities to explore which cities have the most savers and which cities have the biggest savings accounts.

On average, 29 percent of Americans who filed tax returns in 2016 earned interest income on their savings. Average interest income was $530 per return, representing 0.8 percent of total reported income. But regional, demographic and economic forces drive some cities to become super savers while others languish behind. Residents of Greenwich, Conn., earned an average of more than $25,000 in interest income per resident, while in Camden, N.J., just 4 percent of the residents had enough savings to require reporting to the IRS.

Why is there so much variation?

In this report, MagnifyMoney reveals America’s super saving cities, and the forces driving their success as savers.

Key Findings

  • Scarsdale and Garden City, N.Y., are tied for #1 as the cities with the biggest savers overall, with a City Saving Score of 99.6 out of 100.
  • Los Altos, Calif., has the highest concentration of savers — 71 percent of residents reported interest income on their tax returns.
  • Greenwich, Conn., residents earned the most from interest on savings — over $25,000 per filer.
  • Among cities with incomes under $150,000 a year, The Villages, Fla., had the biggest savers with a City Saving Score of 98.5.
  • Camden, N.J., had the lowest activity among savers — only 4 percent of residents reported interest income and an average $8 a year in interest.
  • Communities in the New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago metros represented over 75 percent of the top 5 percent of city saving rankings.

Behind the rankings: The ‘City Saving Score’

There is no comprehensive data that shows the average amount Americans are saving at a metro or city level, so we had to get a bit creative to determine where the biggest savers live.

To rank cities, MagnifyMoney created a “City Saving Score.” Using data for over 2,000 cities, MagnifyMoney ranked cities based on three factors:

  • Breadth of community savings (measured by the percentage of all tax returns that declared interest income, ranked by percentile).
  • Dedication to savings relative to income levels (measured by the percentage of total income that came from interest, ranked by percentile).
  • Magnitude of savings in the community (measured by the average interest income per tax return, ranked by percentile).

Top cities for big savers: Scarsdale and Garden City, New York

Scarsdale, N.Y., and Garden City, N.Y., scored the highest marks on our City Saving Score, with scores of 99.6 out of a possible 100.

They have an obvious advantage on the savings front — Scarsdale residents report an average income of more than $450,000 per tax return, putting them in the top 1 percent of earners in the U.S. today.

On average, savers in Scarsdale declared $9,258 in interest income — 17.5 times as much as the average American saver, who declared $530 in 2016.

Scarsdale savers are also enjoying a higher savings rate than many others. According to the IRS data, 2 percent of their income came from interest earned from savings accounts, which is 2.5 times the national rate of 0.8 percent.

It’s not just the savings volume driving Scarsdale’s place at the top. Two-thirds of Scarsdale residents reported interest income on their tax returns in 2016. That’s more than twice the national rate of 29 percent.

In Garden City, N.Y., residents earned just over $247,000 on average, putting the average household in the top 5 percent of American earners. Just under two-thirds (64 percent) of Garden City residents report income from interest.

However, with the average Garden City resident declaring $5,520 in interest, that represents 2.2 percent of overall income (10 percent more than their peers in Scarsdale, and almost three times the national rate).

The city where (almost) everyone saves: Los Altos, California

In addition to focusing on the amount people earn from their savings, we wanted to look at the share of savers in each city, which gives us an idea of a community’s total commitment to saving. The IRS requires anyone who earns more than $10 in interest income to declare interest income on their tax return. Even in the current low-interest environment, many middle-income savers could have qualified to declare interest income in 2016.

Among the top 10 cities with the most savers, two (The Villages, Fla., and Sun City West, Ariz.) had average incomes below $100,000 in 2016. Both cities feature large retirement communities, and these residents may have a higher propensity to keep their investments liquid compared with younger residents.

However the city with the most savers was Los Altos, Calif., where the average reported income is $476,000 annually. In Los Altos, nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of residents were savers. This is more than double the national average of 29 percent. The average interest income in Los Altos, Calif., was $5,299 — 10 times the national average.

Sky-high interest income in Greenwich, Connecticut

Greenwich, Conn., may not have the highest share of savers in the country (just over half (52 percent) of the city’s residents declared interest income on their tax returns in 2016). But their savers are making a bundle on earned interest.

Average interest income per return for the 2016 tax year was $25,451 — more than 48 times the national average of $530. If savers in Greenwich earned an average of 2% interest on their savings, the average saver would have held nearly $1.3 million in savings. The more than $25,000 in interest income constitutes 3.8 percent of the average reported Greenwich income, which is $664,000 annually thanks to a large number of hedge fund managers and other finance executives living in the area.

In terms of absolute interest income, Greenwich savers lead the pack by a wide margin. Second place Beverly Hills earns $16,638 in interest, just two-thirds of the Greenwich rate. In third place, Scarsdale earns $9,258.

Where do the biggest savers live?

Over three-quarters (77 percent) of the cities with scores of 95 or above came from just five major metro areas. These include the New York Tri-State area, the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, San Francisco Bay Area, Southern California, and Chicago. Retirement communities in Arizona and Florida also feature prominently in the top saving communities, while just 15 percent of all major savings hubs are outside one of the areas mentioned above.

High saving doesn’t require high income

All cities with average incomes in excess of $250,000 earned a savings score of 90. However, some cities with lower incomes made surprise appearances near the top of the savings ranking.

In fact, 14 cities with incomes under $150,000 a year had scores of 95 or above in our study. Many of these “thrifty cities” have large retiree populations like The Villages, Fla., and Sun City West, Ariz. However, other thrifty cities included family-oriented suburbs where average households earned an upper-middle-class income.

  • Agoura Hills, Calif. (96.6 score), a Los Angeles suburb where a quarter of all residents are under the age of 19. Average income among tax filers in the city is $137,000, 60 percent of the average income of other top saving cities. Despite having more children and lower incomes than most other big saving cities, half of Agoura Hills households reported interest income. The average saver in Agoura Hills earned $1,913 per year in interest, 3.6 times the national average of $530.
  • Arcadia, Calif. (95.7 score) is another Los Angeles suburb with an average reported income of $101,000. In addition to modest average incomes (by Southern California standards), nearly 1 in 4 residents in Arcadia is under the age of 19. This means that plenty of households have to pay the high costs of raising kids. In spite of this, 48 percent of taxpayers report interest income, with the average return boasting $1,420 in interest income.
  • Towson, Md. (95.1 score), home of Towson University. In the Baltimore suburb, half (49 percent) of filers report interest income from savings. Despite an average reported income of $125,558, savers earned an average of $1,464 in interest income in 2014.

Where saving isn’t happening

Although rising interest rates are a boon for savers, plenty of communities will struggle as consumer debt rates rise, and income prospects remain middling. The cities with the lowest savings scores are spread throughout the country, but they have a few things in common. The average reported income in the bottom 5 percent was $35,000. That’s 41 percent less than the median income household in the United States today.

Most of the worst saving cities lost job-heavy industries over the course of the last 20 to 50 years. Rust Belt cities like Detroit, Mich., and East St. Louis, Ill., over-represent the bottom 5 percent in savings ranks. Likewise, former industrial towns in the Northeast like Camden, N.J., and Chester, Pa., also fell into the bottom 5 percent of saving cities. Many of the worst saving cities suffer from declining populations as younger generations seek economic opportunities elsewhere.

METHODOLOGY: How we ranked cities with the biggest savers

To rank cities, MagnifyMoney created a “City Saving Score” on a scale of 0 to 100 that included three equally weighted components:

  • How broadly members of the community saved (measured by the percentage of all tax returns that declared interest income, ranked by percentile).
  • The community’s dedication to saving regardless of their income (measured by the percentage of total income that came from interest, ranked by percentile).
  • The absolute magnitude of savings in the community (measured by the average interest income per tax return, ranked by percentile).

MagnifyMoney measured these factors using anonymized data from tax returns filed with the IRS from January 1 to December 31, 2016. ZIP code level data was translated to a city level using the primary city assigned to each ZIP code. The study was limited to cities with a combined primary ZIP code population of 25,000 or more.

To be counted as a saving household, the taxpayer must declare interest income using a form 1099 on their 2016 tax returns. Any filers who earned over $10 on investments, including a high-yield checking or savings account, a CD, a money market account or certain types of taxable bonds, would have reported this income to the IRS.

Interest income is an imperfect way to measure a particular community’s dedication to saving. Many people keep their cash in low-yield checking accounts, and some savers will not use financial instruments declared on Form 1099. In many parts of the country, savers and investors may prefer to build wealth using stocks, real estate or other forms of investments while keeping lower cash reserves.

Despite these drawbacks, interest income from the 1099 form represents a useful proxy for overall savings. The financial instruments that require 1099 reporting include many types of liquid savings that are easily accessible with negligible risk. Most people use interest-bearing accounts to hold funds for use in the case of job loss or a related emergency, or to mitigate consumer debt by paying for larger purchases in cash.

 

The post America’s Super Saving Cities: The regional forces shaping America’s saving landscape appeared first on MagnifyMoney.

Worried about Your Online Information? Use a Virtual Credit Card

work computer

[Disclosure: Cards from our partners are reviewed below.]

Even when online retailers strive to keep customer information safe, data breaches happen. Hackers and thieves are constantly working to gain access to your sensitive data, including credit card numbers. Data breaches are on the rise and could cost businesses $8 trillion over the next five years.

But some credit card issuers, like Bank of America and Citibank, offer virtual card numbers to help you protect your credit card information when you shop online. These virtual card numbers are temporary and eliminate the need to use your physical card, protecting your information from thieves. (Disclosure: Citibank advertises on Credit.com, but that relationship results in no preferential editorial treatment.)

How Do Virtual Card Numbers Work?

Using your physical credit card’s number to shop online comes with risk. If your customer information is ever stolen, thieves could use your card number to make unauthorized purchases. Virtual card numbers reduce that risk by eliminating the need to use your physical card number.

Exact details may vary between credit card issuers, but they all provide a similar service. When you’re ready to shop, you can request a virtual credit card number online. You may be able to set a custom spending limit and an expiration date.

You will then be issued a temporary 16-digit credit card number that you can use to shop online. Depending on the provider, your charges may show up on your monthly credit card statement along with purchases made with your physical card.

If at any point a thief gets ahold of your virtual card number, they won’t be able to exceed the preset spending limit or make purchases beyond the predetermined expiration date. Some virtual card numbers work only with specific predetermined merchants, further protecting you from theft. Plus, your physical card number is still protected.

The Advantages of Virtual Card Numbers

The Fair Credit Billing Act dictates that you’ll never be liable for more than $50 in unauthorized charges if your credit card is lost or stolen. That amount drops to $0 if you report your card as stolen before it is used or if your number, not your card, is stolen. Major card issuers such as Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express also provide zero liability for unauthorized charges, meaning the $50 liability does not apply.

However, if your credit card information is stolen, you may still need to spend time disputing charges, filing a police report, and replacing your card. After that, you’ll have to update any accounts that have your compromised card on file. Using a virtual credit card number at any online merchant can save you some major headaches if that merchant is ever hacked or compromised.

The benefits are even clearer when you examine the laws surrounding ATM and debit cards, which are determined by the Electronic Fund Transfer Act. Your liability varies based on when you report the loss of your card. In fact, you could be responsible for all the money taken from your card account if you fail to report it in a timely manner. If you regularly use your debit card for online shopping, switching to a credit card that offers a virtual card number service may provide additional peace of mind.

Limitations of Virtual Card Numbers 

Virtual card numbers aren’t absolutely necessary, as you can’t be held responsible for more than $50 in unauthorized charges on your credit card, and you won’t be held liable at all if your number is stolen online or if your card issuer offers zero liability for unauthorized purchases.

If you are interested in using virtual card numbers, keep in mind that not all credit card issuers offer the service. Third-party virtual service providers exist, but their quality of service may vary and they require you to sign up for an additional account.

Plus, switching to virtual card numbers won’t completely protect you from fraud or theft. You still need to monitor your statements for unauthorized activity. Your physical card could still be stolen, and any accounts that use your physical card number could be compromised.

Whether you use virtual card numbers or traditional credit cards, it’s important to check your credit card statements and your credit report regularly to keep abreast of potential fraudulent and unauthorized activity. You can get your free credit report from Credit.com.

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Note: It’s important to remember that interest rates, fees, and terms for credit cards, loans, and other financial products frequently change. As a result, rates, fees, and terms for credit cards, loans, and other financial products cited in these articles may have changed since the date of publication. Please be sure to verify current rates, fees, and terms with credit card issuers, banks, or other financial institutions directly.

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